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(Food.com)   Fark Food Thread: Are you a stir-fry wizard? What makes your wok sizzle? Have a tool or trick that makes your creation come out right every time? Pics, tips, recipes, and happiness to your right   (food.com) divider line 143
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2211 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Apr 2013 at 5:00 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-18 05:11:06 PM
Also, fresh ginger.  Sesame oil.  Peanut oil.

Season your hot oil by frying a couple dried chilis (adjust number to degree of hotness desired) for 30 seconds before adding veggies and then meat.  Just be sure to open a window because the chili smoke makes for a terrific coughing fit.  Do not eat the chilis, though.
 
2013-04-18 05:11:39 PM

DGS: RexTalionis: The key to stir fry is that it's not meant to cook for a long time. If you can't get it into the wok and out on a plate in 5 minutes, you're usually doing something wrong.

My biggest concern there is broccoli. I like it in stir-fry but it seems to take longer than that. Should I prep it first? I don't want it mush, but too crunchy and undercooked is a big turn-off, too.


Steam or blanch it first (as someone else said).
 
2013-04-18 05:11:42 PM
i've had some good luck with recipes from this cookbook.  well, i don't exactly follow them, but they are good tasty starting point.

3.bp.blogspot.com

and they are simple and with few ingredients.  of course that might have to do the whole cultural revolution thing...
 
2013-04-18 05:11:42 PM
Only use a wok if you have a deep fryer burner.  Using a wok on a stove top won't get the wok hot enough to be an efficient cooking method.
 
2013-04-18 05:12:34 PM

A Fark Handle: 3.bp.blogspot.com


Fark that. During the cultural revolution, my family starved. They had to eat grass and roots. fark that shiat, man.
 
2013-04-18 05:12:59 PM
Fusion here. I suggest marinating the beef in red wine and the chicken or fish in some chardonnay. Buy the freshest looking vegetables you can find. Chop ginger, garlic and onion very fine. Find some good sesame oil.

That's pretty much it. You all know how to stir fry it. I prefer some clear vermicelli as the base and avocado as garnish. If you want, serve on shredded iceberg lettuce.
 
2013-04-18 05:13:18 PM
I agree with the high BTU burners, but I use a cast iron wok. I like it better than the steel woks.
I picked up a couple locally for $15 each.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-18 05:13:42 PM
And to celebrate stir-fry thread, I'm doing a chicken and broccoli stir-fry tonight. :D
Here are pics of a previous attempt:

i.imgur.com
i.imgur.com
 
2013-04-18 05:14:31 PM

DGS: RexTalionis: The key to stir fry is that it's not meant to cook for a long time. If you can't get it into the wok and out on a plate in 5 minutes, you're usually doing something wrong.

My biggest concern there is broccoli. I like it in stir-fry but it seems to take longer than that. Should I prep it first? I don't want it mush, but too crunchy and undercooked is a big turn-off, too.


you could blanch it?
 
2013-04-18 05:14:37 PM
You need this:

ecx.images-amazon.com

Lao Gan Ma Spicy Chili Crisp - beats the shiat out of any other spicy sauces/oils and is available at your nearest Asian market. While you're there, pick up good soy sauce, not the stuff at your local buffet. It should only have 4 ingredients: water, wheat, soybeans, and salt.
 
2013-04-18 05:15:19 PM
My ultimate, perhaps shameful, secret is that ketchup (particularly if you're going less "asian traditional" with your veggies) can be a great supplement to/replacement for traditional sauces.  It seems to work best when I'm stir frying up all the leftover veggies from the farm box and it's an "everything goes in the pan" kind of thing.
 
2013-04-18 05:15:22 PM
Chilis and Stews utilizing beef - add anchovy filet, you will get a huge boost in beef flavor.

For oriental foods, oyster sauce and fish sauce are your friends while cooking and making the sauce glaze.

When you stir-fry, you want that damned thing HOT. Oil should be just smoking and you use a high-temp oil. Electric burners work best for flat-pan stir-fry, gas for traditional-shaped wok.

2 cup flour 2/3 cup oil 2/3 cup water a dash of salt and baking powder = instant tortillas, roll it out and throw on a hot pan/comale.

Your typical cheap Ramen is best used making dishes similar to Yakisoba - boil the noodles, then fry them. Use the soup packet to create a sauce glaze with the addition of some corn starch.

For a quick flavor boost for rice, add a tiny bit of fresh chopped mint and cilantro after the rice has cooked, mix well, let it sit for 2-3 minutes before serving.

For BBQ/grills, fruits and peppers are your best friend. Raspberry Chipotle, for example, is killer for chicken. Pineapple and habanero is awesome for pork. Beef works well with a bit of lime and jalapeno.

And my personal favorite - quarter two onions, separate all the layers, put those in a boat of aluminum foil with lots of leftover foil to fold over and seal, melt 4oz butter, mix in 2 oz brown sugar, pour that over onions, cover/seal, put in oven at 450 for an hour and a half. This will go well with practically any dish, and is awesome standalone.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-18 05:15:31 PM

RexTalionis: DGS: RexTalionis: The key to stir fry is that it's not meant to cook for a long time. If you can't get it into the wok and out on a plate in 5 minutes, you're usually doing something wrong.

My biggest concern there is broccoli. I like it in stir-fry but it seems to take longer than that. Should I prep it first? I don't want it mush, but too crunchy and undercooked is a big turn-off, too.

Steam or blanch it first (as someone else said).


It's what I did before, and will do again, I was just hoping I could find a neat trick to make it awesome without that step. DAMN YOU SCIENCE. Or something.

/I look forward to food threads, you have good tips. I'd pick your brain more often, given half a chance.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-18 05:16:51 PM

tlchwi02: DGS: RexTalionis: The key to stir fry is that it's not meant to cook for a long time. If you can't get it into the wok and out on a plate in 5 minutes, you're usually doing something wrong.

My biggest concern there is broccoli. I like it in stir-fry but it seems to take longer than that. Should I prep it first? I don't want it mush, but too crunchy and undercooked is a big turn-off, too.

you could blanch it?


Ayup. It's actually what I usually do. Where's the magic in that? *shakes fist and goes to blanch the broccoli*
 
2013-04-18 05:17:00 PM
I don't have any tips myself, so I asked my good friend Todd Barry.  Here's what he told me:

"I made myself a good dinner tonight. I used a wok. That is a great thing to have. With a wok, in the privacy of your own home, you can create your own mediocre Chinese food for 50 cents less than ordering take-out. I'm standing over this thing, going, 'Oh yeah, I'm glad I'm making this stuff myself. Those restaurants in Chinatown just don't make hot dog fried rice the way I like it.'"
 
2013-04-18 05:17:08 PM

Needlessly Complicated: Question. We've gone grain-free. Is arrowroot starch an acceptable substitute for corn starch for the purpose of thickening stir fry sauces?


I've had good luck with it. YMMV.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-18 05:18:27 PM

Precision Boobery: I don't have any tips myself, so I asked my good friend Todd Barry.  Here's what he told me:

"I made myself a good dinner tonight. I used a wok. That is a great thing to have. With a wok, in the privacy of your own home, you can create your own mediocre Chinese food for 50 cents less than ordering take-out. I'm standing over this thing, going, 'Oh yeah, I'm glad I'm making this stuff myself. Those restaurants in Chinatown just don't make hot dog fried rice the way I like it.'"


Bahahahahaha
 
2013-04-18 05:18:47 PM

TheShavingofOccam123: 1. Season your wok well.
2. Heat the crap out of it
3. Use very little peanut oil
4. Toss in the oil then follow up quickly with small amounts of stuff
5. After each type of stuff is cooked, you can remove it, then add some more stuff
6. Once all the stuff piles have been cooked, toss all the cooked stuff in
7. Add your finishing sauce with thickener if you have to
8. Do not cook the sauce at too high of a heat. At the end it's more like the wok is used for simmering

This is they way I do it. It may be the wong wei but it's mai wei.



Came here to post this, esp. #3.  A little peanut oil goes a long way and has some flavor to it.

I make fried rice in mine often.  Just have 4+ cups cooked rice on hand before and then fried rice is easy and cheap as hell to make.  Day old rice in the fridge is what I use and its perfect, just do it exactly as they say on the package.  Dont make it too wet or too dry.

And splurge ($4) and get the wok spatula.
 
2013-04-18 05:19:35 PM
I use peanut oil, but sometimes I also drop in a dollop of peanut butter with what I'm stir-frying. Especially if it's going over rice.
 
2013-04-18 05:20:00 PM

Needlessly Complicated: Question. We've gone grain-free. Is arrowroot starch an acceptable substitute for corn starch for the purpose of thickening stir fry sauces?


It or potato starch is fine.
 
2013-04-18 05:20:19 PM

khyberkitsune: Chilis and Stews utilizing beef - add anchovy filet, you will get a huge boost in beef flavor.

For oriental foods, oyster sauce and fish sauce are your friends while cooking and making the sauce glaze.

When you stir-fry, you want that damned thing HOT. Oil should be just smoking and you use a high-temp oil. Electric burners work best for flat-pan stir-fry, gas for traditional-shaped wok.

2 cup flour 2/3 cup oil 2/3 cup water a dash of salt and baking powder = instant tortillas, roll it out and throw on a hot pan/comale.

Your typical cheap Ramen is best used making dishes similar to Yakisoba - boil the noodles, then fry them. Use the soup packet to create a sauce glaze with the addition of some corn starch.

For a quick flavor boost for rice, add a tiny bit of fresh chopped mint and cilantro after the rice has cooked, mix well, let it sit for 2-3 minutes before serving.

For BBQ/grills, fruits and peppers are your best friend. Raspberry Chipotle, for example, is killer for chicken. Pineapple and habanero is awesome for pork. Beef works well with a bit of lime and jalapeno.

And my personal favorite - quarter two onions, separate all the layers, put those in a boat of aluminum foil with lots of leftover foil to fold over and seal, melt 4oz butter, mix in 2 oz brown sugar, pour that over onions, cover/seal, put in oven at 450 for an hour and a half. This will go well with practically any dish, and is awesome standalone.


Winner. TY
 
2013-04-18 05:20:35 PM

tlchwi02: My biggest concern there is broccoli. I like it in stir-fry but it seems to take longer than that. Should I prep it first? I don't want it mush, but too crunchy and undercooked is a big turn-off, too.

you could blanch it?


That's how it is done.
 
2013-04-18 05:20:45 PM
I was told by an ancient Chinese master to cook veggies in order of toughness; e.g., broccoli, green/red/orange peppers and carrots before onions and bok choi.  If you do it right, then the tougher veggies will be done by the time the softest are done.  Remove the veggies and add more oil to fry the meat.  Once the meat is done, add the veggies and any sauce.
 
2013-04-18 05:21:02 PM
My husband is the chef of the house but he adds alcohol to everything. A little wine or beer to taste, including his stirfry. Always good.
 
2013-04-18 05:21:19 PM
Oh, also...need to post this to anyone who wants to cook, but has no clue on what to do for a given recipe:

www.tastespotting.com

this page is a nice search engine for recipes/ingredients so if you put in pastrami, you get whatever its dug up.

so, when I want to try (and the first try sucked) General Tso's Chicken, thats where I start to research.

General Tso is all about the sauce and mine came out too salty - used too much of some light soy I have and its really damn salty stuff.

I dint taste it enough :p
 
2013-04-18 05:21:48 PM

elffster: Day old rice in the fridge is what I use and its perfect, just do it exactly as they say on the package


No bother, day old rice, a beaten egg mixed in or two (depending upon volume of rice) and a hot greased pan is all you need!

/used to work in a Chinese restaurant/Oriental Market
 
2013-04-18 05:23:53 PM

ginko: My husband is the chef of the house but he adds alcohol to everything. A little wine or beer to taste, including his stirfry. Always good.


Some Chinese supermarkets without a license to sell liquor sell this as "cooking wine."

img.21food.com

Don't cook with it. Your wok will explode.

Put it in a cup and drink it instead.
 
2013-04-18 05:25:03 PM

RexTalionis: A Fark Handle: 3.bp.blogspot.com

Fark that. During the cultural revolution, my family starved. They had to eat grass and roots. fark that shiat, man.


trust me i had the same reaction to the title, but the recipes are good even if lots of folks didn't eat nearly that good during the revolution.  maybe steal a copy?  also, what make it worse, if i recall correct, from my reading these were recipes more from "summer" labor camps were the children of the elite got to pretend they were getting back to the fields and what not.  the back story to the book seems farked up, but the food was delicious.  and since i bought the book secondhand i'm alright with my choice.
 
2013-04-18 05:27:43 PM

WalMartian: I was told by an ancient Chinese master to cook veggies in order of toughness; e.g., broccoli, green/red/orange peppers and carrots before onions and bok choi.  If you do it right, then the tougher veggies will be done by the time the softest are done.  Remove the veggies and add more oil to fry the meat.  Once the meat is done, add the veggies and any sauce.


If you're using American broccoli, yes, broccoli first. If using the smaller and faster-cooking Chinese broccoli, then no. Bloom your spices and onions/garlic/peppers first, remove, then cook your tougher stuff like broccoli and carrots and watercress and bamboo second, add that to the pile of onion/pepper/garlic/spices, Quickly get your meat cooked part-way, add your vegetables back in, toss some sauce and starch, finished.
 
2013-04-18 05:27:45 PM

DGS: tlchwi02: DGS: RexTalionis: The key to stir fry is that it's not meant to cook for a long time. If you can't get it into the wok and out on a plate in 5 minutes, you're usually doing something wrong.

My biggest concern there is broccoli. I like it in stir-fry but it seems to take longer than that. Should I prep it first? I don't want it mush, but too crunchy and undercooked is a big turn-off, too.

you could blanch it?

Ayup. It's actually what I usually do. Where's the magic in that? *shakes fist and goes to blanch the broccoli*


um... more magic. you could roast it on a stick over an open fire while murming incantations and tossing handfuls of dried wolfsbane into the fire
 
2013-04-18 05:30:06 PM
For you people using American broccoli in your stir-frys, you need to cut them down to size. No need to blanch, just cut them down to bite-size and roughly as thin as your other vegetables (I slice the stem into 2mm thick slices and take the florets and quarter those.)
 
2013-04-18 05:32:07 PM
My recipe for Kung Po (koon poo, gung bao, whatever)

Adapted to vegan from a book called "Sichuan Cooking"

You may want to double this recipe. It's REALLY good. Also, use real meat. I don't care.

10oz Seitan or your favorite fake meat (Morningstar chix strips work well if you wash them off.)
3 Cloves Garlic and same amount of Ginger
5 Scallions
2 Tbsp (more if you like) Veg Oil
10 Dried Szechuan Chilis or 2 Tbsp Chili Flakes (This makes it hella hot! Adjust to your liking.)
Really, use less Chilis
2/3 Cup Roasted Peanuts

If you like, you can add Bok Choy, Baby Corn, etc. Just make anything you put in match the size of the chix cubes (~1/2 inch cubes) as this is part of the Kung Po Way.

Did you know... This marinade is traditionally used to mask the unfavorable smell of the raw Chicken? Yay for fake Chicken!

Marinade
1/2 Tsp Salt
2 Tsp Light Soy Sauce
1 Tsp Rice Wine
2 1/4 Tsp Cornstarch
1 Tbsp Water

Sauce
3 Tbsp Sugar
1 1/8 Tsp Cornstarch
2 Tsp Soy Sauce
3 Tsp Black Chinese Vinegar
1 Tsp Sesame Oil
1 Tbsp Stock or Water

Cut the chix into 1/2 inch cubes and mix with the marinade.

Peel and slice thinly the garlic and ginger. Chop the scallion into chunks the size of the chix cubes. De-seed the chilis and crush-em.

Mix up the sauce ingredients.

Heat up your Wok and add 2 Tbsp oil, add the chilis and stir fry for a minute. (Don't burn the chilis.)

Fry the chix for a couple minutes. Add ginger, garlic and white scallion parts.

Stir the sauce and add to Wok. Add the peanuts. Add some green parts from the scallions for color. You may want to add some more water or stock. (I usually make extra sauce (for the next batch) and sometimes add that here.)
 
2013-04-18 05:38:24 PM
static.caloriecount.about.comUnlike other 5-spices, this one goes very easy on the licorice. Better flavor IMO. Soy sauce is so important though and is the key to cooking.

lh3.googleusercontent.com Lee Kum Kee is good. It's your quality take-out/away sauce that gives a great flavor. However my favorite is...


PEARL RIVER BRIDGE!!!!

So many different varieties of sauce! Great for when you want that East Coast NYC Chinese flavor.

www.asiansupermarket365.com

Avoid Kikkoman like the plague for stir-fry. It's *alright* for some sushi and that salty Japanese/California flavor if that's what you're after. But it will tear your tongue up in a second, son, and ruins all other great Asian foods. Especially stir-fry. Kikkoman doesn't like the high temps, whereas good Chinese soy sauce does and will brown up almost a roux. Throw some corn starch in with it too for things like beef broccoli to coat the meat even further!

Most importantly though, and this is crucial! Learn how to season and then care for a good carbon steel Wok!

forums.egullet.org

NEVER EVER get non stick! And don't clean the damn thing with soap! Use some good vegetable oil and season the thing. The more you cook, the better your food tastes. And yes, you need LOTS of heat! Gas only if that's all you have, propane preferably outdoors for the high BTUs.

When it does come to clean up, all you need is water, and a good stiff-bristle brush to get any excess crap off that adhered to the Wok. You DON'T want to scrape the seasoning off. If some does come off, that's fine, but don't worry. As you cook more and more, things taste much better. Finally, once you're done coat the entire Wok in a light film of cooking oil to seal the steel. Next time you cook, just rinse it off and wipe it down.

Cooking tips:
1. You need HEAT! If nothing else, learn this!
2. The Wok will NEVER be as hot as that moment right before you start cooking. So you want to start with your warmest items FIRST! Vegetables first, Meats last! If you have to move them out of the Wok, just put them into a bowl and add them back in a couple of minutes for reheating. Otherwise...
3. Get a large, textured Wok! Wok cooking is achieved by using the center bottom of the Wok where the heat is concentrated. As your items cook, you want to get them out of the way. A good textured and seasoned Wok will cause your vegetables to stick to the upper sides of the Wok. This merely keeps them warm while you cook the rest of your ingredients. Namely meats and fish that go in last. Once those are done, scrape the veggies off the sides and mix everything together!
 
2013-04-18 05:40:00 PM

Needlessly Complicated: Question. We've gone grain-free. Is arrowroot starch an acceptable substitute for corn starch for the purpose of thickening stir fry sauces?


I understand that arrowroot is only to be used to thicken cold dishes. It breks down in the heat.
 
2013-04-18 05:41:07 PM
My parents and I have both lived in Japan.   Stir fry has always been part of my diet.

We don't use recipes anymore.    We just pick the meat of choice for that day, cut it up, stir fry it, add our favorite vegetables and favorite sauces.

Very good.
 
2013-04-18 05:46:40 PM
I do a lot of stir frying. A regular fry pan(with sloping sides) is fine. I often just do vegetables over white rice. Sauces are the key. Oyster sauce, black bean sauce, soy, chili sauce. I have them all and use them all. I like to make a sauce of soy, oyster, cooking sherry(or rice wine), brown sugar...maybe a tablespoon or two of each. Add a bit of water and some corn starch, and reduce it by 1/4...or really, until the alcohol evaporates. I also like mushrooms in the vegetable mix. And bok choy is always nice. Now I need to expand and learn how to do moo goo gai pan and stuff like that...or Orange chicken, my favorite! I do pot stickers all the time. won ton wrappers, stuffed with ground pork and a bit of julianne green onion, and soy sauce. Pan fry, or steam. Delicious.
 
2013-04-18 05:47:19 PM
Wok With Yan - Wok Before You Run

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=arEWFXWtCIw&hd=1

Wok With Yan - Beef & Broccoli

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=idGvS0pKiC4&hd=1

Wok With Yan - Cashew Nut Chicken

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vu93kQpvtGU&hd=1

Wok With Yan - Chicken with Pineapple

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SPa7R7jvkFw&hd=1
 
2013-04-18 05:51:06 PM

billybobtoo: Needlessly Complicated: Question. We've gone grain-free. Is arrowroot starch an acceptable substitute for corn starch for the purpose of thickening stir fry sauces?

I understand that arrowroot is only to be used to thicken cold dishes. It breks down in the heat.


If you temper the arrowroot first (mix it in cool water, then add a little of your hot fluids before mixing into the whole thing) it should be fine.  Also, you'll want to put it in as late as possible, as it will break down if left over the heat too long.
 
2013-04-18 05:57:19 PM

billybobtoo: I do a lot of stir frying. A regular fry pan(with sloping sides) is fine. I often just do vegetables over white rice. Sauces are the key. Oyster sauce, black bean sauce, soy, chili sauce. I have them all and use them all. I like to make a sauce of soy, oyster, cooking sherry(or rice wine), brown sugar...maybe a tablespoon or two of each. Add a bit of water and some corn starch, and reduce it by 1/4...or really, until the alcohol evaporates. I also like mushrooms in the vegetable mix. And bok choy is always nice. Now I need to expand and learn how to do moo goo gai pan and stuff like that...or Orange chicken, my favorite! I do pot stickers all the time. won ton wrappers, stuffed with ground pork and a bit of julianne green onion, and soy sauce. Pan fry, or steam. Delicious.


not to threadjack... but are you familiar with 'bead molasses'?
my wife has a recipe for chop suey that we've made many times... we had planned on making a big batch this last weekend and couldn't find 'bead molasses' anywhere... tried 2 stores where we've bought it in the past... tried a couple of international/aisian food markets... no luck... there is a dynasty brand that used to be available on amazon but it appears to be out of stock online... is 'bead molasses' going away?  know of a substitute?  we ended up using some brown gravy mainly for color... but the taste wasn't the same as with the bead molasses, I saw some suggestions online to substitute an equal amount of light molasses...  just wondering if anyone knows what's going on.
 
2013-04-18 05:59:11 PM
I see oyster and fish sauce have already been addressed.

Might I also suggest XO.
 
2013-04-18 06:04:44 PM
Essential Asian ingrediants:

Kecap manis (sweet soy sauce),
Nam Prik (chili garlic paste),
Squid brand Fish sauce (a couple dashes make the difference),
Brown sugar- just a touch,
Rice vinegar for a zip, and finish with sesame oil at the end or else it'll burn.

Here's my favorite method:
Take charcoal grill, heat a pile of charcoal until white, push into a bowl shape with wok and nestle pan into coals. While that gets hot, cut and portion ingredients, working with things that take longest -like meat- first. Use a wide spoon or a ladle to stir. The pan should be so hit that it smokes when oil is added. Work fast in small batches, removing items when just cooked- it will keep cooking out of the pan. At the end, combine all ingredients- including cooked noodles or rice- and sauce. Remove from heat, place pan on cement to cool, serve and make your neighbors jealous. That is all
 
2013-04-18 06:08:32 PM

tlchwi02: DGS: RexTalionis: The key to stir fry is that it's not meant to cook for a long time. If you can't get it into the wok and out on a plate in 5 minutes, you're usually doing something wrong.

My biggest concern there is broccoli. I like it in stir-fry but it seems to take longer than that. Should I prep it first? I don't want it mush, but too crunchy and undercooked is a big turn-off, too.

you could blanch it?


I cut up fresh broccoli and steam it for a couple minutes to get it started, then add it towards the end of the stirfry.
 
2013-04-18 06:08:54 PM

RexTalionis: ginko: My husband is the chef of the house but he adds alcohol to everything. A little wine or beer to taste, including his stirfry. Always good.

Some Chinese supermarkets without a license to sell liquor sell this as "cooking wine."



Don't cook with it. Your wok will explode.

Put it in a cup and drink it instead.


Thanks for the tip. He's probably sampling the flavors as he's cooking but I'd like to avoid that ER visit.
 
2013-04-18 06:11:44 PM

ginko: RexTalionis: ginko: My husband is the chef of the house but he adds alcohol to everything. A little wine or beer to taste, including his stirfry. Always good.

Some Chinese supermarkets without a license to sell liquor sell this as "cooking wine."

Don't cook with it. Your wok will explode.

Put it in a cup and drink it instead.

Thanks for the tip. He's probably sampling the flavors as he's cooking but I'd like to avoid that ER visit.


It's like 90 proof. It burns all the way down. I don't mean a warm glow, either, you will feel like you swallowed a coca-cola that's been warmed up too quickly.
 
2013-04-18 06:11:51 PM

Sofa King Smart: billybobtoo: I do a lot of stir frying. A regular fry pan(with sloping sides) is fine. I often just do vegetables over white rice. Sauces are the key. Oyster sauce, black bean sauce, soy, chili sauce. I have them all and use them all. I like to make a sauce of soy, oyster, cooking sherry(or rice wine), brown sugar...maybe a tablespoon or two of each. Add a bit of water and some corn starch, and reduce it by 1/4...or really, until the alcohol evaporates. I also like mushrooms in the vegetable mix. And bok choy is always nice. Now I need to expand and learn how to do moo goo gai pan and stuff like that...or Orange chicken, my favorite! I do pot stickers all the time. won ton wrappers, stuffed with ground pork and a bit of julianne green onion, and soy sauce. Pan fry, or steam. Delicious.

not to threadjack... but are you familiar with 'bead molasses'?
my wife has a recipe for chop suey that we've made many times... we had planned on making a big batch this last weekend and couldn't find 'bead molasses' anywhere... tried 2 stores where we've bought it in the past... tried a couple of international/aisian food markets... no luck... there is a dynasty brand that used to be available on amazon but it appears to be out of stock online... is 'bead molasses' going away?  know of a substitute?  we ended up using some brown gravy mainly for color... but the taste wasn't the same as with the bead molasses, I saw some suggestions online to substitute an equal amount of light molasses...  just wondering if anyone knows what's going on.


I was going to mention Amazon, but noticed you have already covered that. I notice a lot of people saying you can substitute a light molasses for the bead molasses. Stay away from the sulferized dark stuff. I have never heard of any kind of molasses being used in Chinese cooking. Maybe I'll give it a try. Love chop suey...even though it's not really a Chinese dish.
 
2013-04-18 06:12:05 PM
I'm surprised that nobody has suggested the following:
Victim in Garlic Bean Sauce
Crispy Tangerine Victim
Sweet and Sour Victim
Whole Fried Victim (seasonal)
 
2013-04-18 06:14:52 PM
I have two woks in my kitchen, a standard steel wok and a Lodge cast-iron wok.   Don't run screaming--the thing weights about twelve pounds but gets massively hot over a standard gas cooktop.  I've done everything from fried rice to American deepfried "chinese" like general tso's.  Works great.

If I'm doing a chicken dish, I'll prep the chicken in a quick coating of a beaten egg, about a tablespoon or so of cornstarch and enough tamari to darken the whole mess.  The meat sits in that while I'm prepping all the vegetables.  (One tip for stir-frying: prep everything ahead of time!  You're ideally cooking in a very VERY hot wok, once you start the clock is ticking.  You don't have time for your food to turn to char while you go chop those onions you forgot.)
 
2013-04-18 06:19:46 PM

praxcelis: prep everything ahead of time


This one thing CANNOT be stressed enough.
 
2013-04-18 06:20:19 PM
Yakisoba sauce:
(Also works for light chicken or seafood dishes, just cut down on the amount)

1/4 C. tamari or premium soy sauce
2 Tbsp. worcestershire sauce
1.5 Tbsp. mirin (rice wine vinegar)
1 Tbsp. sake
1 Tbsp. tomato paste
1 Tbsp. oyster sauce
2 tsp. dark brown sugar
pinch ground ginger
pinch garlic powder

Mix well and store in airtight container a few hours or overnight to let the flavors meld.

There are more combinations of yakisoba noodles, sliced veg, and whatnot to fill a crate.  I usually just go with noodle, baby bok choy, shredded carrot, bell pepper, bean sprouts and broccoli chopped very tiny.
 
2013-04-18 06:21:44 PM
I love cooking. In fact, I am sitting here mulling through my choices for dinner this evening. So far: pork chops, twice-baked potatoes (homemade, of course!), a vegetable, and maybe some biscuits. Not sure yet.

My favorite component of cooking has to be the roux. Once I mastered that, my soups, stews, roasts, gravies, sauces, and chowders went from good to great. I made some chicken fried steak the other day and I used the drippings to make a delicious gravy in the pan. Yea, I am sure that this makes me sound fat, but I am not.

/hungry now
//good thing dinner is soon!
 
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