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(Primer Magazine)   Common words that when you say them make people think you're from Alabama   (primermagazine.com) divider line 380
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2013-04-18 03:23:23 PM

FrancoFile: Strik3r: NUCLEAR
Incorrect pronunciation: nuke - you - lerr

Correct pronunciation: new - clee - err

I'm going to try to get through this one without a President Bush joke. All right, so, despite the fact that it's 2008, this is a word with which we're somehow still struggling. Like most of the words on this list, "nuclear" is spelled EXACTLY AS IT IS SUPPOSED TO BE PRONOUNCED and yet, people continue to screw it up worse than the War in Iraq... oh, dammit.

^^^^  THIS

There's an obvious explanation for this.

"nuke" is shorthand for "cook in the microwave".  Everyone says "nuke" a dozen times a week.  Then they try to transition back to the root word, and can't shove the 'l' into that first syllable.

"nuke" - "ular"  is like jocular, ocular, popular, etc.


There is no L in the first syllable of nuclear.
 
2013-04-18 03:23:59 PM

AdrienVeidt: Water != Wooder.


Of course not. It's WAR dur. You use it to do the WARSH. (at least in South Jersey)
 
2013-04-18 03:26:08 PM
If you pronounce 'Pepsi' or 'Mountain Dew' as 'Coke', you might be from Alabama...
 
2013-04-18 03:27:45 PM

puckrock2000: netcentric: "If you're using words like "snuck," "brang," or "irregardless," (no, none of those are real words)...  "

Wtf ?   That's unpossible.

H'aint ?

Well, according to the Random House Dictionary, "First recorded in writing toward the end of the 19th century in the United States, snuck has become in recent decades a standard variant past tense and past participle of the verb sneak".
So if people have been using it that way for over a century, then yes, it's a real word.


'Snuck' is a perfectly cromulent word.
 
2013-04-18 03:27:55 PM

Mr Guy: FLMountainMan: My wife doesn't have much of an accent, but she does say:

holler - hollow

That's a new one on me.  Around here, "holler" is how you get someone's attention if they ignore you the first time.


It is an Appalachian-ism, and it is correspondingly ancient (well, in US terms)
 
2013-04-18 03:28:03 PM
Des Plaines, IL
Des Moines, IA
 
2013-04-18 03:28:34 PM
Dude needs to pour a cup of purple drank and chill.
 
2013-04-18 03:28:39 PM
Then there's my Canadian friend who insists on pronouncing "pasta" like "Shasta."   Of course, I cut him slack precisely because he's from Canada.
 
2013-04-18 03:28:46 PM
I read FTA...I don't understand the quession.

/It's "QUESTION", people!
//With a 'T'
///peeve...not necessarily pet
 
2013-04-18 03:29:02 PM
 one from the north I know commonly mispronounced: Massachusetts

Way everyone else pronounces: Mass-a-chew-sits

A native from there: Mass-a-too-sets
 
2013-04-18 03:29:32 PM

CheekyMonkey: puckrock2000: netcentric: "If you're using words like "snuck," "brang," or "irregardless," (no, none of those are real words)...  "

Wtf ?   That's unpossible.

H'aint ?

Well, according to the Random House Dictionary, "First recorded in writing toward the end of the 19th century in the United States, snuck has become in recent decades a standard variant past tense and past participle of the verb sneak".
So if people have been using it that way for over a century, then yes, it's a real word.

'Snuck' is a perfectly cromulent word.


I am embiggened by that.
 
2013-04-18 03:29:53 PM
Realtor

Wrong:  Ree-la-tor
Correct: Reel-tor

"Alls I know" v. "All I know"
 
2013-04-18 03:30:33 PM
Common words that when you say them make people think you're from Alabama African American

ASK

Incorrect: Ax

Correct: ASS KUH
 
2013-04-18 03:31:34 PM

tripleseven: Inflatable Rhetoric: ChrisDe: sandrich

Good point.  It's sammidge.

No, it's "Sangwich"


He just smiled, and gave me a Vegemite Sand Wedge...
 
2013-04-18 03:32:02 PM
Splenda is a brand of artificial sweetener. it is not "splender"

"lets get situated"... do you put an apostrophe in that? I use it all the time... Its "let us"... I have never figured out how to properly edit it.
 
2013-04-18 03:32:08 PM

ph0rk: Mr Guy: FLMountainMan: My wife doesn't have much of an accent, but she does say:

holler - hollow

That's a new one on me.  Around here, "holler" is how you get someone's attention if they ignore you the first time.

It is an Appalachian-ism, and it is correspondingly ancient (well, in US terms)


Seems like it needs to be used with the southern pronoun, "them/that-thar".

As in, "Gimme one of themthar holler jugs for mah whis-skay".
 
2013-04-18 03:33:59 PM

brandent: namegoeshere: HortusMatris: puckrock2000: netcentric: "If you're using words like "snuck," "brang," or "irregardless," (no, none of those are real words)...  "

Wtf ?   That's unpossible.

H'aint ?

Well, according to the Random House Dictionary, "First recorded in writing toward the end of the 19th century in the United States, snuck has become in recent decades a standard variant past tense and past participle of the verb sneak".
So if people have been using it that way for over a century, then yes, it's a real word.

^This^

Snuck is so a real word!

I'll give you snuck, but goddammitsomuch I will never surrender to "irregardless!"

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/irregardless

Irregardless of the fact it's been around 100 years?


Syphilis has been around a lot longer, but I'm not about to embrace that, either.
 
2013-04-18 03:34:01 PM

GanjSmokr: I want to pronounce forte (strong point) properly ("fort"), but then people don't know what the hell I'm saying so I end up just pronouncing it incorrectly (like the musical term - "fort-ay").


Geroge Carlin and I agree with you. I say forte (silent e) anyway, just in the hope they'll try and correct me. Of course, most dictionaries now say that both pronounciations are correct. The first pronounciation is still [fort], though.

[for•tay] is a musical term.
 
2013-04-18 03:34:26 PM

El Brujo: FLMountainMan: El Brujo: People say Louisville like "lewellville" to my ears.

I recently read it as "Lewisville" before I realized I was wrong.

/have no reason to visit that part of the country.

It's sad if you're so close-minded you wouldn't even think about going there.I've been all over the country and a few places overseas.  Louisville is one of my favorite cities.  Seriously, I'd put it in my top five (probably would go Miami, Granada Nicaragua, DC, Savannah, then Louisville). Great people, really cool architecture, tons of bourbons at every bar, I was really surprised how much I liked it.

I'm sure it's got it's qualities. Most places do. I've visited almost every state (KY too), but there are only a few I feel the need to rerun to. I'd go if I had a reason to, I suppose.


If you ever have a reason, check it out.  I had the same expectations you did and was pleasantly surprised.  BTW - love the Pacific NW, especially the Mt. St. Helens area.  I must say though, your white people are really, really, really white.
 
2013-04-18 03:35:29 PM
"Buck naked" should never be pronounced "butt nekkid".

Also:

Wedding video
Graduation video
Funny YouTube video
Disaster video
Sex  tape?

Almost only
when it's sex does the media and populace at large call a digitally-shot video a "tape".
 
2013-04-18 03:37:26 PM
In the south: axe=ask
 
2013-04-18 03:38:23 PM

cbathrob: "Oft-ten" is a major pet peeve of mine, but it's become so common that I sound uneducated for pronouncing it "offen."

On the other hand, I got so used to saying "lie-berry" for library, in an ironic, Homer Simpson type voice, that I now use that pronunciation automatically.  My seven year-old corrected me on it, FFS!  Yes, son, Daddy talks like he's in kindergarten...just aks anyone.


HAHA. Something similar happened to me recently at a party with my intentional use of (should be a word) "boughten"

It was only marginally amusing until  I responded to her quizzical look with a completely deadpan "It's a perfectly cromulent word"
 
2013-04-18 03:38:37 PM

TheDumbBlonde: downstairs: FizixJunkee: Ref: How Australians say "no." Apparently, a, e, i, o, and u are all pronounced in this simple word.

Ha!  So true.  1/2 my family lives there.  "no" goes something like "noaye!"

We make fun of each others accents when they visit.  Apparently they think Americans talk funny too.

/All in good fun

My friends that are local to Houston, Texas say "U-ston".


Oh God.  Tony Kornheiser says YOU-ston and SARAH-cuse and occasionally makes PTI unwatchable.
 
2013-04-18 03:39:10 PM

netcentric: "hubiestubert: English is a riotous profusion of forms "

Mrs. Klisher ?


Oddly enough, I do speak Southern in a few forms, from South Carolina, Florida and Louisiana.
 
2013-04-18 03:39:18 PM

Mr Guy: ph0rk: Mr Guy: FLMountainMan: My wife doesn't have much of an accent, but she does say:

holler - hollow

That's a new one on me.  Around here, "holler" is how you get someone's attention if they ignore you the first time.

It is an Appalachian-ism, and it is correspondingly ancient (well, in US terms)

Seems like it needs to be used with the southern pronoun, "them/that-thar".

As in, "Gimme one of themthar holler jugs for mah whis-skay".


A holler (spelled hollow) is a small valley in the mountains. You live in Beaver Holler.
 
2013-04-18 03:40:13 PM
Northeast US, caaaah=car  the hoppah=the hopper,  yoose=you
 
2013-04-18 03:41:21 PM
To hell I say! I had a friend that would try extremely hard to sound cultured (He would study British dialect and such). To the point where I started pronouncing words oddly in our conversations just to get under his skin.

Examples:

Both  -> Bolth
Comfortable -> Cum Fort A Bull
Theater -> The Ate Err
 
2013-04-18 03:41:34 PM
But really, the important linguistic question is Grinder? Sub? Hero? Dagwood?

/team Grinder
 
2013-04-18 03:42:27 PM
Winder v. window

Warsh v. wash
 
2013-04-18 03:42:38 PM

James_Dean_64: also AFF-lete


Not exactly a southern thing, more hip-hop urban slang.  "Th" sounds within a word (not the beginning) are replaced with "f"....such as "baffroom".

We had a trainer for APC do a session, and he was a caucasion New Yorker.  Every word he said with "th" in it was pronounced with the "f" sound....except words with the sound at the beginning, such as "that" or "this".   For those he used a "d" sound..."dis" or "dat".

That dude said stuff like "You put dis wiff dat, and you get da sum.  Let's take a baffroom break."
 
2013-04-18 03:42:58 PM
Off-ten is staying. I'm seriously not changing it.

TheDumbBlonde: My friends that are local to Houston, Texas say "U-ston".


In NYC we pronounce it "House-ton". EXCEPT for the city. Which is Hue-ston. But you can always tell when someone is not from New York when they mispronounce the street.
 
2013-04-18 03:43:11 PM

Slutter McGee: This is stupid. The way people speak is in no way a reflection of intelligence. If you think so then you are probably some idiot northern liberal. Dialect is something that is engrained in a person since child birth. Often this includes so called mispronunciation.

It isn't something thats easy to change.

Grammar in writing is something to judge people on. Judging somebody on different (incorrect or not) ways of pronunciation is just stupid. And I think most linguists would agree.

Slutter McGee


INgrained.

\retard
 
2013-04-18 03:43:13 PM

Pants full of macaroni!!: Fun Fact:  The first syllable of the name Xavier is "ig".

Xavier is pronounced " zavier

"

Being a graduate of St F X   (S t  Francis Xavier University ) , four years of hearing this i know the pronunciation .
 
2013-04-18 03:44:47 PM

cajunns: Pants full of macaroni!!: Fun Fact:  The first syllable of the name Xavier is "ig".

Xavier is pronounced " zavier"

Being a graduate of St F X   (S t  Francis Xavier University ) , four years of hearing this i know the pronunciation .


Sometimes also pronounced as "zah-vee-air"
 
2013-04-18 03:44:54 PM
I suspect that the pronunciation of "often" is currently evolving, which means that some people are still pronouncing it as it is spelled (because it is spelled the way it was pronounced when the spelling was decided upon) and other people are slurring it, dropping the "t" as people so often do, because it is easier that way. The latter will soon be accusing the former of having it wrong instead of vice-versa, the way the British accuse Americans and Canadians of "pronouncing things the way they are spelled"

I DO NOT PRONOUNCE WORDS THE WAY THEY ARE SPELLED, ESPECIALLY WORDS THAT I DID NOT LEARN FROM A BOOK. I PRONOUNCE WORDS THE WAY DR. SAMUEL JOHNSON CHOSE TO SPELL THEM,  AND SO DID HE. Because that is the way they were pronounced by the British or at least many British at the time English immigrated to North America in the mouths of my ancestors and yours.

I would say both pronunciations are therefore correct for now.

The old pronunciation of Athlete has two syllables and is spelled exactly as it is pronounced. But rather than dropping a sound, people are perversely adding one. Why? Because they don't like having three consonants in a row -thl-, or rather, one diphthong and a consonant. They are adding an extra vowel to make the rule that each syllable must have a vowel and each vowel a syllable apply. Technically, they have turned one syllable into two the same way as we do with "rhythm" BECAUSE YOU CAN'T PRONOUNCE IT AS ONE.   The syllable is a marriage between one vowel and one consonant. Anything else is pre-verted.

Well, diphthong isn't easy either, but like athlete, you can pronounce it if you make a physical effort. But look how weird it looks spelled correctly.  Aren't you tempted to turn it into dip-thong? I know I am.

Of course, the same analysis is true of many shifts in pronunciation, including some that annoy some people very much and which they will irrationally fight tooth and claw until the day they die, even after a very large majority of people have made the transition.

This is normal. Linguists make a living studying these shifts and making "rules" that describe them. Whole new languages have been produced by such shifts, such as Modern Dutch from Old Low German, bits of English from Old German or Old Norse, and even Latin and Greek from some proto-language between them and Indo-European.

I sometimes use the "wrong" pronunciation of athelete myself but lean towards the two-syllable version of Athlete. But that is not pronunciation. It is etymology. The Greek word had two syllables, but there is no law that says the English can't perversely make it three or even one. They made a norange into an orange, so making athlete into a thlete would be par for the course.

I never say "excape" or "ex cetera" but am trying to break myself of "expresso" which I agree should remain espresso, the same as the correct Italian pronunciation. Why? Because Italian is cool and also because it is very precisely pronounced (at least by educated Italians), so that the spelling and the pronunciation almost always match. This is good. And rare. I appreciate it. Thanks, Italy!

If you say all three of these words with an ex- instead of an ess, you may be from Brooklyn rather than Alabama.  I ax yah. Which is worse? Definitely Alabama. Brooklynese is so cute. Too bad it seems to be dying out.

There is a tendency for pre- to become per-. Ax the Perfessor and I'll tell you to go ax a linguist. It is so.

Presumably it makes more sense (unconsciously) or it is simply easier. These shifts are often due to a false analogy which over time becomes true by virtue of dominating statistically. Lots of perfectly cromulent new or old words have become falsely attached to the wrong models of pronunciation or etymology or semantics because people thought the two words were related and thus should be the same. The easy and obvious explanation of a word's origin and meaning is often misleading and false. This is true of popular derivations and such pseudo-acronyms as "news".

NEWS is not an acronym for the points of the compass. It is derived from "new" not the cardinal directions. It was first used in print in The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespear. What news? might simply be a misprint for What's new? Or it might be the Englishing of Quelles nouvelles?, which which is French and plural where "new" was always singular in English until the time of Shakespeare. Shakspeer. Shakespear. Spell checker thinks that two of the known six spellings of Bill's name in his own hand are correct.

The author of this article (exceptionally) is only wrong or possibly wrong about two common errors of pronunciation. MINE. The rest of these errors do make you sound ignorant or at least from somewhere in the sticks, boondocks, back woods, back streets, or wherever people talk all wrong.

The mispronunciation of candidate makes you sound like a hick.

The mispronunciation of nuclear makes people want to nuke you, which is one of many reasons why liberals often hate or ridicule George Bush (my tenth cousin, insufficiently removed).

The mispronuncation of utmost seems like a feat of perversity, but it is probably just "mishearing". Obviously these people think the utmost is upper most. It isn't up. It is far, far away, further than anything else of its kind, like Utmost Thule, which may have been that part of Ireland or Britain called "Greenland" by the Viking, Eric the Real Estate Dealer. It is the Utmost North Western point in the Roman world. Or not. Utmost Thule might also be Scandinavia. A number of similar errors fail to come to mind, so I won't state them.

True, Greenland and Ireland are upper most on the map, but that, as some World Southerners and their allies will argue, is because Europeans hold their maps upside down.

I don't see how this is possible, seeing as the Europeans call the East East and the West West the same as Chinese and Japanese do. If they were holding the map upside down, East would be West and West would be East, and never the twain would meet. Wait. What? I have over-reached myself I think. Time to stop was about 500 words ago.

Thank God I gave this post a thorough proof-reading rather than doing that after I post it, because frankly, it is a loo-loo which was stuffed with many inexplicable errors that suggest Malapropism or verbal dyslexia.
 
2013-04-18 03:45:08 PM

cbathrob: Then there's my Canadian friend who insists on pronouncing "pasta" like "Shasta."   Of course, I cut him slack precisely because he's from Canada.


They do a lot of words with the "ah" sound like that.  Last time I went to Canada I was amused to learn that they pronounce Nissan "nee-san", rhyming the second syllable with "pan".  A little jarring to hear it in radio ads for car dealerships.
 
2013-04-18 03:45:46 PM
To those who don't read or can't abide long posts, Brantgoose says "Boo!"
 
2013-04-18 03:46:40 PM

People_are_Idiots: one from the north I know commonly mispronounced: Massachusetts

Way everyone else pronounces: Mass-a-chew-sits

A native with an obvious speech impediment, or who just wanted to fark with you from there: Mass-a-too-sets


FTFY.

/nobody here pronounces it "Mass-a-too-sets"
//Masshole
 
2013-04-18 03:47:25 PM
Lie-berry makes me want to strangle a moron. It's library, damn!
 
2013-04-18 03:47:45 PM

Pants full of macaroni!!: cbathrob: Then there's my Canadian friend who insists on pronouncing "pasta" like "Shasta."   Of course, I cut him slack precisely because he's from Canada.

They do a lot of words with the "ah" sound like that.  Last time I went to Canada I was amused to learn that they pronounce Nissan "nee-san", rhyming the second syllable with "pan".  A little jarring to hear it in radio ads for car dealerships.


Hyundee Hyundai Hyunday?
 
2013-04-18 03:47:49 PM

namegoeshere: Mr Guy: ph0rk: Mr Guy: FLMountainMan: My wife doesn't have much of an accent, but she does say:

holler - hollow

That's a new one on me.  Around here, "holler" is how you get someone's attention if they ignore you the first time.

It is an Appalachian-ism, and it is correspondingly ancient (well, in US terms)

Seems like it needs to be used with the southern pronoun, "them/that-thar".

As in, "Gimme one of themthar holler jugs for mah whis-skay".

A holler (spelled hollow) is a small valley in the mountains. You live in Beaver Holler.


Oh wow.  THAT use.  I guess I am southern, it didn't even occur to me to use it that way, because I don't even consider that incorrect usage.  I'd have probably had to think about it before I told you the correct name WAS Hollow, as in Sleepy Hollow, and not holler.

//Has a love deeper than the holler, stronger than the river
 
2013-04-18 03:49:58 PM

Strik3r: NUCLEAR
Incorrect pronunciation: nuke - you - lerr

Correct pronunciation: new - clee - err

I'm going to try to get through this one without a President Bush joke.


Actually, Jimmy Carter said it that way, too, a fact that many Democrats conveniently forget.  Jimmy Carter has even less of an excuse, since he served on a nuclear sub.  He was roundly mocked by *Republican* elites for it, back in the day.

Pronouncing "ask" as "axe" is something I usually associate with African-American Vernacular English, but AAVE as spoken across the U.S. is heavily influenced by Southern American English, and I'm a damnyankee who doesn't often get to experience the speech of less-educated Southern whites.
 
2013-04-18 03:51:39 PM
I never say "irregardless".

I prefer "irregardlessly" or "irregardlesslier" because it has more of the desired impact on the victim.  If I see a throbbing vein in the temple, I know I've succeeded.

In writing, there are even more options.  For example, I can start a sentence like this:

  "Irregardlessly, that beg's the question..."

Wonderful, concentrated, verbal evil.
 
2013-04-18 03:51:52 PM
I'm going to take it for granite that many of you mispronounce the second month of the year. It's Feb-er-ary. Get it right or you'll look like a maroon.

Feb-er-ary.
 
2013-04-18 03:51:56 PM

cbathrob: And don't get me started on those who insist that "almonds" really rhymes with "Hammonds."


Say wut? Don't they both end "uh nds"?
 
2013-04-18 03:54:02 PM

namegoeshere: But really, the important linguistic question is Grinder? Sub? Hero? Dagwood?

/team Grinder


A Dagwood is on regular bread, not a hoagie bun. It's a completely different kind of sammich altogether.

/but I will go with 'Sub', if you're counting crows.
 
2013-04-18 03:54:07 PM

geekbikerskum: Strik3r: NUCLEAR
Incorrect pronunciation: nuke - you - lerr

Correct pronunciation: new - clee - err

I'm going to try to get through this one without a President Bush joke.

Actually, Jimmy Carter said it that way, too, a fact that many Democrats conveniently forget.  Jimmy Carter has even less of an excuse, since he served on a nuclear sub.  He was roundly mocked by *Republican* elites for it, back in the day.


.....As he should have been.
 
2013-04-18 03:56:29 PM

brantgoose: I suspect that the pronunciation of "often" is currently evolving, which means that some people are still pronouncing it as it is spelled (because it is spelled the way it was pronounced when the spelling was decided upon) and other people are slurring it, dropping the "t" as people so often do, because it is easier that way. The latter will soon be accusing the former of having it wrong instead of vice-versa, the way the British accuse Americans and Canadians of "pronouncing things the way they are spelled"


Close.  That was the only pronunciation I didn't agree with, so I did a little digging.  I posted this same information above, but rather than paraphrase I'm just going to copypasta:

According to Random House:
Often' was pronounced with a t-sound until the 17th century, when a pronunciation without the [t] came to predominate in the speech of the educated, in both North America and Great Britain, and the earlier pronunciation fell into disfavor. Common use of a spelling pronunciation has since restored the [t] for many speakers, and today /ˈɔfən/[aw-fuh and /ˈɔf[awf-tuhn] or /ˈɒfən/[of-uhn] and [of-tuhn] exist side by side. Although it is still sometimes criticized, 'often' with a /t/[t] is now so widely heard from educated speakers that it has become fully standard once again.
 
2013-04-18 03:56:48 PM
Ant vs AUnt
 
2013-04-18 03:57:21 PM

FLMountainMan: El Brujo: FLMountainMan: El Brujo: People say Louisville like "lewellville" to my ears.

I recently read it as "Lewisville" before I realized I was wrong.

/have no reason to visit that part of the country.

It's sad if you're so close-minded you wouldn't even think about going there.I've been all over the country and a few places overseas.  Louisville is one of my favorite cities.  Seriously, I'd put it in my top five (probably would go Miami, Granada Nicaragua, DC, Savannah, then Louisville). Great people, really cool architecture, tons of bourbons at every bar, I was really surprised how much I liked it.

I'm sure it's got it's qualities. Most places do. I've visited almost every state (KY too), but there are only a few I feel the need to rerun to. I'd go if I had a reason to, I suppose.

If you ever have a reason, check it out.  I had the same expectations you did and was pleasantly surprised.  BTW - love the Pacific NW, especially the Mt. St. Helens area.   I must say though, your white people are really, really, really white.


Yes, we do white well in the PNW.
 
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