Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Florida Today)   Power outage strikes yet another Carnival ship. This time it is the Carnival Three Days Dancing Naked In The Desert   (floridatoday.com) divider line 28
    More: Stupid, Carnival Cruise Lines, Port Canaveral, fairs, Carnival Ecstasy, power outages, emergency power system, Carnival Triumph, cruise ships  
•       •       •

4900 clicks; posted to Business » on 18 Apr 2013 at 11:27 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



28 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2013-04-18 11:16:41 AM  
Carnival on Wednesday announced plans for a massive, $300 million upgrade to emergency power systems, fire systems and engine-related electrical components on its 24 ships to prevent a repeat of what happened on the Carnival Triumph.

You should have read their full of BS press release. A sample:

"All of Carnival Cruise Lines' ships operate safely today. Each vessel already has effective systems in place to prevent, detect and respond to emergency situations, and we meet or exceed all regulatory requirements," said Gerry Cahill, president and CEO of Carnival Cruise Lines.

O RLY?

"Although every ship in our fleet currently has emergency back-up power which is designed to enable the continuous operation of safety equipment and some hotel services, it is our intent to significantly bolster that back-up power to support the core hotel services. With this improvement, we will better ensure guest comfort in the rare instance of a loss of main power," said Cahill.

Your ship was dead in the water with NO POWER, back-up or otherwise. It had to be towed and poop was running down the walls. STOP LYING.
 
2013-04-18 11:30:52 AM  
Somewhere the executive who gave a power point on "Savings Generated By Rationalizing Ship Maintenance Procedures" is deleting that power point file and checking exactly what his exit options are.

/rationalizing of course is a code word for cutting
 
2013-04-18 11:55:57 AM  
Reliability Centered Maintenance, how does it work?
 
2013-04-18 12:01:47 PM  
I'm getting tired of subsidizing cruise line operations and all these people's vacations.
 
2013-04-18 12:11:06 PM  
Love, exciting and newCome Aboard. We're expecting you.

Love, life's sweetest reward.Let it flow, it floats back to you.

The Love Boat soon will be making another run

The Love Boat promises something for everyone

Set a course for adventure,Your mind on a new romance.

Love won't hurt anymore It's an open smile on a friendly shore.
 
2013-04-18 12:23:59 PM  

Walker: Carnival on Wednesday announced plans for a massive, $300 million upgrade to emergency power systems, fire systems and engine-related electrical components on its 24 ships to prevent a repeat of what happened on the Carnival Triumph.

You should have read their full of BS press release. A sample:

"All of Carnival Cruise Lines' ships operate safely today. Each vessel already has effective systems in place to prevent, detect and respond to emergency situations, and we meet or exceed all regulatory requirements," said Gerry Cahill, president and CEO of Carnival Cruise Lines.

O RLY?

"Although every ship in our fleet currently has emergency back-up power which is designed to enable the continuous operation of safety equipment and some hotel services, it is our intent to significantly bolster that back-up power to support the core hotel services. With this improvement, we will better ensure guest comfort in the rare instance of a loss of main power," said Cahill.

Your ship was dead in the water with NO POWER, back-up or otherwise. It had to be towed and poop was running down the walls. STOP LYING.


Are there ANY regulatory requirements in the countries where these ships are registered?
 
2013-04-18 12:26:17 PM  
images.zap2it.com

E?
 
2013-04-18 01:15:44 PM  
If we can't bill the cruise lines directly, why don't we sent the invoices for rescue to the countries that they are registered in? Surely there must be some precedent for this.
 
2013-04-18 01:22:51 PM  
Cant the Coast Gaurd board the ship and conduct a safety inspection anytime it is in US territorisl waters?

I say do it, and cursory. Bring out the white silk gloves
 
2013-04-18 01:23:44 PM  

DORMAMU: Cant the Coast Gaurd board the ship and conduct a safety inspection anytime it is in US territorisl waters?

I say do it, and cursory. Bring out the white silk gloves


NOT cursory. NOT

/damnit
 
2013-04-18 01:56:55 PM  
There's a Carnival Burning Man?   Larry Harvey is gonna sue....oh  that OTHER "dancing naked in the desert" festival...my bad
 
2013-04-18 01:57:37 PM  
12 minute outage. Well whoopdee do.
 
2013-04-18 02:04:50 PM  

Russ1642: 12 minute outage. Well whoopdee do.


Was 12 minutes enough for the cruisegoers to start painting the walls with dookie?
 
2013-04-18 02:08:21 PM  

wooden_badger: Are there ANY regulatory requirements in the countries where these ships are registered?


Yes all passenger ships must adhere to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) when they are built after that it falls to the company keeping their ships in good repair.  Carnival is not keeping their ships in good repair.
 
2013-04-18 03:26:52 PM  

Walker: "Although every ship in our fleet currently has emergency back-up power which is designed to enable the continuous operation of safety equipment and some hotel services, it is our intent to significantly bolster that back-up power to support the core hotel services. With this improvement, we will better ensure guest comfort in the rare instance of a loss of main power," said Cahill.

Your ship was dead in the water with NO POWER, back-up or otherwise. It had to be towed and poop was running down the walls. STOP LYING.


If you look at their statement, they didn't say anything about being able to power propulsion and only alluded to some hotel services; which I would guess would be fresh air delivery, reduced lighting, and fresh water delivery. From all accounts, what they're saying isn't a lie - the ship's fire systems, communications and basic systems were still powered. What consumes massive amounts of energy on board are the hotel's food preparations, propulsion and water desalination systems. Interestingly, most ships have to slow down ~25% in the evenings to handle the increased electrical loads of the hotel operations cooking dinners and from passengers getting ready for the evening (blow dryers, showers, etc).

As someone who's gone on a couple dozen cruises, and taken "behind the scenes" tours of most of the ships, I know a few things about their backup systems. Most modern cruise ship afloat have two main, locomotive sized, supercharged diesel engines aboard, and a backup power system (typically a turbine, up near the exhaust stacks, away from the main engine room). If something goes wrong in the main engine room, say a fire, explosion, etc - the turbine kicks on to power essential systems like emergency lighting, communications and fire systems. Emergency systems aren't there for passenger comfort - all the redundant systems are dedicated to saving the ship, not to give passengers fresh ice cream.

I've seen these systems operate several times, due to various reasons, on almost every major cruise line. Large ships are huge machines, operating 24/7. Regardless of how well maintained, things unexpectedly go wrong.

Just for giggles, here's some snaps of behind the scene's safety systems I took recently aboard an older Holland America ship (who are owned by Carnival), aboard the MS Oosterdam:

Water tight doors in the crew area:
sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net

Fire control systems, bridge:
sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net

Main engineering room:
sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net
 
2013-04-18 04:19:16 PM  
I was on the Carnival Ecstasy two years ago.  Ripoff.  You would think they had punchbowls of the stuff around, but no, you had to bring your own drugs.  Bummer.
 
2013-04-18 08:15:24 PM  

MrSteve007: Main engineering room:


Perhaps not surprisingly, that looks like the control room at a power plant. I wasn't expecting it to be so modern; I had a mental image of the old WWII-era battleship engine rooms for some reason.
 
2013-04-18 09:27:53 PM  
I saw the Ecstasy across the pier from us... I was on the Disney Dream at the time. The Ecstasy looked like a POS next to us... outdated, tiny, not even all that well kept up by comparison.

Can't say I'm surprised, especially considering Carnival's problems keeping their boats, you know, WORKING.
 
2013-04-18 10:30:46 PM  

zenobia: I'm getting tired of subsidizing cruise line operations and all these people's vacations.


Why I'm all for throwing poop at Carnival there was nothing in this incident that involved the use of government funds.
 
2013-04-18 11:25:19 PM  
Three Days Dancing Naked In The Desert....

I might have done that with Hunter S. Thompson and Kurt Cobain, or that might have been the mushrooms.
 
2013-04-19 12:05:19 AM  

heypete: MrSteve007: Main engineering room:

Perhaps not surprisingly, that looks like the control room at a power plant. I wasn't expecting it to be so modern; I had a mental image of the old WWII-era battleship engine rooms for some reason.


I'd really want a window.  Hell if I'm parking it I want a remote control and to lean out the port window.
 
2013-04-19 01:29:09 AM  

Zarquon's Flat Tire: I'd really want a window. Hell if I'm parking it I want a remote control and to lean out the port window.


Funny you mention that. I snapped this picture from the starboard docking control station of the wing of the bridge (they have one on the port side too). It might be a little hard to see, but on the bottom right of the photo, you can see the clear lexan that they stand on, so they can get a perfect view, straight down, of how close the hull is getting to the pier, while docking. All the knobs and levers control the speed/direction of the aft azipods and bow thruster.

sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net

They also rigged this sucker up on the bridge. The left meter is the cost of fuel, per minute. Considering this was on a 35-day cruise, with some 22 days traveling at this rate at sea, you can imagine the fuel bill they rack up.
sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net
 
2013-04-19 09:13:50 AM  

MrSteve007: They also rigged this sucker up on the bridge. The left meter is the cost of fuel, per minute. Considering this was on a 35-day cruise, with some 22 days traveling at this rate at sea, you can imagine the fuel bill they rack up.


I like the English/metric mixing on the right-hand display. I just hope they aren't going to be trying to send probes to Mars or fly planes across Canada.
 
2013-04-19 09:43:23 AM  

heypete: MrSteve007: Main engineering room:

Perhaps not surprisingly, that looks like the control room at a power plant. I wasn't expecting it to be so modern; I had a mental image of the old WWII-era battleship engine rooms for some reason.


For a power plant, that would be old (60's/70's vintage with a few refits).  Control rooms at power plants don't have bench boards anymore, analog gauges, and very few push-buttons.  Most today look like a horseshoe of stacked monitors with mice and keyboards and a few large screens, since they are all completely computer driven (the only exception would be the nuclear power industry).
i.imgur.com
 
2013-04-19 09:45:05 AM  

Fubegra: I like the English/metric mixing on the right-hand display. I just hope they aren't going to be trying to send probes to Mars or fly planes across Canada.


I don't think it's mixing English/metric. All distances when traveling across the ocean (and air) are measured in nautical miles - since that is the only distance measurement that matches up with longitudinal lines on the globe; aka. longitude arc minutes. By international treaties, it's universal across all countries.

/even in Canada
 
2013-04-19 09:52:00 AM  

OrionXVI: For a power plant, that would be old (60's/70's vintage with a few refits). Control rooms at power plants don't have bench boards anymore, analog gauges, and very few push-buttons. Most today look like a horseshoe of stacked monitors with mice and keyboards and a few large screens, since they are all completely computer driven (the only exception would be the nuclear power industry).


Those indicators, peaking from the wall behind the monitors, look pretty old school.

Unlike terrestrial based power plants, ships go into situations with rough seas, where the room can be pitching 40 degrees in either direction. I could understand why they'd want a bigass, physical representation on all the main systems and junctions - with a heavy duty grab rail in front. I could only imagine trying to use a keyboard and mouse in 50' seas.
 
2013-04-19 10:16:30 AM  

MrSteve007: I don't think it's mixing English/metric. All distances when traveling across the ocean (and air) are measured in nautical miles - since that is the only distance measurement that matches up with longitudinal lines on the globe; aka. longitude arc minutes. By international treaties, it's universal across all countries.

/even in Canada


Ah, yes, forgot about nautical vs. statute miles.

As for planes across Canada, the Gimli Glider incident resulted from a bad English/metric conversion...
 
2013-04-19 01:20:12 PM  
Carnival is a perfect example of what is wrong with US business.

Incorporate offshore to avoid taxes, cozy up to the relatively wealthy US consumer, hire workers from the 3rd world.  When shiat hits the fan try and find a way for the US taxpayer to foot the bill. (in this case the money spent by the US coast guard to rescue that ship)
 
Displayed 28 of 28 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report