If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(PhoneSat)   Not News: NASA is launching a satellite today. News: It's a small satellite made out of a Smartphone. FARK: It uses ham radio to communicate   (phonesat.org) divider line 202
    More: Cool, NASA, amateur radio operators, small satellite, cigarette packs, cubesats, CB radio  
•       •       •

7252 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Apr 2013 at 11:06 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



202 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-04-17 10:03:41 AM
They better install the antenna booster I saw on late night TV last night.
 
2013-04-17 10:07:52 AM
Hams don't need no stinkin' antenna boosters.

/Woohoo, second greenlight!
 
2013-04-17 10:08:44 AM
I'm assuming the project was sub-contracted to the North Koreans.
 
2013-04-17 10:11:57 AM
Ham radio? Is there anything bacon can't do?
 
2013-04-17 10:12:09 AM
Why is there no bacon radio?
 
2013-04-17 10:13:17 AM
*shaking tiny fist*
 
2013-04-17 10:16:14 AM
www.qsl.net

Yes, yes you do.
 
2013-04-17 11:09:35 AM
Ham radio operators number over 700,000 in the US, the highest-ever number of licensees.

We are everywhere.

/73!
 
2013-04-17 11:10:49 AM
How would one get into Ham radio these days?
 
2013-04-17 11:11:36 AM
Honest question here...

What do you guys do with your Ham radios?  I've never understood the hobby.

/not trolling, genuinely curious
 
2013-04-17 11:13:19 AM

oneodd1: How would one get into Ham radio these days?


Very easily.  You no longer need to know Morse code to get *ANY* license.  It's not required anymore.

You can find more information about how to become a ham at the American Radio Relay League website.
 
2013-04-17 11:13:19 AM

alywa: Honest question here...

What do you guys do with your Ham radios?  I've never understood the hobby.

/not trolling, genuinely curious


They use it to call into Coast to Coast and tell Art Bell about their abduction stories.

That's my theory
 
2013-04-17 11:14:12 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OSCAR

You mean like what's been going on for fifty years?
 
2013-04-17 11:14:28 AM
As long as they don't have Verizon as their carrier
 
2013-04-17 11:14:29 AM

dittybopper: oneodd1: How would one get into Ham radio these days?

Very easily.  You no longer need to know Morse code to get *ANY* license.  It's not required anymore.

You can find more information about how to become a ham at the American Radio Relay League website.


Wow! Thanks ditty, I didn't know they had totally done away with the code requirement. Time to research.
 
2013-04-17 11:14:51 AM

Djembe: We are everywhere.


Indeed we are.

/Secret handshake.
//73 yourself.

dittybopper: /Woohoo, second greenlight!


Nice job Sir.
 
gja [TotalFark]
2013-04-17 11:15:59 AM

Djembe: Ham radio operators number over 700,000 in the US, the highest-ever number of licensees.

We are everywhere.

/73!


QRL OM.
/73 de GJA
 
2013-04-17 11:16:03 AM

oneodd1: dittybopper: oneodd1: How would one get into Ham radio these days?

Very easily.  You no longer need to know Morse code to get *ANY* license.  It's not required anymore.

You can find more information about how to become a ham at the American Radio Relay League website.

Wow! Thanks ditty, I didn't know they had totally done away with the code requirement. Time to research.


They also publish the entire question pool so you can learn exactly what you need to pass the tests.
 
2013-04-17 11:17:32 AM
73
 
2013-04-17 11:19:05 AM
Thanks to budget cuts, it's about all they can afford these days.
 
2013-04-17 11:19:17 AM

alywa: Honest question here...

What do you guys do with your Ham radios?  I've never understood the hobby.

/not trolling, genuinely curious



 Hams talking to each other:

"well, it's a little cold here right now, supposed to start raining soon"

"i soldered a resistor to the circuit board last night"

"The XYL is out at the mall today"

"Can't get a good signal from that new repeater"
 
2013-04-17 11:20:49 AM

oneodd1: How would one get into Ham radio these days?


Just get certified and buy the equipment.

alywa: Honest question here...

What do you guys do with your Ham radios?  I've never understood the hobby.

/not trolling, genuinely curious


Seems to mostly be about seeing how far you can send and receive. People who do it tend to get increasingly larger antennae for that reason. One person i knew awhile back used to communicate with satellites to a limited extent, so this wouldn't be the first time one had the capability. Think i also heard something about bouncing signals off the moon using HAM radio, but i might be confusing something.
 
2013-04-17 11:23:34 AM
73!

/No idea what that means...but I don't want to be left out
//42
 
2013-04-17 11:25:08 AM

alywa: Honest question here...

What do you guys do with your Ham radios?  I've never understood the hobby.

/not trolling, genuinely curious


We communicate with each other. Part of the modern allure is that it doesn't require any infrastructure (internet, cellphone networks etc) to work. I can take a solar-powered radio to any park, throw a long piece of wire into a tree for an antenna, and talk to people halfway around the world. For kicks.

There's plenty of stuff being done with amateur radio that incorporates the most current technologies, merging amateur radio with numerous internet junkets, too.

And of course, when the shiat hits the fan and the modern-day communications infrastructure goes down, we can provide communications into and out of a disaster zone until the regular networks are re-established. Katrina and 9/11 are prime examples of this.

It's an entire community that can teach you about electronics, physics, weather, geography, all at your own pace. There's a fairly large crossover now between ham radio and the DIY community.

But mostly we do it because it's fun.
 
2013-04-17 11:25:44 AM

alywa: Honest question here...

What do you guys do with your Ham radios?  I've never understood the hobby.

/not trolling, genuinely curious


Talk to people.

I actually had someone ask me what we talk about, and I gave an answer about exchanging signal and weather reports, our gear, etc., and it didn't actually occur to me until long after that I gave that person the wrong answer.

The correct answer is that the medium itself is the message.  It doesn't really matter *WHAT* I say to John ZL1BYZ in New Zealand, the cool thing is that I can talk to him while driving my car in upstate New York, with nothing between us but the ionosphere bouncing our signals back and forth.  That's the message:  I can talk to someone on the other side of the World.

Aside from that, the very nature of ham radio is that it's extremely resistant to disasters, and it's often the only way to communicate with the outside world after a major disaster.  That's because by and large it doesn't depend on the infrastructure that can often be destroyed or disabled after such events.   For example, I can with almost 100% reliability communicate with anyone similarly equipped within a radius of about 300 miles, 24/7.  All I need is some sort of power source (batteries, solar, generator, vehicle alternator, whatever), and the ability to string a wire up 10 feet in the air.    That's it.
 
2013-04-17 11:27:55 AM

Djembe: I can take a solar-powered radio to any park, throw a long piece of wire into a tree for an antenna, and talk to people halfway around the world. For kicks.


I talked to a guy in Colorado a week or so ago.  He was using a backpack radio while he was walking.  How cool is that?
 
2013-04-17 11:27:58 AM

my_cats_breath_smells_like_cat_food: 73!

/No idea what that means...but I don't want to be left out
//42


If I remember correctly, 73 was originally a telegraphic code for ending a conversation.  The transmission speeds encouraged the use of a prearranged list of numeric abbreviations to speed up total message transmission speed.
 
2013-04-17 11:28:30 AM

my_cats_breath_smells_like_cat_food: 73!

/No idea what that means...but I don't want to be left out
//42


It means "best regards"
 
2013-04-17 11:29:36 AM

Nogrhi: my_cats_breath_smells_like_cat_food: 73!

/No idea what that means...but I don't want to be left out
//42

If I remember correctly, 73 was originally a telegraphic code for ending a conversation.  The transmission speeds encouraged the use of a prearranged list of numeric abbreviations to speed up total message transmission speed.


The technical meaning is "best regards", and it's a palindrome in Morse so it has a distinct sound:

dadadididit didididadah.
 
2013-04-17 11:30:18 AM

Djembe: alywa: Honest question here...

What do you guys do with your Ham radios?  I've never understood the hobby.

/not trolling, genuinely curious

We communicate with each other. Part of the modern allure is that it doesn't require any infrastructure (internet, cellphone networks etc) to work. I can take a solar-powered radio to any park, throw a long piece of wire into a tree for an antenna, and talk to people halfway around the world. For kicks.

There's plenty of stuff being done with amateur radio that incorporates the most current technologies, merging amateur radio with numerous internet junkets, too.

And of course, when the shiat hits the fan and the modern-day communications infrastructure goes down, we can provide communications into and out of a disaster zone until the regular networks are re-established. Katrina and 9/11 are prime examples of this.

It's an entire community that can teach you about electronics, physics, weather, geography, all at your own pace. There's a fairly large crossover now between ham radio and the DIY community.

But mostly we do it because it's fun.


Favorited as a ham.
 
2013-04-17 11:31:22 AM
It feels like amateur radio is a dying hobby.

At my local ham radio club meeting, I'm usually the youngest person in the room.  And I'm 43.  *sigh*

/73, N0DOS
 
2013-04-17 11:33:49 AM
Satellites using ham radio is old news (so yes, the "FARK:" label is appropriate). AO-7, launched in 1974, is still partially operational.

oneodd1: How would one get into Ham radio these days?


There's an annual event called Field Day the 4th weekend in June. If any local groups are participating, it's a good way to meet some people and see some of the technology in action.
 
2013-04-17 11:34:29 AM
I was always interested in ham radio. Still no clue what id use it for.
 
2013-04-17 11:34:57 AM

alywa: Honest question here...

What do you guys do with your Ham radios?  I've never understood the hobby.

/not trolling, genuinely curious


When sexually potent men are just sick and tired of the constant attention from women.
 
2013-04-17 11:35:15 AM

Nogrhi: my_cats_breath_smells_like_cat_food: 73!

/No idea what that means...but I don't want to be left out
//42

If I remember correctly, 73 was originally a telegraphic code for ending a conversation.  The transmission speeds encouraged the use of a prearranged list of numeric abbreviations to speed up total message transmission speed.


Neat.  Kind of reminds me of a book I read (Agent Zigzag) about a real british double/triple agent in WWII.  He had to communicate via radio using morse code, and apparently had a way of "signing" his communication with a particular way he always ended his transmissions.  I think it went beyond just a random thing like a password, and was actually more of a joke/play-on-words(or play-on-code)/intentional error type of thing.  People could be pretty much 100% sure he was the one sending the message since it was something nobody would normally do.

/I might be getting all that horribly wrong, but I think that is what I remember.
 
2013-04-17 11:36:35 AM
Amateur radio is not dying; the number of licensees and clubs in the US and around the world is at an all-time high.

Neither is the use of Morse code. Even though it was dropped as a requirement to obtain a license, more amateurs are learning code than ever before.

Amateur radio is certainly morphing; it's not all about seeing how far around the world you can send a signal (although there are plenty of hams that still enjoy that part). Mesh networking and robotic remote control are just a couple of activities for Ham Radio 2.0.

/I work at ARRL, so I'm actually getting a kick out of these replies.
 
2013-04-17 11:36:51 AM
Should have used beef radio!
 
2013-04-17 11:36:56 AM

Summercat: I was always interested in ham radio. Still no clue what id use it for.


They're not actually made of ham.
 
2013-04-17 11:36:56 AM

feedle: It feels like amateur radio is a dying hobby.

At my local ham radio club meeting, I'm usually the youngest person in the room.  And I'm 43.  *sigh*

/73, N0DOS


I have the same problem.  I was fortunate to be part of a very active club and ARES group in NH before I moved back to Colorado.  Not nearly the cohesive community where I am now.

/WE1N
 
2013-04-17 11:37:39 AM
DARPA has to have something to do with this.
 
2013-04-17 11:37:59 AM

L'mours: alywa: Honest question here...

What do you guys do with your Ham radios?  I've never understood the hobby.

/not trolling, genuinely curious

They use it to call into Coast to Coast and tell Art Bell about their abduction stories.

That's my theory


24.media.tumblr.com

/Art Bell and Tom Snyder...my late night friends of old...
 
2013-04-17 11:38:24 AM
www.nivek.com

Okay...
 
2013-04-17 11:38:38 AM

alywa: Honest question here...

What do you guys do with your Ham radios?  I've never understood the hobby.

/not trolling, genuinely curious


Maybe the same thing you are doing on this internet board?
 
2013-04-17 11:38:41 AM

J. Frank Parnell: Seems to mostly be about seeing how far you can send and receive. People who do it tend to get increasingly larger antennae for that reason. One person i knew awhile back used to communicate with satellites to a limited extent, so this wouldn't be the first time one had the capability. Think i also heard something about bouncing signals off the moon using HAM radio, but i might be confusing something.


That's kind of correct, but it's a whole lot more than that.

Some hams do indeed bounce signals off the Moon, and the equipment necessary to do so has gotten smaller and easier over the years.

Hams have been putting satellites in space for  over 50 years now (OSCAR 1 was launched in 1961).  Currently, there is a ham radio station on the International Space Station, and there are a bunch of working hamsats in orbit besides.

There is such a myriad different parts to the hobby (including long-distance high speed WiFi) that it's hard to pin it down to just one thing.  There is something in it for anyone interested in technology, or emergency preparedness, or even just chatting with friends.  It can be as simple or as complex as you like.
 
2013-04-17 11:40:40 AM

dittybopper: alywa: Honest question here...

What do you guys do with your Ham radios?  I've never understood the hobby.

/not trolling, genuinely curious

Talk to people.

I actually had someone ask me what we talk about, and I gave an answer about exchanging signal and weather reports, our gear, etc., and it didn't actually occur to me until long after that I gave that person the wrong answer.

The correct answer is that the medium itself is the message.  It doesn't really matter *WHAT* I say to John ZL1BYZ in New Zealand, the cool thing is that I can talk to him while driving my car in upstate New York, with nothing between us but the ionosphere bouncing our signals back and forth.   That's the message:  I can talk to someone on the other side of the World.



I've been doing this for decades with a handy little invention a guy named Alexander Graham Bell made.
 
2013-04-17 11:40:46 AM

alywa: Honest question here...

What do you guys do with your Ham radios?  I've never understood the hobby.


There's the thing - it is a big hobby and the answer to that is big. Talk to people is a big one for a lot of people. Some people drill for emergencies. Some people make new digital modes for exchanging information. Some people do antenna design and construction. Some people are really into working on circuits. Others like setting up new and clever ways to interface their radio with their PC. Some people volunteer to do communications for events (fundraising walks and runs, that sort of thing).
 
2013-04-17 11:41:36 AM

feedle: It feels like amateur radio is a dying hobby.

At my local ham radio club meeting, I'm usually the youngest person in the room.  And I'm 43.  *sigh*

/73, N0DOS


It's not dying:  There are more hams now than there were pretty much at any time in our history:

Ham radio clubs tend, like most other clubs, to be dominated by the elder members, because they've got the time to put into that sort of thing on an ongoing basis.
 
2013-04-17 11:41:38 AM
Hi hi and fine business.

What can you do with ham radio? Anything you can imagine.

I belong to a radio club that works a lot of public service events like fund raising walks, fun runs, marathons, and triathlons. We work closely with the county Sheriff and Emergency Management. We have stations at the hospitals, Sheriff's office, PD, EMA, Red Cross, etc. The club uses the public service events as training sessions. Plus, they're a fun way to give back to the community since amateur radio operators are forbidden by law from receiving pay for provinding communications support.

This weekend about 35 of use are working a local marathon. The county and local officials are using this event as an ICS drill. There has been a lot of planning and ham radio has had a seat at the table from the beginning. We will be using a mesh network over ham radio so the net control and the command point can communicate via chat on computers and view a large map of the course with every station marked along the route. My car will be the lead vehicle. I have a dual band FM radio for phone and will be running APRS (automatic position reporting system) so that my position will update on the may as I move along the course. There will be a bicycle rider running APRS following the last runner also. The hams along the course will be stationed at the water stops and dangerous intersections, with the medical tent and ambulance, and at the Incident Command center.
 
2013-04-17 11:43:01 AM

feedle: It feels like amateur radio is a dying hobby.

At my local ham radio club meeting, I'm usually the youngest person in the room.  And I'm 43.  *sigh*

/73, N0DOS


yea, it seems difficult for people to get into. getting a license and buy a radio has been on my todo list for like 4 years.
 
2013-04-17 11:43:12 AM

mama2tnt: dittybopper: alywa: Honest question here...

What do you guys do with your Ham radios?  I've never understood the hobby.

/not trolling, genuinely curious

Talk to people.

I actually had someone ask me what we talk about, and I gave an answer about exchanging signal and weather reports, our gear, etc., and it didn't actually occur to me until long after that I gave that person the wrong answer.

The correct answer is that the medium itself is the message.  It doesn't really matter *WHAT* I say to John ZL1BYZ in New Zealand, the cool thing is that I can talk to him while driving my car in upstate New York, with nothing between us but the ionosphere bouncing our signals back and forth.   That's the message:  I can talk to someone on the other side of the World.


I've been doing this for decades with a handy little invention a guy named Alexander Graham Bell made.


Now do it without the tens of millions of dollars of installed communications infrastructure between you and the other person.

That's what I'm doing.
 
Displayed 50 of 202 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report