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(WPTV)   Need to have your faith in humanity restored? Here's 15 acts of kindness seen during the Boston bombings   (wptv.com) divider line 213
    More: Hero, Boston, Tax Day, Boston Marathon  
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22089 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Apr 2013 at 3:36 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-16 05:43:17 PM

Flappyhead: Big Man On Campus:

Yes, America was dressed the part, hence asking for rape, so that justifies it.

/Have you considered it might be a in-house job?

Sadly I have a strong suspicion that it is.  I know a lot of people are quick to point overseas but this doesn't strike me as their style.


I'm leaning toward domestic as well because it doesn't seem like an international terrorist plan. It reminds me more of Oklahoma City. Plus, at least from what we have been told, no terror chatter has claimed it.
 
2013-04-16 05:45:58 PM

what_now: Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.

While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.


I replied to the wrong post before-- my apologies to WTFDYW.

Running a marathon doesn't reduce the iron in your blood.  I'm not even sure what you're talking about when you say "there wouldn't be enough oxygen"-- they'd have the same oxygen in their blood they usually do.  And their blood pressure would be normal shortly after they stopped running-- not to mention that distance runners will have better blood pressure on average than the general population.  None of those thing would affect blood donation.  They could be a little dehydrated, but that's not going to disqualify them either.  And assuming it takes them an hour or two post-race to actually get into the chair to donate, they'll be rehydrated anyway.  There's no technical reason this story couldn't be true.
 
2013-04-16 05:46:52 PM
 
2013-04-16 05:50:24 PM
"Shall I tell you what I find beautiful about you?
...
You are at your very best when things are worst."
 
2013-04-16 05:51:30 PM
So, regarding the blood donation issues raised, I actually pulled my copy of the AABB Technical Manual (16th ed) off the shelf - the whole 4th chapter is on disaster management.

Testing and processing of the blood into components is going to take 24-48 hours. The hospital + local blood bank should have approximately a 5-7 day supply on hand and the AABB maintains a national network of blood centers to resupply the affected hospital within 12-24 hours. Blood has to be fully tested before being released, with the only exception noted if "all blood supplies are exhausted, that resupply is not possible, and that blood is needed immediately to save lives." They go on to state that samples should be retained for retrospective testing. Trauma centers have massive transfusion protocols and other means of managing their blood supply. I doubt in this case any rules were "relaxed."

The AABB actually warns against disaster-related donor surges when there isn't a need for blood products. They suggest having people schedule future donations in some cases. Blood has a shelf life, and it is better to have people come in over time to replenish depleted stores and otherwise help maintain our blood supply that to all donate in a very short time frame and then have a bunch of unused units expire right as we move into the summer (typically a 'low season' for blood donations).

In any case, donating blood is a very nice, very humanitarian thing to do if you are able... you really can save a life.
 
2013-04-16 05:52:25 PM

Krustofsky: https://twitter.com/Yankees/status/324259441715339267/photo/1


Next thing you know White Sox and Cub fans will stop beating the crap out of each other.
 
2013-04-16 05:53:21 PM

sleeps in trees: Pontious Pilates: scottydoesntknow: [www.chailife.com image 600x389]

You know, the Mr. Rogers "look for the people helping" meme is one of the very few I can stand and don't think can be overused. There are at least 4-5 versions of it bumping around my facebook news feed, and it really does teach a valuable lesson about the good and hope that can come out of tragedy.

I'm thankful my little boy is too young to understand or care about what's going on in Boston. But in another few years he'll understand or care all too well and that Mr. Rogers quote will always be top of mind for me.



It's sad when my 16 year old has seen more crazy shiat in his lifetime than I did at his age. Between mass shootings, wars, bombings and planes being flown into buildings he's oddly well adjusted.


You had the Internet, YouTube, smartphones, etc... when you were 16?
 
2013-04-16 05:54:37 PM

dazed420: kvinesknows:
you dont understand emergencies that well do you?

Actually he is more than likely right which means you don't understand the requirements for functioning blood donations.  Not only is their blood lacking in oxygen but it will also contain high amounts of toxins the blood is trying to remove from the body not to mention the reduction of blood from the runners during their recovery would be very dangerous for them


Where did this idea that blood is "lacking in oxygen" after running come from?  Or that you need extra blood during recovery?  Extra red cells are needed for maximal athletic performance, not for recovery.  Oxygen levels will be the same as they always are.  Blood pressure is elevated during the running (duh... the heart pumps harder) but returns to normal very quickly after you stop.

It's actually fairly common for runners to donate shortly after a big race, because the downtime/easy training/recovery period after a race is the one time in their training schedule where they won't notice the absence of a few red cells.  I usually donate the evening after a race, for example.  Never had an issue qualifying to donate, or after the donation.
 
2013-04-16 05:55:05 PM

R.A.Danny: Krustofsky: https://twitter.com/Yankees/status/324259441715339267/photo/1

Next thing you know White Sox and Cub fans will stop beating the crap out of each other.


You're funny, even if chicago split in half and was being overrun by zombie aliens, a sox fan would let a cubs fan fall into the great chasm to save their own ass (and vice versa).
 
2013-04-16 05:55:19 PM

Russ1642: LumberJack: I'm probably just an arsehole for pointing out that "first responders doing what first responders do because it's their job" isn't really an act of kindness. Nor is a Mister Rogers Quote.

Posting an inspirational quote is nice and all, but it's as useful as prayer. Make yourself feel like you're helping without actually doing anything.


No, it just restores your faith in humanity, jackass.  What else are people supposed to do who don't live in the area and can't offer homes for stranded travelers, other than:

biohazard76: The AABB actually warns against disaster-related donor surges when there isn't a need for blood products. They suggest having people schedule future donations in some cases. Blood has a shelf life, and it is better to have people come in over time to replenish depleted stores and otherwise help maintain our blood supply that to all donate in a very short time frame and then have a bunch of unused units expire right as we move into the summer (typically a 'low season' for blood donations).

In any case, donating blood is a very nice, very humanitarian thing to do if you are able... you really can save a life.


THIS.

I can't donate for a few more weeks anyhow.  And since donating blood is all I can really do as far as this situation goes, so it goes I suppose.

/donate blood, people
//and sign your organ donor card while you're at it
 
2013-04-16 05:56:24 PM

Godscrack: [imageshack.us image 592x476]


That's Koko, the gorilla who speaks in American Sign Language. And they gave her a kitten. She named it "All Ball". Researchers said that she tried to nurse All Ball and was very gentle and loving.  When someone let the kitten out, it was hit and killed by a car. She signed "Bad, sad, bad" and "Frown, cry, frown, sad". Her handler also reported later hearing Koko making a sound similar to human weeping.

So they gave other kittens. She named the later ones "Lipstick" and "Smokey".

And we shoot those gorillas in the wild for meat.

/and, yes, I am loads of fun at parties
 
2013-04-16 05:56:52 PM
Sometimes, this species is capable of such evil. But, at the same time, holds great promise of greatness.

I'd like to think the good outnumbers the evil.
 
2013-04-16 05:58:09 PM
www.titanic-magazin.de
 
2013-04-16 05:58:12 PM

StreetlightInTheGhetto: /donate blood, people

... in a few weeks, then keep doing it on a regular clip.

/FTFM
//your local blood bank will appreciate it much more if you show up to donate in May than tonight.
 
2013-04-16 06:00:09 PM

TheShavingofOccam123: Godscrack: [imageshack.us image 592x476]

That's Koko, the gorilla who speaks in American Sign Language. And they gave her a kitten. She named it "All Ball". Researchers said that she tried to nurse All Ball and was very gentle and loving.  When someone let the kitten out, it was hit and killed by a car. She signed "Bad, sad, bad" and "Frown, cry, frown, sad". Her handler also reported later hearing Koko making a sound similar to human weeping.

So they gave other kittens. She named the later ones "Lipstick" and "Smokey".

And we shoot those gorillas in the wild for meat.

/and, yes, I am loads of fun at parties


"We" who? I don't. No one I know does.
 
2013-04-16 06:04:47 PM

Jon iz teh kewl: raygundan: WTFDYW: While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.

Running a marathon doesn't reduce the iron in your blood.  I'm not even sure what you're talking about when you say "there wouldn't be enough oxygen"-- they'd have the same oxygen in their blood they usually do.  And their blood pressure would be normal shortly after they stopped running.  None of those thing would affect blood donation.  They could be a little dehydrated, but that's not going to disqualify them either.  And assuming it takes them an hour or two post-race to actually get into the chair to donate, they'll be rehydrated anyway.

and they probably used IV drugs at least ONCE in their lives, like everyone else, thus disqualifying them.


What?
 
2013-04-16 06:05:25 PM

SultanofSchwing: R.A.Danny: Krustofsky: https://twitter.com/Yankees/status/324259441715339267/photo/1

Next thing you know White Sox and Cub fans will stop beating the crap out of each other.

You're funny, even if chicago split in half and was being overrun by zombie aliens, a sox fan would let a cubs fan fall into the great chasm to save their own ass (and vice versa).


Without a square to spare.
 
2013-04-16 06:10:19 PM

Jon iz teh kewl: raygundan: WTFDYW: While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.

Running a marathon doesn't reduce the iron in your blood.  I'm not even sure what you're talking about when you say "there wouldn't be enough oxygen"-- they'd have the same oxygen in their blood they usually do.  And their blood pressure would be normal shortly after they stopped running.  None of those thing would affect blood donation.  They could be a little dehydrated, but that's not going to disqualify them either.  And assuming it takes them an hour or two post-race to actually get into the chair to donate, they'll be rehydrated anyway.

and they probably used IV drugs at least ONCE in their lives, like everyone else, thus disqualifying them.


Do you mean illegal IV drugs?  That'll get you a ban.  Prescription IV drugs are fine.  I'm willing to bet a sizeable majority of marathon runners have never used illegal IV drugs, but if you have information to the contrary, I'll concede the point.
 
2013-04-16 06:11:27 PM

tlars699: I would think that these donors would then be directed to a different spot, where they could donate, or told to patiently wait their turn, and rest up in the meantime, which is probably what happened.

Also, not everyone who works in a hospital is necessarily required for an emergency- I'm sure the phlebotomists on staff, specifically the people who are only trained to draw blood from people for testing, storage, etc. were called in or showed up as needed to handle the donations. You also only need a chair to draw blood, not a bed.


Well, as someone already said "bed space" refers to general patient capacity, not the actual number of beds the hospital has.

And, a note: in a mass trauma incident the phlebotomists are going to be  very busy. Trauma cases still need blood work, especially in the event a patient is too seriously injured or deeply in shock to tell responders their blood type. If I remember right (I'd have to contact an ex- of mine for confirmation), full blood count, UEC, arterial blood gas, and cross-matching tests are standard  anywaysin the event of a major trauma case.
 
2013-04-16 06:13:22 PM

raygundan: Jon iz teh kewl: raygundan: WTFDYW: While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.

Running a marathon doesn't reduce the iron in your blood.  I'm not even sure what you're talking about when you say "there wouldn't be enough oxygen"-- they'd have the same oxygen in their blood they usually do.  And their blood pressure would be normal shortly after they stopped running.  None of those thing would affect blood donation.  They could be a little dehydrated, but that's not going to disqualify them either.  And assuming it takes them an hour or two post-race to actually get into the chair to donate, they'll be rehydrated anyway.

and they probably used IV drugs at least ONCE in their lives, like everyone else, thus disqualifying them.

Do you mean illegal IV drugs?  That'll get you a ban.  Prescription IV drugs are fine.  I'm willing to bet a sizeable majority of marathon runners have never used illegal IV drugs, but if you have information to the contrary, I'll concede the point.


I don't know about IV drugs specifically, but it's pretty well known that runners ingest narcotics to help keep their energy levels up during marathons. Have you never heard of a "runner's high"?
 
2013-04-16 06:13:35 PM

Captain Steroid: Sometimes, this species is capable of such evil. But, at the same time, holds great promise of greatness.

I'd like to think the good outnumbers the evil.


I was told there would BE NO MATH!!!
 
2013-04-16 06:14:42 PM

WelldeadLink: mr_bunny: It is so beautiful to see so much good in the face of so much evil.

Are you referring to the bombing, or to it being in a slideshow?


You magnificent bastard.
 
2013-04-16 06:15:26 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: raygundan: Jon iz teh kewl: raygundan: WTFDYW: While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.

Running a marathon doesn't reduce the iron in your blood.  I'm not even sure what you're talking about when you say "there wouldn't be enough oxygen"-- they'd have the same oxygen in their blood they usually do.  And their blood pressure would be normal shortly after they stopped running.  None of those thing would affect blood donation.  They could be a little dehydrated, but that's not going to disqualify them either.  And assuming it takes them an hour or two post-race to actually get into the chair to donate, they'll be rehydrated anyway.

and they probably used IV drugs at least ONCE in their lives, like everyone else, thus disqualifying them.

Do you mean illegal IV drugs?  That'll get you a ban.  Prescription IV drugs are fine.  I'm willing to bet a sizeable majority of marathon runners have never used illegal IV drugs, but if you have information to the contrary, I'll concede the point.

I don't know about IV drugs specifically, but it's pretty well known that runners ingest narcotics to help keep their energy levels up during marathons. Have you never heard of a "runner's high"?


I'll await your defense of that statement when someone else questions it before giving a score.
 
2013-04-16 06:19:59 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: raygundan: Jon iz teh kewl: raygundan: WTFDYW: While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.

Running a marathon doesn't reduce the iron in your blood.  I'm not even sure what you're talking about when you say "there wouldn't be enough oxygen"-- they'd have the same oxygen in their blood they usually do.  And their blood pressure would be normal shortly after they stopped running.  None of those thing would affect blood donation.  They could be a little dehydrated, but that's not going to disqualify them either.  And assuming it takes them an hour or two post-race to actually get into the chair to donate, they'll be rehydrated anyway.

and they probably used IV drugs at least ONCE in their lives, like everyone else, thus disqualifying them.

Do you mean illegal IV drugs?  That'll get you a ban.  Prescription IV drugs are fine.  I'm willing to bet a sizeable majority of marathon runners have never used illegal IV drugs, but if you have information to the contrary, I'll concede the point.

I don't know about IV drugs specifically, but it's pretty well known that runners ingest narcotics to help keep their energy levels up during marathons. Have you never heard of a "runner's high"?


It is true that runners are notorious addicts, although I don't think I've heard about any use of narcotics.  Endorphins are widespread, though.  Fortunately for most runners, endogenous endorphin use is not illegal or on the list of things that will get you banned from donating blood.
 
2013-04-16 06:23:01 PM

Pair-o-Dice: Captain Steroid: Sometimes, this species is capable of such evil. But, at the same time, holds great promise of greatness.

I'd like to think the good outnumbers the evil.

I was told there would BE NO MATH!!!


i1182.photobucket.com
 
2013-04-16 06:26:17 PM
We have nothing to say but want to cash in on ad revenue, so here's screenshots of fifteen Twitter posts!
 
2013-04-16 06:26:19 PM
70,000 innocents killed in syria - a "meh" from the world

2 people dead and 20 injured suddenly the whole world is "outraged"


yeah, a belief in humanity... that we care more about our own people than anyone else's.

go species human,
 
2013-04-16 06:27:16 PM

raygundan: Jon iz teh kewl: raygundan: WTFDYW: While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.

Running a marathon doesn't reduce the iron in your blood.  I'm not even sure what you're talking about when you say "there wouldn't be enough oxygen"-- they'd have the same oxygen in their blood they usually do.  And their blood pressure would be normal shortly after they stopped running.  None of those thing would affect blood donation.  They could be a little dehydrated, but that's not going to disqualify them either.  And assuming it takes them an hour or two post-race to actually get into the chair to donate, they'll be rehydrated anyway.

and they probably used IV drugs at least ONCE in their lives, like everyone else, thus disqualifying them.

Do you mean illegal IV drugs?  That'll get you a ban.  Prescription IV drugs are fine.  I'm willing to bet a sizeable majority of marathon runners have never used illegal IV drugs, but if you have information to the contrary, I'll concede the point.


i thought everyone shoots heroin at least once in their lives
 
2013-04-16 06:29:58 PM

deplorable: 70,000 innocents killed in syria - a "meh" from the world

2 people dead and 20 injured suddenly the whole world is "outraged"


yeah, a belief in humanity... that we care more about our own people than anyone else's.

go species human,


All species care more about their immediate group than the rest of the species at large. Don't like it, take it up with Gawd or Darwin or whoever.
 
2013-04-16 06:31:43 PM

Jon iz teh kewl: raygundan: Jon iz teh kewl: raygundan: WTFDYW: While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.

Running a marathon doesn't reduce the iron in your blood.  I'm not even sure what you're talking about when you say "there wouldn't be enough oxygen"-- they'd have the same oxygen in their blood they usually do.  And their blood pressure would be normal shortly after they stopped running.  None of those thing would affect blood donation.  They could be a little dehydrated, but that's not going to disqualify them either.  And assuming it takes them an hour or two post-race to actually get into the chair to donate, they'll be rehydrated anyway.

and they probably used IV drugs at least ONCE in their lives, like everyone else, thus disqualifying them.

Do you mean illegal IV drugs?  That'll get you a ban.  Prescription IV drugs are fine.  I'm willing to bet a sizeable majority of marathon runners have never used illegal IV drugs, but if you have information to the contrary, I'll concede the point.

i thought everyone shoots heroin at least once in their lives


Easy mistake.  That's an average.  It's actually just one guy who has done heroin seven billion times.
 
2013-04-16 06:41:34 PM
Not really subs, since I recall a time when it didn`t take a tragedy for us to be kind to each other.

No wait, I don`t.
 
2013-04-16 06:42:27 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: sleeps in trees: Pontious Pilates: scottydoesntknow: [www.chailife.com image 600x389]

You know, the Mr. Rogers "look for the people helping" meme is one of the very few I can stand and don't think can be overused. There are at least 4-5 versions of it bumping around my facebook news feed, and it really does teach a valuable lesson about the good and hope that can come out of tragedy.

I'm thankful my little boy is too young to understand or care about what's going on in Boston. But in another few years he'll understand or care all too well and that Mr. Rogers quote will always be top of mind for me.

It's sad when my 16 year old has seen more crazy shiat in his lifetime than I did at his age. Between mass shootings, wars, bombings and planes being flown into buildings he's oddly well adjusted.

You had the Internet, YouTube, smartphones, etc... when you were 16?




That was my point.
 
2013-04-16 07:03:28 PM
 
2013-04-16 07:09:24 PM

FC Exile: Wow. Stealing jackets during the aftermath.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=1hM7Ura6Q4w


Thought earlier in another thread, couldn't see the video linked, it may have been people looking for jackets to keep victims warm...I don't see much urgency in those people to get the jackets back to people in need...

What a pile of farkers.
 
2013-04-16 07:21:00 PM
Welp, that faith died again as soon as I read the comments here.

/needs a hug
 
2013-04-16 07:24:38 PM
 
2013-04-16 07:27:25 PM

flamingboar: Welp, that faith died again as soon as I read the comments here.

/needs a hug


Apologies. I find it very difficult to allow blatantly untrue assertions stand when they are so close to my field of expertise.
 
2013-04-16 07:30:38 PM

deplorable: 70,000 innocents killed in syria - a "meh" from the world

2 people dead and 20 injured suddenly the whole world is "outraged"


yeah, a belief in humanity... that we care more about our own people than anyone else's.

go species human,


your nick is well-chosen.
 
2013-04-16 07:41:34 PM

ancker: I can't be alone here, but I never lost faith.....

It pisses me off that people do things like this, but of the other 10 billion or so people in this world, they represent such a minuscule minority that their acts don't change my feelings about society as a whole.
I refuse to let this asshat ruin my outlook. Changing how you run your life because of these acts is exactly what these terrorists want, either foreign or domestic.


The reason that the average idiot freaks out and demands shiat like the PATRIOT act and gun bans is the same reason that people play the lottery. People in general don't easily comprehend large numbers or statistics, so they think the "bad people" are waaaay more common than they actually are. I have lost faith. The people around me may be well meaning, but they are well-meaning idiots.
 
2013-04-16 07:43:26 PM

flamingboar: Welp, that faith died again as soon as I read the comments here.

/needs a hug


(hug)

/I would in person if I could; free hugs should be a human right
 
2013-04-16 07:47:08 PM
If I could ask a question to someone with knowledge in the medical community:  Would any of the Boston hospitals accept help from an out of town doctor?  Say a resident doctor from L.A. was in town for the marathon.  Would an out of town doctor offer their services to a hospital or is there a large amount of paperwork that would be needed and liability/insurance forms needing to be filled out before a doctor would e able to help/practice at the hospital?
 
2013-04-16 07:49:19 PM

LumberJack: LumberJack: I'm probably just an arsehole for pointing out that "first responders doing what first responders do because it's their job" isn't really an act of kindness. Nor is a Mister Rogers Quote.

GoldSpider: 4/10 - Telegraphed it a bit, but you should get a few bites.

No, I'm not trolling.

treesloth: No, you're not, but it doesn't mean you're also right.  Yes, it's their job, but there's real kindness to be found in the fact that they accept that job to begin with.  People that knowingly run toward the danger instead of away have my respect.  And why can't a quote be a kindness?  If it helps people focus and banish despondency, it's a kindness, even if it was easy.

... but I am an arsehole then. Called it.

My works towards erasing the dilution of the meaning of certain words/phrases (i.e. "Hero") continues.


You have a point. I've heard of firefighters saying that the most heroic thing they do is join up, and after that, they're just doing their job. However, IMHO, staying in the job counts too. I imagine having a close call, casualties (e.g., 9/11), and things you can't unsee are a good incentive to GTFO.

One more thing worth mentioning is that bombers sometimes set secondary explosives to go off later to kill emergency personnel. First responders are trained (at least in some departments) to NOT enter the area until a sweep for those is made. In this case, they charged right in -- which may wrong, stupid, etc., but shows courage nonetheless. It's impressive that they cleared the wounded in minutes; at least that minimized the danger and no doubt saved some lives.
 
2013-04-16 07:53:39 PM
My faith in humanity is restored in that this is not a "featured partner" link and Farkers are allowed to comment on it.
 
2013-04-16 07:55:22 PM
www.nypost.com
My heart aches looking into the eyes of this innocent little boy who just wanted to watch his daddy finish the marathon.

Track down his killer(s) and punish them.  Their lives are now forfeit. If there is a God, I won't claim to understand it, nor do I care to.  There is no God if such evil acts are done.

There is evil in the world. It is of our own making. Rather than pray, I will choose vigilance and protection of my family and friends. And hold them close.
 
2013-04-16 08:06:17 PM

contrapunctus: It's paradoxical that horrible stuff like this is often what it takes to acknowledge the fact that we simply need to be better to each other.


There is no reasoning with someone still living in 12th century religious dogma.  Time to wake up Mr. Freeman, and smell the ashes.
 
2013-04-16 08:16:26 PM

Bschott007: If I could ask a question to someone with knowledge in the medical community:  Would any of the Boston hospitals accept help from an out of town doctor?  Say a resident doctor from L.A. was in town for the marathon.  Would an out of town doctor offer their services to a hospital or is there a large amount of paperwork that would be needed and liability/insurance forms needing to be filled out before a doctor would e able to help/practice at the hospital?


I imagine it's probably dependent on situation. I'm sure that now, when things are relatively calmer, they will not accept the help without a prohibitive amount of paperwork. In the acute situation, when 200+ traumas were coming in, the average ED doc would ask to see your hospital ID and then tell you to get busy. In that situation consequences can be managed later.
 
2013-04-16 08:25:16 PM

Lt. Cheese Weasel: [www.nypost.com image 524x350]
My heart aches looking into the eyes of this innocent little boy who just wanted to watch his daddy finish the marathon.

Track down his killer(s) and punish them.   Their lives are now forfeit. If there is a God, I won't claim to understand it, nor do I care to.  There is no God if such evil acts are done.

There is evil in the world. It is of our own making.
Rather than pray, I will choose vigilance and protection of my family and friends. And hold them close.


God doesn't make the world this way, we do.
 
2013-04-16 08:40:24 PM
Agent Smiths Laugh:

God doesn't make the world this way, we do.

Good point.  Our all knowing, all powerful God just sits back and lets it happen.
 
2013-04-16 08:42:10 PM

SultanofSchwing: jaytkay: Heartwarming stories.

God was really looking out for the people of Boston yesterday.

I don't mean to kill the sentiment, but I think he forgot about Boston yesterday...


My dad once saw a guy in front of him run his car into a ditch.  He stopped to see if the driver was okay and the guy said, "I'm okay.  God was with me."  My dad said, "You better let him ride with me from now on."  "Why's that?"  "You're gonna kill him driving like that."

/Probably not true, but my dad HAS been trolling hard since the 40s.
 
2013-04-16 08:44:38 PM

fireclown: [media2.wptv.com image 640x480]
This makes me feel a little better.


And it's 100% made up:

http://www.telegram.com/article/20130416/NEWS/104169917

There were 3 types of runners in the marathon: 1) Those who finished well before the explosions; 2) Those caught up in the explosions; and 3) Those diverted because of the explosion and did not finish.

Regarding 3: Runners were immediately diverted to a community area from the explosion area, and then the marathon was stopped.  These people did not know what was going on and did not "continue running to the hospital after crossing the finish line". They never crossed the finish line.  They may have eventually made their way to a hospital to donate blood but it definitely wasn't a "continuously keep running right to the hospital".

Regarding 1:  People who had already crossed the finish line didn't know the explosion occurred and therefore didn't "continue running to the hospital".  One of my friends ran and finished an hour before the bombs went off.  He had already been back to his hotel room, showered, and gone out to get a drink when he saw it on the TV.

Regarding 2: The people who were caught up in the explosion, or finishing right before or after it, most assuredly did not run to a hospital to donate blood. It was complete chaos and pandemonium, no one was thinking "shiat, I'll go donate blood".  They were focused on reuniting with their friends, family, providing immediate help, or getting the hell out of Dodge.

But hey, it might be true in a metaphorical sense in which "kept running to the hospital after you crossed the finish line" means "I decided to head over to the hospital after a time lapse and figuring out what the hell was going on".
 
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