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(Quartz)   Bad week just got worse: Chinese authorities suspect human-to-human transmission of H7N9 avian flu   (qz.com) divider line 100
    More: Obvious, Chinese authorities, Chinese, avian influenza, foreign worker, American Girl, Family Planning Commission, authorities suspect, Government of the United Kingdom  
•       •       •

4279 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Apr 2013 at 12:15 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-17 11:48:40 PM
I picked a bad week to quit sniffing glue.
3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-04-17 11:50:33 PM
Bombs/nukes aren't going to kill off the human race. THIS (or something very close to it) will. Every medical professional you know already knows it, and has just accepted it...Just ask them. We don't discuss it because, frankly, we know there's not a GD thing we can do about it. The Hot Zone was not entirely without foundation.

/been nice knowing all of you
//BIE for a going away present?
 
2013-04-17 11:56:01 PM
There's always an Arquillian Battle Cruiser, or a Corillian Death Ray, or an H7N9 avian flu that is about to wipe out all life on this miserable little planet, and the only way these people can get on with their happy lives is that they DO NOT KNOW ABOUT IT!
 
2013-04-18 12:18:32 AM
So.  Quarantine?
 
2013-04-18 12:18:53 AM
OK, transmission. But did they die? And was there more than one? I'll start packing if there's a massive kill ratio; but until then, I'm not panicking.
 
2013-04-18 12:20:30 AM
So far there's like a 25% fatality rate. Let's hope this doesn't spread too far..
 
2013-04-18 12:20:38 AM
i.newsarama.com
 
2013-04-18 12:21:08 AM
We're all going to die.
 
2013-04-18 12:22:56 AM
We're all going to dye.

i.imgur.com
 
2013-04-18 12:24:29 AM

voodoomedic: Bombs/nukes aren't going to kill off the human race. THIS (or something very close to it) will. Every medical professional you know already knows it, and has just accepted it...Just ask them. We don't discuss it because, frankly, we know there's not a GD thing we can do about it. The Hot Zone was not entirely without foundation.

/been nice knowing all of you
//BIE for a going away present?


Glad I read your profile and know you not to be taken seriously.
/not like my handle would inspire confidence either
 
2013-04-18 12:25:55 AM
Madagascar closes ports.
 
2013-04-18 12:26:16 AM
Capt Tripps?  let's do this!
 
2013-04-18 12:26:38 AM

voodoomedic: Bombs/nukes aren't going to kill off the human race. THIS (or something very close to it) will. Every medical professional you know already knows it, and has just accepted it...Just ask them. We don't discuss it because, frankly, we know there's not a GD thing we can do about it. The Hot Zone was not entirely without foundation.

/been nice knowing all of you
//BIE for a going away present?


Yeah, especially when conventional wisdom says that the thing to do when you're sick is go hang around more sick people.

/doesn't go the hospital until it's absolutely necessary
//last year's trip was for dysentery; doc told her she'd probably been fighting it for a month before it finally got the upper hand
///cipro is a nasty antibiotic btw
 
2013-04-18 12:26:48 AM
Not H7N9!!!1!
 
2013-04-18 12:27:17 AM
Sometimes you need a little Woody...


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zqiblXFlZuk

And for those lucky few who survive, remember fascism isn't about numbers. So even if there's only a few hundred of us left, keep your eyes on the fascists among you...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VwcKwGS7OSQ
 
2013-04-18 12:27:18 AM

sirrerun: We're all going to die.


Don't be morbid.

sirrerun: We're all going to dye.

[i.imgur.com image 544x286]


Don't be mordant.
 
2013-04-18 12:27:21 AM

sirrerun: We're all going to die.


i.ytimg.com
 
2013-04-18 12:28:05 AM

kiyote: So far there's like a 25% fatality rate. Let's hope this doesn't spread too far..


In China, maybe, where the chicken noodle soup just reintroduces the virus and where there are thousands of dead animal carcasses floating in their 'plenty of fluids.'
 
2013-04-18 12:28:17 AM
I love this game.  This is when I start pumping points into Air 1 and 2, Bird 1 and 2 and then reap the Contagion points galore as it spreads and spreads and spreads.

Madagascar better not try anything, though.
 
2013-04-18 12:29:55 AM
Alright, I'm done with this week. I'm just going to set an alarm for
Monday.
 
2013-04-18 12:30:13 AM
We need to SHUT DOWN EVERYTHING!
 
2013-04-18 12:30:29 AM
I'm sure we'll be visited by the anecdote brigade soon enough, telling stories of how they got sick the day they got the flu shot, or that the last pandemic turned out to be typical flu, even though it killed 5 times as many children under 5 as the typical flu.
 
2013-04-18 12:32:13 AM
If it really was so easy for a virus to greatly depopulate the human race, i think they'd have done it already.
 
2013-04-18 12:32:21 AM
Confirmed cases:  82
Chinese population:  1,350,000,000 (est)

Percentage: 0.0000061%

Everybody panic.
 
2013-04-18 12:33:21 AM

kiyote: So far there's like a 25% fatality rate.


Maybe. Those initial statistics can be misleading because it's usually "25% of the people who were sick enough to go to a hospital and were then diagnosed with this particular strain have died". You need more data such as how many others in the community were exposed without developing significant symptoms.
 
2013-04-18 12:33:39 AM
Which trumpet is this?
 
2013-04-18 12:34:41 AM
Oh noes!!!!

A total of 82 H7N9 cases have been reported in China, including 17 that have ended in death.
• In 2010, there were about 219 million (±70 million) malaria cases ... and an estimated 660,000 (±173,000) malaria deaths

Wake me when this becomes Pandemic.
 
2013-04-18 12:34:49 AM

J. Frank Parnell: If it really was so easy for a virus to greatly depopulate the human race, i think they'd have done it already.


Uh...
 
2013-04-18 12:35:49 AM

alabasterblack: [i.newsarama.com image 592x900]


There was a comic for The Stand??? Holy shiat I've gotta find that and read it.

Infernalist: I love this game.  This is when I start pumping points into Air 1 and 2, Bird 1 and 2 and then reap the Contagion points galore as it spreads and spreads and spreads.

Madagascar better not try anything, though.


fark Madagascar.

Also M-O-O-N spells the we're farked and this has been a terrible week. I can only hope Friday isn't worse.
 
2013-04-18 12:36:03 AM
Not really sure why that came ouy miniaturized....
 
2013-04-18 12:36:31 AM

J. Frank Parnell: If it really was so easy for a virus to greatly depopulate the human race, i think they'd have done it already.


which time haven't you heard of? All of them?
 
2013-04-18 12:38:46 AM

parahaps: J. Frank Parnell: If it really was so easy for a virus to greatly depopulate the human race, i think they'd have done it already.

Uh...


It hasn't happened that I can recall since the advent of modern medicine.  That isn't to say that it couldn't, especially in the case of a Twelve Monkeys-esque man-made virus terrorist attack, but I don't see anything ever taking as big a chunk of the population out as the black plague did back in the day.
 
2013-04-18 12:38:49 AM
A plague on all of our houses.
 
2013-04-18 12:40:07 AM
www.blastr.com

Standing by.
 
2013-04-18 12:40:15 AM

J. Frank Parnell: If it really was so easy for a virus to greatly depopulate the human race, i think they'd have done it already.


This should get a few bites.
 
2013-04-18 12:40:28 AM
This is a little different from malaria, sparky.
 
2013-04-18 12:40:33 AM

voodoomedic: Bombs/nukes aren't going to kill off the human race. THIS (or something very close to it) will. Every medical professional you know already knows it, and has just accepted it...Just ask them. We don't discuss it because, frankly, we know there's not a GD thing we can do about it. The Hot Zone was not entirely without foundation.

/been nice knowing all of you
//BIE for a going away present?


What, quarantining and burning the subject doesn't work for you?
 
2013-04-18 12:42:27 AM

TuteTibiImperes: parahaps: J. Frank Parnell: If it really was so easy for a virus to greatly depopulate the human race, i think they'd have done it already.

Uh...

It hasn't happened that I can recall since the advent of modern medicine.  That isn't to say that it couldn't, especially in the case of a Twelve Monkeys-esque man-made virus terrorist attack, but I don't see anything ever taking as big a chunk of the population out as the black plague did back in the day.


I guess you can arbitrarily decide that 'modern medicine' started after the last big one, but the flu pandemic of 1918 killed 3-5% of the world's population. 50-100 million people.
 
2013-04-18 12:43:09 AM

sendtodave: Confirmed cases:  82
Chinese population:  1,350,000,000 (est)

Percentage: 0.0000061%

Everybody panic.


Distance fallen so far: 1.2"
Distance to ground: 2700 feet

Percentage: 0.0000370%

Everybody panic.
 
2013-04-18 12:43:30 AM
We're all going to die.

img.photobucket.com

/saving throw
 
2013-04-18 12:45:37 AM

Ivo Shandor: kiyote: So far there's like a 25% fatality rate.

Maybe. Those initial statistics can be misleading because it's usually "25% of the people who were sick enough to go to a hospital and were then diagnosed with this particular strain have died". You need more data such as how many others in the community were exposed without developing significant symptoms.


Thisy that thisy.

I'm pretty sure there are lots of cases that are nothing but a headache or tummy ache. But maybe those dead pigs and birds on the Chinese rivers know something we don't.
 
2013-04-18 12:47:39 AM

JohnAnnArbor: So.  Quarantine?


*locks basement door*

\Shelter in place.

parahaps: I guess you can arbitrarily decide that 'modern medicine' started after the last big one, but the flu pandemic of 1918 killed 3-5% of the world's population. 50-100 million people.


First I heard about that was as a kid when I mentioned the black death to my grandmother. She would have been 16.
 
2013-04-18 12:51:55 AM

parahaps: TuteTibiImperes: parahaps: J. Frank Parnell: If it really was so easy for a virus to greatly depopulate the human race, i think they'd have done it already.

Uh...

It hasn't happened that I can recall since the advent of modern medicine.  That isn't to say that it couldn't, especially in the case of a Twelve Monkeys-esque man-made virus terrorist attack, but I don't see anything ever taking as big a chunk of the population out as the black plague did back in the day.

I guess you can arbitrarily decide that 'modern medicine' started after the last big one, but the flu pandemic of 1918 killed 3-5% of the world's population. 50-100 million people.


Post germ theory and the first vaccines, but before an influenza specific vaccine and antibiotics, sort of a gray area I'd say.
 
2013-04-18 12:52:05 AM
I would take Bird Flu over Mad Cow/Human disease any day.
/fears prion mediated disorders
 
2013-04-18 12:52:32 AM

parahaps: TuteTibiImperes: parahaps: J. Frank Parnell: If it really was so easy for a virus to greatly depopulate the human race, i think they'd have done it already.

Uh...

It hasn't happened that I can recall since the advent of modern medicine.  That isn't to say that it couldn't, especially in the case of a Twelve Monkeys-esque man-made virus terrorist attack, but I don't see anything ever taking as big a chunk of the population out as the black plague did back in the day.

I guess you can arbitrarily decide that 'modern medicine' started after the last big one, but the flu pandemic of 1918 killed 3-5% of the world's population. 50-100 million people.


Modern medicine starting after the 1918 pandemic is actually a fair statement. Your odds of surviving a severe cut on your arm was not significantly better in 1918 CE than it was in 1918 BCE. If you got an infection in a deep cut, you probably lost the limb, or at least its use. It wasn't until antibiotics that things actually started getting significantly better.

/Demon Under the Microscope is a great book
//"A gentleman's hands are never dirty." - Physician, dismissing an Austrian doctor who had suggested that washing hands between seeing patients should be mandatory in their profession
///The Austrian doctor ended up committing suicide once he figured out how many mothers he killed through his ignorance over the course of his career, and he was unable to get others in his profession anywhere in Europe to adopt cleanliness when he figured it out, despite his hospital's phenomenally low mortality rate
 
2013-04-18 12:53:29 AM

Queensowntalia: We're all going to die.

[img.photobucket.com image 426x325]

/saving throw


If you're going to roll your forts on a d12, you deserve what's coming to you.
 
2013-04-18 12:59:07 AM
yes.

bie?

eip

end of the world boobies
 
2013-04-18 12:59:57 AM
False flag.
 
2013-04-18 01:01:47 AM

RobertBruce: which time haven't you heard of? All of them?


You talking movies, or something?

There has never been a virus that even came close to killing everyone. But what i was talking about are modern engineered viruses. I'm pretty sure it's been tried, and found to be harder than you'd think.

Isolated populations used to have high death-tolls from viruses that developed in other populations, but one of the good things about the global travel thing we have going on now is we've already been exposed to pretty much every humans strain out there, which just leaves these crossovers from animals, but again, it's doubtful we'll see one that kills most people. The biggest death toll of any virus in recorded history is probably the black plague, and even the most generous estimates only put that at half the population of Europe dying. More realistic estimates put it at 25%.

I've pointed out before that it's not even in the interest of viruses to kill people. Any deaths are accidental side effects from the methods used to try and transmit to other bodies. If they were to successfully kill off all of their host species, they would doom themselves. After millions of years evolving alongside a species they need them to keep living.
 
2013-04-18 01:02:31 AM

voodoomedic: Bombs/nukes aren't going to kill off the human race. THIS (or something very close to it) will. Every medical professional you know already knows it, and has just accepted it...Just ask them. We don't discuss it because, frankly, we know there's not a GD thing we can do about it. The Hot Zone was not entirely without foundation.

/been nice knowing all of you
//BIE for a going away present?

Hot Zone

was non-fiction, Cobra Event was fiction.
 
2013-04-18 01:05:19 AM
Bring it you little bastids. See if you can survive in my alcohol soaked bloodstream!!!
 
2013-04-18 01:08:37 AM
J. Frank Parnell: If it really was so easy for a virus to greatly depopulate the human race, i think they'd have done it already.

TuteTibiImperes: ...but the flu pandemic of 1918 killed 3-5% of the world's population. 50-100 million people.

And that was before air travel. Now we have thousands of people going from one continent to another every single day, taking all their germs and infections with them. A new virus that is easily transmitted between humans could be all over the world before anyone was aware that it existed.
 
2013-04-18 01:16:11 AM

J. Frank Parnell: RobertBruce: which time haven't you heard of? All of them?

You talking movies, or something?

There has never been a virus that even came close to killing everyone. But what i was talking about are modern engineered viruses. I'm pretty sure it's been tried, and found to be harder than you'd think.

Isolated populations used to have high death-tolls from viruses that developed in other populations, but one of the good things about the global travel thing we have going on now is we've already been exposed to pretty much every humans strain out there, which just leaves these crossovers from animals, but again, it's doubtful we'll see one that kills most people. The biggest death toll of any virus in recorded history is probably the black plague, and even the most generous estimates only put that at half the population of Europe dying. More realistic estimates put it at 25%.

I've pointed out before that it's not even in the interest of viruses to kill people. Any deaths are accidental side effects from the methods used to try and transmit to other bodies. If they were to successfully kill off all of their host species, they would doom themselves. After millions of years evolving alongside a species they need them to keep living.


Even five percent of the population (1918) is a huge impact.   No it won't destabilize the population but even it caused noticeable waves in genetic diversity in Europe and North America.
 
2013-04-18 01:16:55 AM

kiyote: So far there's like a 25% fatality rate. Let's hope this doesn't spread too far..


Actually, it's not nearly that bad.  It's 25% of those who got sick enough to end up in the hospital.  They've found others with antibodies.

J. Frank Parnell: There has never been a virus that even came close to killing everyone. But what i was talking about are modern engineered viruses. I'm pretty sure it's been tried, and found to be harder than you'd think.


There were places in the New World that were completely depopulated by old world diseases.  Perhaps it wasn't just one and it might simply have been a kill to below viability rather than a total kill, though.

The thing is normally a super-lethal disease with a good vector kills its hosts and thus kills itself in the process.  The deadly stuff that's still around evolved in combination with humans and thus the population had some resistance.  Smallpox might kill a third but next generation it won't get as many and in time it won't get any and would die out.

The New World was a special case, they had no contact with old world diseases and thus they hadn't evolved resistance as the diseases evolved--the stuff that was devastating in the Old World was far worse in the New World.

Unfortunately, our protection against super lethal bugs is no longer viable.  They'll still burn out like they did in the past but instead of getting a village they'll get the global village.  If something really nasty makes a species jump (like flu is all too prone to doing) it could bring us down.  While there would no doubt be survivors from the disease whether they can survive the disruption to society is another matter.  (Contagion *GREATLY* downplayed this aspect of it.)
 
2013-04-18 01:19:22 AM

Loren: kiyote: So far there's like a 25% fatality rate. Let's hope this doesn't spread too far..

Actually, it's not nearly that bad.  It's 25% of those who got sick enough to end up in the hospital.  They've found others with antibodies.

J. Frank Parnell: There has never been a virus that even came close to killing everyone. But what i was talking about are modern engineered viruses. I'm pretty sure it's been tried, and found to be harder than you'd think.

There were places in the New World that were completely depopulated by old world diseases.  Perhaps it wasn't just one and it might simply have been a kill to below viability rather than a total kill, though.

The thing is normally a super-lethal disease with a good vector kills its hosts and thus kills itself in the process.  The deadly stuff that's still around evolved in combination with humans and thus the population had some resistance.  Smallpox might kill a third but next generation it won't get as many and in time it won't get any and would die out.

The New World was a special case, they had no contact with old world diseases and thus they hadn't evolved resistance as the diseases evolved--the stuff that was devastating in the Old World was far worse in the New World.

Unfortunately, our protection against super lethal bugs is no longer viable.  They'll still burn out like they did in the past but instead of getting a village they'll get the global village.  If something really nasty makes a species jump (like flu is all too prone to doing) it could bring us down.  While there would no doubt be survivors from the disease whether they can survive the disruption to society is another matter.  (Contagion *GREATLY* downplayed this aspect of it.)


THIS

those brave American frontiersman didn't venture west into an untouched land of plenty with only a handful of savages

they found the scattered remnants of survivors in a charnel house...most of whom died without ever seeing a white man
 
2013-04-18 01:22:14 AM

Queensowntalia: We're all going to die.

[img.photobucket.com image 426x325]

/saving throw


Those are d12, not d20.  You're doing the saving throw wrong.
 
2013-04-18 01:23:46 AM
Right on. Im headed to china soon.
Anyone want me to bring them back a little something?
 
2013-04-18 01:25:01 AM
All the best outbreaks in the past were successful due to ignorance, not travel.

We know far too much about micro-organisms now and how they work for any of them to be truly effective on a cataclysmic level. There will be no more Black Deaths. But there will always be new AIDS or SARS poking up periodically: Pandemics that inflict a low percentage until we figure out how they can be prevented/treated/marginalized.
 
2013-04-18 01:30:00 AM
thomas malthus chuckles
 
2013-04-18 01:36:56 AM
Why does this crap always seem to originate in China?
 
2013-04-18 01:48:36 AM
^^^^^

Because Gwyneth Paltrow:

encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com
 
2013-04-18 02:02:27 AM
img248.imageshack.us
 
2013-04-18 02:06:19 AM
Older Pathologist: Oh my God.
Younger Pathologist: Do you want me to take a sample?
Older Pathologist: I want you to step away from the table.
*sloshing noises are heard, implying that the virus has liquefied Beth's brain*
 
2013-04-18 02:10:33 AM
sites.google.com
 
2013-04-18 02:23:43 AM
A 5% drop in the population will do really bad things too property values, but have a positive effect on unemployment and road congestion :)
 
2013-04-18 02:26:46 AM
University of Pittsburgh's Vector Lab had a recombinant vaccine out the door, in record time, that was 100% effective in chickens and mice, for H5N1. Vaccinated chickens were challenged with `dose' of H5N1 10,000 times as large as a `barnyard' exposure.  None showed any evidence of disease. Controls? 100% dead..

Here is a thorough presentation of the technology (ignore the marketing yap):
http://www.novavax.com/download/file/World%20Vaccine%202012%20final% 20 halpern%20-%20pages%2011-17%20removed.pdf

If you are interested in delving into the detective story, at the little lower layer, re: the current candidate:
http://www .flutrackers.com/forum/showthread.php?t=202708
 
2013-04-18 02:57:51 AM
A pandemic won't wipe out humans, neither would global warfare. Both might put a good sized dent in the population, but won't end it. A super-volcano event like Yellowstone would be far more damaging, as would a largish sized asteroid strike. I don't actually know how many active calderas are currently brewing (too lazy to find out), but Yellowstone will blow again, and she is definitely due (within a few tens of thousands of years perhaps). That alone might be the best reason to build a space presence somewhere in our solar system.
 
2013-04-18 04:41:17 AM
3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-04-18 05:06:52 AM
Uh oh! Time to break out the hand sanitizers and surgeon's faces masks again!
 
2013-04-18 05:53:20 AM

Langdon_777: A 5% drop in the population will do really bad things too property values, but have a positive effect on unemployment and road congestion

Your logic is solid, but all farked up.  Go back to school.

 
2013-04-18 05:53:57 AM
I'm starting to regret just buying the minimum on my weekly shopping trip.
 
2013-04-18 06:33:35 AM
i48.tinypic.com
 
2013-04-18 06:54:24 AM

kiyote: So far there's like a 25% fatality rate. Let's hope this doesn't spread too far..


It's probably significantly less than 25%. The only sampling we truly have are from cases involving hospitalization (at least in the beginnin). A quarter of the hospitalized patients died? Those odds are a bit better.

I was reading an article about this strain and many quoted scientists indicated that we don't know how long this strain has been around. It's likely this strain is much more wide spread but because it presents like a normal flu - those sick do not seek treatment unless it becomes very bad.
 
2013-04-18 06:56:06 AM
The herd could use some thinning.
 
2013-04-18 06:57:13 AM

Phins: J. Frank Parnell: If it really was so easy for a virus to greatly depopulate the human race, i think they'd have done it already.

TuteTibiImperes: ...but the flu pandemic of 1918 killed 3-5% of the world's population. 50-100 million people.

And that was before air travel. Now we have thousands of people going from one continent to another every single day, taking all their germs and infections with them. A new virus that is easily transmitted between humans could be all over the world before anyone was aware that it existed.


Take, for example, the boy for Taiwan. He was visting in China. Diagnosis was not confirmed until he returned home.

/IRC the people he visited had a poultry farm
 
2013-04-18 06:59:32 AM

Xenomech:


I work at a company in which I interface with many people in Japan. A lot of my emails are phonetically spelled. The other day I received something with the word global in it. It was spelled grobal. All 9 files.
 
2013-04-18 07:03:30 AM
I look forward to being your new King of the Wasteland and have already set a "Just Walk Away" policy in motion.
 
2013-04-18 07:11:14 AM

J. Frank Parnell: The biggest death toll of any virus in recorded history is probably the black plague, and even the most generous estimates only put that at half the population of Europe dying. More realistic estimates put it at 25%.


Wasnt the black plague caused by a bacteria and not a virus?
 
2013-04-18 07:13:40 AM

RobertBruce: Even five percent of the population (1918) is a huge impact.   No it won't destabilize the population but even it caused noticeable waves in genetic diversity in Europe and North America.


Sort of.  As a general rule, the sick and elderly take the brunt of the fatalities in these situations.  Children too, but to a lesser extent.  My point being though, its the less productive members of society.

/From a macro perspective
 
2013-04-18 07:39:31 AM
So, I should forgo the happy ending?
 
2013-04-18 07:44:05 AM

Alonjar: RobertBruce: Even five percent of the population (1918) is a huge impact.   No it won't destabilize the population but even it caused noticeable waves in genetic diversity in Europe and North America.

Sort of.  As a general rule, the sick and elderly take the brunt of the fatalities in these situations.  Children too, but to a lesser extent.  My point being though, its the less productive members of society.

/From a macro perspective


Except that, in the case of the 1918 flu pandemic, it was predominantly the young and fit who died.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1918_flu_pandemic#Patterns_of_fatality
 
2013-04-18 08:03:21 AM

Doctor Funfrock: Queensowntalia: We're all going to die.

[img.photobucket.com image 426x325]

/saving throw

If you're going to roll your forts on a d12, you deserve what's coming to you.


A good DM would let him do it too.
"Lets see, you want those die huh? Okay. You need to hit 17"
*roll*
"An 11. No good. The dragon fire hits you, roll to see if you catch fire, you need 15"
*roll*
"9. Nope. You're on fire. Maybe you can make it to that lake. You need...lets say 14"
*roll*
"12. So close. Sorry, you're dead. Roll to see if you get to go to heaven. You need a 13"
 
2013-04-18 08:04:38 AM

GentlemanJ: Older Pathologist: Oh my God.
Younger Pathologist: Do you want me to take a sample?
Older Pathologist: I want you to step away from the table.
*sloshing noises are heard, implying that the virus has liquefied Beth's brain*


Damn scary movie
 
2013-04-18 08:14:51 AM

kiyote: So far there's like a 25% fatality rate. Let's hope this doesn't spread too far..


It's killed16 people so far. This outbreak has the capability of killing literally some people.
 
2013-04-18 08:55:51 AM

digistil: False flag.


Too bad gov't doesn't false flag like you.
 
2013-04-18 10:37:18 AM

Ishkur: All the best outbreaks in the past were successful due to ignorance, not travel.

We know far too much about micro-organisms now and how they work for any of them to be truly effective on a cataclysmic level. There will be no more Black Deaths. But there will always be new AIDS or SARS poking up periodically: Pandemics that inflict a low percentage until we figure out how they can be prevented/treated/marginalized.


Perhaps. Here's another way to look at. There are a lot of people on Earth. They require some basics such as food and water every day. Too often their food harbors influenza whilst their water harbors mosquitoes. In time of drought, the mosquitos (in cisterns) and the influenza (in chickens, ducks and geese) get concentrated closer and closer to the people. Acute water scarcity and lack of awareness about proper water storage methods combined with concentration of food animals could bring Black Death II.

But, we have figured out how to control the threats during drought? Not really.

Current India drought
 
2013-04-18 11:41:00 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: There's always an Arquillian Battle Cruiser, or a Corillian Death Ray, or an H7N9 avian flu that is about to wipe out all life on this miserable little planet, and the only way these people can get on with their happy lives is that they DO NOT KNOW ABOUT IT!



approves
 
2013-04-18 11:42:23 AM
goddamitsomuch

static3.businessinsider.com
 
2013-04-18 11:54:02 AM

J. Frank Parnell: RobertBruce: which time haven't you heard of? All of them?

You talking movies, or something?

There has never been a virus that even came close to killing everyone. But what i was talking about are modern engineered viruses. I'm pretty sure it's been tried, and found to be harder than you'd think.

Isolated populations used to have high death-tolls from viruses that developed in other populations, but one of the good things about the global travel thing we have going on now is we've already been exposed to pretty much every humans strain out there, which just leaves these crossovers from animals, but again, it's doubtful we'll see one that kills most people. The biggest death toll of any virus in recorded history is probably the black plague, and even the most generous estimates only put that at half the population of Europe dying. More realistic estimates put it at 25%.

I've pointed out before that it's not even in the interest of viruses to kill people. Any deaths are accidental side effects from the methods used to try and transmit to other bodies. If they were to successfully kill off all of their host species, they would doom themselves. After millions of years evolving alongside a species they need them to keep living.


Black plague was caused by the yersinia pestis bacterium, not a virus.
 
2013-04-18 12:10:07 PM

Voiceofreason01: kiyote: So far there's like a 25% fatality rate. Let's hope this doesn't spread too far..

It's killed16 people so far. This outbreak has the capability of killing literally some people.


There's some speculation that the CDC is going to offically announce a pandemic today and that the new cases provide evidence of sustained H2H transmission. We'll see.

One of the problems scientists are facing is that not all birds are sympomatic and not all sympomatic birds have tested positive for this strain. There was a quiet announcement today that they're going to start looking for other sources since they're no doubting that birds are spreading it.
 
2013-04-18 12:27:46 PM
Someone is taking the game too seriously...

i.imgur.com
 
2013-04-18 12:36:40 PM

cevarius: Someone is taking the game too seriously...


What is that game?
 
2013-04-18 12:46:50 PM

cevarius: Someone is taking the game too seriously...


Now I want to play.

/rooting for my virus is an awkward feeling
 
2013-04-18 01:16:22 PM

parahaps: TuteTibiImperes: parahaps: J. Frank Parnell: If it really was so easy for a virus to greatly depopulate the human race, i think they'd have done it already.

Uh...

It hasn't happened that I can recall since the advent of modern medicine.  That isn't to say that it couldn't, especially in the case of a Twelve Monkeys-esque man-made virus terrorist attack, but I don't see anything ever taking as big a chunk of the population out as the black plague did back in the day.

I guess you can arbitrarily decide that 'modern medicine' started after the last big one, but the flu pandemic of 1918 killed 3-5% of the world's population. 50-100 million people.


Had a little bird
Its name was enza
Opened up the window and Influenza!
 
2013-04-18 03:03:34 PM
There's a medical blood filter that can capture any virus: Aethlon Medical's Hemopurifier

It's been proved against H1N1, H5N1, HIV, HCV, Dengue Fever, Ebola....

The FDA is holding it back so far...
 
2013-04-18 04:49:50 PM

Omahawg: yes.

bie?

eip

end of the world boobies


No more boobies?  I *don't* feel fine.
 
2013-04-18 05:16:15 PM
LGT a story about the potential break up of the Pepsi Co brands. WTF?
 
2013-04-18 08:19:41 PM

ransack.: cevarius: Someone is taking the game too seriously...

What is that game?


Plague Inc.
 
2013-04-18 11:26:57 PM

Summoner101: Alright, I'm done with this week. I'm just going to set an alarm for
Monday.


Yeah, um, about that...we need you to sign for this order of one billion cicadas you ordered seventeen years ago.
 
2013-04-19 01:31:48 AM

PunGent: Summoner101: Alright, I'm done with this week. I'm just going to set an alarm for
Monday.

Yeah, um, about that...we need you to sign for this order of one billion cicadas you ordered seventeen years ago.


. . .

/waits for the moon, rivers, and sun to turn red
 
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