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(Primer Magazine)   Common words that when you say them make people think you're from Alabama   (primermagazine.com) divider line 380
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26780 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Apr 2013 at 1:00 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-18 03:57:31 PM  

Mikeyworld: namegoeshere: But really, the important linguistic question is Grinder? Sub? Hero? Dagwood?

/team Grinder

A Dagwood is on regular bread, not a hoagie bun. It's a completely different kind of sammich altogether.

/but I will go with 'Sub', if you're counting crows.


Huh. earn something new every day. And now I'm hungry.
 
2013-04-18 03:58:15 PM  

namegoeshere: earn something new every day


Whar L whar
 
2013-04-18 03:59:23 PM  

Mr Guy: ph0rk: Mr Guy: FLMountainMan: My wife doesn't have much of an accent, but she does say:

holler - hollow

That's a new one on me.  Around here, "holler" is how you get someone's attention if they ignore you the first time.

It is an Appalachian-ism, and it is correspondingly ancient (well, in US terms)

Seems like it needs to be used with the southern pronoun, "them/that-thar".

As in, "Gimme one of themthar holler jugs for mah whis-skay".


A holler is a type of place. Think "little valley".

I don't hear it too much on the eastern side of the divide, but I'm too far east for there to be any hollers.
 
2013-04-18 04:00:19 PM  
jbournesblog.files.wordpress.com

Someone doesn't like to be called stu...stu...stupid.
 
2013-04-18 04:00:35 PM  

geekbikerskum: Strik3r: NUCLEAR
Incorrect pronunciation: nuke - you - lerr

Correct pronunciation: new - clee - err

I'm going to try to get through this one without a President Bush joke.

Actually, Jimmy Carter said it that way, too, a fact that many Democrats conveniently forget.  Jimmy Carter has even less of an excuse, since he served on a nuclear sub.  He was roundly mocked by *Republican* elites for it, back in the day.

Pronouncing "ask" as "axe" is something I usually associate with African-American Vernacular English, but AAVE as spoken across the U.S. is heavily influenced by Southern American English, and I'm a damnyankee who doesn't often get to experience the speech of less-educated Southern whites.


People forget that Southerners say it that way because we have a tendency to put a hard scottish stop on "k" sounds midword.  Most of us don't actually say it "Nuc-u-lear", it's just the sound we make aspirating the c and putting the hard gutteral stop midword really leaves us no where to go to get to the L sound, and the "u" sounds is just laziness to make it flow better.  We really tend to say it "Nuk'uh lear", but slowing down and enunciating it, we realize there's something wrong and feebly substitute a "u" when speaking slowly and clearly.  It's one of these things that's much easier for me to demonstrate the sounds more than explain.

It's funny, you can really tell what the general climate of a region is from their accents.  The more nasal differentiation done between vowels in a culture, the colder the culture's environment.   Shorter vowel sounds and lots of jarring consonants seem to come from warmer climates. A lot of our language is derived from the comfortable ways of holding your vocal boxes and nasal cavities to maintain comfortable airflow when speaking for the prevailing temperatures.  Bracing against the cold encourages lower voice registers and more nasal differentiation with vowel sounds.
 
2013-04-18 04:03:11 PM  
Pe-dan-tic
 
2013-04-18 04:03:59 PM  
brantgoose has blown my mind. Not only do I pronounce the word dip-thong, until today, I would have sworn it was spelled that way.

Diphthong, eh? Who knew?
 
2013-04-18 04:04:04 PM  

tricycleracer: I've had people say this while serving me an espresso.


Be fair though, "es-" rather than "ex-" is just the Italians getting their Latin wrong, so they've no reason to complain.
 
2013-04-18 04:04:23 PM  
Also for college basketball it's "Gone-ZAG-uh" not "Gun-ZAAAHHH-guh" there, Zsa Zsa.
 
2013-04-18 04:12:32 PM  

WalMartian: cajunns: Pants full of macaroni!!: Fun Fact:  The first syllable of the name Xavier is "ig".

Xavier is pronounced " zavier"

Being a graduate of St F X   (S t  Francis Xavier University ) , four years of hearing this i know the pronunciation .

Sometimes also pronounced as "zah-vee-air"


Or "hav-ee-AY"

Pants full of macaroni!!: cbathrob: Then there's my Canadian friend who insists on pronouncing "pasta" like "Shasta."   Of course, I cut him slack precisely because he's from Canada.

They do a lot of words with the "ah" sound like that.  Last time I went to Canada I was amused to learn that they pronounce Nissan "nee-san", rhyming the second syllable with "pan".  A little jarring to hear it in radio ads for car dealerships.


What always sound weird to my Canadian ear is the "zed" vs "zee" in car names. Camaro "zee"28, Datsun 240"zee" sound distinctly odd to me.
 
2013-04-18 04:12:42 PM  
How about "National Championship?"  How do you smart-asses pronounce that?  It never ceases to amaze me the way 'mercuh talks smack about Alabama.  I've lived in Alabama all my life.  Yes, we have our share of inbreeds, but we also have an over-abundance of geniuses and trend-setters.  Whuddabout juze guize in frkkn Brooklyn?  Duuddee... Cali's got way more... uhhhh... what was I gonna say, brahh?  And doze wicked pissahs in Southie? You're all just jealous because you can visit snow-capped mountains and sun-drenched beaches in one day without leaving this state.  Lay off the stereotypes or come on down to the promised land and prove me wrong.
 
2013-04-18 04:15:46 PM  

netcentric: "hubiestubert: English is a riotous profusion of forms "

Mrs. Klisher ?


"English doesn't borrow from other languages. English follows other languages down dark alleys, knocks them over and goes through their pockets for loose grammar."
 
2013-04-18 04:18:29 PM  
Pernouncin words wrong makes you look ignernt.
 
2013-04-18 04:20:42 PM  

Mikeyworld: namegoeshere: But really, the important linguistic question is Grinder? Sub? Hero? Dagwood?

/team Grinder

A Dagwood is on regular bread, not a hoagie bun. It's a completely different kind of sammich altogether.

/but I will go with 'Sub', if you're counting crows.


It's a completely different kind of sammich!
 
2013-04-18 04:21:33 PM  
Goddammit I hate this comments box so much.  Thanks for freezing for 3 minutes and then losing my work.
 
2013-04-18 04:25:55 PM  
Vehicle

Dumb ass says: vee-hik-el
Possible non douche says: vee-ikl
 
2013-04-18 04:27:09 PM  

AdrienVeidt: Also, teh Brits are dumb when they say 'Hoo-stun'. This is one time Stewie's right; it's 'Hyuu-stun', dammit.


Unless it's a street in Manhattan and then it's 'HOW stun.'
 
2013-04-18 04:27:46 PM  
If you're using words like "snuck," "brang," or "irregardless," (no, none of those are real words)

Contiguous string of Roman characters:  check
Corresponds to a spoken utterance:  check
Means something to an English speaker:  check

It's one thing to say that "irregardless" is an idiotic word, or has no proper usage.  But to say that it isn't a word at all?
 That's like saying that 27 isn't a number because there is no 27 o'clock.
 
2013-04-18 04:35:21 PM  

ertznay: Putting an 'r' in a word that doesn't have one pisses me off. "Warsh my car."
My God.


Well of course he warshed his car; it needs warshed.
 
2013-04-18 04:35:24 PM  
Jew. Translation: Did you.

Example: "I had sex with mah sister last night. Jew?"
 
2013-04-18 04:36:59 PM  

CptnSpldng: ertznay: Putting an 'r' in a word that doesn't have one pisses me off. "Warsh my car."
My God.

Well of course he warshed his car; it needs warshed.


Your hair wants cuttin', boy.
 
2013-04-18 04:40:05 PM  

Tenga: Jew. Translation: Did you.

Example: "I had sex with mah sister last night. Jew?"


And "jall", plural.
 
2013-04-18 04:40:22 PM  

ZeroCorpse: "Buck naked" should never be pronounced "butt nekkid".

Also:

Wedding video
Graduation video
Funny YouTube video
Disaster video
Sex  tape?

Almost onlywhen it's sex does the media and populace at large call a digitally-shot video a "tape".


Naked = sans clothes.
Nekkid = sans clothes and UP to sumptin'
 
2013-04-18 04:41:19 PM  
Off the top of my head I think the word I most hear people mispronouncing in English is "Caribbean."

Amazing thing about language though, if it is prevalent enough the mispronunciation becomes acceptable and it all becomes a moot point.  Caribbean is a good case study of the mutability of language.
 
2013-04-18 04:45:19 PM  

FizixJunkee: [i.chzbgr.com image 456x570]


Barrow?

It's a bloody half of a barrel with wheels.  It's a farking wheel-barrel.

/First time I've ever noticed it as being 'barrow', right there.
//Had to google to figure out which angle of the image was funny.
 
2013-04-18 04:48:04 PM  

namegoeshere: CptnSpldng: ertznay: Putting an 'r' in a word that doesn't have one pisses me off. "Warsh my car."
My God.

Well of course he warshed his car; it needs warshed.

Your hair wants cuttin', boy.


Western Pennsultucky
 
2013-04-18 04:49:00 PM  

NkThrasher: FizixJunkee: [i.chzbgr.com image 456x570]

Barrow?

It's a bloody half of a barrel with wheels.  It's a farking wheel-barrel.

/First time I've ever noticed it as being 'barrow', right there.
//Had to google to figure out which angle of the image was funny.


I always knew it was barrow, because I grew up pronouncing it with the w very faint, almost not there. Not quite barroh, but something in between. I never knew people thought it was wheel barrel.
 
2013-04-18 04:53:53 PM  

namegoeshere: I always knew it was barrow, because I grew up pronouncing it with the w very faint, almost not there. Not quite barroh, but something in between. I never knew people thought it was wheel barrel.


I'm New English, my excuse for this is that those double-R sounds completely screw up a Bostonian speaker in the middle of a word like that.  You can't just turn them into 'ah' sounds like you normally would, and I assume it ends up making the end of both words sound similar.

All that said, I need to call one of my Bostonian friends tonight and ask them to say both words so I can hear it and verify my assumption.

/Only have a Bostonian accent around my brother
//Can't do it on my own to save my life
 
2013-04-18 04:55:51 PM  

brap: Off the top of my head I think the word I most hear people mispronouncing in English is "Caribbean."

Amazing thing about language though, if it is prevalent enough the mispronunciation becomes acceptable and it all becomes a moot point.  Caribbean is a good case study of the mutability of language.


Our kayaking guide in St. Croix gave us a whole history of the Carib Indians, including the proper pronunciation of Caribbean.  Even knowing the right way, it's awfully hard to change, especially with a word you don't say very often.
 
GBB
2013-04-18 04:59:07 PM  
"Tire"
Correct: Tie-err
Incorrect: Tar
 
2013-04-18 05:02:48 PM  

t3knomanser: pute kisses like a man: in middle english it was aks.  thus, the historically accurate pronunciation is aks.

Well, not really. Up until 1600 "ax" was considered an acceptable word for "ask", and it derives from "acsian" in Old English. But also dating back to Old English is "ascian", which is the root of the modern "ask".

Arguably, "ask" is more historically "accurate" because it's closer to the roots across many closely related languages: Proto-Germanic's "aiskojan", Saxon's "escon", Old High German's "eiscon",. The "ais-" prefix itself ties back to Sanskrit and Armenian.

All that is to say, "aks" was an acceptable historical anomaly, but was never "the" accurate pronunciation of "ask".


well, look at the big brain on t3knomanser!
 
2013-04-18 05:08:28 PM  

brantgoose: I suspect that the pronunciation of "often" is currently evolving, which means that some people are still pronouncing it as it is spelled (because it is spelled the way it was pronounced when the spelling was decided upon) and other people are slurring it, dropping the "t" as people so often do, because it is easier that way. The latter will soon be accusing the former of having it wrong instead of vice-versa, the way the British accuse Americans and Canadians of "pronouncing things the way they are spelled"

I DO NOT PRONOUNCE WORDS THE WAY THEY ARE SPELLED, ESPECIALLY WORDS THAT I DID NOT LEARN FROM A BOOK. I PRONOUNCE WORDS THE WAY DR. SAMUEL JOHNSON CHOSE TO SPELL THEM,  AND SO DID HE. Because that is the way they were pronounced by the British or at least many British at the time English immigrated to North America in the mouths of my ancestors and yours.

I would say both pronunciations are therefore correct for now.

The old pronunciation of Athlete has two syllables and is spelled exactly as it is pronounced. But rather than dropping a sound, people are perversely adding one. Why? Because they don't like having three consonants in a row -thl-, or rather, one diphthong and a consonant. They are adding an extra vowel to make the rule that each syllable must have a vowel and each vowel a syllable apply. Technically, they have turned one syllable into two the same way as we do with "rhythm" BECAUSE YOU CAN'T PRONOUNCE IT AS ONE.   The syllable is a marriage between one vowel and one consonant. Anything else is pre-verted.

Well, diphthong isn't easy either, but like athlete, you can pronounce it if you make a physical effort. But look how weird it looks spelled correctly.  Aren't you tempted to turn it into dip-thong? I know I am.

Of course, the same analysis is true of many shifts in pronunciation, including some that annoy some people very much and which they will irrationally fight tooth and claw until the day they die, even after a very large majority of pe ...


Yup, whut he/she say'ed. ^
 
2013-04-18 05:09:28 PM  
Euler
 
2013-04-18 05:19:55 PM  

sxacho: Euler


ronetheboxhouston.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-04-18 05:23:26 PM  
TEMPERATURE
incorrect = temp - uh - cher
correct = temp - er - uh - cher

It has four syllables, not three.
I hear local weather bunnies make this mistake all the time.  It irritates me.
 
2013-04-18 05:26:05 PM  

threedingers: What always sound weird to my Canadian ear is the "zed" vs "zee" in car names. Camaro "zee"28, Datsun 240"zee" sound distinctly odd to me.


Why? For Americans every consonant's name is the sound it makes elongated with a vowel sound. But for Canadians and Brits it's every consonant save for Z. [All but W in both cases as its name is a functional description rather than its sound] Why end the name of only that one consonant with another consonant? How does that makes any sense?

Dee
Gee
Pee
Tee
Zed

One of these things is not like the other.
 
2013-04-18 05:29:18 PM  
Roll tide
 
2013-04-18 05:30:46 PM  
Those of you who think your specific word is only pronounced correctly one way should pick up a dictionary. You might be surprised to see that the person saying a word "wrong" is also using a correct pronunciation. (sometimes) ;)
 
2013-04-18 05:36:52 PM  

namegoeshere: NkThrasher: FizixJunkee: [i.chzbgr.com image 456x570]

Barrow?

It's a bloody half of a barrel with wheels.  It's a farking wheel-barrel.

/First time I've ever noticed it as being 'barrow', right there.
//Had to google to figure out which angle of the image was funny.

I always knew it was barrow, because I grew up pronouncing it with the w very faint, almost not there. Not quite barroh, but something in between. I never knew people thought it was wheel barrel.


I grew up in rural Oklahoma.  The default pronunciation there for this object is "wheel barrel."
 
2013-04-18 05:37:17 PM  
I admit I mangle prescription and prerogative
 
2013-04-18 05:52:26 PM  

Walker: OFTEN
Incorrect pronunciation: off - ten

Correct pronunciation: off - en

 Oh, I'm not going along with this one. I see a "T" so I'm pronouncing it.
If you say it "Off-en" THEN you sound like you are from Alabama.
"Hey ya'll, I offen go huntin with my ma and Pa"


Correct usage is : Hey paw, get offen me yer crushin mah smokes!
 
2013-04-18 05:59:23 PM  
Off-ten:  you can always go with the poetic version --> Oft
From Marriam-Websters online dictionary:
 Oft - Origin
     Middle English, from Old English; akin to Old High German ofto often
     First Known Use: before 12th century
 Oft - Sample usage
     as I have oft said, you need to look before you leap
 
2013-04-18 06:13:48 PM  
Jagwire.
 
2013-04-18 06:17:21 PM  
Trio, Tri-
Incorrect pronunciation: tr-ee-o, tr-ee
Correct pronunciation: tr-eye-o (or tr-i-o), or Tr-eye (Tr-i)

Most often said incorrectly when used at the end of a name, like "cold cut tr-ee-o" (think Subway). And yet, most people don't say "tree state area", they say "tr-i state area".

I mean, for fark's sake, you pronounce the i like an i, and NOT like you're referring to an "ee".

Goes the same for triplicate and triple. Do you really say "tr-ee-plicate" and "tr-ee-ple"?? Didn't think so.
 
2013-04-18 06:21:08 PM  
The most common words I heard in while in Texas were:
  fixin to
  usedtacould (spelling?)
  mightcould
  your'n (spelling? - you are in)
  aw-ite
  axe
 
2013-04-18 06:23:10 PM  

Oldiron_79: Dont forget people that pronounce Missouri Missourah.


Only news people and politicians who aren't from there, though.
 
2013-04-18 06:24:42 PM  
Meh...the French-ified version of espresso is "expresso"
 
2013-04-18 06:25:44 PM  

LDM90: Oldiron_79: Dont forget people that pronounce Missouri Missourah.

Only news people and politicians who aren't from there, though.


And my grandmother who was from southern Iowa.
 
2013-04-18 06:26:39 PM  
imageshack.us
 
2013-04-18 06:31:15 PM  

namegoeshere: But really, the important linguistic question is Grinder? Sub? Hero? Dagwood?

/team Grinder


Poboy?  Bomber sandwich?  Hoagie?  Zep?
 
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