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(WPTV)   Need to have your faith in humanity restored? Here's 15 acts of kindness seen during the Boston bombings   (wptv.com) divider line 213
    More: Hero, Boston, Tax Day, Boston Marathon  
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22107 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Apr 2013 at 3:36 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-16 04:52:10 PM  

LandOfChocolate: Perhaps its the cynic in me but the "Pay only if you can" restaurant tweet seems opportunistic

Who are they really targeting here?  Who was affected by this tragedy that is going to go out for tapas and because of the event, cannot afford to pay/


Imagine if you were running and your supporters with your clothes, wallet etc. were in the explosion.

10s of 1000s of people were in from out of town. Some of them had to stay in town unexpectedly for injured friends and relatives.

People near the blasts dropped their belongings and ran.

There were runners who literally had only the clothes on their back.  It was 40 degrees F last night.
 
2013-04-16 04:54:40 PM  

SultanofSchwing: FLMountainMan: ChipNASA: Oh LOOTIE!!!

[www.deque.com image 227x222]
Really????, injured people feet away and folks are LOOTING MARATHON JACKETS?!?!?!?

Actually looks like a pretty good mix of looters and people desperately trying to find clothing.

Inclined to agree.  Given that the temperature in Boston yesterday wasn't exactly balmy only about 48F and you have runners and spectators with severe shock and injuries, getting warm clothing to them ASAP could be pretty important.

idk I can't watch the video, I could be wrong...but I'd like to not think the worst.


Oh I was completely being snarky and referring to the demographics of those looting.

That said, I'm glad you see the good side of people.
 
2013-04-16 04:55:18 PM  

tlars699: dazed420: kvinesknows:
you dont understand emergencies that well do you?

Actually he is more than likely right which means you don't understand the requirements for functioning blood donations.  Not only is their blood lacking in oxygen but it will also contain high amounts of toxins the blood is trying to remove from the body not to mention the reduction of blood from the runners during their recovery would be very dangerous for them

Provided they are healthy(they ran 26 miles, and have been training for months), and they are hydrated (yay for volunteers) and they rest for an hour or two (probably the time they had to wait to donate) and maybe eat a snack/drink some fluids(key words: cookie/o.j.) they should be fine to donate.

It won't help anyone injured immediately at this event, but it may help them recover from a possible bleed out due to surgical complications days from now, or the survivors of a car wreck 30 miles from Boston two weeks from now. Who's to say?
That you are knocking them for trying to help in the best way they can says loads about you.


Yeah, they should be fine to donate. They're certainly not going to have low iron or oxygen. Marathon runners are likely to have polycythemia rather than anemia and I'm pretty sure their lungs work fine.

They might have a bit of impact hemolysis, but that's a minor thing.

As far as nonspecific "toxins:" no such thing. I don't care what Dr. Oz has been telling you.

There might be some myoglobin and free hemoglobin floating around, but these are serum proteins. Unless someone is in fulminant rhabdomyolysis, its fine. Also, people with rhabdo tend to pee dark brown, feel like shiat, and die of renal failure. Not likely to pass Red Cross screening.

In any case, blood is dispensed as PRBCs: packed red blood cells. No serum. No floating proteins. No lactate floating around either.
 
2013-04-16 04:57:32 PM  

Big Man On Campus: that bosnian sniper:  ...Unless you're capable and of sound mind and body, and have the expertise that can be put to use by coordinators, it's better to stay out of the way and act  if requested to by someone authoritative...

If someone gets their leg blown off 10 feet from me, or has any other major wound they are bleeding out from, I'm not going to stay out of the way, I'm going to try to stop their bleeding. I don't even know CPR, but I damn well know enough about first-aid to perform that first-two-minutes-triage that can make all the difference in the world.

If someone gets their leg blown off 2 miles from me, I'm probably just going to find the best bug-out direction, and comply with law enforcement when requested.


Learn CPR. I think everyone should. It's easy, there are lots of videos online, and if you look around you might find a fire department event or similar in your area where they'll have a practice dummy and teach you for free. Hell, there was that story a few weeks ago about that 9-year-old who raced over to a neighbor's house and saved the life of a baby with it when the mother didn't know what to do. That was just from memorizing a poster in the school cafeteria.

I was a lifeguard for a number of years as a teen and certified in CPR, but I never had to use it. I still watch a video and go over the steps regularly to refresh myself in case I'm ever in a situation like this.
 
2013-04-16 04:58:27 PM  

FLMountainMan: SultanofSchwing: FLMountainMan: ChipNASA: Oh LOOTIE!!!

[www.deque.com image 227x222]
Really????, injured people feet away and folks are LOOTING MARATHON JACKETS?!?!?!?

Actually looks like a pretty good mix of looters and people desperately trying to find clothing.

Inclined to agree.  Given that the temperature in Boston yesterday wasn't exactly balmy only about 48F and you have runners and spectators with severe shock and injuries, getting warm clothing to them ASAP could be pretty important.

idk I can't watch the video, I could be wrong...but I'd like to not think the worst.

Oh I was completely being snarky and referring to the demographics of those looting.

That said, I'm glad you see the good side of people.


I have my mix of snark usually, but yeah...I am trying.  I don't even live anywhere near Boston but this whole thing has me pretty angry.
 
2013-04-16 04:58:51 PM  

Big Man On Campus: ChipNASA: Oh LOOTIE!!!
[www.deque.com image 227x222]
Really????, injured people feet away and folks are LOOTING MARATHON JACKETS?!?!?!?

How is anyone able to think about "free t-shirts" at a time like that? Seems like it has to be fake, on human nature alone. Now, if it were stolen gold bars that were lying around...
[mimg.ugo.com image 288x288]


I figured they took them to use as bandages. A lot of people needed something to stop the blood.
 
2013-04-16 05:00:21 PM  

dazed420: Not only is their blood lacking in oxygen but it will also contain high amounts of toxins

You body is not full of toxins."Toxins" is marketing talk from people who want to sell you something or make you a Scientologist.
 
2013-04-16 05:01:01 PM  
GoldSpider

Don't worry, this will all balance out when the recovering victims start suing the people who saved their lives with first aid.

I hope this would never happen but I live in America and I have seen that no good deed goes unpunished.

Who gets sued first
 
2013-04-16 05:02:02 PM  
Heartwarming stories.

God was really looking out for the people of Boston yesterday.
 
2013-04-16 05:02:19 PM  
The Fred Rogers quote came in handy when i had to explain what had happened to my own son.  He's about the same age as the little boy who died. .

I had explained that there are some desperate, dispicable men out there whose world view is so dimented that the not only belive tht thier acts are justified, but they are rightous.   Struggling to help him make sense of a sensless act it was good to show him that we as a species are not so doomed.

.
 
2013-04-16 05:02:53 PM  

THX 1138: While I certainly appreciate much of what was in that link, I have a hard time categorizing ambulances waiting to transport patients as an "act of kindness".


That would be an "act of extortion".

"Here, have a $1,200 ride, and you do not have a choice." Have a nice day :)
 
2013-04-16 05:03:03 PM  

Suede head: Yep, this is a tragedy.

Meanwhile, thousands of people have been killed by American drones in Asia and Africa with no pretence of arrest or trial, including hundreds even the US government says were certainly innocent.

Do you think... maybe... that might have annoyed some people enough to bomb you back?



www.knology.net
 
2013-04-16 05:04:09 PM  

jaytkay: Heartwarming stories.

God was really looking out for the people of Boston yesterday.


I don't mean to kill the sentiment, but I think he forgot about Boston yesterday...
 
2013-04-16 05:05:19 PM  
Maybe it is because I've just had too much black-market cyberware installed,  but these "le faith in le humanity restored" memes don't do anything for me. These kind of acts happen all the time, but now they don't count unless someone recorded it so they could submit it to a webzone so they could get upboats and likes it you "cry every teim"
 
2013-04-16 05:05:47 PM  

Maud Dib: Suede head: Yep, this is a tragedy.

Meanwhile, thousands of people have been killed by American drones in Asia and Africa with no pretence of arrest or trial, including hundreds even the US government says were certainly innocent.

Do you think... maybe... that might have annoyed some people enough to bomb you back?


[www.knology.net image 60x55]


Thank you.
I was composing a response, refreshed, and saw that you had it covered.
 
2013-04-16 05:07:09 PM  

albuquerquehalsey: Maybe it is because I've just had too much black-market cyberware installed,  but these "le faith in le humanity restored" memes don't do anything for me. These kind of acts happen all the time, but now they don't count unless someone recorded it so they could submit it to a webzone so they could get upboats and likes it you "cry every teim"


How does that lessen the act?  Whether it was recorded or not.  Unless you're specifically aiming this at the point doing the recording and deifying the subject.
 
2013-04-16 05:07:45 PM  

jaytkay: Heartwarming stories.

God was really looking out for the people of Boston yesterday.


Then why did he let the asshole plant that bomb if he was watching out for them?  Or if you want to argue "free will", how come this omnipotent, telepathic, omni-present God let over 100 people get injured and 3 die because of it?  I mean, really.  And did God transport people to the hospital?  Nooooo, he let them lie there and suffer until the barricades could be torn down and people put themselves at risk to save them.

This God character seems kind of a dick if you ask me.
 
2013-04-16 05:07:45 PM  

SultanofSchwing: albuquerquehalsey: Maybe it is because I've just had too much black-market cyberware installed,  but these "le faith in le humanity restored" memes don't do anything for me. These kind of acts happen all the time, but now they don't count unless someone recorded it so they could submit it to a webzone so they could get upboats and likes it you "cry every teim"

How does that lessen the act?  Whether it was recorded or not.  Unless you're specifically aiming this at the person doing the recording and deifying the subject.


ftfm
 
2013-04-16 05:08:10 PM  
My works towards erasing the dilution of the meaning of certain words/phrases (i.e. "Hero") continues.


How do you feel about "hoagie?"
 
2013-04-16 05:11:45 PM  

darknys: tlars699: dazed420: kvinesknows:
you dont understand emergencies that well do you?

Actually he is more than likely right which means you don't understand the requirements for functioning blood donations.  Not only is their blood lacking in oxygen but it will also contain high amounts of toxins the blood is trying to remove from the body not to mention the reduction of blood from the runners during their recovery would be very dangerous for them

Provided they are healthy(they ran 26 miles, and have been training for months), and they are hydrated (yay for volunteers) and they rest for an hour or two (probably the time they had to wait to donate) and maybe eat a snack/drink some fluids(key words: cookie/o.j.) they should be fine to donate.

It won't help anyone injured immediately at this event, but it may help them recover from a possible bleed out due to surgical complications days from now, or the survivors of a car wreck 30 miles from Boston two weeks from now. Who's to say?
That you are knocking them for trying to help in the best way they can says loads about you.

Yeah, they should be fine to donate. They're certainly not going to have low iron or oxygen. Marathon runners are likely to have polycythemia rather than anemia and I'm pretty sure their lungs work fine.

They might have a bit of impact hemolysis, but that's a minor thing.

As far as nonspecific "toxins:" no such thing. I don't care what Dr. Oz has been telling you.

There might be some myoglobin and free hemoglobin floating around, but these are serum proteins. Unless someone is in fulminant rhabdomyolysis, its fine. Also, people with rhabdo tend to pee dark brown, feel like shiat, and die of renal failure. Not likely to pass Red Cross screening.

In any case, blood is dispensed as PRBCs: packed red blood cells. No serum. No floating proteins. No lactate floating around either.


Thanks for your knowledgeable input!

Also, an FYI to those who may not know:
http://www.aabb.org/pressroom/statements/Pages/statement061510.aspx

There is still a 12 month wait time to donate if you're a man, and you've had any(even protected) kind of sex with a man. This means you have to wait a year, with no sex as a homosexual dude, to donate blood.

There is no similar ban on people who have had promiscuous, unprotected, heterosexual or female homosexual sex who haven't been testing themselves for STD's.

There is only a 12 month ban if you have had contact with someone known to have an STD, or know that you have had one within the past year.
 
2013-04-16 05:12:40 PM  

jaytkay: Heartwarming stories.

God was really looking out for the people of Boston yesterday.


Reminds me of one of my favourite Simpsons scenes where they cut to sunday school just as the teacher is saying "...and that's why god causes train wrecks."
 
2013-04-16 05:14:53 PM  

tlars699: darknys: tlars699: dazed420: kvinesknows:
you dont understand emergencies that well do you?

Actually he is more than likely right which means you don't understand the requirements for functioning blood donations.  Not only is their blood lacking in oxygen but it will also contain high amounts of toxins the blood is trying to remove from the body not to mention the reduction of blood from the runners during their recovery would be very dangerous for them

Provided they are healthy(they ran 26 miles, and have been training for months), and they are hydrated (yay for volunteers) and they rest for an hour or two (probably the time they had to wait to donate) and maybe eat a snack/drink some fluids(key words: cookie/o.j.) they should be fine to donate.

It won't help anyone injured immediately at this event, but it may help them recover from a possible bleed out due to surgical complications days from now, or the survivors of a car wreck 30 miles from Boston two weeks from now. Who's to say?
That you are knocking them for trying to help in the best way they can says loads about you.

Yeah, they should be fine to donate. They're certainly not going to have low iron or oxygen. Marathon runners are likely to have polycythemia rather than anemia and I'm pretty sure their lungs work fine.

They might have a bit of impact hemolysis, but that's a minor thing.

As far as nonspecific "toxins:" no such thing. I don't care what Dr. Oz has been telling you.

There might be some myoglobin and free hemoglobin floating around, but these are serum proteins. Unless someone is in fulminant rhabdomyolysis, its fine. Also, people with rhabdo tend to pee dark brown, feel like shiat, and die of renal failure. Not likely to pass Red Cross screening.

In any case, blood is dispensed as PRBCs: packed red blood cells. No serum. No floating proteins. No lactate floating around either.

Thanks for your knowledgeable input!

Also, an FYI to those who may not know:
http://www.aabb.org/pressroom/statements/Pages/statement061510.aspx

There is still a 12 month wait time to donate if you're a man, and you've had any(even protected) kind of sex with a man. This means you have to wait a year, with no sex as a homosexual dude, to donate blood.

There is no similar ban on people who have had promiscuous, unprotected, heterosexual or female homosexual sex who haven't been testing themselves for STD's.

There is only a 12 month ban if you have had contact with someone known to have an STD, or know that you have had one within the past year.


They also require a recent pay stub and net worth statement to make sure they get only blood from the right stock.
 
2013-04-16 05:17:45 PM  

Big Man On Campus: If someone gets their leg blown off 10 feet from me, or has any other major wound they are bleeding out from, I'm not going to stay out of the way, I'm going to try to stop their bleeding. I don't even know CPR, but I damn well know enough about first-aid to perform that first-two-minutes-triage that can make all the difference in the world.


That's fine and totally understandable, and laudable, but if a trained responder on the scene is trying to direct you,  listen to them. That  includes helping them, or getting out of the way if you're  not helping.

tlars699: If they rest a bit, and take in some food and drink while they are waiting to donate, they should be fine to do so.


Should be, yes. That's not what reporters on the scene said, however; what was reported, was people were showing up at hospitals  in the middle of the crisis to donate.

EMS and hospitals don't have infinite manpower, you know; resources (medical and administrative staff, bed space, equipment)delegated to dealing with would-be donors, no matter how well-intended, arenot being delegated to handling the crisis proper.
 
2013-04-16 05:19:38 PM  
The way most of humanity feels after an obvious tragedy like this:  Interconnected, compassionate, attentive.

If we can somehow figure out a way to keep this sentiment alive well after a tragedy like this passes, we will have gone 90% of the way toward solving all of our problems as a species.  I don't know if many of you remember it clearly, but the weeks post 9-11 were almost surreal in this country.  For a short while there, people I met in the street were nicer.  Store clerks were more patient.  Disagreeable co-workers were more social.

It's paradoxical that horrible stuff like this is often what it takes to acknowledge the fact that we simply need to be better to each other.
 
2013-04-16 05:20:56 PM  

Russ1642: tlars699: darknys: tlars699: dazed420: kvinesknows:


2/10- you almost got me.
 
2013-04-16 05:21:26 PM  

contrapunctus: The way most of humanity feels after an obvious tragedy like this:  Interconnected, compassionate, attentive.

If we can somehow figure out a way to keep this sentiment alive well after a tragedy like this passes, we will have gone 90% of the way toward solving all of our problems as a species.  I don't know if many of you remember it clearly, but the weeks post 9-11 were almost surreal in this country.  For a short while there, people I met in the street were nicer.  Store clerks were more patient.  Disagreeable co-workers were more social.

It's paradoxical that horrible stuff like this is often what it takes to acknowledge the fact that we simply need to be better to each other.


So you're pro bombing. Nice.
 
2013-04-16 05:22:37 PM  

what_now: Summoner101: Emergencies, especially ones with gross trauma, tend to make blood services lax their standards.

No they don't. I gave blood an hour ago. They went through every single test, and I saw them boot people.


One hour ago is not in the middle of the crisis.
 
2013-04-16 05:23:26 PM  

tlars699: Russ1642: tlars699: darknys: tlars699: dazed420: kvinesknows:

2/10- you almost got me.


Wasn't really trolling with that one. The blood donation rules are based on morality from a century ago rather than science.
 
2013-04-16 05:23:52 PM  

Russ1642: contrapunctus: The way most of humanity feels after an obvious tragedy like this:  Interconnected, compassionate, attentive.

If we can somehow figure out a way to keep this sentiment alive well after a tragedy like this passes, we will have gone 90% of the way toward solving all of our problems as a species.  I don't know if many of you remember it clearly, but the weeks post 9-11 were almost surreal in this country.  For a short while there, people I met in the street were nicer.  Store clerks were more patient.  Disagreeable co-workers were more social.

It's paradoxical that horrible stuff like this is often what it takes to acknowledge the fact that we simply need to be better to each other.

So you're pro bombing. Nice.


Lulz.
 
2013-04-16 05:25:39 PM  
I can't be alone here, but I never lost faith.....

It pisses me off that people do things like this, but of the other 10 billion or so people in this world, they represent such a minuscule minority that their acts don't change my feelings about society as a whole.
I refuse to let this asshat ruin my outlook. Changing how you run your life because of these acts is exactly what these terrorists want, either foreign or domestic.
 
2013-04-16 05:29:15 PM  
Now, he wasn't necessarily helping, (maybe indirectly by capturing video evidence) but the camera man at the finish line got my vote for pretty damn ballsy. Here he is just feet away from an explosion, and he keeps rolling while going RIGHT UP TO the explosion area and then captures the second one.

Crazy!
 
2013-04-16 05:29:23 PM  

that bosnian sniper: Big Man On Campus: If someone gets their leg blown off 10 feet from me, or has any other major wound they are bleeding out from, I'm not going to stay out of the way, I'm going to try to stop their bleeding. I don't even know CPR, but I damn well know enough about first-aid to perform that first-two-minutes-triage that can make all the difference in the world.

That's fine and totally understandable, and laudable, but if a trained responder on the scene is trying to direct you,  listen to them. That  includes helping them, or getting out of the way if you're  not helping.

tlars699: If they rest a bit, and take in some food and drink while they are waiting to donate, they should be fine to do so.

Should be, yes. That's not what reporters on the scene said, however; what was reported, was people were showing up at hospitals  in the middle of the crisis to donate.

EMS and hospitals don't have infinite manpower, you know; resources (medical and administrative staff, bed space, equipment)delegated to dealing with would-be donors, no matter how well-intended, are not being delegated to handling the crisis proper.


I would think that these donors would then be directed to a different spot, where they could donate, or told to patiently wait their turn, and rest up in the meantime, which is probably what happened.

Also, not everyone who works in a hospital is necessarily required for an emergency- I'm sure the phlebotomists on staff, specifically the people who are only trained to draw blood from people for testing, storage, etc. were called in or showed up as needed to handle the donations. You also only need a chair to draw blood, not a bed.
 
2013-04-16 05:29:27 PM  

contrapunctus: The way most of humanity feels after an obvious tragedy like this:  Interconnected, compassionate, attentive.

If we can somehow figure out a way to keep this sentiment alive well after a tragedy like this passes, we will have gone 90% of the way toward solving all of our problems as a species.  I don't know if many of you remember it clearly, but the weeks post 9-11 were almost surreal in this country.  For a short while there, people I met in the street were nicer.  Store clerks were more patient.  Disagreeable co-workers were more social.

It's paradoxical that horrible stuff like this is often what it takes to acknowledge the fact that we simply need to be better to each other.


Perhaps that's what Jefferson meant by keeping the tree of liberty watered with blood of patriots and enemies. I forget the exact quote and am too lazy to look it up.
 
2013-04-16 05:30:11 PM  

Russ1642: jaytkay: Heartwarming stories.

God was really looking out for the people of Boston yesterday.

Reminds me of one of my favourite Simpsons scenes where they cut to sunday school just as the teacher is saying "...and that's why god causes train wrecks."


It's not complicated: God is love.  Love will get you an extra slice of pie, but it will never bake it for you.
 
2013-04-16 05:31:00 PM  

The Incredible Sexual Egg: I've seen it so much over the last day or so, but that picture with the three cops is badass


I agree.  Sometimes cops don

Oldiron_79: So when are we gonna get serious and talk about banning high capacity assault cookware? No one needs a 30L pressure cooker.


No we don't need a 30 L pressure cooker, but imagine how much chili we could make.  About 7 gallons an hour as long as we got the meat, onions, peppers etc. (beans, you go sit over there 'till you're called).
 
2013-04-16 05:31:54 PM  

Billy Bathsalt: Russ1642: jaytkay: Heartwarming stories.

God was really looking out for the people of Boston yesterday.

Reminds me of one of my favourite Simpsons scenes where they cut to sunday school just as the teacher is saying "...and that's why god causes train wrecks."

It's not complicated: God is love.  Love will get you an extra slice of pie, but it will never bake it for you.


wtf?
 
2013-04-16 05:31:59 PM  

Suede head: Yep, this is a tragedy.

Meanwhile, thousands of people have been killed by American drones in Asia and Africa with no pretence of arrest or trial, including hundreds even the US government says were certainly innocent.

Do you think... maybe... that might have annoyed some people enough to bomb you back?


so if we'd sent manned planes instead of drones that would have been somehow better?
 
2013-04-16 05:32:01 PM  

tlars699: I would think that these donors would then be directed to a different spot, where they could donate, or told to patiently wait their turn, and rest up in the meantime, which is probably what happened.

Also, not everyone who works in a hospital is necessarily required for an emergency- I'm sure the phlebotomists on staff, specifically the people who are only trained to draw blood from people for testing, storage, etc. were called in or showed up as needed to handle the donations. You also only need a chair to draw blood, not a bed.


they put the hospitals into lockdown, the swat teams rolled up and they kicked everyone who wasn't hurt or essential out.
 
2013-04-16 05:34:39 PM  

tlars699: that bosnian sniper: Big Man On Campus: If someone gets their leg blown off 10 feet from me, or has any other major wound they are bleeding out from, I'm not going to stay out of the way, I'm going to try to stop their bleeding. I don't even know CPR, but I damn well know enough about first-aid to perform that first-two-minutes-triage that can make all the difference in the world.

That's fine and totally understandable, and laudable, but if a trained responder on the scene is trying to direct you,  listen to them. That  includes helping them, or getting out of the way if you're  not helping.

tlars699: If they rest a bit, and take in some food and drink while they are waiting to donate, they should be fine to do so.

Should be, yes. That's not what reporters on the scene said, however; what was reported, was people were showing up at hospitals  in the middle of the crisis to donate.

EMS and hospitals don't have infinite manpower, you know; resources (medical and administrative staff, bed space, equipment)delegated to dealing with would-be donors, no matter how well-intended, are not being delegated to handling the crisis proper.

I would think that these donors would then be directed to a different spot, where they could donate, or told to patiently wait their turn, and rest up in the meantime, which is probably what happened.

Also, not everyone who works in a hospital is necessarily required for an emergency- I'm sure the phlebotomists on staff, specifically the people who are only trained to draw blood from people for testing, storage, etc. were called in or showed up as needed to handle the donations. You also only need a chair to draw blood, not a bed.


'hospital beds' doesn't refer to actual beds but rather to patient capacity, usually limited by staff.
 
2013-04-16 05:34:49 PM  

Russ1642: tlars699: Russ1642: tlars699: darknys: tlars699: dazed420: kvinesknows:

2/10- you almost got me.

Wasn't really trolling with that one. The blood donation rules are based on morality from a century ago rather than science.


Yes, but they don't require a paystub, just a proof of address/id so you can prove you are who you say you are.
I also wanted to point out the morality thing, and how a significant portion of that is promoted by the FDA. The Red Cross are the "nice" folks who say a year is all that's needed.

Facts are there would be less of a blood shortage, if people were less bigoted.
 
2013-04-16 05:35:27 PM  
Big Man On Campus:

Yes, America was dressed the part, hence asking for rape, so that justifies it.

/Have you considered it might be a in-house job?


Sadly I have a strong suspicion that it is.  I know a lot of people are quick to point overseas but this doesn't strike me as their style.
 
2013-04-16 05:35:51 PM  
At the other end of the spectrum, any idea how Bostonians will react to inevitable planned WBC picketing of the funerals? I can see them going for the kids', just to get people really riled up.
 
2013-04-16 05:35:54 PM  
Russ1642:

'hospital beds' doesn't refer to actual beds but rather to patient capacity, usually limited by staff.

Fair enough.
 
2013-04-16 05:36:19 PM  

WTFDYW: While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.


Running a marathon doesn't reduce the iron in your blood.  I'm not even sure what you're talking about when you say "there wouldn't be enough oxygen"-- they'd have the same oxygen in their blood they usually do.  And their blood pressure would be normal shortly after they stopped running.  None of those thing would affect blood donation.  They could be a little dehydrated, but that's not going to disqualify them either.  And assuming it takes them an hour or two post-race to actually get into the chair to donate, they'll be rehydrated anyway.
 
2013-04-16 05:38:48 PM  
fifteen acts of kindness
twelve thousand acts of cowardice
three acts of murder
140 acts of terrorism
tens of thousands of pictures put online just to show the world that america is full of terrified grieving cowards.

Find em.  Bomb em. Rape their goats with chainsaws.  Teach their women to read and wear pants.
 
2013-04-16 05:39:04 PM  

tlchwi02: tlars699: I would think that these donors would then be directed to a different spot, where they could donate, or told to patiently wait their turn, and rest up in the meantime, which is probably what happened.

Also, not everyone who works in a hospital is necessarily required for an emergency- I'm sure the phlebotomists on staff, specifically the people who are only trained to draw blood from people for testing, storage, etc. were called in or showed up as needed to handle the donations. You also only need a chair to draw blood, not a bed.

they put the hospitals into lockdown, the swat teams rolled up and they kicked everyone who wasn't hurt or essential out.


Okay- I didn't know that. I still think I covered it, but its nice to have confirmation from someone better inthe know.
 
2013-04-16 05:40:18 PM  

sleeps in trees: It's sad when my 16 year old has seen more crazy shiat in his lifetime than I did at his age. Between mass shootings, wars, bombings and planes being flown into buildings he's oddly well adjusted.


That is probably because it is considered normal to him as that is all he knows.
 
2013-04-16 05:40:50 PM  

louiedog: Big Man On Campus: that bosnian sniper:  ...Unless you're capable and of sound mind and body, and have the expertise that can be put to use by coordinators, it's better to stay out of the way and act  if requested to by someone authoritative...

If someone gets their leg blown off 10 feet from me, or has any other major wound they are bleeding out from, I'm not going to stay out of the way, I'm going to try to stop their bleeding. I don't even know CPR, but I damn well know enough about first-aid to perform that first-two-minutes-triage that can make all the difference in the world.

If someone gets their leg blown off 2 miles from me, I'm probably just going to find the best bug-out direction, and comply with law enforcement when requested.

Learn CPR. I think everyone should. It's easy, there are lots of videos online, and if you look around you might find a fire department event or similar in your area where they'll have a practice dummy and teach you for free. Hell, there was that story a few weeks ago about that 9-year-old who raced over to a neighbor's house and saved the life of a baby with it when the mother didn't know what to do. That was just from memorizing a poster in the school cafeteria.

I was a lifeguard for a number of years as a teen and certified in CPR, but I never had to use it. I still watch a video and go over the steps regularly to refresh myself in case I'm ever in a situation like this.


This.

Learn CPR and First Aid.

You won't be a paramedic but you might keep that limb or keep somone going until they can get to a hosptial.  If not, hey, you tried your very best.  I've had FA training since 1993.  It takes one day.
 
2013-04-16 05:42:27 PM  
want to lose your faith in humanity again?  read through these comments.

/it's a vicious cycle
//dickheads
///slashed!
 
2013-04-16 05:43:09 PM  

raygundan: WTFDYW: While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.

Running a marathon doesn't reduce the iron in your blood.  I'm not even sure what you're talking about when you say "there wouldn't be enough oxygen"-- they'd have the same oxygen in their blood they usually do.  And their blood pressure would be normal shortly after they stopped running.  None of those thing would affect blood donation.  They could be a little dehydrated, but that's not going to disqualify them either.  And assuming it takes them an hour or two post-race to actually get into the chair to donate, they'll be rehydrated anyway.


and they probably used IV drugs at least ONCE in their lives, like everyone else, thus disqualifying them.
 
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