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(Food.com)   Fark Food Thread: Are you a stir-fry wizard? What makes your wok sizzle? Have a tool or trick that makes your creation come out right every time? Pics, tips, recipes, and happiness to your right   (food.com) divider line 143
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2212 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Apr 2013 at 5:00 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-18 06:23:56 PM
Use gas.
Peanut oil.
Add things that need to cook longer first.
Add things that need to cook less last.
Never scrub your wok.
Treat it like cast iron.
After that, you can go nuts.
 
2013-04-18 06:25:29 PM

Anastacya: roux


Add cold liquids to hot roux.
Add cold roux to hot liquids.
After that, you can go nuts.
 
2013-04-18 06:27:11 PM
Karen Barnaby, an executive chef out of Vancouver BC, went low-carb quite a few years back to great success.  Because she missed fried rice, she came up with an awesome substitution, and then gave it away.  She posted this recipe on several low-carb diet forums and while I gave up on it a long time ago, this is still the standard "fried rice" recipe in my house. The kids love it far over regular rice.  (And when I've served it to guests, I always wait to tell them until after that it's not rice.  I catch a few unawares.)

Karen Barnaby's "cauliflied rice"

1 head cauliflower, grated through the large holes of a box grater
2 cloves garlic, sliced thin
1 egg
4 slices bacon, chopped small
4 - 5 green onions, trimmed and chopped
tamari or premium soy sauce, to taste

Grate cauliflower through large holes in box grater
Press out as much moisture as you can with paper towels
Add bacon to hot wok and stir-fry until crisp
Add garlic and onions and continue stirring until onion is soft and the garlic is lightly toasted
Add egg and stir-fry into mixture
Add grated cauliflower and stir-fry until all other ingredients are incorporated.  This is about enough time to actually cook the cauliflower, about 2 minutes tops
Add tamari to taste and transfer to serving bowl
 
2013-04-18 06:28:02 PM

costermonger: msupf: Best stir fry tip I ever got:

use a deep fryer burner setup.

Normal stove top burners just cannot put out enough BTU's to get the wok hot enough. Ever since I started using an outdoor burner setup, the recipes cook up much better.

[www.turkeyfryerexpress.com image 364x400]
I'm running out of reasons *not* to buy one of these.


^ This.  A wok needs lots and lots and lots of heat.

The rest is all prep work.  Just add Udon noodles.
 
2013-04-18 06:32:17 PM

Marcus Aurelius: costermonger: msupf: Best stir fry tip I ever got:

use a deep fryer burner setup.

Normal stove top burners just cannot put out enough BTU's to get the wok hot enough. Ever since I started using an outdoor burner setup, the recipes cook up much better.

[www.turkeyfryerexpress.com image 364x400]
I'm running out of reasons *not* to buy one of these.

^ This.  A wok needs lots and lots and lots of heat.

The rest is all prep work.  Just add Udon noodles.



Its surprising how little oil and liquid you really need once you have a hot enough wok.
 
2013-04-18 06:45:54 PM
Like a lot of other people in this thread I really like the Lodge cast iron wok. you can nestle it directly int he coals of a campfire or into hot coals and it holds heat incredibly well. Super heavy, but I really prefer it over the carbo steel ones I have used in the past.

Most of the time to stir fry is prep, so I prep as the week goes along. When I cook rice, I make a bunch extra (it's rice, it is no extra work to make a big pot) and keep it in quart bags in the freezer. I do the same with noodles. When I prep certain meats, I buy an extra piece or two and cut them for stirfry and pop into a freezer bag, like an extra steak or chicken breast.

Then as the week goes buy and I prep veggies for dinner, I prep a few extra of whatever I'm making and put in the fridge. When I have enough for stir-fry, I just defrost a baggie of protein and let a baggies of rice or noodles if I am using them come to room temp and all the prep is done. Dinner in just a few minutes.

I also freeze the little bits left over from stuff like chili sauce and tomato paste when the jar is nearly empty. I just keep an ice cube tray in a freezer bag and add bits here and there. Then I have small portions of all kinds of sauces, including stuff like my candied jalapenos, homemade curry paste, and such to combine together on a whim.

It's actually the easiest meal we make when it is warm out. And nestling the wok in a camp fire adds an amazing smokey flavor.
 
2013-04-18 06:48:56 PM

redslippers: Like a lot of other people in this thread I really like the Lodge cast iron wok. you can nestle it directly int he coals of a campfire or into hot coals and it holds heat incredibly well. Super heavy, but I really prefer it over the carbo steel ones I have used in the past.

Most of the time to stir fry is prep, so I prep as the week goes along. When I cook rice, I make a bunch extra (it's rice, it is no extra work to make a big pot) and keep it in quart bags in the freezer. I do the same with noodles. When I prep certain meats, I buy an extra piece or two and cut them for stirfry and pop into a freezer bag, like an extra steak or chicken breast.

Then as the week goes buy and I prep veggies for dinner, I prep a few extra of whatever I'm making and put in the fridge. When I have enough for stir-fry, I just defrost a baggie of protein and let a baggies of rice or noodles if I am using them come to room temp and all the prep is done. Dinner in just a few minutes.

I also freeze the little bits left over from stuff like chili sauce and tomato paste when the jar is nearly empty. I just keep an ice cube tray in a freezer bag and add bits here and there. Then I have small portions of all kinds of sauces, including stuff like my candied jalapenos, homemade curry paste, and such to combine together on a whim.

It's actually the easiest meal we make when it is warm out. And nestling the wok in a camp fire adds an amazing smokey flavor.


We call this approach SFR, or "Stir Fried Random".   Whatever has been hanging around in the plastic rectangles in the fridge enjoys a comeback as SFR fodder.
 
2013-04-18 06:50:32 PM
praxcelis, I'm stealing that term. It describes it perfectly :-)
 
2013-04-18 06:57:14 PM
My tip is to use fresh orange/red/yellow bell peppers, and julienne them!  Julienne means to cut into narrow strips.   It doesn't seem like this should make such a big difference, but in fact it is a big deal.

Also, use shallots instead of onions.
 
2013-04-18 06:58:11 PM
Did somebody say sesame oil?
 
2013-04-18 06:59:39 PM
Wok the Dog is a yo-yo trick, not a recipe.
 
2013-04-18 07:06:43 PM
sybaritica.files.wordpress.com

'nuff said
 
2013-04-18 07:12:36 PM
This week I jazzed up a frozen sweet and spur stir fry by adding a few cups of chicken broth, the juice from one large grapefruit, a large teaspoon of Tamarind paste, and about a half teaspoon of fresh ginger to the pan before adding the frozen bit. I also added on bag of frozen broccoli. After all the frozen stuff was defrosted I added a cup of rice to absorb the extra liquid.
 
2013-04-18 07:16:03 PM

DGS: RexTalionis: The key to stir fry is that it's not meant to cook for a long time. If you can't get it into the wok and out on a plate in 5 minutes, you're usually doing something wrong.

My biggest concern there is broccoli. I like it in stir-fry but it seems to take longer than that. Should I prep it first? I don't want it mush, but too crunchy and undercooked is a big turn-off, too.


I cut broccoli florets lengthwise into quarters or halves.  Makes it cook way faster while still letting you keep biggish pieces.
 
2013-04-18 07:16:12 PM
Protip for those that want citrus flavor in your stir-fry: Zest or kaffir lime leaf - use the latter sparingly.
 
2013-04-18 07:24:17 PM
I do have trouble with the fish oil or sauce. It's so fishy tasting, no matter how small amount I use. Well, I've never used less than a tablespoon, so perhaps I'll try 1/4 tbs.
 
2013-04-18 07:33:04 PM

billybobtoo: I do have trouble with the fish oil or sauce. It's so fishy tasting, no matter how small amount I use. Well, I've never used less than a tablespoon, so perhaps I'll try 1/4 tbs.


1/2 tablespoon, some soy sauce, some black bean sauce, use with beef or pork.
 
2013-04-18 07:33:42 PM

DGS: RexTalionis: The key to stir fry is that it's not meant to cook for a long time. If you can't get it into the wok and out on a plate in 5 minutes, you're usually doing something wrong.

My biggest concern there is broccoli. I like it in stir-fry but it seems to take longer than that. Should I prep it first? I don't want it mush, but too crunchy and undercooked is a big turn-off, too.



I always hated it because it got burnt.  Finally found on the webs:  Blanch for 30 seconds (I use steam).  You can go to 40 seconds, but at 1 minute I've found it to get mushy, believe it or not.  I get the water going so I can dump it in the wok as soon as it's done.
 
2013-04-18 07:35:10 PM
Brocoli slaw!


*not a bookmark*
 
2013-04-18 07:39:57 PM

BenSaw: DGS: RexTalionis: The key to stir fry is that it's not meant to cook for a long time. If you can't get it into the wok and out on a plate in 5 minutes, you're usually doing something wrong.

My biggest concern there is broccoli. I like it in stir-fry but it seems to take longer than that. Should I prep it first? I don't want it mush, but too crunchy and undercooked is a big turn-off, too.


I always hated it because it got burnt.  Finally found on the webs:  Blanch for 30 seconds (I use steam).  You can go to 40 seconds, but at 1 minute I've found it to get mushy, believe it or not.  I get the water going so I can dump it in the wok as soon as it's done.


EDIT:  I see this has been covered already.  F5, how does it work?  Also, someone mentioned a couple of minutes and didn't mention mush, so I guess you'll need to play around with the time depending upon how much you're cooking. (I don't use much since it's usually just me),
 
2013-04-18 08:02:52 PM
Am I doing sum ting wong??
 
2013-04-18 08:26:35 PM
My standard stir fry (which so far has converted my boyfriend, thegreenintern, and my girlfriend (who is not on Fark...yet) ):

1lb chicken breast (cook in pan with five spice powder, garlic, and fresh grated ginger)
1 can water chestnuts
1 can bean sprouts
1 can bamboo shoots
(replace any of the above with veggies of your choice)

Sauce:
1/2 jar hoisin sauce
1/2 jar oyster sauce
splash rice wine
two splashes cooking sherry
splash soy sauce
ie, 1:2:1 ratio of rice wine:sherry:soy sauce
1 tbsp garlic
Siracha to taste

Mix sauce ingredients together, pour over chicken and veggies. It will thin out as it cooks. It's a quick and dirty recipe, but it tastes good and serves about 3 people + leftovers.  Could be stretched more if you added rice.
 
2013-04-18 08:29:47 PM

DGS: My biggest concern there is broccoli. I like it in stir-fry but it seems to take longer than that. Should I prep it first? I don't want it mush, but too crunchy and undercooked is a big turn-off, too.


I've seen local Chinese restaurants blanch the broccoli before putting it in the stir fry.  Seems to work well.
 
2013-04-18 08:37:11 PM
Whatever you do, DONT overload the wok. Cook one individual serving at a time.
 
2013-04-18 08:41:48 PM
Asparagus Noodle Stir Fry

vegetable oil
1 inch piece ginger, minced
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 onion, cut in half, sliced thin
1 bunch very thin asparagus, cut into 1 inch pieces
1 c bean sprouts, rinsed
1 package udon noodles
3 green onions, sliced fairly thin
4 tbsp good quality soy sauce or, preferably, tamari

Prep all ingredients. You need to prepare this in two batches or you'll overload the wok. So you'll do all this twice.

Prepare half the noodles according to the directions, but subtract one minute from the cooking time. When done, drain them, put them in a bowl and drizzle a tbsp of oil over them and stir.

While the noodles are boiling, heat the wok up over medium high heat and add a tbsp of oil. When that is shimmering, add the ginger, garlic and onions. Stir fry for 3 minutes.

Add half the asparagus. Stir fry for 3 minutes.

Add half the the bean sprouts and the half batch of noodles. Stir constantly for 2 minutes. I mean it. If you stop stirring, the noodles will stick to the pan and make a mess.

Add half the the green onions and 2 tbsp of tamari. Stir fry for a minute longer so the noodles suck up all the sauce. When done, plop it all in a bowl, put the bowl in front your your S.O., brush out the wok and start round two.
 
2013-04-18 08:44:31 PM

AJisaff: ahab: Pad Thai is probably my favorite thing I've ever made in my wok.

Recipe
[farm6.staticflickr.com image 640x512]

ohh... yeah.. yum.  going to make that soon.  I love making it at home because I can't have it anywhere else.. I am allergic to peanuts, so I make it with cashews


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TfMrk9m5euo&feature=youtu.be&t=6m15s
 
2013-04-18 08:53:29 PM

RexTalionis: The key to stir fry is that it's not meant to cook for a long time. If you can't get it into the wok and out on a plate in 5 minutes, you're usually doing something wrong.


That's the conclusion I've come to after trying several times; I asked for and got a wok as a wedding gift, and I hardly use it because I finally determined my stove doesn't have the BTUs (this screws up my tomato canning too goshdarnit). Maybe when we move we can find a house with a better stove and I can try again...
 
2013-04-18 08:55:34 PM

ckccfa: My ultimate, perhaps shameful, secret is that ketchup (particularly if you're going less "asian traditional" with your veggies) can be a great supplement to/replacement for traditional sauces.  It seems to work best when I'm stir frying up all the leftover veggies from the farm box and it's an "everything goes in the pan" kind of thing.


I thought ketchup was originally from China and was used thinned down like a concentrate. It might be more traditional than you thought.
 
2013-04-18 09:25:44 PM
How about we just have a live thread? I've got my webcam in the kitchen. Let's do this!

http://tinychat.com/farkskitchen
 
2013-04-18 09:29:41 PM
For those of us with the fraking allergies:

Cottonseed and/or sesame oil to replace peanut oil.

Cashews to replace peanuts.

Almond butter to replace peanut butter.

No, it isn't exactly the same, but you won't croak from anaphalactic shock either. And almond butter made with real salt and sugar is tasty shiat too.
 
2013-04-18 09:36:41 PM

CptnSpldng: For those of us with the fraking allergies:

Cottonseed and/or sesame oil to replace peanut oil.

Cashews to replace peanuts.

Almond butter to replace peanut butter.

No, it isn't exactly the same, but you won't croak from anaphalactic shock either. And almond butter made with real salt and sugar is tasty shiat too.


If peanut oil will make you swell up and die, go to your local restaurant supply and pick up some rice bran oil. Flavor neutral and an absurdly high smoke point.
 
2013-04-18 09:40:00 PM
Got my ingredients chosen and begnning prep, come on in and have a show!
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-18 09:42:06 PM

khyberkitsune: How about we just have a live thread? I've got my webcam in the kitchen. Let's do this!

http://tinychat.com/farkskitchen


Heh, I'm watching. I thought you were joking.
 
2013-04-18 09:59:52 PM
Black vinegar...just a bit.
ninecooks.typepad.com
 
2013-04-18 10:12:33 PM
So who else used some ideas from this thread for dinner?

/the pad thai pic was too hard to resist
 
2013-04-18 10:17:27 PM
2 parts oyster sauce
1 part light soy sauce
1 part dark soy sauce
1 part Shaoxing rice wine
1 part corn starch
1/2 part sesame oil
1/4 part white pepper, ground

Add to this base any of the flavors you'd like - garlic, chili oil, dried chiles, lime, fish sauce, etc. - for your stir fry.
 
2013-04-18 10:23:57 PM
I recently discovered Cambodian food and I'm addicted to Kroeng, a lemongrass and garlic- based curry paste that makes incredible curries.

And this simple recipe is great with mushrooms, fish or veggies:
- cook the protein or veggies half way
- add 2 tbsp each soy sauce and brown sugar
- cook down until the meat and or veggies are done and the sauce thickens
- add chopped green onions, toss once or twice and serve
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-18 10:55:42 PM

khyberkitsune: Got my ingredients chosen and begnning prep, come on in and have a show!


Was a good show! Thanks for the demo and taking questions, I got a lot out of that!
 
2013-04-18 11:20:29 PM

msupf: Best stir fry tip I ever got:

use a deep fryer burner setup.

Normal stove top burners just cannot put out enough BTU's to get the wok hot enough. Ever since I started using an outdoor burner setup, the recipes cook up much better.


+1
I have a propane fired stir fry burner.  It really is the key.  Amazing & hot as hell.
 
2013-04-18 11:37:47 PM
Cook the veggies for about 6 minutes, then remove them, place them in a glass bowl and cover it with a plate.

Cook the meat. When the meat is just about done, add the veggies and whatever sauce you want to use.

Heat for only a minute or two longer on lower heat.
 
2013-04-18 11:49:02 PM
i.imgur.com

And for those of you that did not show up to the cooking party, you missed this being made and some great banter.
 
2013-04-19 12:13:55 AM
Try my recipe.
Marinade skinless, boneless chicken in a Hawaiian sauce. (Vacuum pack if you can.)
Sesame oil on the bottom of the wok.
Use a CHARCOAL grill.
Heat the wok and start cooking the chicken.
Sweeten the chicken by adding sweetened flake coconut
Add the following:
broccoli
cilantro
fresh pineapple (When cutting, save the juice)
baby carrots
juice of 1/2 of a lemon
juice of 1/2 of a lime
pineapple juice
peanuts
onion
mushrooms
any other veggie you like
Serve over rice.
 
2013-04-20 12:36:24 AM
Unfortunately, my Wok has sat unused for almost three years since we moved from our last place that had a gas range.  Every other place we've lived has only had electric and I have not been able to find a ring for the Wok.

I hate electric ranges.

I am keeping some of these however, for when I DO get a chance to make use of them.
 
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