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(Popular Science)   Ale yeast running for official state microbe of Oregon. Subby wishes to welcome our new unicellular overlords   (popsci.com) divider line 24
    More: Spiffy, Oregon, ale yeast, Wisconsinites  
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972 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Apr 2013 at 7:33 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



24 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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Archived thread
 
2013-04-17 07:42:26 AM  
New?
 
2013-04-17 07:45:49 AM  
Microbes already run everything anyway.

Alcohol is just their way of keeping us complacent.
 
2013-04-17 07:52:10 AM  
Or you could just name a Micro Brewery down the street as micro-b of the year.
 
2013-04-17 08:04:31 AM  
Sounds like a fun guy.

/fungi
//get it?
/...
 
2013-04-17 08:12:21 AM  
I wonder what microbe Georgia should be lobbying for.

/still lobbying for a Fark Georgia tag
 
2013-04-17 08:14:57 AM  
Get ready for the attack ads by Lager Yeast.
 
2013-04-17 08:15:49 AM  
Good luck, I hear the Koch brothers are backing (or is it baking?) bread yeast.
 
2013-04-17 09:08:12 AM  
Inquiring minds want to know....WHICH YEAST? Can't just go with a blanket "Saccharomyces cerevisiae",you gotta be more specific!

I vote for:
www.midwestsupplies.com
...let the beersnobbery begin!
 
2013-04-17 09:17:04 AM  

croesius: Inquiring minds want to know....WHICH YEAST? Can't just go with a blanket "Saccharomyces cerevisiae",you gotta be more specific!

I vote for:
[www.midwestsupplies.com image 400x500]
...let the beersnobbery begin!


Booooooo.  US-05 or GTFO!

/Will accept Nottingham as VP
 
2013-04-17 10:00:59 AM  
Notty, US-05, or my personal favorite WLP300.
 
2013-04-17 10:13:31 AM  
You guys are boring.

WLP500 FTW.

/also, my Fark login is relevant!
 
2013-04-17 10:47:52 AM  

Bruxellensis: You guys are boring.

WLP500 FTW.

/also, my Fark login is relevant!


Well fine, if you want a (not really) obscure yeast, why not just go whole-hog and vote for Brettanomyces
 
2013-04-17 10:57:51 AM  
"Saccharomyces cerevisiae" Because we are not lagers!
 
2013-04-17 10:59:31 AM  

my_cats_breath_smells_like_cat_food: Bruxellensis: You guys are boring.

WLP500 FTW.

/also, my Fark login is relevant!

Well fine, if you want a (not really) obscure yeast, why not just go whole-hog and vote for Brettanomyces


1. Because it isn't Saccharomyces?
 -or-
2. My user name could count as a silent vote for Brett
 
2013-04-17 11:48:25 AM  

Bruxellensis: my_cats_breath_smells_like_cat_food: Bruxellensis: You guys are boring.

WLP500 FTW.

/also, my Fark login is relevant!

Well fine, if you want a (not really) obscure yeast, why not just go whole-hog and vote for Brettanomyces

1. Because it isn't Saccharomyces?
 -or-
2. My user name could count as a silent vote for Brett


1. You and your "facts".  Where the hell do you think you are?!  =)

2.  Yeah, I've seen you in some other homebrew threads, I knew what I was getting into.

/First Brett brew is in the planning stages, clone of the Russian River Supplication.  I'm pretty excited.
//Bottling my first 10%+ ABV beer this weekend, an IIPA (or probably more accurately an American Barleywine using BJCP guidelines)
///I am boring when it comes to yeast, it is an aspect of the hobby I will expand into one day but as I only have 18 batches under my belt I am still getting the feel for recipe formulation and the dynamic interactions of the various parts of the process.  I like to expand the number of variables I change slowly, to gain a clearer picture of how each part impacts the whole.
//So far have only used US-05 for IPAs and Pale Ales, and Notty for Porters.
/I do wash my own yeast though, and keep a fridge stocked with both strains
 
2013-04-17 12:12:21 PM  
I swipe yeast from the pilot brewery at work. I think I'm using WLP0004 (5th gen) on my current batch, an American Wheat with 24 IBU of Mosaic.
 
2013-04-17 12:56:44 PM  

my_cats_breath_smells_like_cat_food: Bruxellensis: my_cats_breath_smells_like_cat_food: Bruxellensis: You guys are boring.

WLP500 FTW.

/also, my Fark login is relevant!

Well fine, if you want a (not really) obscure yeast, why not just go whole-hog and vote for Brettanomyces

1. Because it isn't Saccharomyces?
 -or-
2. My user name could count as a silent vote for Brett

1. You and your "facts".  Where the hell do you think you are?!  =)

2.  Yeah, I've seen you in some other homebrew threads, I knew what I was getting into.

/First Brett brew is in the planning stages, clone of the Russian River Supplication.  I'm pretty excited.



I love Brett beers.  I've got several going right now, and a few in bottles.  One in particular that stands out was aged for 6 months on American oak.  It grew a wicked pellicle, too.  It is a Brett lover's dream.  At 8.5 months, it has wonderful aroma and flavor.  Very complex.  I carbed it high (which I recommend for any Brett beer) to aid in mouthfeel due to the high attenuating nature of Brett yeast.  For middle of the road funk, I go with B. Bruxellensis, but for a true wild character, I'll go with 100% B. Lambicus.

My advice for all Brett beers: raise the temperature.  Brett loves the higher temps, and it will reward you for it.  I've gotten a beautiful amalgamation of fruity mango, tart cherry, and apple, along with the coveted barnyard horse blanket and wet stone funk from a 84F Brettanomyces Lambicus ferment.  Yum.  Secondly, be patient.  After six months, the Brett starts to do interesting things.  After 8 months, it really starts to shine.  Give it a year, and your patience will be rewarded.

Here's one of my pellicles from an all-Brett beer:
i787.photobucket.com
 
2013-04-17 02:08:18 PM  

Bruxellensis: my_cats_breath_smells_like_cat_food: Bruxellensis: my_cats_breath_smells_like_cat_food: Bruxellensis: You guys are boring.

WLP500 FTW.

/also, my Fark login is relevant!

Well fine, if you want a (not really) obscure yeast, why not just go whole-hog and vote for Brettanomyces

1. Because it isn't Saccharomyces?
 -or-
2. My user name could count as a silent vote for Brett

1. You and your "facts".  Where the hell do you think you are?!  =)

2.  Yeah, I've seen you in some other homebrew threads, I knew what I was getting into.

/First Brett brew is in the planning stages, clone of the Russian River Supplication.  I'm pretty excited.


I love Brett beers.  I've got several going right now, and a few in bottles.  One in particular that stands out was aged for 6 months on American oak.  It grew a wicked pellicle, too.  It is a Brett lover's dream.  At 8.5 months, it has wonderful aroma and flavor.  Very complex.  I carbed it high (which I recommend for any Brett beer) to aid in mouthfeel due to the high attenuating nature of Brett yeast.  For middle of the road funk, I go with B. Bruxellensis, but for a true wild character, I'll go with 100% B. Lambicus.

My advice for all Brett beers: raise the temperature.  Brett loves the higher temps, and it will reward you for it.  I've gotten a beautiful amalgamation of fruity mango, tart cherry, and apple, along with the coveted barnyard horse blanket and wet stone funk from a 84F Brettanomyces Lambicus ferment.  Yum.  Secondly, be patient.  After six months, the Brett starts to do interesting things.  After 8 months, it really starts to shine.  Give it a year, and your patience will be rewarded.

Here's one of my pellicles from an all-Brett beer:
[i787.photobucket.com image 850x784]


Nice, that pellicale is gnarly...in a good way...

The recipe I am starting with as a base calls for 3 seperate yeasts.  First, a regular ale yeast to get it down to 1.014, and then from there add oak, some pinot noir, and a bunch of cherries, and pitch the Brett.  Let that go for 2 months, then add a Belgian Sour Mix yeast (it has lacto, pedo and something else I think, I have the actual WLP # written down at home) and let that do it's thing for 6-12 months, then bottle it (adding some US-05 for carbing) and let it age in bottles for another 2-3 months.  The times might change slightly, but that is the basic plan.

I am planning on carbing high, I need to check my notes again, but I want to say it was something like 4.5 volumes CO2?  That could be way off, as I don't typically carb to style and instead just do 4-5oz/5g.  I am going to buy some bottles specifically for this beer though, which is going to be about 1/3 of the total cost...but I figure it will be worth it.  If it turns out how it is *supposed* to, I'll have something like 25-30 beers that would normally be $10-20 each, for more like $3/each.  I have some family that appreciates sour beer, so I am hoping to knock some socks off.
 
2013-04-17 02:51:11 PM  

my_cats_breath_smells_like_cat_food: Nice, that pellicale is gnarly...in a good way...

The recipe I am starting with as a base calls for 3 seperate yeasts. First, a regular ale yeast to get it down to 1.014, and then from there add oak, some pinot noir, and a bunch of cherries, and pitch the Brett. Let that go for 2 months, then add a Belgian Sour Mix yeast (it has lacto, pedo and something else I think, I have the actual WLP # written down at home) and let that do it's thing for 6-12 months, then bottle it (adding some US-05 for carbing) and let it age in bottles for another 2-3 months. The times might change slightly, but that is the basic plan.


Most sour mixes have a combination of Brett B., Brett L., Pediococcus, and Acetobacter.That combination does a pretty good job of emulating the natural fauna of the Flanders region of Belgium.  Lacto is also found naturally occurring on malt.  I would recommend getting an oak dowel rod and pushing that through your stopper instead of an air lock once your sour mix is pitched.  If you go a full year with those bugs, maybe only keep the dowel rod for 3-6 months of that.  Some oxygen is good.  Too much gives you vinegar.

Make sure to rehydrate your US-05 before adding to your bottling bucket.  The low pH of a sour beer is too harsh for dry yeast cells, and you will end up killing a good percentage of them.  Get them rehydrated, and a larger portion of the culture will survive.


I am planning on carbing high, I need to check my notes again, but I want to say it was something like 4.5 volumes CO2? That could be way off, as I don't typically carb to style and instead just do 4-5oz/5g. I am going to buy some bottles specifically for this beer though, which is going to be about 1/3 of the total cost...but I figure it will be worth it. If it turns out how it is *supposed* to, I'll have something like 25-30 beers that would normally be $10-20 each, for more like $3/each. I have some family that appreciates sour beer, so I am hoping to knock some socks off.

4.5 volumes is HIGH.  That's not unheard of, though.  I carb my Brett and Gueuzes to around 3.8 volumes of CO2.  High carbonation is good, though, since it enhances the mouthfeel on such a dry and thin brew.  That combination of wild bugs has a really high attenuation.  Just make sure you use champagne bottles or some kind of robust bottle.  I use champagne bottles and Belgian bottles with corks & cages.  I picked up a Champagne floor corker and love it.  It'll cost ya, but your great grand children will be using that sucker long from now.

I'm sure that brew will turn out well.  They are unpredictable, though.  It's almost impossible to reproduce a sour ale, even with the same culture pitch.  That is also quite the complicated fermentation schedule.  There are many easier ways to get a really farking good sour ale.  The real significance lies in the blending.  Brew a few different sours, even mix up some different cultures, or ratio of cultures, and see how they turn out.  Blend ones that came out somewhat milder with ones that came out super sour.  Or blend according to the funk flavor.  You can even blend young ones with older matured sours at bottling time, and get your carbonation that way.  For Lambic breweries, the master blender gains more respect than the brewer himself.

Anyway, hope your beer turns out awesome!
 
2013-04-17 02:52:16 PM  

Bruxellensis: Most sour mixes have a combination of Brett B., Brett L., Pediococcus, and Acetobacter.


Totally forgot to mention Lactobacillus
 
2013-04-17 03:21:25 PM  
I checked and my recipe calls for 4.0 volumes, so slightly less than I originally posted, but still damn high.

I am going to use belgian bottles, with the corks and cages, trying to respect the style, ya know  =)

Thanks for the tip on re-hydrating for bottling, as I never bother with it when pitching to wort, I just toss it in dry.  Well...9 times out of 10 I am using washed yeast from an old batch so I just let it warm up to room temp and dump THAT in, but for the sour beer I was planning on going with the dry stuff to be safe.  Also thanks for the dowel tip, I had read that on Homebrewtalk for certain brews, but it didn't stick in my head that I should be using it for this beer.

Blending is something I have read a bit about, but hadn't gotten too deep into.  I generally try and stick to a tried-and-true recipe for each new style I brew before tweaking things, although I did come across a lot of blended sour recipes... I think part of my decision to go with this recipe, despite the complex fermentation schedule is 1.  I have enjoyed most Russian River brews I've had, and figure their sour is probably pretty damn good.  2.  The recipe I found was made using input directly from RR, so it should be fairly accurate.  3.  It just sounds friggin delicious with the oak and pinot and cherries...mmmmm...

After this beeer I'll probably do something simpler, unless it really is just too good and I feel the need to repeat it.  I may do a straight Brett brew and try some blends, but that all depends on how this goes.  Luckily I have a lot of buckets/carboys so I can keep brewing my regular brews while waiting for these long-aging ones to finish.

/BEER.
 
2013-04-17 03:31:21 PM  
 
2013-04-17 05:45:49 PM  
My brew buddy and I just got some Brett (felt like a drug deal since we met one of his out of town friends at a hotel to snag the vials), so bookmarking for future reference.
 
2013-04-18 10:23:55 AM  

NaziKamikaze: My brew buddy and I just got some Brett (felt like a drug deal since we met one of his out of town friends at a hotel to snag the vials), so bookmarking for future reference.


Cool.  Which strain?
 
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