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(Primer Magazine)   Common words that when you say them make people think you're from Alabama   (primermagazine.com) divider line 380
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2013-04-18 01:54:04 PM
My philosophy on English is that it is a living language, so feel free to come up with new words as needed or desired.  Verbify nouns, make composite words, come up with new onomonopias, etc. I have no qualms with any of this.  But, once we have come up with a word I think we should all agree on one spelling for it. Misspellings just cause confusion, and they cannot be excused as "living language".

To an extent grammar fall into this need for agreement as well.  While grammatical structures may change over time, and we do need to adapt to that, we still need consistency for how we put the current grammar in writing.  Having grammar all over the place causes confusion, so we really should strive to use the presently accepted grammar.


/I am sure there is a misspelling and several grammatical errors in this post
 
2013-04-18 01:56:35 PM

fruitloop: [i171.photobucket.com image 185x272]

I do love me some carmel

carnal apples.

/Pet peeve
 
2013-04-18 01:57:16 PM
Roll Tide
 
2013-04-18 01:57:39 PM

t3knomanser: pute kisses like a man: in middle english it was aks.  thus, the historically accurate pronunciation is aks.

Well, not really. Up until 1600 "ax" was considered an acceptable word for "ask", and it derives from "acsian" in Old English. But also dating back to Old English is "ascian", which is the root of the modern "ask".

Arguably, "ask" is more historically "accurate" because it's closer to the roots across many closely related languages: Proto-Germanic's "aiskojan", Saxon's "escon", Old High German's "eiscon",. The "ais-" prefix itself ties back to Sanskrit and Armenian.

All that is to say, "aks" was an acceptable historical anomaly, but was never "the" accurate pronunciation of "ask".


What a lot of dialects do is preserve older forms. And it boils down to mutual intelligibility.

English is a riotous profusion of forms, with formal and informal often blurring over the years. Long years at that, as a trade tongue, it borrowed heavily from Latinate forms, as well as the Germanic forebears, and the odd bits of Gaelic and other languages it butts up against. It is a sponge for new words, from languages that are no where near those roots.

"Proper" English is no more than the dialect that is used by those in current power, and taught as being the "correct" version, as a method of cultural control. It is a device of politics, not linguistics. Populations that are isolated by region spin dialects out of use. "Proper" English is only "proper" because folks in power would like their version be the formal one, and it is reinforced again and again, to keep those populations slightly isolated, by marginalizing the usage from their region. It's not about proper, it's merely a tool of politics.
 
2013-04-18 01:59:20 PM

fruitloop: Any word that ends with an "-oh" sound turns into ending with an "-er" sound: window, fellow, tomato, pillow, hollow.


my mom, born & raised in Queens, NY, pronounced my name peetah, and my sisters name donner ..

//also bottel ..
 
2013-04-18 01:59:31 PM
hay, wach yall talkin about
 
2013-04-18 02:00:14 PM

vudukungfu: OK OK OK
PRIMER Magazine.

Is it pronounced
PRIM-MER
or
PRIME-ER?


Good call.
To me it is the latter.  To old librarians it is the former.
 
2013-04-18 02:01:23 PM

DrPainMD: dramatools: Alabama has plenty of people intelligent enough to pronounce words correctly. They just don't get elected to public office.

No matter where you're from, you speak like those around you. Intelligence, or lack thereof, has nothing to do with it.


This is true. However, speech in Alabama isn't as uniform as you might think. College educated people with ties to out of state develop their own social networks, which preserves pockets of better speech. Additionally, Alabamians spend their evenings watching the same shows and hearing the same Midwestern American Standard pronunciation as the rest of us do.

I always thought the exaggerated southern speech that Alabamian politicians use was an affectation. Maybe that isn't the right word. It was genuine, but they deliberately preserve speaking with as thick an accent as possible. It not only conveys that they're good ole boys, but it shows they're outsiders fighting the evil beltway insiders.

Howell Heflin was the classic example.
 
2013-04-18 02:02:24 PM

FirstNationalBastard: Oh, and I still don't see how the Brits get "leftenant" out of "lieutenant".


Comes from the old french spelling of "leuf" as opposed to the more modern "lieu."  That's according to my Lord Strathcona's tank buddy.
 
2013-04-18 02:02:34 PM
Bless his heart.

I'd like to date someone outside of the family.

I'm going out to the hollyhocks; anyone seen the White Pages?
 
2013-04-18 02:03:14 PM

Xenomech: vudukungfu: OK OK OK
PRIMER Magazine.

Is it pronounced
PRIM-MER
or
PRIME-ER?


vowel-consonant-vowel = first vowel is long (typically).

To pronounce it "primmer" you would have to have -- you guessed it -- two letter Ms in there (or bad teeth).


Wrong.

/PRIM-er is a lesson or a guide; PRIME-er is the first coat of paint.
//since the magazine bills itself as containing "Self-development, how-to guides, career advice, and reclaiming manliness", it should use the first pronunciation
///but you'd probably have to axe the managing editor, and he'll splain it to you
 
2013-04-18 02:04:08 PM
This one I've noticed in the northeast. It's subtle, but "dr" at the beginning of words turns into "jr". Drop becomes jrop.
 
2013-04-18 02:04:56 PM
IGNUNT
 
2013-04-18 02:05:21 PM

maxx2112: Roll Tide


And we are done here.
 
2013-04-18 02:05:26 PM
I hate when people use the phrase " my work". As in:

I need to drive to my work today to pick up some documents. JOB. In that sentence, the correct word to use would be job. Or, leave off the "my". Please. For me.
 
2013-04-18 02:05:32 PM

hubiestubert: English is a riotous profusion of forms


I think that's part of what has given English its viral power. Oh, sure, much of the modern world speaks English because of three centuries of Anglophile colonialism, but there seems to be something attractive about the way English is very forgiving of neologisms and neogrammatisms. We tend to feel that parts of speech are more of a suggestion, which means verbing nouns or nouning verbs is perfectly acceptable. New words tend to pop up and quickly become common. I don't know how many other languages would have easily facilitated LOLCATS. Anything with a phonetic spelling is automatically eliminated. Languages that elide vowels too.

hubiestubert: "Proper" English is only "proper" because folks in power would like their version be the formal one


As it goes, the closest modern dialect to Elizabethan English would be what they speak in Kentucky. Keep that in mind when you watch Shakespearian plays.
 
2013-04-18 02:05:47 PM

Sofa King Smart: the thing that toasts my giblets is the past tense of 'to see'...

I don't know how or why but the word 'seen' gets used a lot in my part of the country and it's like nails on a chalkboard to me..  ex:  I seen where Joe went an got him a new truck.  Hey, I seen your sister down at the girlie club last weekend...


On this very night, ten years ago, along this very stretch of road in a dense fog just like this. I saw the worst accident I ever seen. There was this sound, like a garbage truck dropped off the Empire State Building... And when they pulled the driver's body from the twisted, burning wreck. It looked like this...
i10.photobucket.com
 
2013-04-18 02:06:46 PM

fruitloop: Any word that ends with an "-oh" sound turns into ending with an "-er" sound: window, fellow, tomato, pillow, hollow.


You do realize that this is actually a British thing as well?

Anyone recall Peter Davison's run as the Doctor?  And how he constantly referred to Nyssa as Nyss-er?  But the best was the villain Omega....PD called him Omig-er throughout the episode.  Very funny.
 
2013-04-18 02:07:01 PM

FirstNationalBastard: Oh, and I still don't see how the Brits get "leftenant" out of "lieutenant".


I always thought it was weird that English drops the middle letters in the pronunciation of "colonel". Then I learned military ranks in Hebrew - it's pronounced "co-low-NELL" (the first 2 syllables rhyme), which makes far more sense. Based on the fact that Hebrew borrows a whole fark of a lot from British English, I wonder if they do this in The Queen's as well.
 
2013-04-18 02:09:19 PM
You people are becoming just as bad as the French.
 
2013-04-18 02:09:54 PM

ristst: fruitloop: Any word that ends with an "-oh" sound turns into ending with an "-er" sound: window, fellow, tomato, pillow, hollow.

You do realize that this is actually a British thing as well?

Anyone recall Peter Davison's run as the Doctor?  And how he constantly referred to Nyssa as Nyss-er?  But the best was the villain Omega....PD called him Omig-er throughout the episode.  Very funny.


This tread is getting very My Fair Lady.

In Hartford, Hereford, and Hampshire, Hurricanes Hardly ever Happen. HHHHHHHHHHHHHHH.....HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH...HHHHHHHHHHHH
 
2013-04-18 02:10:58 PM

hubiestubert: t3knomanser: pute kisses like a man: in middle english it was aks.  thus, the historically accurate pronunciation is aks.

Well, not really. Up until 1600 "ax" was considered an acceptable word for "ask", and it derives from "acsian" in Old English. But also dating back to Old English is "ascian", which is the root of the modern "ask".

Arguably, "ask" is more historically "accurate" because it's closer to the roots across many closely related languages: Proto-Germanic's "aiskojan", Saxon's "escon", Old High German's "eiscon",. The "ais-" prefix itself ties back to Sanskrit and Armenian.

All that is to say, "aks" was an acceptable historical anomaly, but was never "the" accurate pronunciation of "ask".

What a lot of dialects do is preserve older forms. And it boils down to mutual intelligibility.

English is a riotous profusion of forms, with formal and informal often blurring over the years. Long years at that, as a trade tongue, it borrowed heavily from Latinate forms, as well as the Germanic forebears, and the odd bits of Gaelic and other languages it butts up against. It is a sponge for new words, from languages that are no where near those roots.

"Proper" English is no more than the dialect that is used by those in current power, and taught as being the "correct" version, as a method of cultural control. It is a device of politics, not linguistics. Populations that are isolated by region spin dialects out of use. "Proper" English is only "proper" because folks in power would like their version be the formal one, and it is reinforced again and again, to keep those populations slightly isolated, by marginalizing the usage from their region. It's not about proper, it's merely a tool of politics.


i3.ytimg.com

"Yes, well that's not exactly what I've got written on the card,
but I knew your father, so Footlights lead by 25 points."


 
2013-04-18 02:11:11 PM

Dr Dreidel: FirstNationalBastard: Oh, and I still don't see how the Brits get "leftenant" out of "lieutenant".

I always thought it was weird that English drops the middle letters in the pronunciation of "colonel". Then I learned military ranks in Hebrew - it's pronounced "co-low-NELL" (the first 2 syllables rhyme), which makes far more sense. Based on the fact that Hebrew borrows a whole fark of a lot from British English, I wonder if they do this in The Queen's as well.


They got the pronunciation from Italian but the spelling from French.
 
2013-04-18 02:11:14 PM

namegoeshere: This tread is getting very My Fair Lady.


Tread, of course, being a perfectly cromulent dialectical variation of thread.
 
2013-04-18 02:11:44 PM

YouPeopleAreCrazy: Yes, Alabamans mangle the language. Idiot flyover country people.

I wonder what a similar analysis of Boston linguistics would look like...


The way they and Long Islanders speak have to be the ugliest pronunciations of English anywhere.  Just awful.

And this speaks more to cultural bias than anything else, but I don't think anyone sounds dumber than a person from da Bronx.
 
2013-04-18 02:12:57 PM

YouPeopleAreCrazy: Yes, Alabamans mangle the language. Idiot flyover country people.

I wonder what a similar analysis of Boston linguistics would look like...


Dude, too soon!

Also, when I lived in Philly and asked a friend if she wanted something to drink, I'd wonder how one could drink wood and what her other option was.
Water != Wooder.
 
2013-04-18 02:14:16 PM

t3knomanser: hubiestubert: English is a riotous profusion of forms

I think that's part of what has given English its viral power. Oh, sure, much of the modern world speaks English because of three centuries of Anglophile colonialism, but there seems to be something attractive about the way English is very forgiving of neologisms and neogrammatisms. We tend to feel that parts of speech are more of a suggestion, which means verbing nouns or nouning verbs is perfectly acceptable. New words tend to pop up and quickly become common. I don't know how many other languages would have easily facilitated LOLCATS. Anything with a phonetic spelling is automatically eliminated. Languages that elide vowels too.

hubiestubert: "Proper" English is only "proper" because folks in power would like their version be the formal one

As it goes, the closest modern dialect to Elizabethan English would be what they speak in Kentucky. Keep that in mind when you watch Shakespearian plays.


Je peu avoir Royale avec fromage?
 
2013-04-18 02:16:31 PM
If you say "under wire" you sound like a busty southern woman talkIng about her skivvies rather than her bra.

If you say "my cocaine" you sound like Michael Kane saying his name.

/that's alls I got
 
2013-04-18 02:18:30 PM
Then there is ah-ite meaning alright.
 
2013-04-18 02:18:39 PM

ristst: fruitloop: Any word that ends with an "-oh" sound turns into ending with an "-er" sound: window, fellow, tomato, pillow, hollow.

You do realize that this is actually a British thing as well?

Anyone recall Peter Davison's run as the Doctor?  And how he constantly referred to Nyssa as Nyss-er?  But the best was the villain Omega....PD called him Omig-er throughout the episode.  Very funny.


I think that mostly happens when the ending 'r' sound immediately precedes a vowel.
 
2013-04-18 02:19:47 PM

YouPeopleAreCrazy: Yes, Alabamans mangle the language. Idiot flyover country people.

I wonder what a similar analysis of Boston linguistics would look like...


I refuse to recognize chowdahese as part of the Queen's English.
 
2013-04-18 02:20:29 PM

Strik3r: NUCLEAR
Incorrect pronunciation: nuke - you - lerr

Correct pronunciation: new - clee - err

I'm going to try to get through this one without a President Bush joke. All right, so, despite the fact that it's 2008, this is a word with which we're somehow still struggling. Like most of the words on this list, "nuclear" is spelled EXACTLY AS IT IS SUPPOSED TO BE PRONOUNCED and yet, people continue to screw it up worse than the War in Iraq... oh, dammit.

^^^^  THIS


Same is true for Israel, too, yet so many pronounce it "is ree ahl" instead of "is rah el".
 
2013-04-18 02:21:16 PM

Pants full of macaroni!!: ristst: fruitloop: Any word that ends with an "-oh" sound turns into ending with an "-er" sound: window, fellow, tomato, pillow, hollow.

You do realize that this is actually a British thing as well?

Anyone recall Peter Davison's run as the Doctor?  And how he constantly referred to Nyssa as Nyss-er?  But the best was the villain Omega....PD called him Omig-er throughout the episode.  Very funny.

I think that mostly happens when the ending 'r' sound immediately precedes a vowel.


Darn, lemme try that again.  When there's a word ending with a schwa vowel immediately preceding another vowel, an 'r' sound gets inserted.
 
2013-04-18 02:21:22 PM
Michael Caine, rather
 
2013-04-18 02:23:27 PM

Pocket Ninja: Subby, most of the incorrect pronunciations listed on that page would mark a significant improvement in pronunciation for Alabam

ians.


Where's the "i" at?
 
2013-04-18 02:23:55 PM
These silly people from Osaka with their funny Kansai dialect... Osaka mamas.
 
2013-04-18 02:24:01 PM

solitary: IGNUNT


Negatory, it's ig'nit.

You're something or other for not knowing that. What's the word... Damn, it's right on the tip of my thumb...
 
2013-04-18 02:24:56 PM
 I don't think Hank done it this way
 
2013-04-18 02:26:31 PM

Dr Dreidel: FirstNationalBastard: Oh, and I still don't see how the Brits get "leftenant" out of "lieutenant".

I always thought it was weird that English drops the middle letters in the pronunciation of "colonel". Then I learned military ranks in Hebrew - it's pronounced "co-low-NELL" (the first 2 syllables rhyme), which makes far more sense. Based on the fact that Hebrew borrows a whole fark of a lot from British English, I wonder if they do this in The Queen's as well.


LaBeau always called Col. Hogan "colo-NELL".

/my day will be complete if I can just reference Gen. Burkhalter
//Maj. Hochstetter was originally from Nashville, TN
 
2013-04-18 02:26:32 PM
"hubiestubert: English is a riotous profusion of forms "

Mrs. Klisher ?
 
2013-04-18 02:26:40 PM

mysticcat: Fixin', as in "I was fixin' to watch reruns of the 1415 Tide football titles, but i had to make a beer run first."


/FTFM
//RTR
 
2013-04-18 02:27:46 PM

namegoeshere: JerkyMeat: Typical.

TFA conveniently skipped the possum or opossum conundrum.

Crayfish, crawfish, crawdads, craydads, craydiddies, little tiny fresh water lobsters...


Crawlfish, a New Orleans favorite of mine.
 
2013-04-18 02:28:09 PM

StickyKleenexWad: I live in St. Clair County AL about 35 min. drive from Talladega ('Dega).  The drawl & language on the factory floor at my last job would probably make most of ya'll internet folks' ears fall off.   "I gotta git down to tha doller stoar 'fore Misty gits off her shift at tha cracker Barrel. We gon git some coors lite & go to tha races"  Also, Row Tide ya'll.


Oh your god do I remember listening to that shat.I had to really work on my diction in order to make sure i was taken seriously in broadcasting I lived 20 min from the Dega in Ohatchee AL. You might remember this small town from 2 a days on MTV when the head coach from Hoover high went home to mamas for Thanksgiving
 
2013-04-18 02:28:48 PM

Xenomech: To pronounce it "primmer" you would have to have -- you guessed it -- two letter Ms in there (or bad teeth).


THEN TELL FARKING NPR TO STOP PRNOUNCING IT PRIMMER FOR GOD'S SAKES
THEY ARE ALL FARKING ENGRISH MAJORS, TOO.
It's bad enough all they hire are people with speech impediments.
 
2013-04-18 02:28:57 PM
Dont forget people that pronounce Missouri Missourah.
 
2013-04-18 02:29:42 PM

J. Frank Parnell: I use the word terlet instead of toilet, not because i'm anywhere near the south, but simply because it amuses me.

One thing i've never seen anyone mention, but seems to be fairly common, is Americans pronouncing measure as maesure.


There was an anchorman on CNN who used to do that. He had the normal "neutral" accent for most words, but when he said measure he sounded like Gomer f*ckin' Pyle. "Go-lleee! Sarge is makin' me may-shure the whole camp with this here ruler!"
 
2013-04-18 02:29:42 PM

limeyferg: aluminum... somehow becomes Al- u-min-i-um

The -ium is how us Brits say it.  I think Bill Bryson researched it and said the original element was named as -"aluminum: and that's how the US says it and spells it.  For some reason the brits decided that it sounded better if you add the -ium and made it aluminium.


The Brits did something similar with the pronunciation of herb.  "Herb" comes from French and the "h" is silent; originally, the English adhered to the silent "h"---which is why we Americans don't pronounce the it---but then changed their limey minds sometime during the 1800s and decided to pronounce the "h."

Worse, Brits like to think they pronounce "herbs" correctly when, in fact, they're wrong.  I've heard many a Brit say that Americans sound like idiots when they say " 'erb" instead of "herb."

Morans.
 
2013-04-18 02:29:48 PM
"You don't have permission to access /2008/learn/10-words-you-mispronounce-that-make-people-think-youre-an- idiot on this server."

Guess I'll remain ignint.
 
2013-04-18 02:29:55 PM
I did it "On accident"

Makes me roll my eyes.

I will use "Unpossible" but really only as a joke.  When someone presents me with a technical question or theory at work, I will all dramatically say "UNPOSSIBLE!"
 
2013-04-18 02:30:54 PM

FizixJunkee: Strik3r: NUCLEAR
Incorrect pronunciation: nuke - you - lerr

Correct pronunciation: new - clee - err

I'm going to try to get through this one without a President Bush joke. All right, so, despite the fact that it's 2008, this is a word with which we're somehow still struggling. Like most of the words on this list, "nuclear" is spelled EXACTLY AS IT IS SUPPOSED TO BE PRONOUNCED and yet, people continue to screw it up worse than the War in Iraq... oh, dammit.

^^^^  THIS

Same is true for Israel, too, yet so many pronounce it "is ree ahl" instead of "is rah el".


What about Iz-ray-el?
 
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