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(E! Online)   Dove's new ad campaign involves an FBI sketch artist and women crying about their looks. Sounds like a bachelorette party gone wrong   (eonline.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, sketch artists, FBI, bachelorette party, facial composite, beauty  
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6638 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Apr 2013 at 1:19 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



78 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-04-17 09:21:34 PM  
If this doesn't win a CLIO, there's no justice.
 
2013-04-18 01:12:47 AM  
This just in: people will describe you in kinder words than you will describe yourself.
 
2013-04-18 01:21:19 AM  
I look like Brad Pitt after he ate George Clooney and a bucket of wings.


Sketch.......NOW!
 
2013-04-18 01:22:17 AM  
i.imgur.com
 
2013-04-18 01:28:54 AM  

Cyno01: [i.imgur.com image 245x225]


This.

What a nice change to see beauty products marketed by building self esteem instead of destroying it. W2G Dove!
 
2013-04-18 01:36:20 AM  
The women each gave the sketch artist detailed technical descriptions of their features.  The people they met couldn't remember those details, and therefore described them in more general impressions.  In fact, the women were specifically instructed to chat up the people they met, generating a more positive perception than if they hadn't introduced themselves or spoken.

Therefore, no blemishes or wrinkles, and smiles instead of neutral faces.  This bullshiat is why sociology is not a science.
 
2013-04-18 01:42:35 AM  
Dove... altering reality since 1867.
 
2013-04-18 01:42:41 AM  
for years Dove has "beauty bar" on the package. ugly people not allowed to buy.
 
2013-04-18 01:44:30 AM  
Wow, Dove really does care. Finally a beauty product company that cares about the woman inside.
Dove doesn't just wash your skin, it washes your soul.
 
2013-04-18 01:44:58 AM  

HotWingAgenda: The women each gave the sketch artist detailed technical descriptions of their features.  The people they met couldn't remember those details, and therefore described them in more general impressions.  In fact, the women were specifically instructed to chat up the people they met, generating a more positive perception than if they hadn't introduced themselves or spoken.

Therefore, no blemishes or wrinkles, and smiles instead of neutral faces.  This bullshiat is why sociology is not a science.


And why eyewitnesses make for shiatty criminal evidence.
 
2013-04-18 01:46:40 AM  

HotWingAgenda: The women each gave the sketch artist detailed technical descriptions of their features.  The people they met couldn't remember those details, and therefore described them in more general impressions.  In fact, the women were specifically instructed to chat up the people they met, generating a more positive perception than if they hadn't introduced themselves or spoken.

Therefore, no blemishes or wrinkles, and smiles instead of neutral faces.  This bullshiat is why sociology is not a science.


Its also why eye witness testimony is not reliable.
 
2013-04-18 01:50:29 AM  

HotWingAgenda: The women each gave the sketch artist detailed technical descriptions of their features.  The people they met couldn't remember those details, and therefore described them in more general impressions.  In fact, the women were specifically instructed to chat up the people they met, generating a more positive perception than if they hadn't introduced themselves or spoken.

Therefore, no blemishes or wrinkles, and smiles instead of neutral faces.  This bullshiat is why sociology is not a science.


Instructions for the test influence the outcome. Sounds like some form of science.
 
2013-04-18 01:51:57 AM  

gozar_the_destroyer: HotWingAgenda: The women each gave the sketch artist detailed technical descriptions of their features.  The people they met couldn't remember those details, and therefore described them in more general impressions.  In fact, the women were specifically instructed to chat up the people they met, generating a more positive perception than if they hadn't introduced themselves or spoken.

Therefore, no blemishes or wrinkles, and smiles instead of neutral faces.  This bullshiat is why sociology is not a science.

Instructions for the test influence the outcome. Sounds like some form of science.


That's psychology.
 
2013-04-18 01:51:59 AM  

HotWingAgenda: The women each gave the sketch artist detailed technical descriptions of their features.  The people they met couldn't remember those details, and therefore described them in more general impressions.  In fact, the women were specifically instructed to chat up the people they met, generating a more positive perception than if they hadn't introduced themselves or spoken.

Therefore, no blemishes or wrinkles, and smiles instead of neutral faces.  This bullshiat is why sociology is not a science.


It's also why eyewitness testimony makes for shiatty reliable testiclemony.
 
2013-04-18 01:59:34 AM  
I think some people are missing the point.

If you noticed, a big thing was that the women looked more like the second picture because the "other person" was giving a better description that wasn't filled with all the things the women hated about themselves like "my chin is blah" or "my eyes are all crap".

It isn't about science so much as showing, people don't focus on the bad. They see you and go "hey, she looks like X, X & X" and the X usually is not "God that biatches eyes were huge and her nose had a kink."
 
2013-04-18 02:00:06 AM  

HotWingAgenda: The women each gave the sketch artist detailed technical descriptions of their features.  The people they met couldn't remember those details, and therefore described them in more general impressions.  In fact, the women were specifically instructed to chat up the people they met, generating a more positive perception than if they hadn't introduced themselves or spoken.

Therefore, no blemishes or wrinkles, and smiles instead of neutral faces.  This bullshiat is why sociology is not a science.


And yet the second pictures were far more accurate than the ones people gave about themselves.
 
2013-04-18 02:01:00 AM  
I like the part where women felt they were not beautiful because they described themselves as "fat" or "Wrinkled" or "big" then dove turned around and drew them slim, and younger looking and wrinkle free....Hmmmmm, that's some fine sticking to the traditional norms of what "beauty" is in western culture. I guess heavy people or older people can't be beautiful on the inside because it's not properly reflected on the outside.
 
2013-04-18 02:02:31 AM  
Dove is owned by Unilever, owner of the Axe brand and its sexist advertisement campaigns.

Consume accordingly.
 
2013-04-18 02:12:02 AM  

marcre3363: I look like Brad Pitt after he ate George Clooney and a bucket of wings.


Sketch.......NOW!


i965.photobucket.com
 
2013-04-18 02:17:20 AM  

HotWingAgenda: The women each gave the sketch artist detailed technical descriptions of their features.  The people they met couldn't remember those details, and therefore described them in more general impressions.  In fact, the women were specifically instructed to chat up the people they met, generating a more positive perception than if they hadn't introduced themselves or spoken.

Therefore, no blemishes or wrinkles, and smiles instead of neutral faces.  This bullshiat is why sociology is not a science.


Congratulations, you missed the point entirely.  Hint:  they weren't and didn't intend to perform science.
 
2013-04-18 02:32:55 AM  

bonzeemer: marcre3363: I look like Brad Pitt after he ate George Clooney and a bucket of wings.


Sketch.......NOW!

[i965.photobucket.com image 834x1024]


I laughed so hard that my chapped lips ended up splitting, dripping blood onto my dinner.

/Thanks for the ew.
 
2013-04-18 02:35:28 AM  

marcre3363: I look like Brad Pitt after he ate George Clooney and a bucket of wings.


Sketch.......NOW!


Reminds me of http://jimllpaintit.tumblr.com/ which, if you've never seen before, should not be viewed with liquids in your mouth.
 
2013-04-18 02:37:17 AM  

karmachameleon: HotWingAgenda: The women each gave the sketch artist detailed technical descriptions of their features.  The people they met couldn't remember those details, and therefore described them in more general impressions.  In fact, the women were specifically instructed to chat up the people they met, generating a more positive perception than if they hadn't introduced themselves or spoken.

Therefore, no blemishes or wrinkles, and smiles instead of neutral faces.  This bullshiat is why sociology is not a science.

Congratulations, you missed the point entirely.  Hint:  they weren't and didn't intend to perform science.


The point they thought they were making is that women are overly critical of themselves.  The point they actually made is that a person described in vague terms sounds more attractive than someone described in technical detail.  Professional photographers learned to put vaseline on the lens for fat, ugly or wrinkly people a long time ago.
 
2013-04-18 02:52:36 AM  
It's because you have been looking at yourself in the mirror every day for your entire life and you know every detail, every mole, every crease, every blackheaded pore, every wisp of hair, and every little thing to describe to a police sketch artist.

Someone else seeing you for the first time wouldn't notice these details and they're just describing generalized first impressions.

We are our own worst critics because we know ourselves the best.
 
2013-04-18 02:55:50 AM  

INeedAName: And yet the second pictures were far more accurate than the ones people gave about themselves.


The only person for which that was true was the long-haired blonde woman. The others, not so much.
 
2013-04-18 03:05:30 AM  

HotWingAgenda: karmachameleon: HotWingAgenda: The women each gave the sketch artist detailed technical descriptions of their features.  The people they met couldn't remember those details, and therefore described them in more general impressions.  In fact, the women were specifically instructed to chat up the people they met, generating a more positive perception than if they hadn't introduced themselves or spoken.

Therefore, no blemishes or wrinkles, and smiles instead of neutral faces.  This bullshiat is why sociology is not a science.

Congratulations, you missed the point entirely.  Hint:  they weren't and didn't intend to perform science.

The point they thought they were making is that women are overly critical of themselves.  The point they actually made is that a person described in vague terms sounds more attractive than someone described in technical detail.  Professional photographers learned to put vaseline on the lens for fat, ugly or wrinkly people a long time ago.


I knew this was an ad and not science too, but it's dressed up to sound scientific, and the first thing I thought while watching the ad was "not blinded". The artist knew which description he was getting, and it's really super easy to make an accurate drawing look pretty or not using shading and emphasis. Also, yeah, most people are way too polite to point out feature faults in a perfect stranger.
 
2013-04-18 03:13:19 AM  
Whine about your looks, then whine about how someone else is making you whine about your looks.... that is why I only bang ugly broads who never wear makeup.

/that IS the REASON.  It IS
 
2013-04-18 03:14:58 AM  
But there was minimalist piano music! Anything with Erik Satie is beautiful!
 
2013-04-18 03:16:18 AM  

Dion Fortune: Whine about your looks, then whine about how someone else is making you whine about your looks.... that is why I only bang ugly broads who never wear makeup.

/that IS the REASON.  It IS


"But I like my makeup" is the typical response, despite looking like an Egyptian prince.
 
2013-04-18 03:28:09 AM  

E5bie: HotWingAgenda: karmachameleon: HotWingAgenda: The women each gave the sketch artist detailed technical descriptions of their features.  The people they met couldn't remember those details, and therefore described them in more general impressions.  In fact, the women were specifically instructed to chat up the people they met, generating a more positive perception than if they hadn't introduced themselves or spoken.

Therefore, no blemishes or wrinkles, and smiles instead of neutral faces.  This bullshiat is why sociology is not a science.

Congratulations, you missed the point entirely.  Hint:  they weren't and didn't intend to perform science.

The point they thought they were making is that women are overly critical of themselves.  The point they actually made is that a person described in vague terms sounds more attractive than someone described in technical detail.  Professional photographers learned to put vaseline on the lens for fat, ugly or wrinkly people a long time ago.

I knew this was an ad and not science too, but it's dressed up to sound scientific, and the first thing I thought while watching the ad was "not blinded". The artist knew which description he was getting, and it's really super easy to make an accurate drawing look pretty or not using shading and emphasis. Also, yeah, most people are way too polite to point out feature faults in a perfect stranger.


Now you're both - still - missing the point.
 
2013-04-18 03:35:02 AM  

E5bie: HotWingAgenda: karmachameleon: HotWingAgenda: The women each gave the sketch artist detailed technical descriptions of their features.  The people they met couldn't remember those details, and therefore described them in more general impressions.  In fact, the women were specifically instructed to chat up the people they met, generating a more positive perception than if they hadn't introduced themselves or spoken.

Therefore, no blemishes or wrinkles, and smiles instead of neutral faces.  This bullshiat is why sociology is not a science.

Congratulations, you missed the point entirely.  Hint:  they weren't and didn't intend to perform science.

The point they thought they were making is that women are overly critical of themselves.  The point they actually made is that a person described in vague terms sounds more attractive than someone described in technical detail.  Professional photographers learned to put vaseline on the lens for fat, ugly or wrinkly people a long time ago.

I knew this was an ad and not science too, but it's dressed up to sound scientific, and the first thing I thought while watching the ad was "not blinded". The artist knew which description he was getting, and it's really super easy to make an accurate drawing look pretty or not using shading and emphasis. Also, yeah, most people are way too polite to point out feature faults in a perfect stranger.


Yes, I, too, believe in science, and therefore never remember a general impression of someone's looks, but instead take an exhaustive inventory of their features in technical detail, with special attention paid to all the flaws and imperfections while chatting with them about general topics. This is also how I make friends.
 
2013-04-18 04:25:51 AM  
Draw me like one of your French Dove girls...
 
2013-04-18 04:55:26 AM  
Come to think of it, if I went missing I couldn't describe myself to a sketch artist to save my life.
 
2013-04-18 05:04:15 AM  
obligatory

/if you have daughters, show them this
//I have 3
 
2013-04-18 05:04:53 AM  
I think that a sexy girl is one that is having fun no matter what she looks like.  I would hate to be in the presence of someone who only feels good by looking good.
 
2013-04-18 05:25:24 AM  
cdn.ebaumsworld.com
 
2013-04-18 05:47:32 AM  

karmachameleon: Congratulations, you missed the point entirely. Hint: they weren't and didn't intend to perform science.


Exactly. While I'm not unhappy the shenanigans were used to do some good (along with the blatant marketing), they were shenanigans all the same. The sketch artist knew which image was which at all times, and so made the "other person" image deliberately better than the "self images" he sandbagged. He didn't even have to come all that close (and he didn't pretty frequently), just make one less pretty than the other, by screwing with proportions, less-flattering hairstyles, facial cues, etc.

All the imagery tricks you see in "before and after" beauty ads, in fact, and everybody's falling for it 'cause it's "all new, scented with aloe and enriched with 'rejuvinator#6'. Astroturfing at its finest.

/  I can respect the filmography, though, it was effectively done.
 
2013-04-18 05:48:11 AM  

Ray_Peranus: [cdn.ebaumsworld.com image 440x321]


Also, this. :)
 
2013-04-18 06:45:50 AM  
Women are narcissistic and insecure? Who knew?!
 
2013-04-18 07:06:02 AM  
If your description of yourself includes a big ol' mole on your face and a stranger's description of you doesn't, whose description is likely more accurate?
 
2013-04-18 07:18:26 AM  
I like how they remind us at the end that "Beauty [...] couldn't be more critical to your happiness."
 
2013-04-18 07:21:10 AM  
sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net
 
2013-04-18 07:39:27 AM  
The Donkey seemed to like the party.

www.eatsleeplivefilm.com
 
2013-04-18 07:48:34 AM  

Christian Bale: HotWingAgenda: The women each gave the sketch artist detailed technical descriptions of their features.  The people they met couldn't remember those details, and therefore described them in more general impressions.  In fact, the women were specifically instructed to chat up the people they met, generating a more positive perception than if they hadn't introduced themselves or spoken.

Therefore, no blemishes or wrinkles, and smiles instead of neutral faces.  This bullshiat is why sociology is not a science.

It's also why eyewitness testimony makes for shiatty reliable testiclemony.


lolwut?
 
2013-04-18 07:59:32 AM  
The next dove commercial:

Woman, standing over the sink...scrubs and washes her face, looks up, stares at herself and says:
"God, I look like crap today"
-end-


/never gonna happen
//so much for true beauty
///natural slashies
 
2013-04-18 08:38:19 AM  

Dear Jerk: If your description of yourself includes a big ol' mole on your face and a stranger's description of you doesn't, whose description is likely more accurate?


The point is not that one is more accurate than the other, the point is about who is focusing on what.

We tend to be our own worst critics.  Other people do not tend to notice the "flaws" that we sometimes obsess about ourselves.  What is a flaw to us is just a normal, unremarkable feature to anyone else.

The point was not to conduct science, and those of you insisting on that aspect are missing the forest for the trees.  This, from someone deeply devoted to science.  That was not the point of this short film.
 
2013-04-18 08:39:23 AM  
While I commend Dove for their campaign, the sketch artist HAD to have known what he was doing in purposefully creating fairly miserable before pictures.  Some of those before pictures were near to caricatures.
 
2013-04-18 08:42:23 AM  
You mean that people who spend time EVERY day concealing their flaws know exactly what those flaws are?  And they were relatively nice and outgoing to the strangers, enhancing the halo effect?

Amazing!

Seriously, though, this kind of BS pisses me off.  For the most part, women don't want to look good because society or advertisements tells them they should.  They just really want to look better than the next woman.  And the primary reason behind this is because they want a better mate.
 
2013-04-18 08:43:46 AM  
So the message is that women are more attractive than they think they are, which is important because a woman's worth is still tied to her looks?

Dove. Where we get you to buy our products by using a different type of emotional manipulation.
 
2013-04-18 09:04:44 AM  
It shows that they feel like they're covered with flaws and horrible features, whereas other people think they have nice faces. This altered perception is pervasive in society. It's a problem, and the filmmaker wants to show people this issue's consequences so we can start dealing with it and MAYBE fixing it.

Commenting on whether society only values a woman based on her looks is beside the point, since women tend to want to be pretty. They may also want to be the most accomplished phlebotomist in their hospital group, but they want to be pretty and it's a fairly consistent desire. Being valued based on your looks is not a females only thing. Many studies have shown that handsome and tall men who keep their hair have more successful careers and tend to be considered for promotion at a much higher rate than shorter men or those who don't keep their hair. All of humanity is shallow and materialistic- you can either shake your fist at the sky in impotent rage at this fact, or start helping the individuals within society to deal with the implications of this tendency. Many people choose the latter, as it has a relatively high possibility of success and impact. It's simply easier to help individuals than fix all of human society. India hasn't stopped burning brides, and we haven't stopped valuing a tight bottom and fine features. Pick your battle.
 
2013-04-18 09:14:29 AM  
Why isn't anyone pointing out the premise is entirely false, anyway?  The woman looks MUCH more like the picture she described of herself.  Even with the benefit of a skewed sketch artist, positive skewing from strangers, the woman is more identifiable in her self description, which is neither shocking.

What Dove really demonstrated is that at a glance, people just notice you're overall impression on them, but once you point out your own flaws THEY CAN NOT BE UNSEEN.
 
2013-04-18 09:27:58 AM  

Mitch Mitchell: I think that a sexy girl is one that is having fun no matter what she looks like.  I would hate to be in the presence of someone who only feels good by looking good.


i.imgur.com
 
2013-04-18 09:34:35 AM  

HotWingAgenda: The women each gave the sketch artist detailed technical descriptions of their features.  The people they met couldn't remember those details, and therefore described them in more general impressions.  In fact, the women were specifically instructed to chat up the people they met, generating a more positive perception than if they hadn't introduced themselves or spoken.

Therefore, no blemishes or wrinkles, and smiles instead of neutral faces.  This bullshiat is why sociology is not a science.


I once got asked by a topless woman on a close friends cabin trip (i go to one each year) why I didn't notice the stretch marks her bras caused on her breasts.  My response was mflbribblehuh.  She'd have been better off asking after everyone got dressed.
 
2013-04-18 09:39:14 AM  

Ishkur: INeedAName: And yet the second pictures were far more accurate than the ones people gave about themselves.

The only person for which that was true was the long-haired blonde woman. The others, not so much.


Nah.  For a couple, reality was a mixture of both pictures.  But for most the second one was more accurate.
 
2013-04-18 09:48:31 AM  

cwolf20: HotWingAgenda: The women each gave the sketch artist detailed technical descriptions of their features.  The people they met couldn't remember those details, and therefore described them in more general impressions.  In fact, the women were specifically instructed to chat up the people they met, generating a more positive perception than if they hadn't introduced themselves or spoken.

Therefore, no blemishes or wrinkles, and smiles instead of neutral faces.  This bullshiat is why sociology is not a science.

I once got asked by a topless woman on a close friends cabin trip (i go to one each year) why I didn't notice the stretch marks her bras caused on her breasts.  My response was mflbribblehuh.  She'd have been better off asking after everyone got dressed.


I hope you remind her the best way to get rid of skin imprints is proper hydration, and physically stimulating blood flow back into the affected areas.
 
2013-04-18 09:50:00 AM  

Mr Guy: Why isn't anyone pointing out the premise is entirely false, anyway?  The woman looks MUCH more like the picture she described of herself.  Even with the benefit of a skewed sketch artist, positive skewing from strangers, the woman is more identifiable in her self description, which is neither shocking.

What Dove really demonstrated is that at a glance, people just notice you're overall impression on them, but once you point out your own flaws THEY CAN NOT BE UNSEEN.


Something tells me if some Farkers had been the strangers recruited to give a description, they'd have added horns, warts and a caption saying "girls are gross and mean!"
I think there is some b.s. to this ad, but what Dove inadvertently demonstrated is that there are some Farkers who  will still tear down women no matter what the evidence is, out of some weird need to.  Dove should do a campaign using them.
 
2013-04-18 09:54:12 AM  

precious_crotchflake: Mr Guy: Why isn't anyone pointing out the premise is entirely false, anyway?  The woman looks MUCH more like the picture she described of herself.  Even with the benefit of a skewed sketch artist, positive skewing from strangers, the woman is more identifiable in her self description, which is neither shocking.

What Dove really demonstrated is that at a glance, people just notice you're overall impression on them, but once you point out your own flaws THEY CAN NOT BE UNSEEN.

Something tells me if some Farkers had been the strangers recruited to give a description, they'd have added horns, warts and a caption saying "girls are gross and mean!"
I think there is some b.s. to this ad, but what Dove inadvertently demonstrated is that there are some Farkers who  will still tear down women no matter what the evidence is, out of some weird need to.  Dove should do a campaign using them.


I'm just not sure the message works, as they intended.  They are trying for a message of "You don't look like you think you do", but the truth is more obvious, "You DO look like that, just no one else CARES as long as you're relatively healthy".
 
2013-04-18 10:05:44 AM  
I am a guy, and it occurs to me that I don't think I could describe my face in enough detail for a sketch without a mirror.  Is that a guy thing, or am I just particularly unconcerned with my appearance?
 
2013-04-18 10:16:27 AM  

Mr Guy: cwolf20: HotWingAgenda: The women each gave the sketch artist detailed technical descriptions of their features.  The people they met couldn't remember those details, and therefore described them in more general impressions.  In fact, the women were specifically instructed to chat up the people they met, generating a more positive perception than if they hadn't introduced themselves or spoken.

Therefore, no blemishes or wrinkles, and smiles instead of neutral faces.  This bullshiat is why sociology is not a science.

I once got asked by a topless woman on a close friends cabin trip (i go to one each year) why I didn't notice the stretch marks her bras caused on her breasts.  My response was mflbribblehuh.  She'd have been better off asking after everyone got dressed.

I hope you remind her the best way to get rid of skin imprints is proper hydration, and physically stimulating blood flow back into the affected areas.


If I'd had that knowledge, I might have told her.  If she's blunt enough to ask the question,the discussion would have been interesting.  As it is, she's always been aware and not uncomfortable with me looking only at her in those situations.  I never try anything without consent.  Our group is close knit..

the only downside to once a year nightly nudity at a cabin is that our group is guys and gals.  Topless women, full nude men. In the pool.
 
2013-04-18 10:17:04 AM  

cwolf20: HotWingAgenda: The women each gave the sketch artist detailed technical descriptions of their features.  The people they met couldn't remember those details, and therefore described them in more general impressions.  In fact, the women were specifically instructed to chat up the people they met, generating a more positive perception than if they hadn't introduced themselves or spoken.

Therefore, no blemishes or wrinkles, and smiles instead of neutral faces.  This bullshiat is why sociology is not a science.

I once got asked by a topless woman on a close friends cabin trip (i go to one each year) why I didn't notice the stretch marks her bras caused on her breasts.  My response was mflbribblehuh.  She'd have been better off asking after everyone got dressed.


i have a really hard time saying anything while shaking my head from side to side, too.
 
2013-04-18 10:28:08 AM  

cwolf20: Mr Guy: cwolf20: HotWingAgenda: The women each gave the sketch artist detailed technical descriptions of their features.  The people they met couldn't remember those details, and therefore described them in more general impressions.  In fact, the women were specifically instructed to chat up the people they met, generating a more positive perception than if they hadn't introduced themselves or spoken.

Therefore, no blemishes or wrinkles, and smiles instead of neutral faces.  This bullshiat is why sociology is not a science.

I once got asked by a topless woman on a close friends cabin trip (i go to one each year) why I didn't notice the stretch marks her bras caused on her breasts.  My response was mflbribblehuh.  She'd have been better off asking after everyone got dressed.

I hope you remind her the best way to get rid of skin imprints is proper hydration, and physically stimulating blood flow back into the affected areas.

If I'd had that knowledge, I might have told her.  If she's blunt enough to ask the question,the discussion would have been interesting.  As it is, she's always been aware and not uncomfortable with me looking only at her in those situations.  I never try anything without consent.  Our group is close knit..

the only downside to once a year nightly nudity at a cabin is that our group is guys and gals.  Topless women, full nude men. In the pool.


I try to help.  I don't blame you for it not immediately occurring to you, your blood may have been otherwise prioritized.
 
2013-04-18 10:37:11 AM  

bonzeemer: marcre3363: I look like Brad Pitt after he ate George Clooney and a bucket of wings.


Sketch.......NOW!

[i965.photobucket.com image 834x1024]


Pretty much spot on. Bravo!
 
2013-04-18 10:44:44 AM  

karmachameleon: Dear Jerk: If your description of yourself includes a big ol' mole on your face and a stranger's description of you doesn't, whose description is likely more accurate?

The point is not that one is more accurate than the other, the point is about who is focusing on what.

We tend to be our own worst critics.  Other people do not tend to notice the "flaws" that we sometimes obsess about ourselves.  What is a flaw to us is just a normal, unremarkable feature to anyone else.

The point was not to conduct science, and those of you insisting on that aspect are missing the forest for the trees.  This, from someone deeply devoted to science.  That was not the point of this short film.


Genius, the point is to sell Dove products.

It's not about pointing to a higher Truth, or improving women's self esteem, or any of that.
Ads only exist to manipulate your emotions in a way that will last until you next go shopping.
See soaps in store. Feel warm and fuzzy at Dove. Buy Dove soap.
 
2013-04-18 10:46:16 AM  
Wait, does Dove sell soap or chocolate?
 
2013-04-18 11:00:21 AM  

E5bie: karmachameleon: Dear Jerk: If your description of yourself includes a big ol' mole on your face and a stranger's description of you doesn't, whose description is likely more accurate?

The point is not that one is more accurate than the other, the point is about who is focusing on what.

We tend to be our own worst critics.  Other people do not tend to notice the "flaws" that we sometimes obsess about ourselves.  What is a flaw to us is just a normal, unremarkable feature to anyone else.

The point was not to conduct science, and those of you insisting on that aspect are missing the forest for the trees.  This, from someone deeply devoted to science.  That was not the point of this short film.

Genius, the point is to sell Dove products.

It's not about pointing to a higher Truth, or improving women's self esteem, or any of that.
Ads only exist to manipulate your emotions in a way that will last until you next go shopping.
See soaps in store. Feel warm and fuzzy at Dove. Buy Dove soap.



Used to be "Oh, women feel ugly and want to cover themselves?  Here's a product for that!"

now it's "Oh, now natural beauty is the thing and women say they want to be seen as beautiful just the way they are?  No problem, we'll change our marketing accordingly!"

Dove:  you're OK just the way you are and please see our new array of anti aging deoderant.

Trends change, the rush to get a buck has not.

Still, I think most would take this over Juicy Couture ads any day.
 
2013-04-18 11:53:32 AM  
What I found remarkable was the fact that the artist did such a good job on the drawings. I went to art school ages ago. I've drawn portraits of friends and people sitting in public spaces and cannot fathom being able to get a decent resemblance based on a verbal description.

As for Dove, they have good products. I have no complaint about them. Their ad campaign is sensible and low key. "We like you as you are. By the way, we sell soap and stuff." instead of saying, "You'll never be loved unless you buy our stuff."

As for women and self esteem... women tear themselves down and then fark bulldozes the smoldering wreckage.
 
2013-04-18 12:59:17 PM  
Videos do not show up on that site for me. Whyyyy?

Can someone link the video? Thanks.
 
2013-04-18 01:03:07 PM  
ps: found it myself, but what is up with that site?

video is here
 
2013-04-18 01:16:25 PM  
I like the concept, but I bet there are some women who would describe themselves to be beautiful and their real sketch would look like 40 miles of bad road. Snooki for example.
 
2013-04-18 01:32:20 PM  

TedRaceway: I am a guy, and it occurs to me that I don't think I could describe my face in enough detail for a sketch without a mirror.  Is that a guy thing, or am I just particularly unconcerned with my appearance?


Nope. You're a guy. Your head his filled with ideas that will change the world or give you an advantage over your competitors, not this trivial nonsense.
 
2013-04-18 02:12:26 PM  

MidnightSnacks: Dove is owned by Unilever, owner of the Axe brand and its sexist advertisement campaigns.

Consume accordingly.


Agreed - I don't like the way Axe ads portray men either.
 
2013-04-18 04:03:07 PM  
Total crap, the guy made the solo one look a little sad and drew prettier, happier faces on the group one.
 
2013-04-18 06:41:07 PM  

E5bie: karmachameleon: Dear Jerk: If your description of yourself includes a big ol' mole on your face and a stranger's description of you doesn't, whose description is likely more accurate?

The point is not that one is more accurate than the other, the point is about who is focusing on what.

We tend to be our own worst critics.  Other people do not tend to notice the "flaws" that we sometimes obsess about ourselves.  What is a flaw to us is just a normal, unremarkable feature to anyone else.

The point was not to conduct science, and those of you insisting on that aspect are missing the forest for the trees.  This, from someone deeply devoted to science.  That was not the point of this short film.

Genius, the point is to sell Dove products.

It's not about pointing to a higher Truth, or improving women's self esteem, or any of that.
Ads only exist to manipulate your emotions in a way that will last until you next go shopping.
See soaps in store. Feel warm and fuzzy at Dove. Buy Dove soap.


Your cynicism is noted (and sometimes warranted).  It is, however, possible to practice commerce and humanity at the same time.  It would have been easier and cheaper for them to produce a standard commercial, and instead they produced this.  It could have been worse, and just because it's an ad, doesn't mean it doesn't have an important message.
 
2013-04-18 07:51:33 PM  
karmachameleon:
Your cynicism is noted (and sometimes warranted).  It is, however, possible to practice commerce and humanity at the same time.  It would have been easier and cheaper for them to produce a standard commercial, and instead they produced this.  It could have been worse, and just because it's an ad, doesn't mean it doesn't have an important message.

I agree with what you said all through this thread.
Used to work with a lady that didnt like the way she looked and talked about herself so harshly.  One day I said, "if you could see yourself through my eyes, you wouldn't say those things," and proceeded to tell her what I saw when I looked at her.
I thought she was going to cry and I didnt hear her talk like that anymore.

If only we saw ourselves the way others did.

/wasn't going to post in this thread.
//everything was just so negative
///Liked your posts though
 
2013-04-18 11:00:37 PM  

Contents Under Pressure: As for Dove, they have good products. I have no complaint about them. Their ad campaign is sensible and low key. "We like you as you are. By the way, we sell soap and stuff." instead of saying, "You'll never be loved unless you buy our stuff."


Another great point.  This is how most women's products are sold.  It is great that Dove is taking a different, far less cynical approach.

darthaegis: /wasn't going to post in this thread.
//everything was just so negative
///Liked your posts though


Thank you.  I have a teenage daughter and I see things a lot differently than I used to.  I've always "known" this point, but having a teenager in the house has really brought it from theory to reality.  She's farking beautiful, and it's a waste if she doesn't intuitively know that.
 
2013-04-19 01:21:53 AM  

darthaegis: One day I said, "if you could see yourself through my eyes, you wouldn't say those things," and proceeded to tell her what I saw when I looked at her.


And you were then fired and sued for creating a sexually charged workplace?
 
2013-04-19 01:55:04 AM  

bonzeemer: marcre3363: I look like Brad Pitt after he ate George Clooney and a bucket of wings.


Sketch.......NOW!

[i965.photobucket.com image 834x1024]


Followup: This photo just became my Facebook profile picture. It's already got three "Likes".

Which is weird, since I only have two friends.
 
2013-04-19 11:48:43 AM  
The mental image is more important than the immediate physical image.

Beauty is not what we see but how we perceive.

How someone looks is based on how we judge them, not the other way around.

Dove shampoo is better than Pantene.

I think you see my point.
 
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