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(E! Online)   Dove's new ad campaign involves an FBI sketch artist and women crying about their looks. Sounds like a bachelorette party gone wrong   (eonline.com) divider line 28
    More: Interesting, sketch artists, FBI, bachelorette party, facial composite, beauty  
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6516 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Apr 2013 at 1:19 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
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Archived thread
2013-04-18 02:00:06 AM
4 votes:

HotWingAgenda: The women each gave the sketch artist detailed technical descriptions of their features.  The people they met couldn't remember those details, and therefore described them in more general impressions.  In fact, the women were specifically instructed to chat up the people they met, generating a more positive perception than if they hadn't introduced themselves or spoken.

Therefore, no blemishes or wrinkles, and smiles instead of neutral faces.  This bullshiat is why sociology is not a science.


And yet the second pictures were far more accurate than the ones people gave about themselves.
2013-04-18 01:59:34 AM
4 votes:
I think some people are missing the point.

If you noticed, a big thing was that the women looked more like the second picture because the "other person" was giving a better description that wasn't filled with all the things the women hated about themselves like "my chin is blah" or "my eyes are all crap".

It isn't about science so much as showing, people don't focus on the bad. They see you and go "hey, she looks like X, X & X" and the X usually is not "God that biatches eyes were huge and her nose had a kink."
2013-04-18 02:17:20 AM
3 votes:

HotWingAgenda: The women each gave the sketch artist detailed technical descriptions of their features.  The people they met couldn't remember those details, and therefore described them in more general impressions.  In fact, the women were specifically instructed to chat up the people they met, generating a more positive perception than if they hadn't introduced themselves or spoken.

Therefore, no blemishes or wrinkles, and smiles instead of neutral faces.  This bullshiat is why sociology is not a science.


Congratulations, you missed the point entirely.  Hint:  they weren't and didn't intend to perform science.
2013-04-18 02:02:31 AM
3 votes:
Dove is owned by Unilever, owner of the Axe brand and its sexist advertisement campaigns.

Consume accordingly.
2013-04-18 06:41:07 PM
2 votes:

E5bie: karmachameleon: Dear Jerk: If your description of yourself includes a big ol' mole on your face and a stranger's description of you doesn't, whose description is likely more accurate?

The point is not that one is more accurate than the other, the point is about who is focusing on what.

We tend to be our own worst critics.  Other people do not tend to notice the "flaws" that we sometimes obsess about ourselves.  What is a flaw to us is just a normal, unremarkable feature to anyone else.

The point was not to conduct science, and those of you insisting on that aspect are missing the forest for the trees.  This, from someone deeply devoted to science.  That was not the point of this short film.

Genius, the point is to sell Dove products.

It's not about pointing to a higher Truth, or improving women's self esteem, or any of that.
Ads only exist to manipulate your emotions in a way that will last until you next go shopping.
See soaps in store. Feel warm and fuzzy at Dove. Buy Dove soap.


Your cynicism is noted (and sometimes warranted).  It is, however, possible to practice commerce and humanity at the same time.  It would have been easier and cheaper for them to produce a standard commercial, and instead they produced this.  It could have been worse, and just because it's an ad, doesn't mean it doesn't have an important message.
2013-04-18 10:05:44 AM
2 votes:
I am a guy, and it occurs to me that I don't think I could describe my face in enough detail for a sketch without a mirror.  Is that a guy thing, or am I just particularly unconcerned with my appearance?
2013-04-18 08:43:46 AM
2 votes:
So the message is that women are more attractive than they think they are, which is important because a woman's worth is still tied to her looks?

Dove. Where we get you to buy our products by using a different type of emotional manipulation.
2013-04-18 08:39:23 AM
2 votes:
While I commend Dove for their campaign, the sketch artist HAD to have known what he was doing in purposefully creating fairly miserable before pictures.  Some of those before pictures were near to caricatures.
2013-04-18 03:28:09 AM
2 votes:

E5bie: HotWingAgenda: karmachameleon: HotWingAgenda: The women each gave the sketch artist detailed technical descriptions of their features.  The people they met couldn't remember those details, and therefore described them in more general impressions.  In fact, the women were specifically instructed to chat up the people they met, generating a more positive perception than if they hadn't introduced themselves or spoken.

Therefore, no blemishes or wrinkles, and smiles instead of neutral faces.  This bullshiat is why sociology is not a science.

Congratulations, you missed the point entirely.  Hint:  they weren't and didn't intend to perform science.

The point they thought they were making is that women are overly critical of themselves.  The point they actually made is that a person described in vague terms sounds more attractive than someone described in technical detail.  Professional photographers learned to put vaseline on the lens for fat, ugly or wrinkly people a long time ago.

I knew this was an ad and not science too, but it's dressed up to sound scientific, and the first thing I thought while watching the ad was "not blinded". The artist knew which description he was getting, and it's really super easy to make an accurate drawing look pretty or not using shading and emphasis. Also, yeah, most people are way too polite to point out feature faults in a perfect stranger.


Now you're both - still - missing the point.
2013-04-18 02:12:02 AM
2 votes:

marcre3363: I look like Brad Pitt after he ate George Clooney and a bucket of wings.


Sketch.......NOW!


i965.photobucket.com
2013-04-18 01:22:17 AM
2 votes:
i.imgur.com
2013-04-18 04:03:07 PM
1 votes:
Total crap, the guy made the solo one look a little sad and drew prettier, happier faces on the group one.
2013-04-18 01:32:20 PM
1 votes:

TedRaceway: I am a guy, and it occurs to me that I don't think I could describe my face in enough detail for a sketch without a mirror.  Is that a guy thing, or am I just particularly unconcerned with my appearance?


Nope. You're a guy. Your head his filled with ideas that will change the world or give you an advantage over your competitors, not this trivial nonsense.
2013-04-18 11:53:32 AM
1 votes:
What I found remarkable was the fact that the artist did such a good job on the drawings. I went to art school ages ago. I've drawn portraits of friends and people sitting in public spaces and cannot fathom being able to get a decent resemblance based on a verbal description.

As for Dove, they have good products. I have no complaint about them. Their ad campaign is sensible and low key. "We like you as you are. By the way, we sell soap and stuff." instead of saying, "You'll never be loved unless you buy our stuff."

As for women and self esteem... women tear themselves down and then fark bulldozes the smoldering wreckage.
2013-04-18 10:44:44 AM
1 votes:

karmachameleon: Dear Jerk: If your description of yourself includes a big ol' mole on your face and a stranger's description of you doesn't, whose description is likely more accurate?

The point is not that one is more accurate than the other, the point is about who is focusing on what.

We tend to be our own worst critics.  Other people do not tend to notice the "flaws" that we sometimes obsess about ourselves.  What is a flaw to us is just a normal, unremarkable feature to anyone else.

The point was not to conduct science, and those of you insisting on that aspect are missing the forest for the trees.  This, from someone deeply devoted to science.  That was not the point of this short film.


Genius, the point is to sell Dove products.

It's not about pointing to a higher Truth, or improving women's self esteem, or any of that.
Ads only exist to manipulate your emotions in a way that will last until you next go shopping.
See soaps in store. Feel warm and fuzzy at Dove. Buy Dove soap.
2013-04-18 09:54:12 AM
1 votes:

precious_crotchflake: Mr Guy: Why isn't anyone pointing out the premise is entirely false, anyway?  The woman looks MUCH more like the picture she described of herself.  Even with the benefit of a skewed sketch artist, positive skewing from strangers, the woman is more identifiable in her self description, which is neither shocking.

What Dove really demonstrated is that at a glance, people just notice you're overall impression on them, but once you point out your own flaws THEY CAN NOT BE UNSEEN.

Something tells me if some Farkers had been the strangers recruited to give a description, they'd have added horns, warts and a caption saying "girls are gross and mean!"
I think there is some b.s. to this ad, but what Dove inadvertently demonstrated is that there are some Farkers who  will still tear down women no matter what the evidence is, out of some weird need to.  Dove should do a campaign using them.


I'm just not sure the message works, as they intended.  They are trying for a message of "You don't look like you think you do", but the truth is more obvious, "You DO look like that, just no one else CARES as long as you're relatively healthy".
2013-04-18 09:14:29 AM
1 votes:
Why isn't anyone pointing out the premise is entirely false, anyway?  The woman looks MUCH more like the picture she described of herself.  Even with the benefit of a skewed sketch artist, positive skewing from strangers, the woman is more identifiable in her self description, which is neither shocking.

What Dove really demonstrated is that at a glance, people just notice you're overall impression on them, but once you point out your own flaws THEY CAN NOT BE UNSEEN.
2013-04-18 08:42:23 AM
1 votes:
You mean that people who spend time EVERY day concealing their flaws know exactly what those flaws are?  And they were relatively nice and outgoing to the strangers, enhancing the halo effect?

Amazing!

Seriously, though, this kind of BS pisses me off.  For the most part, women don't want to look good because society or advertisements tells them they should.  They just really want to look better than the next woman.  And the primary reason behind this is because they want a better mate.
2013-04-18 08:38:19 AM
1 votes:

Dear Jerk: If your description of yourself includes a big ol' mole on your face and a stranger's description of you doesn't, whose description is likely more accurate?


The point is not that one is more accurate than the other, the point is about who is focusing on what.

We tend to be our own worst critics.  Other people do not tend to notice the "flaws" that we sometimes obsess about ourselves.  What is a flaw to us is just a normal, unremarkable feature to anyone else.

The point was not to conduct science, and those of you insisting on that aspect are missing the forest for the trees.  This, from someone deeply devoted to science.  That was not the point of this short film.
2013-04-18 07:59:32 AM
1 votes:
The next dove commercial:

Woman, standing over the sink...scrubs and washes her face, looks up, stares at herself and says:
"God, I look like crap today"
-end-


/never gonna happen
//so much for true beauty
///natural slashies
2013-04-18 07:18:26 AM
1 votes:
I like how they remind us at the end that "Beauty [...] couldn't be more critical to your happiness."
2013-04-18 05:47:32 AM
1 votes:

karmachameleon: Congratulations, you missed the point entirely. Hint: they weren't and didn't intend to perform science.


Exactly. While I'm not unhappy the shenanigans were used to do some good (along with the blatant marketing), they were shenanigans all the same. The sketch artist knew which image was which at all times, and so made the "other person" image deliberately better than the "self images" he sandbagged. He didn't even have to come all that close (and he didn't pretty frequently), just make one less pretty than the other, by screwing with proportions, less-flattering hairstyles, facial cues, etc.

All the imagery tricks you see in "before and after" beauty ads, in fact, and everybody's falling for it 'cause it's "all new, scented with aloe and enriched with 'rejuvinator#6'. Astroturfing at its finest.

/  I can respect the filmography, though, it was effectively done.
2013-04-18 04:55:26 AM
1 votes:
Come to think of it, if I went missing I couldn't describe myself to a sketch artist to save my life.
2013-04-18 02:37:17 AM
1 votes:

karmachameleon: HotWingAgenda: The women each gave the sketch artist detailed technical descriptions of their features.  The people they met couldn't remember those details, and therefore described them in more general impressions.  In fact, the women were specifically instructed to chat up the people they met, generating a more positive perception than if they hadn't introduced themselves or spoken.

Therefore, no blemishes or wrinkles, and smiles instead of neutral faces.  This bullshiat is why sociology is not a science.

Congratulations, you missed the point entirely.  Hint:  they weren't and didn't intend to perform science.


The point they thought they were making is that women are overly critical of themselves.  The point they actually made is that a person described in vague terms sounds more attractive than someone described in technical detail.  Professional photographers learned to put vaseline on the lens for fat, ugly or wrinkly people a long time ago.
2013-04-18 01:44:30 AM
1 votes:
Wow, Dove really does care. Finally a beauty product company that cares about the woman inside.
Dove doesn't just wash your skin, it washes your soul.
2013-04-18 01:36:20 AM
1 votes:
The women each gave the sketch artist detailed technical descriptions of their features.  The people they met couldn't remember those details, and therefore described them in more general impressions.  In fact, the women were specifically instructed to chat up the people they met, generating a more positive perception than if they hadn't introduced themselves or spoken.

Therefore, no blemishes or wrinkles, and smiles instead of neutral faces.  This bullshiat is why sociology is not a science.
2013-04-18 01:12:47 AM
1 votes:
This just in: people will describe you in kinder words than you will describe yourself.
2013-04-17 09:21:34 PM
1 votes:
If this doesn't win a CLIO, there's no justice.
 
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