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(Kotaku)   A copy of Stadium Events, one of the rarest releases on the NES, was found complete at a Goodwill store for $7.99. Actual value: over $15K   (kotaku.com) divider line 67
    More: Interesting, Stadium Events, Hamm, test market  
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6090 clicks; posted to Geek » on 19 Apr 2013 at 1:01 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-19 12:53:13 PM
I'm always looking, hoping to scoop up a copy of Tengen Tetris for NES.
 
2013-04-19 12:53:58 PM
What it isn't quite up to the apparent value of this game, I was pleased when I looked up the value of a couple of the first edition books I have in my collection:
sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net
-Death of a Salesman
-Animal Farm
 
2013-04-19 01:00:20 PM

etherknot: I'm always looking, hoping to scoop up a copy of Tengen Tetris for NES.


$50-$60 and a trip to ebay and it can be yours. That game is not nearly as rare as people thought it was prior to the invention of ebay.
 
2013-04-19 01:57:34 PM

Jobber8742: They don't have any value in the real world other than what the market says they have. We can all emulate games for free if we wanted to, but people like you and me choose to spend our money on it anyhow. You were comparing NWC to Stadium Events and arguing that World Class Track Meet is the same game as Stadium Events. While the gameplay is identical, which means it doesn't matter which one you buy to a gamer, it certainly does matter to a collector.


People collect things because they're historically significant, aesthetically pleasing, or are associated with something or someone of significance.  Rarity is just a modifier for the value of those things. I'm not disputing the price that people are willing to pay for it.  I just think the reasons are bogus, and for that reason, I think that it's either a bubble waiting to burst, or that it's grossly overpriced.  I think the barometer is that you should be able to reasonably explain why the thing is valuable to someone who otherwise has no interest in the hobby or field of interest.  "It was a game that was recalled and repackaged into a first-party Nintendo peripheral that nobody really cared for" doesn't cut it.

MrSteve007: What it isn't quite up to the apparent value of this game, I was pleased when I looked up the value of a couple of the first edition books I have in my collection:


Showoff.  lol
 
2013-04-19 02:44:32 PM

Mad_Radhu: whizbangthedirtfarmer: The Loaf: whizbangthedirtfarmer: And then it would have to be relisted when the hucksters decided not to pay.  It's a video game, not an established antique or collectible just yet.

And that's exactly why the prices are going up on these things and not so much on 1990's comics.  People still think that some day their polybagged Death of Superman is gonna let them retire some day, but it won't.  But thirty years from now a sealed copy of an obscure NES game or an alpha edition Magic card might.

Thirty years from now does not mean BIG CASH BONANZA right now.  And I'm talking about all comics that aren't super rare, from the 60s onward.  Yes, the 90s comics are basically worthless (our LCBS owner tried to give them away, and only a few people picked some up), but, right now, games are not recognized universally as collectible.  You may have the nostalgia-stricken person wanting Luigi's Mansion, but it's not as if you will see them at Sotheby's any time soon.  Even NES.

I wonder if the push to digital will make comics more collectible because eventually the print versions will be more rare. I grabbed Saga #1 via Comixology on release day, and only later realized I should have gotten a paper copy as well because first editions have been appreciating like crazy because of the limited print runs.


IIRC, they're already pretty much printing to order, filling the pre-orders and overprinting a decent, yet small, amount just in case the book is very popular.

So, for the major companies, most books probably have a print run of 30,000-100,000 copies. The indy stuff may have print runs of less than 10,000 books.
 
2013-04-19 03:15:26 PM
Thrift store employees often don't know what things are worth. My husband went to one the other day, they wantedd $75 for a no-name acoustic guitar with a puncture hole in the body and $5 for a new serpentine belt worth $40.
 
2013-04-19 04:33:35 PM

FirstNationalBastard: Mad_Radhu: whizbangthedirtfarmer: The Loaf: whizbangthedirtfarmer: And then it would have to be relisted when the hucksters decided not to pay.  It's a video game, not an established antique or collectible just yet.

And that's exactly why the prices are going up on these things and not so much on 1990's comics.  People still think that some day their polybagged Death of Superman is gonna let them retire some day, but it won't.  But thirty years from now a sealed copy of an obscure NES game or an alpha edition Magic card might.

Thirty years from now does not mean BIG CASH BONANZA right now.  And I'm talking about all comics that aren't super rare, from the 60s onward.  Yes, the 90s comics are basically worthless (our LCBS owner tried to give them away, and only a few people picked some up), but, right now, games are not recognized universally as collectible.  You may have the nostalgia-stricken person wanting Luigi's Mansion, but it's not as if you will see them at Sotheby's any time soon.  Even NES.

I wonder if the push to digital will make comics more collectible because eventually the print versions will be more rare. I grabbed Saga #1 via Comixology on release day, and only later realized I should have gotten a paper copy as well because first editions have been appreciating like crazy because of the limited print runs.

IIRC, they're already pretty much printing to order, filling the pre-orders and overprinting a decent, yet small, amount just in case the book is very popular.

So, for the major companies, most books probably have a print run of 30,000-100,000 copies. The indy stuff may have print runs of less than 10,000 books.


That, and I'm not being a dick about it, but piracy has trimmed back on the rarity of these comics and games, too.
 
2013-04-19 05:12:09 PM

whizbangthedirtfarmer: FirstNationalBastard: Mad_Radhu: whizbangthedirtfarmer: The Loaf: whizbangthedirtfarmer: And then it would have to be relisted when the hucksters decided not to pay.  It's a video game, not an established antique or collectible just yet.

And that's exactly why the prices are going up on these things and not so much on 1990's comics.  People still think that some day their polybagged Death of Superman is gonna let them retire some day, but it won't.  But thirty years from now a sealed copy of an obscure NES game or an alpha edition Magic card might.

Thirty years from now does not mean BIG CASH BONANZA right now.  And I'm talking about all comics that aren't super rare, from the 60s onward.  Yes, the 90s comics are basically worthless (our LCBS owner tried to give them away, and only a few people picked some up), but, right now, games are not recognized universally as collectible.  You may have the nostalgia-stricken person wanting Luigi's Mansion, but it's not as if you will see them at Sotheby's any time soon.  Even NES.

I wonder if the push to digital will make comics more collectible because eventually the print versions will be more rare. I grabbed Saga #1 via Comixology on release day, and only later realized I should have gotten a paper copy as well because first editions have been appreciating like crazy because of the limited print runs.

IIRC, they're already pretty much printing to order, filling the pre-orders and overprinting a decent, yet small, amount just in case the book is very popular.

So, for the major companies, most books probably have a print run of 30,000-100,000 copies. The indy stuff may have print runs of less than 10,000 books.

That, and I'm not being a dick about it, but piracy has trimmed back on the rarity of these comics and games, too.


On the comics front, it's doesn't even have to be piracy... TPBs are reprinting a hell of a lot of stuff, and the TPBs have a much longer shelf life in real bookstores and even comic shops than a bin of floppies do. Plus, legal digital downloads through whatever apps you kids are using these days, since the companies are trying to get their backissues online and available.

Sure, the original issues may be rare, and have some value to the completeist, but for regular people the future... hell, the present is TPBs for people who want a physical copy to read, and digital for readers who prefer their collections to be on a single ipad.
 
2013-04-19 05:25:58 PM

Amberwind: Husby and I bought a game for Intellivision at last night's swap meet for $3 that turned out to be worth between $200 and $500 when we checked Ebay this morning, so I'm getting a kick...


Which game, might I ask?
 
2013-04-19 07:29:06 PM
It's up for auction, so we'll see how high it goes for:  Stadium Events
 
2013-04-19 09:57:53 PM
People are asking who would spend that much money. Just from what I've seen, the way it goes is that the auction or private sale is announced a collectors forum, & people on the forum pool their money together. I'm speaking on games that were never released though, & the forum people want the game dumped before bit rot destroys what may be the only copy of it forever. Bio-Force Ape is an example.
 
2013-04-19 09:58:13 PM

DanZero: Amberwind: Husby and I bought a game for Intellivision at last night's swap meet for $3 that turned out to be worth between $200 and $500 when we checked Ebay this morning, so I'm getting a kick...

Which game, might I ask?


Congo Bongo. The cheapest one we found on Ebay was $124, in much worse condition than the one we got.
 
2013-04-19 10:10:24 PM

Amberwind: DanZero: Amberwind: Husby and I bought a game for Intellivision at last night's swap meet for $3 that turned out to be worth between $200 and $500 when we checked Ebay this morning, so I'm getting a kick...

Which game, might I ask?

Congo Bongo. The cheapest one we found on Ebay was $124, in much worse condition than the one we got.


I had no idea the Intellivision port was that rare. I know the Atari 2600 is slightly easier to get a good deal on. I see that loose cartridge prices go from $30-$150, so that was a good find.
 
2013-04-20 12:43:19 AM

DanZero: I know the Atari 2600 is slightly easier to get a good deal on.


I don't know that I'd characterize any purchase of 2600 Congo Bongo as "a good deal".  I mean, have you ever tried to play it?

/or even look at it?
//a brave attempt to do iso perspective on the world's crudest graphics chip
 
2013-04-20 01:01:02 AM

poot_rootbeer: DanZero: I know the Atari 2600 is slightly easier to get a good deal on.

I don't know that I'd characterize any purchase of 2600 Congo Bongo as "a good deal".  I mean, have you ever tried to play it?

/or even look at it?
//a brave attempt to do iso perspective on the world's crudest graphics chip


I know how bad it is -- perhaps that's why it's cheaper!
 
2013-04-20 01:08:25 PM
Wasn't Stadium Events packaged with the Power Pad exercise thingy?  I have no idea why it's so rare.
 
2013-04-20 01:29:51 PM

Stinkyy: Wasn't Stadium Events packaged with the Power Pad exercise thingy?


Sort of.

Initially, Bandai created and released their own mat controller and game for the NES, which they called the "Family Fun Fitness mat" and "Stadium Events", respectively.  Shortly into the North American release, Nintendo purchased the rights to those products from Bandai and re-released them themselves as the "Power Pad" and "World Class Track Meet".  All unsold copies of the Bandai products were pulled from the shelves when that happened.
 
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