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(Wisconsin Gazette)   And the nation's most challenged book is ... Captain Underpants, a really big threat to society   (wisconsingazette.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, Captain Underpants, Harper Lee, National Book Award, American Library Association, Maya Angelou, society, public libraries  
•       •       •

6279 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Apr 2013 at 11:10 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-17 10:28:00 AM  
It may not be a book, but I prefer:

images4.wikia.nocookie.net

HANDI-QUACKS!
 
2013-04-17 10:52:39 AM  
This is probably sati-

*clicks link*

Wow. Post-modern Puritanism writ large.
 
2013-04-17 10:55:43 AM  
I had a coworker whose kid got in trouble for dressing up as Captain Underpants, as part of an assignment to dress as a character from a book for a book report.  All he did was put tighty whities on over his pants and tie on a cape.
 
2013-04-17 11:08:58 AM  
Another reason we can't have nice things brought to you by The American Society of Simple-minded Halfwits Offended by Literally Everything in Sight
 
2013-04-17 11:14:01 AM  
Today your kid is reading Captain Underpants, tomorrow he'll be getting gay-married.
 
2013-04-17 11:14:25 AM  
I've read many Captain Underpants books with my nephew. They are dumb, but fun to read. They aren't over-the-top gross or anything, but just exactly what you would expect a 8 year old to find hilarious.

If it gets them to read and isn't overly graphic, why do people have a problem with it?
 
2013-04-17 11:15:42 AM  
To be fair, Captain Underpants talks an awful lot of shiat about Nubians.
 
2013-04-17 11:16:32 AM  

AgentBang: I've read many Captain Underpants books with my nephew. They are dumb, but fun to read. They aren't over-the-top gross or anything, but just exactly what you would expect a 8 year old to find hilarious.

If it gets them to read and isn't overly graphic, why do people have a problem with it?


Because they're prudes.
 
2013-04-17 11:16:57 AM  
It's because he's fat and half-naked, isn't it?

/Scary Stories is on the challenge list.
 
2013-04-17 11:18:18 AM  
images4.wikia.nocookie.net

Blatant ripoff.
 
2013-04-17 11:19:40 AM  
Some praise the books because they encourage boys to read, others criticize them for their toilet humor and irreverent attitude;

You know who else has a problem with irreverent humor and people being shown in their underwear?

www.capalert.com
 
2013-04-17 11:20:28 AM  
Amazing how so much energy is expended over such innocuous stuff...  while the things that truly are threats are largely ignored
 
2013-04-17 11:21:23 AM  
WHAT'S NEXT?!?!?!?!?!?

2.bp.blogspot.com


www.ronanlyons.com
 
2013-04-17 11:21:36 AM  
You are more than welcome to supply your child with whatever books who see fit.  But if you think that a scribbled sitcom about an obese kid in underwear is remotely worth fighting for, then you probably aren't too generally concerned with what your child is consuming anyway.  It's amazing to me how hard bad parents will fight to maintain their delusions.

Nearly every classic that you can imagine - and by classic I mean the books that have withstood the rigors of hundreds of years of assessment and reassessment, and not what you found intriguing when you yourself were a child), nearly every classic has been abridged, simplified, even illustrated to meet the needs of just about every possible audience.  There's no reason to waste money on marketing ploys like Captain Underpants, Harry Potter, and Twilight.  Do some actual legwork and find your kid some decent books instead of being a lard ass, both physically and mentally.  It's really that simple.

The excuse I always get from parents that come into my reading center, "But he's actually reading!  He never reads!"  That's like giving your finicky kid a pile of candy to devour - "But he's eating!  He's actually eating!"  Yeah, he's eating because it requires zero effort on his part - the sugar dissolves almost instantly on his tongue.  Same with these books.  Every time you give your kid a Captain Underpants installment, I want you to shiat in your hand and feed it to them.  That's what you're doing anyway.
 
2013-04-17 11:22:06 AM  

AgentBang: I've read many Captain Underpants books with my nephew. They are dumb, but fun to read. They aren't over-the-top gross or anything, but just exactly what you would expect a 8 year old to find hilarious.

If it gets them to read and isn't overly graphic, why do people have a problem with it?


THIS.  My son loves captain underpants, and read them every trip to the library.  Wasn't my favorite, but he was reading.  He's moved on to goosebumps, so I don't see a big problem with it.

Kids like what their parents don't like, news at 11.

/Biggest rock is best rock
 
2013-04-17 11:24:32 AM  
Captain Underpants is the reason my youngest child started reading so early in life.  I bought it and suggested it was kind of naughty.  She wouldn't put it down until she had devoured and learned every single word.  Then we bought the rest of the series.

Anyone that doesn't like Captain Underpants hates freedom, apple pie, America in general, and American children in particular.
 
2013-04-17 11:26:16 AM  

AgentBang: I've read many Captain Underpants books with my nephew. They are dumb, but fun to read. They aren't over-the-top gross or anything, but just exactly what you would expect a 8 year old to find hilarious.

If it gets them to read and isn't overly graphic, why do people have a problem with it?


These are not "people" in the normal sense of the word.  These are Puritanical assholes that make believe they're just like real people.
 
2013-04-17 11:26:24 AM  
Our 5 year old daughter has every Captain Underpants book; she absolutely love them, and we find them amusing, too.

Troll-la-lol!
 
2013-04-17 11:28:22 AM  

spentmiles: You are more than welcome to supply your child with whatever books who see fit.  But if you think that a scribbled sitcom about an obese kid in underwear is remotely worth fighting for, then you probably aren't too generally concerned with what your child is consuming anyway.  It's amazing to me how hard bad parents will fight to maintain their delusions.

Nearly every classic that you can imagine - and by classic I mean the books that have withstood the rigors of hundreds of years of assessment and reassessment, and not what you found intriguing when you yourself were a child), nearly every classic has been abridged, simplified, even illustrated to meet the needs of just about every possible audience.  There's no reason to waste money on marketing ploys like Captain Underpants, Harry Potter, and Twilight.  Do some actual legwork and find your kid some decent books instead of being a lard ass, both physically and mentally.  It's really that simple.

The excuse I always get from parents that come into my reading center, "But he's actually reading!  He never reads!"  That's like giving your finicky kid a pile of candy to devour - "But he's eating!  He's actually eating!"  Yeah, he's eating because it requires zero effort on his part - the sugar dissolves almost instantly on his tongue.  Same with these books.  Every time you give your kid a Captain Underpants installment, I want you to shiat in your hand and feed it to them.  That's what you're doing anyway.


Reading anything is better than reading nothing.  Work on literacy before you work on culture.
 
2013-04-17 11:29:46 AM  

spentmiles: You are more than welcome to supply your child with whatever books who see fit.  But if you think that a scribbled sitcom about an obese kid in underwear is remotely worth fighting for, then you probably aren't too generally concerned with what your child is consuming anyway.  It's amazing to me how hard bad parents will fight to maintain their delusions.



Wanna know how I can tell you haven't read Captain Underpants?
 
2013-04-17 11:32:37 AM  
As a used book dealer I oppose Captain Underpants because I can't make any money on them.
 
2013-04-17 11:34:12 AM  

spentmiles: You are more than welcome to supply your child with whatever books who see fit.  But if you think that a scribbled sitcom about an obese kid in underwear is remotely worth fighting for, then you probably aren't too generally concerned with what your child is consuming anyway.  It's amazing to me how hard bad parents will fight to maintain their delusions.

Nearly every classic that you can imagine - and by classic I mean the books that have withstood the rigors of hundreds of years of assessment and reassessment, and not what you found intriguing when you yourself were a child), nearly every classic has been abridged, simplified, even illustrated to meet the needs of just about every possible audience.  There's no reason to waste money on marketing ploys like Captain Underpants, Harry Potter, and Twilight.  Do some actual legwork and find your kid some decent books instead of being a lard ass, both physically and mentally.  It's really that simple.

The excuse I always get from parents that come into my reading center, "But he's actually reading!  He never reads!"  That's like giving your finicky kid a pile of candy to devour - "But he's eating!  He's actually eating!"  Yeah, he's eating because it requires zero effort on his part - the sugar dissolves almost instantly on his tongue.  Same with these books.  Every time you give your kid a Captain Underpants installment, I want you to shiat in your hand and feed it to them.  That's what you're doing anyway.


you have to start somewhere and progress. dr seuss, captain underpants, hardy boys, new york post, tolstoy
 
2013-04-17 11:35:30 AM  

spentmiles: Blah, blah, blah



Captain Underpants isn't a kid, he's the school Principal.
 
2013-04-17 11:35:57 AM  

Trayal: Amazing how so much energy is expended over such innocuous stuff...  while the things that truly are threats are largely ignored


Dealing with those would probably mean raising taxes and blaspheming Supply Side Jesus. But harassing schools and libraries costs nothing. (Remember, free speech is nothing.)
 
2013-04-17 11:36:47 AM  

spentmiles: You are more than welcome to supply your child with whatever books who see fit.  But if you think that a scribbled sitcom about an obese kid in underwear is remotely worth fighting for, then you probably aren't too generally concerned with what your child is consuming anyway.  It's amazing to me how hard bad parents will fight to maintain their delusions.

Nearly every classic that you can imagine - and by classic I mean the books that have withstood the rigors of hundreds of years of assessment and reassessment, and not what you found intriguing when you yourself were a child), nearly every classic has been abridged, simplified, even illustrated to meet the needs of just about every possible audience.  There's no reason to waste money on marketing ploys like Captain Underpants, Harry Potter, and Twilight.  Do some actual legwork and find your kid some decent books instead of being a lard ass, both physically and mentally.  It's really that simple.

The excuse I always get from parents that come into my reading center, "But he's actually reading!  He never reads!"  That's like giving your finicky kid a pile of candy to devour - "But he's eating!  He's actually eating!"  Yeah, he's eating because it requires zero effort on his part - the sugar dissolves almost instantly on his tongue.  Same with these books.  Every time you give your kid a Captain Underpants installment, I want you to shiat in your hand and feed it to them.  That's what you're doing anyway.


As a follow-up:

Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling (1894)
The Wind in the Willows by Grahame (1908)
Alice in Wonderland (Through the looking glass) by Lewis Carroll (1865)
Winnie-the-Pooh by A.A. Milne (1926)
Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne (1870)

Just a few favorites I've read to my kids.  My oldest still loves Jules Verne books.

Like everything in life, you should use moderation and expand your literary experiences.  The classics are classics for a reason, but don't discount pulp novels, they can be fun to read as well.
 
2013-04-17 11:38:49 AM  

AgentBang: They aren't over-the-top gross or anything, but just exactly what you would expect a 8 year old to find hilarious.


It's sort of the struggle the neo-puritians have, isn't it? They have this idea that children should be reading about cute bunnies who learn to share with their friends and brothers play baseball with each other, or whatever. And anyone that has ever once seen a child knows that's not at all what they are into.
 
2013-04-17 11:40:34 AM  

spentmiles: The excuse I always get from parents that come into my reading center, "But he's actually reading! He never reads!" That's like giving your finicky kid a pile of candy to devour - "But he's eating! He's actually eating!" Yeah, he's eating because it requires zero effort on his part - the sugar dissolves almost instantly on his tongue. Same with these books. Every time you give your kid a Captain Underpants installment, I want you to shiat in your hand and feed it to them. That's what you're doing anyway.


We have a couple copies of Captain Underpants floating around in my EFL classroom. Please go die in a fire. Thanks.
 
2013-04-17 11:40:50 AM  
Apparently if you don't talk about beating kittens with hammers or post pics of your miscarriage, you can troll in subtle ways.
 
2013-04-17 11:43:32 AM  
My boys read those books and they've only killed 4 people, 5 max
 
2013-04-17 11:51:13 AM  

tdyak: AgentBang: I've read many Captain Underpants books with my nephew. They are dumb, but fun to read. They aren't over-the-top gross or anything, but just exactly what you would expect a 8 year old to find hilarious.

If it gets them to read and isn't overly graphic, why do people have a problem with it?

THIS.  My son loves captain underpants, and read them every trip to the library.  Wasn't my favorite, but he was reading.  He's moved on to goosebumps, so I don't see a big problem with it.

Kids like what their parents don't like, news at 11.

/Biggest rock is best rock


I would read (or pretend to read) a book I wanted my kid to pick up. I'd let him see me put it down, then give him a look. "Now, honey, I don't think you should read this book. I think it's too mature [or scary or whatever adjective would intrigue him] for you, so be sure NOT to read it."

It would always disappear for a while, then he'd "sneak" it back to me after enjoying the heck out of reading.
 
2013-04-17 11:51:36 AM  

spentmiles: You are more than welcome to supply your child with whatever books who see fit.  But if you think that a scribbled sitcom about an obese kid in underwear is remotely worth fighting for, then you probably aren't too generally concerned with what your child is consuming anyway.  It's amazing to me how hard bad parents will fight to maintain their delusions.

Nearly every classic that you can imagine - and by classic I mean the books that have withstood the rigors of hundreds of years of assessment and reassessment, and not what you found intriguing when you yourself were a child), nearly every classic has been abridged, simplified, even illustrated to meet the needs of just about every possible audience.  There's no reason to waste money on marketing ploys like Captain Underpants, Harry Potter, and Twilight.  Do some actual legwork and find your kid some decent books instead of being a lard ass, both physically and mentally.  It's really that simple.

The excuse I always get from parents that come into my reading center, "But he's actually reading!  He never reads!"  That's like giving your finicky kid a pile of candy to devour - "But he's eating!  He's actually eating!"  Yeah, he's eating because it requires zero effort on his part - the sugar dissolves almost instantly on his tongue.  Same with these books.  Every time you give your kid a Captain Underpants installment, I want you to shiat in your hand and feed it to them.  That's what you're doing anyway.


You are (in my opinion) the funniest contributor on Fark. Every once in a while, someone gives you a challenge, but I always smile when I see your name come up in a thread.

That being said, this appears to be a cogent thought, and a well made argument... So I can't figure out if you mean it, or are just being facetious.

Either way, thank you Spentmiles for your contributions to Fark and for your hard work at your reading center.
 
2013-04-17 11:51:57 AM  
Captain Underpants got my 8 year old interested in reading.  He was losing his enthusiasm to read and we were struggling to find books that would keep his interest.  I brought home a bunch of Captain Underpants books from the used bookstore and he devoured them.  Are they intellectually challenging?  No.  Do they use good spelling and syntax?  No.  Are they a little stupid and gross?  Yep.  Do I give a shiat?  No.  He read them all and it's exposed him to the fact that books can be fun, and not just work.

fark off to the parents that want to take books, any books away from a child.
 
2013-04-17 11:52:35 AM  

tdyak: Just a few favorites I've read to my kids. My oldest still loves Jules Verne books.


There is a large difference between reading to your kids and having your kids read.  I picked up an abridged version of 20,000 Leagues(for kids) and even that was slow and boring.

/just gave my middleschooler 10 Little Indians to read
//I read it in middle school as a youth, but now it's all modern books.. no more Agatha Christie, no more Red Badge of Courage, not even To Kill a Mockingbird
///Of course, I mostly blame parents for complaining about the non-PC nature of many of those books
 
2013-04-17 11:52:54 AM  
This comment from the article just pisses me off (I don't think he's trolling, but who knows):

ALA fakes its annual list of challenged books, and I have a recording of a listed author announcing the fakery. And Tango Makes Three was also faked years ago until I knocked it off the list by exposing the fraud, but it appears the ALA will again harm the homosexual community to use it to advance the ALA's own interests. And still ALA won't list the numbers of challenges, because it is so minuscule that there really is no problem, neither is it newsworthy--authors have told me ALA doesn't even tell them the numbers. If a mere four challenges set #1 on the top of the list of ten, across the USA for an entire year, that really a no-news event: http://safelibraries.blogspot.com/2011/09/banned-books-week-is-gay-pro motion.html" rel="nofollow nofollow" target="_blank">http://safelibraries.blogspot.com/2011/09/banned-book s-week-is-gay-promotion.html.
 
2013-04-17 11:53:01 AM  
I wish now that I'd chosen 'Captain Underpants' as my Fark login. :)
 
2013-04-17 12:00:05 PM  
My kids had and enjoyed books from this series. I hated them. Misspellings are keenly unfunny to me, and I knew their school wasn't paying much attention to correct spelling either.

If there are folks arguing to ban them, that's dumb, but I would definitely agree that these books are crap. So I kind of agree with the troll - it's not any sort of progress if a kid spends time reading these. I used to bargain for spending time reading Almost Anything Else* for my kids to get new versions of these books, so we got a little use out of them that way.

*Obviously, no Dan Brown
 
2013-04-17 12:01:05 PM  

spentmiles: You are more than welcome to supply your child with whatever books who see fit.  But if you think that a scribbled sitcom about an obese kid in underwear is remotely worth fighting for, then you probably aren't too generally concerned with what your child is consuming anyway.  It's amazing to me how hard bad parents will fight to maintain their delusions.

Nearly every classic that you can imagine - and by classic I mean the books that have withstood the rigors of hundreds of years of assessment and reassessment, and not what you found intriguing when you yourself were a child), nearly every classic has been abridged, simplified, even illustrated to meet the needs of just about every possible audience.  There's no reason to waste money on marketing ploys like Captain Underpants, Harry Potter, and Twilight.  Do some actual legwork and find your kid some decent books instead of being a lard ass, both physically and mentally.  It's really that simple.

The excuse I always get from parents that come into my reading center, "But he's actually reading!  He never reads!"  That's like giving your finicky kid a pile of candy to devour - "But he's eating!  He's actually eating!"  Yeah, he's eating because it requires zero effort on his part - the sugar dissolves almost instantly on his tongue.  Same with these books.  Every time you give your kid a Captain Underpants installment, I want you to shiat in your hand and feed it to them.  That's what you're doing anyway.


How dare you place twilight next to captain underpants! At least captain underpants doesn't blatantly insult it's audience's intellegance!
 
2013-04-17 12:05:37 PM  

spentmiles: Every time you give your kid a Captain Underpants installment, I want you to shiat in your hand and feed it to them. That's what you're doing anyway


I can see that you don't have any children, nor do you know the least thing about them.

/has grandson
//will read captain underpants
 
2013-04-17 12:14:28 PM  

tdyak: spentmiles: You are more than welcome to supply your child with whatever books who see fit.  But if you think that a scribbled sitcom about an obese kid in underwear is remotely worth fighting for, then you probably aren't too generally concerned with what your child is consuming anyway.  It's amazing to me how hard bad parents will fight to maintain their delusions.

Nearly every classic that you can imagine - and by classic I mean the books that have withstood the rigors of hundreds of years of assessment and reassessment, and not what you found intriguing when you yourself were a child), nearly every classic has been abridged, simplified, even illustrated to meet the needs of just about every possible audience.  There's no reason to waste money on marketing ploys like Captain Underpants, Harry Potter, and Twilight.  Do some actual legwork and find your kid some decent books instead of being a lard ass, both physically and mentally.  It's really that simple.

The excuse I always get from parents that come into my reading center, "But he's actually reading!  He never reads!"  That's like giving your finicky kid a pile of candy to devour - "But he's eating!  He's actually eating!"  Yeah, he's eating because it requires zero effort on his part - the sugar dissolves almost instantly on his tongue.  Same with these books.  Every time you give your kid a Captain Underpants installment, I want you to shiat in your hand and feed it to them.  That's what you're doing anyway.

As a follow-up:

Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling (1894)
The Wind in the Willows by Grahame (1908)
Alice in Wonderland (Through the looking glass) by Lewis Carroll (1865)
Winnie-the-Pooh by A.A. Milne (1926)
Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne (1870)

Just a few favorites I've read to my kids.  My oldest still loves Jules Verne books.

Like everything in life, you should use moderation and expand your literary experiences.  The classics are classics for a reason, but don't discount pulp novels, they can be fun to read as well.


It is spentmiles, he is probably just spinning stories like usual.

On the subject of pulp novels, at least some of Shakespeare's works (might have been all, don't quite remember) were once considered low brow entertainment for the plebs. Yet now "The Man" would be overjoyed if the plebs would go read and watch the works of Shakespeare.
 
2013-04-17 12:14:28 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: spentmiles: Every time you give your kid a Captain Underpants installment, I want you to shiat in your hand and feed it to them. That's what you're doing anyway

I can see that you don't have any children, nor do you know the least thing about them.

/has grandson
//will read captain underpants


If you think having grandkids equates to having children, then you go ahead and enjoy your captain underpants.
 
2013-04-17 12:20:37 PM  
This is the most bites I think I've ever seen Spenty get on a thread. Well done, sir or ma'am!
 
2013-04-17 12:23:29 PM  
But he fights for truth, justice and all things pre-shrunk and cottony!
 
2013-04-17 12:26:01 PM  

Karl LaFong: I wish now that I'd chosen 'Captain Underpants' as my Fark login. :)


How about 'Captain No Underpants'
 
2013-04-17 12:26:59 PM  
Dav Pilkey's A Friend for Dragon made me cry. However his Dogzilla and Kat Kong cheered me up. Captain Underpants is ok with me. I like his Dumb Bunnies too!
 
2013-04-17 12:27:07 PM  

Uranus Megahertz: Karl LaFong: I wish now that I'd chosen 'Captain Underpants' as my Fark login. :)

How about 'Captain No Underpants'


Even better!
 
2013-04-17 12:28:21 PM  
If you're afraid of "Captain Underpants" then you are afraid of literally everything.

DerAppie: On the subject of pulp novels, at least some of Shakespeare's works (might have been all, don't quite remember) were once considered low brow entertainment for the plebs.


Actually some of the works attributed to Shakespeare really are lowbrow.  Titus Andronicus was a bloody, titillating mess.  Ugh.  I've read it once and I'll never read it again.  A Comedy of Errors was on par with the Three Stooges (except not very funny).  The Merry Wives of Windsor was written at the request of Queen Elizabeth (no pleb!) just to give Falstaff a chance for some more hijinx, and it shows.

None of them are staged often (though there was a film adaptation of Titus Andronicus recently) and with good reason.  There are other plays that are not staged often, also because they're bad, or difficult, but not so much because they're lowbrow.

You might even go so far as to call Macbeth lowbrow, considering that it was probably written at the request James I to entertain some visitor (can't remember who).  James considered himself an authority on the dangers of witchcraft, and considered himself a descendant of Banquo, and his guest was likewise cookoo for witchcraft CocoPuffs.  But the play is crammed full of memorable characters, scenes, and dialogue.  They distract from/compensate for the quite frankly foolish theme.  It's one of my favorites; but then I'm also a fan of a lot of lowbrow entertainment.
 
2013-04-17 12:31:17 PM  
I think I just suffered an acute attack of nostalgia.

/remembers reading the first book in the series
//seem to recall my favorite part being the flippy-pages in the middle
 
2013-04-17 12:33:12 PM  

spentmiles: You are more than welcome to supply your child with whatever books who see fit.  But if you think that a scribbled sitcom about an obese kid in underwear is remotely worth fighting for, then you probably aren't too generally concerned with what your child is consuming anyway.  It's amazing to me how hard bad parents will fight to maintain their delusions.

Nearly every classic that you can imagine - and by classic I mean the books that have withstood the rigors of hundreds of years of assessment and reassessment, and not what you found intriguing when you yourself were a child), nearly every classic has been abridged, simplified, even illustrated to meet the needs of just about every possible audience.  There's no reason to waste money on marketing ploys like Captain Underpants, Harry Potter, and Twilight.  Do some actual legwork and find your kid some decent books instead of being a lard ass, both physically and mentally.  It's really that simple.

The excuse I always get from parents that come into my reading center, "But he's actually reading!  He never reads!"  That's like giving your finicky kid a pile of candy to devour - "But he's eating!  He's actually eating!"  Yeah, he's eating because it requires zero effort on his part - the sugar dissolves almost instantly on his tongue.  Same with these books.  Every time you give your kid a Captain Underpants installment, I want you to shiat in your hand and feed it to them.  That's what you're doing anyway.


Lighten up Francis.
 
2013-04-17 12:34:07 PM  
TRA-LA-LAAAA!!!!


Truth
Justice
Pre-Shrunk Cotton
 
2013-04-17 12:38:43 PM  
the things I say around my kids are far worse then anything they'll read in those books
 
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