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(WPTV)   Need to have your faith in humanity restored? Here's 15 acts of kindness seen during the Boston bombings   (wptv.com) divider line 59
    More: Hero, Boston, Tax Day, Boston Marathon  
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22142 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Apr 2013 at 3:36 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2013-04-16 03:54:19 PM  
9 votes:
i1222.photobucket.com
2013-04-16 02:20:36 PM  
7 votes:
www.chailife.com
2013-04-16 02:32:10 PM  
5 votes:
Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.
2013-04-16 03:48:49 PM  
4 votes:
Were Bostonians.  The entire notion that we will let this event define us as a city and people is about as foreign to us as being a Yankee fan.

However in these times the thoughts, prayers and gestures of goodwill are appreciated.
2013-04-16 03:45:24 PM  
4 votes:

scottydoesntknow: [www.chailife.com image 600x389]


You know, the Mr. Rogers "look for the people helping" meme is one of the very few I can stand and don't think can be overused. There are at least 4-5 versions of it bumping around my facebook news feed, and it really does teach a valuable lesson about the good and hope that can come out of tragedy.

I'm thankful my little boy is too young to understand or care about what's going on in Boston. But in another few years he'll understand or care all too well and that Mr. Rogers quote will always be top of mind for me.
2013-04-16 03:37:33 PM  
4 votes:

Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.


While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.
2013-04-16 02:33:58 PM  
4 votes:

brap: Annnnnnnnnnnnnd there go the waterworks.

 ---  Thanks Mr. Roger's mom.


Heh, sorry. But it really is one of the best quotes ever about tragedies or disasters. It also helps you realize that no matter the atrocity, there are always people there to help, no matter the race, age, religion, etc.

It's those things that keep me wanting to live on this planet. For every horrible person, there's 100 others looking to help.
2013-04-16 05:07:45 PM  
3 votes:

jaytkay: Heartwarming stories.

God was really looking out for the people of Boston yesterday.


Then why did he let the asshole plant that bomb if he was watching out for them?  Or if you want to argue "free will", how come this omnipotent, telepathic, omni-present God let over 100 people get injured and 3 die because of it?  I mean, really.  And did God transport people to the hospital?  Nooooo, he let them lie there and suffer until the barricades could be torn down and people put themselves at risk to save them.

This God character seems kind of a dick if you ask me.
2013-04-16 02:52:17 PM  
3 votes:

Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.


Godawful shiat like this does have a habit of bringing out the very best in humanity. Odd since the cause was part of the very worst of humanity. But there it is.
2013-04-16 05:42:27 PM  
2 votes:
want to lose your faith in humanity again?  read through these comments.

/it's a vicious cycle
//dickheads
///slashed!
2013-04-16 05:23:26 PM  
2 votes:

tlars699: Russ1642: tlars699: darknys: tlars699: dazed420: kvinesknows:

2/10- you almost got me.


Wasn't really trolling with that one. The blood donation rules are based on morality from a century ago rather than science.
2013-04-16 05:19:38 PM  
2 votes:
The way most of humanity feels after an obvious tragedy like this:  Interconnected, compassionate, attentive.

If we can somehow figure out a way to keep this sentiment alive well after a tragedy like this passes, we will have gone 90% of the way toward solving all of our problems as a species.  I don't know if many of you remember it clearly, but the weeks post 9-11 were almost surreal in this country.  For a short while there, people I met in the street were nicer.  Store clerks were more patient.  Disagreeable co-workers were more social.

It's paradoxical that horrible stuff like this is often what it takes to acknowledge the fact that we simply need to be better to each other.
2013-04-16 04:55:18 PM  
2 votes:

tlars699: dazed420: kvinesknows:
you dont understand emergencies that well do you?

Actually he is more than likely right which means you don't understand the requirements for functioning blood donations.  Not only is their blood lacking in oxygen but it will also contain high amounts of toxins the blood is trying to remove from the body not to mention the reduction of blood from the runners during their recovery would be very dangerous for them

Provided they are healthy(they ran 26 miles, and have been training for months), and they are hydrated (yay for volunteers) and they rest for an hour or two (probably the time they had to wait to donate) and maybe eat a snack/drink some fluids(key words: cookie/o.j.) they should be fine to donate.

It won't help anyone injured immediately at this event, but it may help them recover from a possible bleed out due to surgical complications days from now, or the survivors of a car wreck 30 miles from Boston two weeks from now. Who's to say?
That you are knocking them for trying to help in the best way they can says loads about you.


Yeah, they should be fine to donate. They're certainly not going to have low iron or oxygen. Marathon runners are likely to have polycythemia rather than anemia and I'm pretty sure their lungs work fine.

They might have a bit of impact hemolysis, but that's a minor thing.

As far as nonspecific "toxins:" no such thing. I don't care what Dr. Oz has been telling you.

There might be some myoglobin and free hemoglobin floating around, but these are serum proteins. Unless someone is in fulminant rhabdomyolysis, its fine. Also, people with rhabdo tend to pee dark brown, feel like shiat, and die of renal failure. Not likely to pass Red Cross screening.

In any case, blood is dispensed as PRBCs: packed red blood cells. No serum. No floating proteins. No lactate floating around either.
2013-04-16 04:50:40 PM  
2 votes:
While the Mr. Rogers quote is good, it's been overused, so instead...

It's like in the great stories, Mr. Frodo. The ones that really mattered. Full of darkness and danger, they were. And sometimes you didn't want to know the end. Because how could the end be happy? How could the world go back to the way it was when so much bad had happened? But in the end, it's only a passing thing, this shadow. Even darkness must pass. A new day will come. And when the sun shines it will shine out the clearer. Those were the stories that stayed with you. That meant something, even if you were too small to understand why. But I think, Mr. Frodo, I do understand. I know now. Folk in those stories had lots of chances of turning back, only they didn't. They kept going. Because they were holding on to something.
2013-04-16 04:44:11 PM  
2 votes:
that bosnian sniper:  ...Unless you're capable and of sound mind and body, and have the expertise that can be put to use by coordinators, it's better to stay out of the way and act  if requested to by someone authoritative...

If someone gets their leg blown off 10 feet from me, or has any other major wound they are bleeding out from, I'm not going to stay out of the way, I'm going to try to stop their bleeding. I don't even know CPR, but I damn well know enough about first-aid to perform that first-two-minutes-triage that can make all the difference in the world.

If someone gets their leg blown off 2 miles from me, I'm probably just going to find the best bug-out direction, and comply with law enforcement when requested.
2013-04-16 04:42:11 PM  
2 votes:

stevetherobot: that bosnian sniper: Benevolent Misanthrope: My wow was not for the blood bank, but for the intent of those TRYING TO DO SOMETHING POSITIVE, even though most of us would say, "fark this noise, I wanna sit down."

The  intent is laudable, sure, but on the other hand there is a point to be made here. When it comes to mass casualty incidents, whether it's a major accident, natural disaster, or violent act such as yesterday, emergency response is already taxed. Unless you're capable and of sound mind and body, and have the expertise that can be put to use by coordinators, it's better to stay out of the way and act  if requested to by someone authoritative.

I'd bet a good number of runners, if not most of them, had to be turned away as already at health risk due to having just finished a marathon, let alone had some of them donated only to have complications from it. It takes manpower and time that is much better-allocated to receiving casualties, performing triage, and even processing paperwork, to turn otherwise well-meaning people away at the door especially during that first hour.

All that aside, hasn't it occurred to anyone that that story implies that these runners went ahead and finished the race AFTER the explosions?


If a bomb went off behind me I'd sure as hell have finished the damn race. In record time too.
2013-04-16 04:24:53 PM  
2 votes:

LumberJack: I'm probably just an arsehole for pointing out that "first responders doing what first responders do because it's their job" isn't really an act of kindness. Nor is a Mister Rogers Quote.


No, you're not, but it doesn't mean you're also right.  Yes, it's their job, but there's real kindness to be found in the fact that they accept that job to begin with.  People that knowingly run toward the danger instead of away have my respect.  And why can't a quote be a kindness?  If it helps people focus and banish despondency, it's a kindness, even if it was easy.
2013-04-16 04:17:19 PM  
2 votes:

Russ1642: Summoner101: Russ1642: what_now: Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.

While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.

Do they even use blood that soon? I thought that donating blood immediately after a crisis didn't actually help even if there was a blood shortage.

It will still have to be processed and won't fulfill an immediate need, but it will bolster their reserves since these traumas will likely need transfusions over the coming weeks.

Provided the blood makes it through the morality screening. Don't want any of that gay or slutty blood.


I've got an appointment to donate at MGH on Thursday, and I'm pretty sure (fingers crossed) they'll use mine. No sex, no drugs, and no foreign travel for me. My blood like freshly scrubbed linoleum, boring but clean.

/O+
2013-04-16 03:51:12 PM  
2 votes:

Summoner101: Emergencies, especially ones with gross trauma, tend to make blood services lax their standards.


It was also noted that while the gesture to donate now is appreciated, the coming weeks are just as important as we get into Spring and Summer.
2013-04-16 03:49:11 PM  
2 votes:

Summoner101: Emergencies, especially ones with gross trauma, tend to make blood services lax their standards.


No they don't. I gave blood an hour ago. They went through every single test, and I saw them boot people.
2013-04-16 03:48:15 PM  
2 votes:

what_now: Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.

While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.


I bet you're a real hit at parties.

My wow was not for the blood bank, but for the intent of those TRYING TO DO SOMETHING POSITIVE, even though most of us would say, "fark this noise, I wanna sit down."
2013-04-16 03:47:51 PM  
2 votes:

what_now: Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.

While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.


Emergencies, especially ones with gross trauma, tend to make blood services lax their standards.

/and really, they won't know until they get to the screening
//the healthier runners would probably still qualify
2013-04-16 03:45:16 PM  
2 votes:

LandOfChocolate: Who are they really targeting here? Who was affected by this tragedy that is going to go out for tapas and because of the event, cannot afford to pay/


The people who left their bags and ran like hell, and now can't get back to their bags, into their hotel rooms, on their flights etc etc
2013-04-16 03:41:29 PM  
2 votes:
I'd have more faith in humanity if there hadn't been a bombing.
2013-04-16 02:43:22 PM  
2 votes:
It is so beautiful to see so much good in the face of so much evil.
2013-04-16 02:25:32 PM  
2 votes:
Annnnnnnnnnnnnd there go the waterworks.

 ---  Thanks Mr. Roger's mom.
2013-04-16 08:16:26 PM  
1 votes:

Bschott007: If I could ask a question to someone with knowledge in the medical community:  Would any of the Boston hospitals accept help from an out of town doctor?  Say a resident doctor from L.A. was in town for the marathon.  Would an out of town doctor offer their services to a hospital or is there a large amount of paperwork that would be needed and liability/insurance forms needing to be filled out before a doctor would e able to help/practice at the hospital?


I imagine it's probably dependent on situation. I'm sure that now, when things are relatively calmer, they will not accept the help without a prohibitive amount of paperwork. In the acute situation, when 200+ traumas were coming in, the average ED doc would ask to see your hospital ID and then tell you to get busy. In that situation consequences can be managed later.
2013-04-16 07:53:39 PM  
1 votes:
My faith in humanity is restored in that this is not a "featured partner" link and Farkers are allowed to comment on it.
2013-04-16 07:43:26 PM  
1 votes:

flamingboar: Welp, that faith died again as soon as I read the comments here.

/needs a hug


(hug)

/I would in person if I could; free hugs should be a human right
2013-04-16 06:29:58 PM  
1 votes:

deplorable: 70,000 innocents killed in syria - a "meh" from the world

2 people dead and 20 injured suddenly the whole world is "outraged"


yeah, a belief in humanity... that we care more about our own people than anyone else's.

go species human,


All species care more about their immediate group than the rest of the species at large. Don't like it, take it up with Gawd or Darwin or whoever.
2013-04-16 06:26:19 PM  
1 votes:
70,000 innocents killed in syria - a "meh" from the world

2 people dead and 20 injured suddenly the whole world is "outraged"


yeah, a belief in humanity... that we care more about our own people than anyone else's.

go species human,
2013-04-16 06:19:59 PM  
1 votes:

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: raygundan: Jon iz teh kewl: raygundan: WTFDYW: While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.

Running a marathon doesn't reduce the iron in your blood.  I'm not even sure what you're talking about when you say "there wouldn't be enough oxygen"-- they'd have the same oxygen in their blood they usually do.  And their blood pressure would be normal shortly after they stopped running.  None of those thing would affect blood donation.  They could be a little dehydrated, but that's not going to disqualify them either.  And assuming it takes them an hour or two post-race to actually get into the chair to donate, they'll be rehydrated anyway.

and they probably used IV drugs at least ONCE in their lives, like everyone else, thus disqualifying them.

Do you mean illegal IV drugs?  That'll get you a ban.  Prescription IV drugs are fine.  I'm willing to bet a sizeable majority of marathon runners have never used illegal IV drugs, but if you have information to the contrary, I'll concede the point.

I don't know about IV drugs specifically, but it's pretty well known that runners ingest narcotics to help keep their energy levels up during marathons. Have you never heard of a "runner's high"?


It is true that runners are notorious addicts, although I don't think I've heard about any use of narcotics.  Endorphins are widespread, though.  Fortunately for most runners, endogenous endorphin use is not illegal or on the list of things that will get you banned from donating blood.
2013-04-16 06:11:27 PM  
1 votes:

tlars699: I would think that these donors would then be directed to a different spot, where they could donate, or told to patiently wait their turn, and rest up in the meantime, which is probably what happened.

Also, not everyone who works in a hospital is necessarily required for an emergency- I'm sure the phlebotomists on staff, specifically the people who are only trained to draw blood from people for testing, storage, etc. were called in or showed up as needed to handle the donations. You also only need a chair to draw blood, not a bed.


Well, as someone already said "bed space" refers to general patient capacity, not the actual number of beds the hospital has.

And, a note: in a mass trauma incident the phlebotomists are going to be  very busy. Trauma cases still need blood work, especially in the event a patient is too seriously injured or deeply in shock to tell responders their blood type. If I remember right (I'd have to contact an ex- of mine for confirmation), full blood count, UEC, arterial blood gas, and cross-matching tests are standard  anywaysin the event of a major trauma case.
2013-04-16 05:56:52 PM  
1 votes:
Sometimes, this species is capable of such evil. But, at the same time, holds great promise of greatness.

I'd like to think the good outnumbers the evil.
2013-04-16 05:56:24 PM  
1 votes:

Godscrack: [imageshack.us image 592x476]


That's Koko, the gorilla who speaks in American Sign Language. And they gave her a kitten. She named it "All Ball". Researchers said that she tried to nurse All Ball and was very gentle and loving.  When someone let the kitten out, it was hit and killed by a car. She signed "Bad, sad, bad" and "Frown, cry, frown, sad". Her handler also reported later hearing Koko making a sound similar to human weeping.

So they gave other kittens. She named the later ones "Lipstick" and "Smokey".

And we shoot those gorillas in the wild for meat.

/and, yes, I am loads of fun at parties
2013-04-16 05:43:17 PM  
1 votes:

Flappyhead: Big Man On Campus:

Yes, America was dressed the part, hence asking for rape, so that justifies it.

/Have you considered it might be a in-house job?

Sadly I have a strong suspicion that it is.  I know a lot of people are quick to point overseas but this doesn't strike me as their style.


I'm leaning toward domestic as well because it doesn't seem like an international terrorist plan. It reminds me more of Oklahoma City. Plus, at least from what we have been told, no terror chatter has claimed it.
2013-04-16 05:40:50 PM  
1 votes:

louiedog: Big Man On Campus: that bosnian sniper:  ...Unless you're capable and of sound mind and body, and have the expertise that can be put to use by coordinators, it's better to stay out of the way and act  if requested to by someone authoritative...

If someone gets their leg blown off 10 feet from me, or has any other major wound they are bleeding out from, I'm not going to stay out of the way, I'm going to try to stop their bleeding. I don't even know CPR, but I damn well know enough about first-aid to perform that first-two-minutes-triage that can make all the difference in the world.

If someone gets their leg blown off 2 miles from me, I'm probably just going to find the best bug-out direction, and comply with law enforcement when requested.

Learn CPR. I think everyone should. It's easy, there are lots of videos online, and if you look around you might find a fire department event or similar in your area where they'll have a practice dummy and teach you for free. Hell, there was that story a few weeks ago about that 9-year-old who raced over to a neighbor's house and saved the life of a baby with it when the mother didn't know what to do. That was just from memorizing a poster in the school cafeteria.

I was a lifeguard for a number of years as a teen and certified in CPR, but I never had to use it. I still watch a video and go over the steps regularly to refresh myself in case I'm ever in a situation like this.


This.

Learn CPR and First Aid.

You won't be a paramedic but you might keep that limb or keep somone going until they can get to a hosptial.  If not, hey, you tried your very best.  I've had FA training since 1993.  It takes one day.
2013-04-16 05:36:19 PM  
1 votes:

WTFDYW: While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.


Running a marathon doesn't reduce the iron in your blood.  I'm not even sure what you're talking about when you say "there wouldn't be enough oxygen"-- they'd have the same oxygen in their blood they usually do.  And their blood pressure would be normal shortly after they stopped running.  None of those thing would affect blood donation.  They could be a little dehydrated, but that's not going to disqualify them either.  And assuming it takes them an hour or two post-race to actually get into the chair to donate, they'll be rehydrated anyway.
2013-04-16 05:35:27 PM  
1 votes:
Big Man On Campus:

Yes, America was dressed the part, hence asking for rape, so that justifies it.

/Have you considered it might be a in-house job?


Sadly I have a strong suspicion that it is.  I know a lot of people are quick to point overseas but this doesn't strike me as their style.
2013-04-16 05:05:19 PM  
1 votes:
Maybe it is because I've just had too much black-market cyberware installed,  but these "le faith in le humanity restored" memes don't do anything for me. These kind of acts happen all the time, but now they don't count unless someone recorded it so they could submit it to a webzone so they could get upboats and likes it you "cry every teim"
2013-04-16 05:03:03 PM  
1 votes:

Suede head: Yep, this is a tragedy.

Meanwhile, thousands of people have been killed by American drones in Asia and Africa with no pretence of arrest or trial, including hundreds even the US government says were certainly innocent.

Do you think... maybe... that might have annoyed some people enough to bomb you back?



www.knology.net
2013-04-16 05:00:21 PM  
1 votes:

dazed420: Not only is their blood lacking in oxygen but it will also contain high amounts of toxins

You body is not full of toxins."Toxins" is marketing talk from people who want to sell you something or make you a Scientologist.
2013-04-16 04:58:51 PM  
1 votes:

Big Man On Campus: ChipNASA: Oh LOOTIE!!!
[www.deque.com image 227x222]
Really????, injured people feet away and folks are LOOTING MARATHON JACKETS?!?!?!?

How is anyone able to think about "free t-shirts" at a time like that? Seems like it has to be fake, on human nature alone. Now, if it were stolen gold bars that were lying around...
[mimg.ugo.com image 288x288]


I figured they took them to use as bandages. A lot of people needed something to stop the blood.
2013-04-16 04:57:32 PM  
1 votes:

Big Man On Campus: that bosnian sniper:  ...Unless you're capable and of sound mind and body, and have the expertise that can be put to use by coordinators, it's better to stay out of the way and act  if requested to by someone authoritative...

If someone gets their leg blown off 10 feet from me, or has any other major wound they are bleeding out from, I'm not going to stay out of the way, I'm going to try to stop their bleeding. I don't even know CPR, but I damn well know enough about first-aid to perform that first-two-minutes-triage that can make all the difference in the world.

If someone gets their leg blown off 2 miles from me, I'm probably just going to find the best bug-out direction, and comply with law enforcement when requested.


Learn CPR. I think everyone should. It's easy, there are lots of videos online, and if you look around you might find a fire department event or similar in your area where they'll have a practice dummy and teach you for free. Hell, there was that story a few weeks ago about that 9-year-old who raced over to a neighbor's house and saved the life of a baby with it when the mother didn't know what to do. That was just from memorizing a poster in the school cafeteria.

I was a lifeguard for a number of years as a teen and certified in CPR, but I never had to use it. I still watch a video and go over the steps regularly to refresh myself in case I'm ever in a situation like this.
2013-04-16 04:42:58 PM  
1 votes:

that bosnian sniper: jcooli09: Just curious, how do you know this?  Is there a second standard for times of crisis?

Yes, it's called "let's make sure donors are physically capable of donating at this time, lest they keel over while donating and inadvertently add to the number of inpatients, when we're already overloaded and people are still coming in".


If they rest a bit, and take in some food and drink while they are waiting to donate, they should be fine to do so. I don't know where this "OMG! They lack oxygen/iron!" b.s. came from. They are marathon runners- most of whom have been training for months to do this, i.e. run 26 miles, without collapsing, on the way. If you're healthy and hydrated, your physical recovery time is relatively quick.
2013-04-16 04:41:42 PM  
1 votes:

Russ1642: LumberJack: I'm probably just an arsehole for pointing out that "first responders doing what first responders do because it's their job" isn't really an act of kindness. Nor is a Mister Rogers Quote.

Posting an inspirational quote is nice and all, but it's as useful as prayer. Make yourself feel like you're helping without actually doing anything.


So it would be better to just sit around and do absolutely nothing at all? People are scared and confused right now. Letting them know that others are thinking about them does a lot towards reducing those feelings of fear and isolation. That's why the President goes on TV and gives a speech that really says very little, but reminds us we're all Americans right now, or why feel-good stories about anonymous heroes giving strangers orange juice make headlines coast to coast. Because otherwise we'd have a lot of Bostonians wandering around in shock and feeling like nobody gives a shiat--even their fellow Bostonians across the Commons who weren't directly affected by the blast.

It's called compassion and empathy, which evidently is sorely lacking amongst the troll population.
2013-04-16 04:32:12 PM  
1 votes:
Friend was running in the race. Wife was in the stands. Pregnant. Wife got pierced with shrapnel, Emergency C section later, the kid is alive. In an incubator for now ,but still. Jeepers.  Name for now is "Mike Lucky", lol.  Just name the kid lucky and be done with it.
2013-04-16 04:27:42 PM  
1 votes:
I see someone let the trolls off their leash.  meh. Part of returning to normalcy, I guess.

/the stupid part
2013-04-16 04:27:05 PM  
1 votes:
It's important to acknowledge the work that people do to help one another.  That said, if you're someone who continually needs to have your faith in humanity restored, you're either part of the problem or just not paying attention.
2013-04-16 04:26:33 PM  
1 votes:

Russ1642: LumberJack: I'm probably just an arsehole for pointing out that "first responders doing what first responders do because it's their job" isn't really an act of kindness. Nor is a Mister Rogers Quote.

Posting an inspirational quote is nice and all, but it's as useful as prayer. Make yourself feel like you're helping without actually doing anything.


And biatching how much those don't help on an internet forum is accomplishing what exactly?
2013-04-16 04:26:06 PM  
1 votes:
Looking at that reminded me of The Dark Knight:

"Sometimes people deserve more. Sometimes people deserve to have their faith rewarded"
2013-04-16 04:18:06 PM  
1 votes:

LumberJack: I'm probably just an arsehole for pointing out that "first responders doing what first responders do because it's their job" isn't really an act of kindness. Nor is a Mister Rogers Quote.


Posting an inspirational quote is nice and all, but it's as useful as prayer. Make yourself feel like you're helping without actually doing anything.
2013-04-16 04:11:51 PM  
1 votes:

Benevolent Misanthrope: My wow was not for the blood bank, but for the intent of those TRYING TO DO SOMETHING POSITIVE, even though most of us would say, "fark this noise, I wanna sit down."


The  intent is laudable, sure, but on the other hand there is a point to be made here. When it comes to mass casualty incidents, whether it's a major accident, natural disaster, or violent act such as yesterday, emergency response is already taxed. Unless you're capable and of sound mind and body, and have the expertise that can be put to use by coordinators, it's better to stay out of the way and act  if requested to by someone authoritative.

I'd bet a good number of runners, if not most of them, had to be turned away as already at health risk due to having just finished a marathon, let alone had some of them donated only to have complications from it. It takes manpower and time that is much better-allocated to receiving casualties, performing triage, and even processing paperwork, to turn otherwise well-meaning people away at the door especially during that first hour.
2013-04-16 04:07:19 PM  
1 votes:

Russ1642: what_now: Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.

While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.

Do they even use blood that soon? I thought that donating blood immediately after a crisis didn't actually help even if there was a blood shortage.


Actually, if I know my stuff- when an emergency like this happens, the surrounding medical facilities and blood banks are put on alert. Any available resources are sent where it is immediately needed, without depleting emergency supplies for any specific center.
All blood packs are kept track of through billing- center/hospital to the hospital that uses it, after the crisis is over. They still keep track of blood types and such throughout this process. Some ambulances and medical vehicles are transporting these supplies to where they are needed.

Any donations made by the runners that day, while still needing to be tested, and not able to be used immediately, will be needed to replenish the stock loss incurred by this whole process.
Even if it doesn't help at this particular event, it is thoughtful, and still helps  someone.
2013-04-16 04:04:25 PM  
1 votes:
The Joe Andruzzi thing is fricking amazing.  If you didn't know this, his three brothers are all FDNY and were at the scene at Ground Zero.  You just can't mess with his family, period.
2013-04-16 03:56:57 PM  
1 votes:

Skarekrough: Summoner101: Emergencies, especially ones with gross trauma, tend to make blood services lax their standards.

It was also noted that while the gesture to donate now is appreciated, the coming weeks are just as important as we get into Spring and Summer.


Don't forget every holiday season- our demand for the phlebotomy kits we sell drops significantly, despite the increased need, due to accidents both at home and on the road. Keep events like this in mind, and give whenever you can.
2013-04-16 03:53:35 PM  
1 votes:

Pontious Pilates: scottydoesntknow: [www.chailife.com image 600x389]

You know, the Mr. Rogers "look for the people helping" meme is one of the very few I can stand and don't think can be overused. There are at least 4-5 versions of it bumping around my facebook news feed, and it really does teach a valuable lesson about the good and hope that can come out of tragedy.

I'm thankful my little boy is too young to understand or care about what's going on in Boston. But in another few years he'll understand or care all too well and that Mr. Rogers quote will always be top of mind for me.


One day my 7 yr old niece came up to me after she had seen a school shooting on tv and asked me if that would ever happen at her school.  I didn't know what to say.  No one can predict where or when evil will strike.  So I just said, "Yeah, probably."
2013-04-16 03:50:13 PM  
1 votes:

The Incredible Sexual Egg: I've seen it so much over the last day or so, but that picture with the three cops is badass


The middle cop always looks to me like he's about to whip it out.
2013-04-16 03:44:12 PM  
1 votes:
 
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