If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(WPTV)   Need to have your faith in humanity restored? Here's 15 acts of kindness seen during the Boston bombings   (wptv.com) divider line 213
    More: Hero, Boston, Tax Day, Boston Marathon  
•       •       •

22115 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Apr 2013 at 3:36 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



213 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-04-16 04:07:19 PM  

Russ1642: what_now: Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.

While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.

Do they even use blood that soon? I thought that donating blood immediately after a crisis didn't actually help even if there was a blood shortage.


Actually, if I know my stuff- when an emergency like this happens, the surrounding medical facilities and blood banks are put on alert. Any available resources are sent where it is immediately needed, without depleting emergency supplies for any specific center.
All blood packs are kept track of through billing- center/hospital to the hospital that uses it, after the crisis is over. They still keep track of blood types and such throughout this process. Some ambulances and medical vehicles are transporting these supplies to where they are needed.

Any donations made by the runners that day, while still needing to be tested, and not able to be used immediately, will be needed to replenish the stock loss incurred by this whole process.
Even if it doesn't help at this particular event, it is thoughtful, and still helps  someone.
 
2013-04-16 04:07:21 PM  

FriarReb98: The Joe Andruzzi thing is fricking amazing.  If you didn't know this, his three brothers are all FDNY and were at the scene at Ground Zero.  You just can't mess with his family, period.


Wait. Anyone else seeing a pattern here? I'm calling Alex Jones right now.
 
2013-04-16 04:08:44 PM  

Louisiana_Sitar_Club: One day my 7 yr old niece came up to me after she had seen a school shooting on tv and asked me if that would ever happen at her school.  I didn't know what to say.  No one can predict where or when evil will strike.  So I just said, "Yeah, probably."


I was really becoming quite touched as I read that, and then once I hit that last sentence I farking LOL'd loud enough for all my co-workers to wonder what the hell is happening over here.
 
2013-04-16 04:10:28 PM  

nekom: Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.

Godawful shiat like this does have a habit of bringing out the very best in humanity. Odd since the cause was part of the very worst of humanity. But there it is.


There's always good in humanity. Sometimes the degree of recognizable goodness increases as the need for it increases, such as in the face of tragedy.
 
2013-04-16 04:11:15 PM  
 
2013-04-16 04:11:41 PM  
That guy giving the women orange juice wins the coveted "Most Compassionate during a Disaster" award. That's not some store-brand orange drink. Thats the good shiat.

/double points if it had been Simply Lemonade
 
2013-04-16 04:11:51 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: My wow was not for the blood bank, but for the intent of those TRYING TO DO SOMETHING POSITIVE, even though most of us would say, "fark this noise, I wanna sit down."


The  intent is laudable, sure, but on the other hand there is a point to be made here. When it comes to mass casualty incidents, whether it's a major accident, natural disaster, or violent act such as yesterday, emergency response is already taxed. Unless you're capable and of sound mind and body, and have the expertise that can be put to use by coordinators, it's better to stay out of the way and act  if requested to by someone authoritative.

I'd bet a good number of runners, if not most of them, had to be turned away as already at health risk due to having just finished a marathon, let alone had some of them donated only to have complications from it. It takes manpower and time that is much better-allocated to receiving casualties, performing triage, and even processing paperwork, to turn otherwise well-meaning people away at the door especially during that first hour.
 
2013-04-16 04:12:45 PM  

Louisiana_Sitar_Club: One day my 7 yr old niece came up to me after she had seen a school shooting on tv and asked me if that would ever happen at her school. I didn't know what to say. No one can predict where or when evil will strike. So I just said, "Yeah, probably."


Well played.
 
2013-04-16 04:13:39 PM  

Russ1642: FriarReb98: The Joe Andruzzi thing is fricking amazing.  If you didn't know this, his three brothers are all FDNY and were at the scene at Ground Zero.  You just can't mess with his family, period.

Wait. Anyone else seeing a pattern here? I'm calling Alex Jones right now.


This made me chuckle.

DROxINxTHExWIND: That guy giving the women orange juice wins the coveted "Most Compassionate during a Disaster" award. That's not some store-brand orange drink. Thats the good shiat.

/double points if it had been Simply Lemonade


Triple for Indian River.
 
2013-04-16 04:13:48 PM  

WTFDYW: what_now

Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.

While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.


You are kidding right?


Someone put their panty liner on tape said up this morning.
 
2013-04-16 04:14:35 PM  
I'm probably just an arsehole for pointing out that "first responders doing what first responders do because it's their job" isn't really an act of kindness. Nor is a Mister Rogers Quote.
 
2013-04-16 04:15:38 PM  
kvinesknows:
you dont understand emergencies that well do you?

Actually he is more than likely right which means you don't understand the requirements for functioning blood donations.  Not only is their blood lacking in oxygen but it will also contain high amounts of toxins the blood is trying to remove from the body not to mention the reduction of blood from the runners during their recovery would be very dangerous for them
 
2013-04-16 04:16:10 PM  
It is very dusty in my office all of a sudden.  Very, very dusty.
 
2013-04-16 04:17:19 PM  

Russ1642: Summoner101: Russ1642: what_now: Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.

While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.

Do they even use blood that soon? I thought that donating blood immediately after a crisis didn't actually help even if there was a blood shortage.

It will still have to be processed and won't fulfill an immediate need, but it will bolster their reserves since these traumas will likely need transfusions over the coming weeks.

Provided the blood makes it through the morality screening. Don't want any of that gay or slutty blood.


I've got an appointment to donate at MGH on Thursday, and I'm pretty sure (fingers crossed) they'll use mine. No sex, no drugs, and no foreign travel for me. My blood like freshly scrubbed linoleum, boring but clean.

/O+
 
2013-04-16 04:18:06 PM  

LumberJack: I'm probably just an arsehole for pointing out that "first responders doing what first responders do because it's their job" isn't really an act of kindness. Nor is a Mister Rogers Quote.


Posting an inspirational quote is nice and all, but it's as useful as prayer. Make yourself feel like you're helping without actually doing anything.
 
2013-04-16 04:19:14 PM  
media2.wptv.com
This makes me feel a little better.
 
2013-04-16 04:23:46 PM  

dazed420: kvinesknows:
you dont understand emergencies that well do you?

Actually he is more than likely right which means you don't understand the requirements for functioning blood donations.  Not only is their blood lacking in oxygen but it will also contain high amounts of toxins the blood is trying to remove from the body not to mention the reduction of blood from the runners during their recovery would be very dangerous for them


you dont get them either it seems,
 
2013-04-16 04:24:25 PM  

LumberJack: I'm probably just an arsehole for pointing out that "first responders doing what first responders do because it's their job" isn't really an act of kindness. Nor is a Mister Rogers Quote.


4/10 - Telegraphed it a bit, but you should get a few bites.
 
2013-04-16 04:24:53 PM  

LumberJack: I'm probably just an arsehole for pointing out that "first responders doing what first responders do because it's their job" isn't really an act of kindness. Nor is a Mister Rogers Quote.


No, you're not, but it doesn't mean you're also right.  Yes, it's their job, but there's real kindness to be found in the fact that they accept that job to begin with.  People that knowingly run toward the danger instead of away have my respect.  And why can't a quote be a kindness?  If it helps people focus and banish despondency, it's a kindness, even if it was easy.
 
2013-04-16 04:26:06 PM  
Looking at that reminded me of The Dark Knight:

"Sometimes people deserve more. Sometimes people deserve to have their faith rewarded"
 
2013-04-16 04:26:33 PM  

Russ1642: LumberJack: I'm probably just an arsehole for pointing out that "first responders doing what first responders do because it's their job" isn't really an act of kindness. Nor is a Mister Rogers Quote.

Posting an inspirational quote is nice and all, but it's as useful as prayer. Make yourself feel like you're helping without actually doing anything.


And biatching how much those don't help on an internet forum is accomplishing what exactly?
 
2013-04-16 04:27:05 PM  
It's important to acknowledge the work that people do to help one another.  That said, if you're someone who continually needs to have your faith in humanity restored, you're either part of the problem or just not paying attention.
 
2013-04-16 04:27:14 PM  

kvinesknows: dazed420: kvinesknows:
you dont understand emergencies that well do you?

Actually he is more than likely right which means you don't understand the requirements for functioning blood donations.  Not only is their blood lacking in oxygen but it will also contain high amounts of toxins the blood is trying to remove from the body not to mention the reduction of blood from the runners during their recovery would be very dangerous for them

you dont get them either it seems,


What don't they get about emergencies? That only marathon runners have blood?
 
2013-04-16 04:27:42 PM  
I see someone let the trolls off their leash.  meh. Part of returning to normalcy, I guess.

/the stupid part
 
2013-04-16 04:28:08 PM  

Summoner101: what_now: Summoner101: Emergencies, especially ones with gross trauma, tend to make blood services lax their standards.

No they don't. I gave blood an hour ago. They went through every single test, and I saw them boot people.

Noticed I said lax not get rid of them entirely considering the infectious diseases screening would still get you booted as that puts the person receiving the blood in danger.  However, a marathon runner who would have marginally qualified due to the effects of the race would have been more likely to get through due to necessity granted they would have watched them afterwards more closely.


Just curious, how do you know this?  Is there a second standard for times of crisis?
 
2013-04-16 04:31:07 PM  

ChipNASA: Oh LOOTIE!!!
[www.deque.com image 227x222]
Really????, injured people feet away and folks are LOOTING MARATHON JACKETS?!?!?!?


How is anyone able to think about "free t-shirts" at a time like that? Seems like it has to be fake, on human nature alone. Now, if it were stolen gold bars that were lying around...
mimg.ugo.com
 
2013-04-16 04:31:23 PM  

jcooli09: Just curious, how do you know this?  Is there a second standard for times of crisis?


Yes, it's called "let's make sure donors are physically capable of donating at this time, lest they keel over while donating and inadvertently add to the number of inpatients, when we're already overloaded and people are still coming in".
 
2013-04-16 04:32:12 PM  
Friend was running in the race. Wife was in the stands. Pregnant. Wife got pierced with shrapnel, Emergency C section later, the kid is alive. In an incubator for now ,but still. Jeepers.  Name for now is "Mike Lucky", lol.  Just name the kid lucky and be done with it.
 
2013-04-16 04:34:01 PM  

dazed420: kvinesknows:
you dont understand emergencies that well do you?

Actually he is more than likely right which means you don't understand the requirements for functioning blood donations.  Not only is their blood lacking in oxygen but it will also contain high amounts of toxins the blood is trying to remove from the body not to mention the reduction of blood from the runners during their recovery would be very dangerous for them


Provided they are healthy(they ran 26 miles, and have been training for months), and they are hydrated (yay for volunteers) and they rest for an hour or two (probably the time they had to wait to donate) and maybe eat a snack/drink some fluids(key words: cookie/o.j.) they should be fine to donate.

It won't help anyone injured immediately at this event, but it may help them recover from a possible bleed out due to surgical complications days from now, or the survivors of a car wreck 30 miles from Boston two weeks from now. Who's to say?
That you are knocking them for trying to help in the best way they can says loads about you.
 
2013-04-16 04:34:10 PM  

Quigs: Friend was running in the race. Wife was in the stands. Pregnant. Wife got pierced with shrapnel, Emergency C section later, the kid is alive. In an incubator for now ,but still. Jeepers.  Name for now is "Mike Lucky", lol.  Just name the kid lucky and be done with it.


How about naming him Boris, as in Boris the Bullet Dodger.
 
2013-04-16 04:37:03 PM  

Quigs: Friend was running in the race. Wife was in the stands. Pregnant. Wife got pierced with shrapnel, Emergency C section later, the kid is alive. In an incubator for now ,but still. Jeepers.  Name for now is "Mike Lucky", lol.  Just name the kid lucky and be done with it.


That sounds like the beginning of the next Jean Claude Van Damme movie... if he can show his face in front of a camera again.
 
2013-04-16 04:38:00 PM  

that bosnian sniper: Benevolent Misanthrope: My wow was not for the blood bank, but for the intent of those TRYING TO DO SOMETHING POSITIVE, even though most of us would say, "fark this noise, I wanna sit down."

The  intent is laudable, sure, but on the other hand there is a point to be made here. When it comes to mass casualty incidents, whether it's a major accident, natural disaster, or violent act such as yesterday, emergency response is already taxed. Unless you're capable and of sound mind and body, and have the expertise that can be put to use by coordinators, it's better to stay out of the way and act  if requested to by someone authoritative.

I'd bet a good number of runners, if not most of them, had to be turned away as already at health risk due to having just finished a marathon, let alone had some of them donated only to have complications from it. It takes manpower and time that is much better-allocated to receiving casualties, performing triage, and even processing paperwork, to turn otherwise well-meaning people away at the door especially during that first hour.


All that aside, hasn't it occurred to anyone that that story implies that these runners went ahead and finished the race AFTER the explosions?
 
2013-04-16 04:40:25 PM  
Ya know, it was working, it was working, my faith was coming back and then..then I looked at the picture of Martin Richard again. Oop, faith no more.
i229.photobucket.com
 
2013-04-16 04:41:25 PM  

mr_bunny: It is so beautiful to see so much good in the face of so much evil.


Are you referring to the bombing, or to it being in a slideshow?
 
2013-04-16 04:41:42 PM  

Russ1642: LumberJack: I'm probably just an arsehole for pointing out that "first responders doing what first responders do because it's their job" isn't really an act of kindness. Nor is a Mister Rogers Quote.

Posting an inspirational quote is nice and all, but it's as useful as prayer. Make yourself feel like you're helping without actually doing anything.


So it would be better to just sit around and do absolutely nothing at all? People are scared and confused right now. Letting them know that others are thinking about them does a lot towards reducing those feelings of fear and isolation. That's why the President goes on TV and gives a speech that really says very little, but reminds us we're all Americans right now, or why feel-good stories about anonymous heroes giving strangers orange juice make headlines coast to coast. Because otherwise we'd have a lot of Bostonians wandering around in shock and feeling like nobody gives a shiat--even their fellow Bostonians across the Commons who weren't directly affected by the blast.

It's called compassion and empathy, which evidently is sorely lacking amongst the troll population.
 
2013-04-16 04:42:11 PM  

stevetherobot: that bosnian sniper: Benevolent Misanthrope: My wow was not for the blood bank, but for the intent of those TRYING TO DO SOMETHING POSITIVE, even though most of us would say, "fark this noise, I wanna sit down."

The  intent is laudable, sure, but on the other hand there is a point to be made here. When it comes to mass casualty incidents, whether it's a major accident, natural disaster, or violent act such as yesterday, emergency response is already taxed. Unless you're capable and of sound mind and body, and have the expertise that can be put to use by coordinators, it's better to stay out of the way and act  if requested to by someone authoritative.

I'd bet a good number of runners, if not most of them, had to be turned away as already at health risk due to having just finished a marathon, let alone had some of them donated only to have complications from it. It takes manpower and time that is much better-allocated to receiving casualties, performing triage, and even processing paperwork, to turn otherwise well-meaning people away at the door especially during that first hour.

All that aside, hasn't it occurred to anyone that that story implies that these runners went ahead and finished the race AFTER the explosions?


If a bomb went off behind me I'd sure as hell have finished the damn race. In record time too.
 
2013-04-16 04:42:20 PM  
LumberJack: I'm probably just an arsehole for pointing out that "first responders doing what first responders do because it's their job" isn't really an act of kindness. Nor is a Mister Rogers Quote.

GoldSpider: 4/10 - Telegraphed it a bit, but you should get a few bites.

No, I'm not trolling.

treesloth: No, you're not, but it doesn't mean you're also right.  Yes, it's their job, but there's real kindness to be found in the fact that they accept that job to begin with.  People that knowingly run toward the danger instead of away have my respect.  And why can't a quote be a kindness?  If it helps people focus and banish despondency, it's a kindness, even if it was easy.


... but I am an arsehole then. Called it.

My works towards erasing the dilution of the meaning of certain words/phrases (i.e. "Hero") continues.
 
2013-04-16 04:42:29 PM  

stevetherobot: that bosnian sniper: Benevolent Misanthrope: My wow was not for the blood bank, but for the intent of those TRYING TO DO SOMETHING POSITIVE, even though most of us would say, "fark this noise, I wanna sit down."

The  intent is laudable, sure, but on the other hand there is a point to be made here. When it comes to mass casualty incidents, whether it's a major accident, natural disaster, or violent act such as yesterday, emergency response is already taxed. Unless you're capable and of sound mind and body, and have the expertise that can be put to use by coordinators, it's better to stay out of the way and act  if requested to by someone authoritative.

I'd bet a good number of runners, if not most of them, had to be turned away as already at health risk due to having just finished a marathon, let alone had some of them donated only to have complications from it. It takes manpower and time that is much better-allocated to receiving casualties, performing triage, and even processing paperwork, to turn otherwise well-meaning people away at the door especially during that first hour.

All that aside, hasn't it occurred to anyone that that story implies that these runners went ahead and finished the race AFTER the explosions?


According to reports last night roughly 4,000 were redirected and never finished the race
 
2013-04-16 04:42:56 PM  

stevetherobot: that bosnian sniper: Benevolent Misanthrope: My wow was not for the blood bank, but for the intent of those TRYING TO DO SOMETHING POSITIVE, even though most of us would say, "fark this noise, I wanna sit down."

The  intent is laudable, sure, but on the other hand there is a point to be made here. When it comes to mass casualty incidents, whether it's a major accident, natural disaster, or violent act such as yesterday, emergency response is already taxed. Unless you're capable and of sound mind and body, and have the expertise that can be put to use by coordinators, it's better to stay out of the way and act  if requested to by someone authoritative.

I'd bet a good number of runners, if not most of them, had to be turned away as already at health risk due to having just finished a marathon, let alone had some of them donated only to have complications from it. It takes manpower and time that is much better-allocated to receiving casualties, performing triage, and even processing paperwork, to turn otherwise well-meaning people away at the door especially during that first hour.

All that aside, hasn't it occurred to anyone that that story implies that these runners went ahead and finished the race AFTER the explosions?


Probably they were quite a ways away when the bombs went off. Imagine running up on a scene like that when you just finished running 26 miles? 
WTF?
I'd keep running too.
 
2013-04-16 04:42:58 PM  

that bosnian sniper: jcooli09: Just curious, how do you know this?  Is there a second standard for times of crisis?

Yes, it's called "let's make sure donors are physically capable of donating at this time, lest they keel over while donating and inadvertently add to the number of inpatients, when we're already overloaded and people are still coming in".


If they rest a bit, and take in some food and drink while they are waiting to donate, they should be fine to do so. I don't know where this "OMG! They lack oxygen/iron!" b.s. came from. They are marathon runners- most of whom have been training for months to do this, i.e. run 26 miles, without collapsing, on the way. If you're healthy and hydrated, your physical recovery time is relatively quick.
 
2013-04-16 04:44:11 PM  
that bosnian sniper:  ...Unless you're capable and of sound mind and body, and have the expertise that can be put to use by coordinators, it's better to stay out of the way and act  if requested to by someone authoritative...

If someone gets their leg blown off 10 feet from me, or has any other major wound they are bleeding out from, I'm not going to stay out of the way, I'm going to try to stop their bleeding. I don't even know CPR, but I damn well know enough about first-aid to perform that first-two-minutes-triage that can make all the difference in the world.

If someone gets their leg blown off 2 miles from me, I'm probably just going to find the best bug-out direction, and comply with law enforcement when requested.
 
2013-04-16 04:44:35 PM  
Yep, this is a tragedy.

Meanwhile, thousands of people have been killed by American drones in Asia and Africa with no pretence of arrest or trial, including hundreds even the US government says were certainly innocent.

Do you think... maybe... that might have annoyed some people enough to bomb you back?
 
2013-04-16 04:45:03 PM  
I especially like the part where the police, in bright yellow vests, are simply rushing to & fro, not sure what to do, so not doing a damn thing except pushing folks. Then the military dudes in camo come in & start pulling the barricade back from the wounded. So the cops realise they can now do SOMETHING... without getting too close.
 
2013-04-16 04:45:24 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.


The first Marathon runner died.
Now, we just keep going... and have ourselves bled.
Progress.
 
2013-04-16 04:47:58 PM  

Suede head: Yep, this is a tragedy.

Meanwhile, thousands of people have been killed by American drones in Asia and Africa with no pretence of arrest or trial, including hundreds even the US government says were certainly innocent.

Do you think... maybe... that might have annoyed some people enough to bomb you back?


Yes, America was dressed the part, hence asking for rape, so that justifies it.

/Have you considered it might be a in-house job?
 
2013-04-16 04:48:45 PM  

that bosnian sniper: jcooli09: Just curious, how do you know this?  Is there a second standard for times of crisis?

Yes, it's called "let's make sure donors are physically capable of donating at this time, lest they keel over while donating and inadvertently add to the number of inpatients, when we're already overloaded and people are still coming in".


That's kind of what I was thinking, but for some reason Summoner101 gave me the impression that he knows something that I don't.

I was married to a red cross phlebotomist for a while and know some of the drill from 20 years ago.  The hoops they jumped through to ensure the safety of the donor and the eventual beneficiary were pretty intense and not at all optional.  It's hard for me to imagine them just relaxing their standards for a while to "whatever, we really need blood right now".

I got trolled, didn't I?
 
2013-04-16 04:49:02 PM  

ChipNASA: Oh LOOTIE!!!

[www.deque.com image 227x222]
Really????, injured people feet away and folks are LOOTING MARATHON JACKETS?!?!?!?


Actually looks like a pretty good mix of looters and people desperately trying to find clothing.
 
2013-04-16 04:50:40 PM  
While the Mr. Rogers quote is good, it's been overused, so instead...

It's like in the great stories, Mr. Frodo. The ones that really mattered. Full of darkness and danger, they were. And sometimes you didn't want to know the end. Because how could the end be happy? How could the world go back to the way it was when so much bad had happened? But in the end, it's only a passing thing, this shadow. Even darkness must pass. A new day will come. And when the sun shines it will shine out the clearer. Those were the stories that stayed with you. That meant something, even if you were too small to understand why. But I think, Mr. Frodo, I do understand. I know now. Folk in those stories had lots of chances of turning back, only they didn't. They kept going. Because they were holding on to something.
 
2013-04-16 04:51:34 PM  

FLMountainMan: ChipNASA: Oh LOOTIE!!!

[www.deque.com image 227x222]
Really????, injured people feet away and folks are LOOTING MARATHON JACKETS?!?!?!?

Actually looks like a pretty good mix of looters and people desperately trying to find clothing.


Inclined to agree.  Given that the temperature in Boston yesterday wasn't exactly balmy only about 48F and you have runners and spectators with severe shock and injuries, getting warm clothing to them ASAP could be pretty important.

idk I can't watch the video, I could be wrong...but I'd like to not think the worst.
 
2013-04-16 04:52:04 PM  

Suede head: Yep, this is a tragedy.

Meanwhile, thousands of people have been killed by American drones in Asia and Africa with no pretence of arrest or trial, including hundreds even the US government says were certainly innocent.

Do you think... maybe... that might have annoyed some people enough to bomb you back?


Not to mention millions of Iraqis and Afghans.
 
Displayed 50 of 213 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report