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(NBC News)   With up to 15 people dead and dozens injured, Texas explosion aftermath described as "like a war zone". America hasn't seen scenes like this since...well, since Monday actually, but it's been an unusual week   (usnews.nbcnews.com) divider line 165
    More: Followup, Texas, human leg  
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5264 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Apr 2013 at 11:58 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-18 12:28:42 PM

Bashar and Asma's Infinite Playlist: This was a bad week to finish up the first season of Homeland. "Oh what's on the news? Crowds of civilians being blown up. Let's watch some Netflix. Oh, it's more civilians being blown up... Can we just watch Girls instead?"


Lena Dunham blown up there too.

/I'd still hit it
//like 4000 tons of fertilizer
 
2013-04-18 12:29:16 PM

rocinante721: What caused the explosions, chemically?

I get the nitrates (oxygenator) in the fertilizer, but what was the accelerant (ie. fuel)?

/curious chemist


Isn't ammonium nitrate, even without another component present, a pretty explosive material?  A fire or even a smaller detonation could have easily set it off and produced...ridiculous results.  AN has an explosive velocity almost equal to TNT.
 
2013-04-18 12:32:20 PM
I think it's time for some actual regulations, but, with previous evidence, any company that might not benefit from these regulations will probably lobby against it.

I can understand here in Mexico, do I like it? No, and I'm one of the few architects/civil engineers that try to uphold the law when it comes to construction and/or design, even if most of my buildings are residential, but how do you guys let these things happen in the US? It's supposed to be a more progressive country, more advanced (supposedly) when it comes to building regulations.
 
2013-04-18 12:32:58 PM

bdub77: vpb: vernonFL: Its scary how close the neighborhoods and a retirement home were to the fertilizer plant. I don't know about you, but probably just the smell alone would make one want to live farther away. Instead it seemed like it was in the middle of the town.

In a lot of towns the refinery or whatever IS the center of town.  It's why there is a town there.

Not from what I've seen. Typically the industry that supports the town is not dead center in the town. Usually because industry is dirty and, no pun intended, you don't shiat where you eat.


Every mill town in bc has the mill in the middle of town near the trains and highways. Or just on the outskirts of town. The coal mines are all out of town and gas and petroleum is usually in the middle of nowhere near the oil fields
 
2013-04-18 12:34:34 PM
Just saw the video from the guy in the truck.  Holy crap.
 
2013-04-18 12:34:48 PM

rocinante721: What caused the explosions, chemically?

I get the nitrates (oxygenator) in the fertilizer, but what was the accelerant (ie. fuel)?

/curious chemist


My WAG is: primarily the soot from the existing structure fires.  Uncontrolled fires really don't use much of their fuel efficiently.  Sooty smoke is quite combustible (re-burners... that's how you get over half of your heat in a modern wood stove).  Since the volunteers were already dousing it with water, that would make even a sootier fire.
 
2013-04-18 12:35:20 PM

Thebloodpotato: Maud Dib: Poopspasm: vernonFL: Its scary how close the neighborhoods and a retirement home were to the fertilizer plant. I don't know about you, but probably just the smell alone would make one want to live farther away. Instead it seemed like it was in the middle of the town.

It's Texas. They're stupid there.

You see a Texas tag anywhere? I think Floriduh has us beat in the stupid, dumbass.

i live in texas...this place is pretty damn stupid.


Stupid as in "hold my beer" stupid? Or stupid "I know I can dance (while drunk)" stupid?.
 
2013-04-18 12:35:45 PM
So the video dude.  He stopped to video it and told his daughter that the building would likely soon collapse and that they would see an explosion.  He just didn't expect it to be so larger.  Farking moron put his life and kid's in danger for a fireworks display.

Skip to 00:24 for this genius's comments.
 
2013-04-18 12:36:52 PM

rocinante721: What caused the explosions, chemically?

I get the nitrates (oxygenator) in the fertilizer, but what was the accelerant (ie. fuel)?

/curious chemist


It seems it decomposes into oxygen when heated.  If the container storing it caught fire, pressure can rise until an explosion occurs.  It can also be induced to detonate by a nearby explosion, I imagine this causes a chain reaction in a large stockpile.  Nearby fire -> spreads to container -> decomposition to oxygen -> tightly packed burning material has small explosion -> sets off chain reaction that creates a detonation of all nearby material

/not a chemist
 
2013-04-18 12:39:30 PM

wingnut396: So the video dude.  He stopped to video it and told his daughter that the building would likely soon collapse and that they would see an explosion.  He just didn't expect it to be so larger.  Farking moron put his life and kid's in danger for a fireworks display.

Skip to 00:24 for this genius's comments.


Pretty much. If you're alone, fine, go do your thang. Friend/relatives hopping along? Fark that noise, it ain't safe.
 
2013-04-18 12:42:58 PM

Stoj: Little known fact - almost 20% of the 9/11/2001 victims were hillbillies trying to take video of the buildings on fire.


Read that in the voice of a certain "King of the Hill" character
 
2013-04-18 12:43:48 PM
Are you saying people shouldn't build schools and apartment buildings
near  fireworks rocket fuel propane bottling fertilizer plants?
Take it up with the zoning board!
 
2013-04-18 12:45:21 PM
Yeah, I didn't realize America was this 'splodey. Hopefully it's not a hot new trend.
 
2013-04-18 12:47:37 PM

NutWrench: Quit calling every bit of debris-strewn ground a "war zone," you nuts.


Yeah, this. Ruined, obliterated, leveled, destroyed. Any one of those words would do, without co-opting the now-cliche "war zone" reference.
 
2013-04-18 12:47:51 PM

The Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves: FTA: In a safety report on file with the Environmental Protection Agency, the West Fertilizer Co. said that there was no risk of fire or explosion from the ammonia stored near a residential neighborhood and a school, the Dallas Morning News reported. The main hazard was an accidental release of the gas, the report said.

You would think the EPA would know whether that report was total bullshiat just based on the chemicals involved. It's like saying there is no risk of fire from a natural gas pipeline.


Well, that would be... wait, what? When we built our house next to the gas pipeline, Enbridge assured us that it was perfectly safe. In fact, when they up the transmission pressure to 3000PSI that makes it safer, since gas only leaks when it's moving more slowly, and gas isn't flammable at such high pressures.

/once heard something similar from an energy marketing exec
//couldn't tell if he was just evil, or stupid, or both
 
2013-04-18 12:48:29 PM

ChipNASA: Pepcon laughs at your puny little explosion...

[www.damninteresting.net image 310x177]

/boom clicky the photo goes the linky


Texas City 1947 tells Pepcon, that's not an explosion, this is an explosion.

encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.comnfpa.typepad.com
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-04-18 12:48:58 PM

Bashar and Asma's Infinite Playlist: This was a bad week to finish up the first season of Homeland. "Oh what's on the news? Crowds of civilians being blown up. Let's watch some Netflix. Oh, it's more civilians being blown up... Can we just watch Girls instead?"


You just know that Kim Jong Un is sitting there in Best Korea having a temper tantrum and going "WAAAHHHHH! Pay attention to me!"
 
2013-04-18 12:49:30 PM
The company should have had a coordination plan with local emergency services. No one should have been fighting that fire, they should have concentrated emergency service efforts on evacuation of nearby facilities.

For those interested, situations like this are regulated by 29 CFR Part 1910,  Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals; Explosives and Blasting Agents.

While OSHA does periodic audits and inspections of companies (by industry code), realize that they are seriously understaffed for the job and can only inspect a small percentage of plants per year.
 
2013-04-18 12:51:00 PM

bdub77: dletter: bdub77: vpb: vernonFL: Its scary how close the neighborhoods and a retirement home were to the fertilizer plant. I don't know about you, but probably just the smell alone would make one want to live farther away. Instead it seemed like it was in the middle of the town.

In a lot of towns the refinery or whatever IS the center of town.  It's why there is a town there.

Not from what I've seen. Typically the industry that supports the town is not dead center in the town. Usually because industry is dirty and, no pun intended, you don't shiat where you eat.

It is a town of 2,700 though..... very small towns like that, I don't believe (unfortunately) the city planning was all that great, especially if this town and plant goes back 60-70 years or more.... people just didn't "plan" things that way back then.

I'm not gonna say there aren't tons of exceptions like this one. But most of what I've seen in rural America, the plant is typically several miles away from the residential and town areas.

I would think a fertilizer plant in particular would be further away, not only from smell but because of the potential for something dangerous like this to occur.


I would think that one of the main reasons that you would want some distance would be the danger of an anhydrous ammonia leak, that could kill a lot of people in a short time.
 
2013-04-18 12:52:21 PM

Smelly Pirate Hooker: NutWrench: Quit calling every bit of debris-strewn ground a "war zone," you nuts.

Yeah, this. Ruined, obliterated, leveled, destroyed. Any one of those words would do, without co-opting the now-cliche "war zone" reference.


The town was decimated!
 
2013-04-18 12:52:28 PM

Walker: The fertilizer plant that exploded Wednesday night in West, Texas, reported to the Environmental Protection Agency and local public safety officials that it presented no risk of fire or explosion, documents show.

West Fertilizer Co. reported having as much as 54,000 pounds of anhydrous ammonia on hand in an emergency planning report required of facilities that use toxic or hazardous chemicals.

But the report, reviewed Wednesday night by The Dallas Morning News, stated "no" under fire or explosive risks. The worst possible scenario, the report said, would be a 10-minute release of ammonia gas that would kill or injure no one.

The second worst possibility projected was a leak from a broken hose used to transfer the product, again causing no injuries.

Somebody made a boo boo....or out and out lied.
I'm sure the plant operators will be punished to the fullest extent of the law. Buhahahaha. Yeah right.


They probably will. Its the manager who gets to walk.
 
2013-04-18 12:54:10 PM

spelletrader: The company should have had a coordination plan with local emergency services. No one should have been fighting that fire, they should have concentrated emergency service efforts on evacuation of nearby facilities.

For those interested, situations like this are regulated by 29 CFR Part 1910,  Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals; Explosives and Blasting Agents.

While OSHA does periodic audits and inspections of companies (by industry code), realize that they are seriously understaffed for the job and can only inspect a small percentage of plants per year.


I believe they did begin evacuating. While firefighters (who I have to guess are probably dead now, if they were close to the plant) were trying to put out the fire.
 
2013-04-18 12:55:39 PM

priapic_abandon: Texas City 1947 tells Pepcon, that's not an explosion, this is an explosion.


upload.wikimedia.org

Halifax says, "eh"?
 
2013-04-18 12:56:04 PM

Arkanaut: Actually I imagine the sheer force of a fertilizer plant explosion is orders of magnitudes worse than a pressure-cooker bomb.


Yeah, I'm going with the plant explosion probably makes the bomb thing look like a black cat.  Of course, I don't blame submitter for playing it up.  Greenlights are fun.
 
2013-04-18 12:56:08 PM

priapic_abandon: ChipNASA: Pepcon laughs at your puny little explosion...

[www.damninteresting.net image 310x177]

/boom clicky the photo goes the linky

Texas City 1947 tells Pepcon, that's not an explosion, this is an explosion.

[encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com image 285x177][nfpa.typepad.com image 500x248]
[upload.wikimedia.org image 800x475]


Bhopal says Americans are fascinated by splody things.  Real industrial disaster can be a silent creeping cloud...
 
2013-04-18 12:56:22 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n85R3OXK3bs

Non-Texans just don't get us. We celebrate Independence Day any chance we get.
Here, hold my beer.
 
2013-04-18 12:57:00 PM

wingnut396: So the video dude.  He stopped to video it and told his daughter that the building would likely soon collapse and that they would see an explosion.  He just didn't expect it to be so larger.  Farking moron put his life and kid's in danger for a fireworks display.

Skip to 00:24 for this genius's comments.


In fairness, the time between the explosion and the sound was between 1-2 seconds which I'm sure would be around a half a mile to a mile away. He probably thought he was a safe distance back.
 
2013-04-18 12:57:07 PM

spelletrader: The company should have had a coordination plan with local emergency services. No one should have been fighting that fire, they should have concentrated emergency service efforts on evacuation of nearby facilities.

For those interested, situations like this are regulated by 29 CFR Part 1910,  Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals; Explosives and Blasting Agents.

While OSHA does periodic audits and inspections of companies (by industry code), realize that they are seriously understaffed for the job and can only inspect a small percentage of plants per year.


Given what is known thus far, that may be closer to the truth than any deliberate action.

/sf. Appalachian coal mines
 
2013-04-18 12:57:38 PM

Poopspasm: vernonFL: Its scary how close the neighborhoods and a retirement home were to the fertilizer plant. I don't know about you, but probably just the smell alone would make one want to live farther away. Instead it seemed like it was in the middle of the town.

It's Texas. They're stupid there.


Really?  Your profile says Florida and you're playing that card?
 
2013-04-18 12:59:40 PM

ole prophet: wingnut396: So the video dude.  He stopped to video it and told his daughter that the building would likely soon collapse and that they would see an explosion.  He just didn't expect it to be so larger.  Farking moron put his life and kid's in danger for a fireworks display.

Skip to 00:24 for this genius's comments.

In fairness, the time between the explosion and the sound was between 1-2 seconds which I'm sure would be around a half a mile to a mile away. He probably thought he was a safe distance back.


No, this was debated pretty well last night in the thread of the video.  From what it looks like, he was in the middle school parking lot, which is literally, just across some train tracks from the plant.
 
2013-04-18 01:01:30 PM

priapic_abandon: ChipNASA: Pepcon laughs at your puny little explosion...

[www.damninteresting.net image 310x177]

/boom clicky the photo goes the linky

Texas City 1947 tells Pepcon, that's not an explosion, this is an explosion.

[encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com image 285x177][nfpa.typepad.com image 500x248]
[upload.wikimedia.org image 800x475]


Halifax's Explosion of December 1917 would like a word with you.
 
2013-04-18 01:02:21 PM

Smelly Pirate Hooker: I believe they did begin evacuating. While firefighters (who I have to guess are probably dead now, if they were close to the plant) were trying to put out the fire.


If the company had done the right thing those fire fighters would have been assisting in the evacuation instead of fighting the fire.

Fire fighters know to never fight a fire when explosive material is involved. They were not adequately informed of the danger and the company is directly (and willfully) responsible for those casualties.
 
2013-04-18 01:02:35 PM

ole prophet: wingnut396: So the video dude.  He stopped to video it and told his daughter that the building would likely soon collapse and that they would see an explosion.  He just didn't expect it to be so larger.  Farking moron put his life and kid's in danger for a fireworks display.

Skip to 00:24 for this genius's comments.

In fairness, the time between the explosion and the sound was between 1-2 seconds which I'm sure would be around a half a mile to a mile away. He probably thought he was a safe distance back.


For your enjoyment
 
2013-04-18 01:04:27 PM

CygnusDarius: I think it's time for some actual regulations, but, with previous evidence, any company that might not benefit from these regulations will probably lobby against it.

I can understand here in Mexico, do I like it? No, and I'm one of the few architects/civil engineers that try to uphold the law when it comes to construction and/or design, even if most of my buildings are residential, but how do you guys let these things happen in the US? It's supposed to be a more progressive country, more advanced (supposedly) when it comes to building regulations.


Hate to say it, but it probably wasn't advanced, progressive, white American people that built the plant.
 
2013-04-18 01:05:06 PM

The Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves: FTA: In a safety report on file with the Environmental Protection Agency, the West Fertilizer Co. said that there was no risk of fire or explosion from the ammonia stored near a residential neighborhood and a school, the Dallas Morning News reported. The main hazard was an accidental release of the gas, the report said.

You would think the EPA would know whether that report was total bullshiat just based on the chemicals involved. It's like saying there is no risk of fire from a natural gas pipeline.


The ammonia's relatively safe. The report filed with the EPA didn't take into account the first responder's mistakes. The fire crew that arrived hosed down an ammonia fire with water. Every trained firefighter knows that won't work. It will, in fact, make it worse. "Emergency responders should not mix water used for firefighting directly with anhydrous ammonia as this will result in warming of the product, causing the liquid to turn into a vapor cloud." What started as a bad situation, soon turned deadly due to simple human error. Someone on a small fire department, possibly a volunteer, misread the situation and escalated a fire into an explosion. Quite probably paying for their mistake with their life.
 
2013-04-18 01:06:52 PM
I guess that when shiat happens in Texas, it happens with a bang!
 
2013-04-18 01:08:53 PM

dletter: bdub77: vpb: vernonFL: Its scary how close the neighborhoods and a retirement home were to the fertilizer plant. I don't know about you, but probably just the smell alone would make one want to live farther away. Instead it seemed like it was in the middle of the town.

In a lot of towns the refinery or whatever IS the center of town.  It's why there is a town there.

Not from what I've seen. Typically the industry that supports the town is not dead center in the town. Usually because industry is dirty and, no pun intended, you don't shiat where you eat.

It is a town of 2,700 though..... very small towns like that, I don't believe (unfortunately) the city planning was all that great, especially if this town and plant goes back 60-70 years or more.... people just didn't "plan" things that way back then.


This. People forget that the concept of "planning" a city before it's even built is a brand new thing. For example, compare cities that existed before the automobile versus those after the automobile. In the old cities, the streets are laid out to favor pedestrians and possibly horse-drawn carts -- not automobiles that convey people for long distances from home to market.

As for "why did they build housing so close to the plant?" In Texas, a city has to be chartered in order to create and implement zoning. To get chartered, a city needs to have more than 5,000 people. The population of West is about half that, so businesses can do build whatever they want wherever they want it. This explosion is another bad example of how Texas is "business friendly" to the detriment of its own people.
 
2013-04-18 01:10:21 PM

CygnusDarius: Thebloodpotato: Maud Dib: Poopspasm: vernonFL: Its scary how close the neighborhoods and a retirement home were to the fertilizer plant. I don't know about you, but probably just the smell alone would make one want to live farther away. Instead it seemed like it was in the middle of the town.

It's Texas. They're stupid there.

You see a Texas tag anywhere? I think Floriduh has us beat in the stupid, dumbass.

i live in texas...this place is pretty damn stupid.

Stupid as in "hold my beer" stupid? Or stupid "I know I can dance (while drunk)" stupid?.


stupid as in an having an above average population of materialistic, selfish, egotistical bigots who don't like to hear opinions that conflict with their own and an unwillingness to compromise to boot...i put boot in there because texans love boots and i am willing to give back a little
 
2013-04-18 01:10:39 PM
img96.imageshack.us

Texas City > Halifax by a large margin.
 
2013-04-18 01:11:02 PM

spelletrader: Smelly Pirate Hooker: I believe they did begin evacuating. While firefighters (who I have to guess are probably dead now, if they were close to the plant) were trying to put out the fire.

If the company had done the right thing those fire fighters would have been assisting in the evacuation instead of fighting the fire.

Fire fighters know to never fight a fire when explosive material is involved. They were not adequately informed of the danger and the company is directly (and willfully) responsible for those casualties.


OK, thanks, caped crusader. I think it's a little early to be assigning fault, but whatever, you're on the internet, so I guess it's to be expected.

My understanding is, some of the firefighters were volunteers (not full-time FD). So that probably had something to do with it.

Small government for the win.
 
2013-04-18 01:14:10 PM

sethen320: Walker: The fertilizer plant that exploded Wednesday night in West, Texas, reported to the Environmental Protection Agency and local public safety officials that it presented no risk of fire or explosion, documents show.

West Fertilizer Co. reported having as much as 54,000 pounds of anhydrous ammonia on hand in an emergency planning report required of facilities that use toxic or hazardous chemicals.

But the report, reviewed Wednesday night by The Dallas Morning News, stated "no" under fire or explosive risks. The worst possible scenario, the report said, would be a 10-minute release of ammonia gas that would kill or injure no one.

The second worst possibility projected was a leak from a broken hose used to transfer the product, again causing no injuries.

Somebody made a boo boo....or out and out lied.
I'm sure the plant operators will be punished to the fullest extent of the law. Buhahahaha. Yeah right.

They probably will. Its the manager who gets to walk.


Look, ever since it was revealed that BP's "emergency response plan" filed with the US government on how to handle an oil spill for one of their drilling rigs in the gulf of Mexico, included consulting with the world's foremost expert on Penguin ecology (who had been dead a few years when the plan was filed) nothing shocks me anymore
 
2013-04-18 01:19:32 PM
http://www.dallasnews.com/photos/20130418-massive-fertilizer-plant-ex p losion-injures-dozens-in-west-near-waco.ece?ssimg=975128#ssTop974973

Fairly new pictures. Sorry, Dallas Morning News website is shiatty and page reloads with every picture. But there are thumbnails underneath so you can kinda preview before clicking.
 
2013-04-18 01:19:43 PM

Thebloodpotato: CygnusDarius: Thebloodpotato: Maud Dib: Poopspasm: vernonFL: Its scary how close the neighborhoods and a retirement home were to the fertilizer plant. I don't know about you, but probably just the smell alone would make one want to live farther away. Instead it seemed like it was in the middle of the town.

It's Texas. They're stupid there.

You see a Texas tag anywhere? I think Floriduh has us beat in the stupid, dumbass.

i live in texas...this place is pretty damn stupid.

Stupid as in "hold my beer" stupid? Or stupid "I know I can dance (while drunk)" stupid?.

stupid as in an having an above average population of materialistic, selfish, egotistical bigots who don't like to hear opinions that conflict with their own and an unwillingness to compromise to boot...i put boot in there because texans love boots and i am willing to give back a little


Your description sounds a lot like New York.
 
2013-04-18 01:21:56 PM

Civil_War2_Time: [img96.imageshack.us image 750x500]

Texas City > Halifax by a large margin.


Halifax:
aprox. 2000 killed and 9000 injured
estimated force 2.9 KT

Texas City:
aprox. 450 killed and 5000 injured
estimated force 2.7 to 3.2 KT

Please explain "large margin"?
 
2013-04-18 01:23:59 PM

Smelly Pirate Hooker: OK, thanks, caped crusader. I think it's a little early to be assigning fault, but whatever, you're on the internet, so I guess it's to be expected.

My understanding is, some of the firefighters were volunteers (not full-time FD). So that probably had something to do with it.

Small government for the win.


You're right. That should read "If they were not adequately informed of the danger the company is directly (and willfully) responsible for those casualties."
 
2013-04-18 01:26:42 PM

Magorn: sethen320: Walker: The fertilizer plant that exploded Wednesday night in West, Texas, reported to the Environmental Protection Agency and local public safety officials that it presented no risk of fire or explosion, documents show.

West Fertilizer Co. reported having as much as 54,000 pounds of anhydrous ammonia on hand in an emergency planning report required of facilities that use toxic or hazardous chemicals.

But the report, reviewed Wednesday night by The Dallas Morning News, stated "no" under fire or explosive risks. The worst possible scenario, the report said, would be a 10-minute release of ammonia gas that would kill or injure no one.

The second worst possibility projected was a leak from a broken hose used to transfer the product, again causing no injuries.

Somebody made a boo boo....or out and out lied.
I'm sure the plant operators will be punished to the fullest extent of the law. Buhahahaha. Yeah right.

They probably will. Its the manager who gets to walk.

Look, ever since it was revealed that BP's "emergency response plan" filed with the US government on how to handle an oil spill for one of their drilling rigs in the gulf of Mexico, included consulting with the world's foremost expert on Penguin ecology (who had been dead a few years when the plan was filed) nothing shocks me anymore


BP has all kinds of problems.  Nothing they do surprises me.
 
2013-04-18 01:28:38 PM

mjohnson71: Civil_War2_Time: [img96.imageshack.us image 750x500]

Texas City > Halifax by a large margin.

Halifax:
aprox. 2000 killed and 9000 injured
estimated force 2.9 KT

Texas City:
aprox. 450 killed and 5000 injured
estimated force 2.7 to 3.2 KT

Please explain "large margin"?


Well kilotons are pretty much the big boy league unless you are playing with nukes.

If I had stupid amounts of money Id pay stupidly to get to blow up a test site with a Tsar bomba.
 
2013-04-18 01:31:57 PM

sethen320: Thebloodpotato: CygnusDarius: Thebloodpotato: Maud Dib: Poopspasm: vernonFL: Its scary how close the neighborhoods and a retirement home were to the fertilizer plant. I don't know about you, but probably just the smell alone would make one want to live farther away. Instead it seemed like it was in the middle of the town.

It's Texas. They're stupid there.

You see a Texas tag anywhere? I think Floriduh has us beat in the stupid, dumbass.

i live in texas...this place is pretty damn stupid.

Stupid as in "hold my beer" stupid? Or stupid "I know I can dance (while drunk)" stupid?.

stupid as in an having an above average population of materialistic, selfish, egotistical bigots who don't like to hear opinions that conflict with their own and an unwillingness to compromise to boot...i put boot in there because texans love boots and i am willing to give back a little

Your description sounds a lot like New York.


that place is pretty awful until you go deep below the subways...but i wasn't aware they liked boots in new york.
 
2013-04-18 01:32:34 PM

Oldiron_79: If I had stupid amounts of money Id pay stupidly to get to blow up a test site with a Tsar bomba.


I'm pretty sure some Russian millionaires do this.
 
2013-04-18 01:39:08 PM

mjohnson71: Civil_War2_Time: [img96.imageshack.us image 750x500]

Texas City > Halifax by a large margin.

Halifax:
aprox. 2000 killed and 9000 injured
estimated force 2.9 KT

Texas City:
aprox. 450 killed and 5000 injured
estimated force 2.7 to 3.2 KT

Please explain "large margin"?


I'm just throwing shiat out there...like a five ton anchor 1/2 mile, and a two ton anchor 1.62 miles. Maybe me growing up 15 miles from the blast sight makes me wonder about the Halifax data.
 
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