If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(WPTV)   Need to have your faith in humanity restored? Here's 15 acts of kindness seen during the Boston bombings   (wptv.com) divider line 213
    More: Hero, Boston, Tax Day, Boston Marathon  
•       •       •

22089 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Apr 2013 at 3:36 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



213 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2013-04-16 02:20:36 PM
www.chailife.com
 
2013-04-16 02:25:32 PM
Annnnnnnnnnnnnd there go the waterworks.

 ---  Thanks Mr. Roger's mom.
 
2013-04-16 02:32:10 PM
Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.
 
2013-04-16 02:33:58 PM

brap: Annnnnnnnnnnnnd there go the waterworks.

 ---  Thanks Mr. Roger's mom.


Heh, sorry. But it really is one of the best quotes ever about tragedies or disasters. It also helps you realize that no matter the atrocity, there are always people there to help, no matter the race, age, religion, etc.

It's those things that keep me wanting to live on this planet. For every horrible person, there's 100 others looking to help.
 
2013-04-16 02:34:07 PM
userserve-ak.last.fm

Although I'd never give them a bud light. That'd be an insult to beer and them.
 
2013-04-16 02:43:22 PM
It is so beautiful to see so much good in the face of so much evil.
 
2013-04-16 02:52:17 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.


Godawful shiat like this does have a habit of bringing out the very best in humanity. Odd since the cause was part of the very worst of humanity. But there it is.
 
2013-04-16 03:37:33 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.


While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.
 
2013-04-16 03:40:49 PM
what_now

Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.

While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.


You are kidding right?
 
2013-04-16 03:41:29 PM
I'd have more faith in humanity if there hadn't been a bombing.
 
2013-04-16 03:42:42 PM
I'm not sure what was accomplished by doing this.
 
2013-04-16 03:43:57 PM
I assume the hoard of people looting the stand selling jackets isn't on the list.
 
2013-04-16 03:44:04 PM
Perhaps its the cynic in me but the "Pay only if you can" restaurant tweet seems opportunistic

Who are they really targeting here?  Who was affected by this tragedy that is going to go out for tapas and because of the event, cannot afford to pay/
 
2013-04-16 03:44:12 PM
 
2013-04-16 03:44:19 PM

WTFDYW: what_now

Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.

While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.


You are kidding right?


which one of us?
 
2013-04-16 03:44:22 PM
4.bp.blogspot.com
Pray for Massachubatts.
 
2013-04-16 03:44:30 PM
Nah, I'm good.
 
2013-04-16 03:44:50 PM

NightOwl2255: I assume the hoard of people looting the stand selling jackets isn't on the list.


I was busy getting the link....
 
2013-04-16 03:45:16 PM

LandOfChocolate: Who are they really targeting here? Who was affected by this tragedy that is going to go out for tapas and because of the event, cannot afford to pay/


The people who left their bags and ran like hell, and now can't get back to their bags, into their hotel rooms, on their flights etc etc
 
2013-04-16 03:45:24 PM

scottydoesntknow: [www.chailife.com image 600x389]


You know, the Mr. Rogers "look for the people helping" meme is one of the very few I can stand and don't think can be overused. There are at least 4-5 versions of it bumping around my facebook news feed, and it really does teach a valuable lesson about the good and hope that can come out of tragedy.

I'm thankful my little boy is too young to understand or care about what's going on in Boston. But in another few years he'll understand or care all too well and that Mr. Rogers quote will always be top of mind for me.
 
2013-04-16 03:47:36 PM
I've seen it so much over the last day or so, but that picture with the three cops is badass
 
2013-04-16 03:47:51 PM

what_now: Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.

While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.


Emergencies, especially ones with gross trauma, tend to make blood services lax their standards.

/and really, they won't know until they get to the screening
//the healthier runners would probably still qualify
 
2013-04-16 03:48:15 PM

what_now: Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.

While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.


I bet you're a real hit at parties.

My wow was not for the blood bank, but for the intent of those TRYING TO DO SOMETHING POSITIVE, even though most of us would say, "fark this noise, I wanna sit down."
 
2013-04-16 03:48:49 PM
Were Bostonians.  The entire notion that we will let this event define us as a city and people is about as foreign to us as being a Yankee fan.

However in these times the thoughts, prayers and gestures of goodwill are appreciated.
 
2013-04-16 03:48:59 PM
So when are we gonna get serious and talk about banning high capacity assault cookware? No one needs a 30L pressure cooker.
 
2013-04-16 03:49:11 PM

Summoner101: Emergencies, especially ones with gross trauma, tend to make blood services lax their standards.


No they don't. I gave blood an hour ago. They went through every single test, and I saw them boot people.
 
2013-04-16 03:49:39 PM
imageshack.us
 
2013-04-16 03:50:13 PM

The Incredible Sexual Egg: I've seen it so much over the last day or so, but that picture with the three cops is badass


The middle cop always looks to me like he's about to whip it out.
 
2013-04-16 03:51:12 PM

Summoner101: Emergencies, especially ones with gross trauma, tend to make blood services lax their standards.


It was also noted that while the gesture to donate now is appreciated, the coming weeks are just as important as we get into Spring and Summer.
 
2013-04-16 03:52:00 PM

what_now: Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.

While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.


You sound out of shape.
 
2013-04-16 03:52:01 PM

Pontious Pilates: scottydoesntknow: [www.chailife.com image 600x389]

You know, the Mr. Rogers "look for the people helping" meme is one of the very few I can stand and don't think can be overused. There are at least 4-5 versions of it bumping around my facebook news feed, and it really does teach a valuable lesson about the good and hope that can come out of tragedy.

I'm thankful my little boy is too young to understand or care about what's going on in Boston. But in another few years he'll understand or care all too well and that Mr. Rogers quote will always be top of mind for me.




It's sad when my 16 year old has seen more crazy shiat in his lifetime than I did at his age. Between mass shootings, wars, bombings and planes being flown into buildings he's oddly well adjusted.
 
2013-04-16 03:53:35 PM

Pontious Pilates: scottydoesntknow: [www.chailife.com image 600x389]

You know, the Mr. Rogers "look for the people helping" meme is one of the very few I can stand and don't think can be overused. There are at least 4-5 versions of it bumping around my facebook news feed, and it really does teach a valuable lesson about the good and hope that can come out of tragedy.

I'm thankful my little boy is too young to understand or care about what's going on in Boston. But in another few years he'll understand or care all too well and that Mr. Rogers quote will always be top of mind for me.


One day my 7 yr old niece came up to me after she had seen a school shooting on tv and asked me if that would ever happen at her school.  I didn't know what to say.  No one can predict where or when evil will strike.  So I just said, "Yeah, probably."
 
2013-04-16 03:53:46 PM

what_now: Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.

While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.


Do they even use blood that soon? I thought that donating blood immediately after a crisis didn't actually help even if there was a blood shortage.
 
2013-04-16 03:54:19 PM
i1222.photobucket.com
 
GBB
2013-04-16 03:54:37 PM

what_now: Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.

While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.


Yeah, it's like trying to reuse motor oil from the Daytona 500 cars after the race.
 
2013-04-16 03:56:15 PM
Don't worry, this will all balance out when the recovering victims start suing the people who saved their lives with first aid.
 
2013-04-16 03:56:16 PM

what_now: Summoner101: Emergencies, especially ones with gross trauma, tend to make blood services lax their standards.

No they don't. I gave blood an hour ago. They went through every single test, and I saw them boot people.


Noticed I said lax not get rid of them entirely considering the infectious diseases screening would still get you booted as that puts the person receiving the blood in danger.  However, a marathon runner who would have marginally qualified due to the effects of the race would have been more likely to get through due to necessity granted they would have watched them afterwards more closely.
 
2013-04-16 03:56:57 PM

Skarekrough: Summoner101: Emergencies, especially ones with gross trauma, tend to make blood services lax their standards.

It was also noted that while the gesture to donate now is appreciated, the coming weeks are just as important as we get into Spring and Summer.


Don't forget every holiday season- our demand for the phlebotomy kits we sell drops significantly, despite the increased need, due to accidents both at home and on the road. Keep events like this in mind, and give whenever you can.
 
2013-04-16 03:58:20 PM

Russ1642: what_now: Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.

While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.

Do they even use blood that soon? I thought that donating blood immediately after a crisis didn't actually help even if there was a blood shortage.


It will still have to be processed and won't fulfill an immediate need, but it will bolster their reserves since these traumas will likely need transfusions over the coming weeks.
 
2013-04-16 03:59:12 PM

sleeps in trees: Pontious Pilates: scottydoesntknow: [www.chailife.com image 600x389]

You know, the Mr. Rogers "look for the people helping" meme is one of the very few I can stand and don't think can be overused. There are at least 4-5 versions of it bumping around my facebook news feed, and it really does teach a valuable lesson about the good and hope that can come out of tragedy.

I'm thankful my little boy is too young to understand or care about what's going on in Boston. But in another few years he'll understand or care all too well and that Mr. Rogers quote will always be top of mind for me.

It's sad when my 16 year old has seen more crazy shiat in his lifetime than I did at his age. Between mass shootings, wars, bombings and planes being flown into buildings he's oddly well adjusted.


It is extremely unlikely that there were not mass shootings, war, or bombings in your first 16 years.

I'll grant you the planes and buildings thing. That one's fairly new, AFAIK.
 
2013-04-16 03:59:36 PM

what_now: Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.

While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.


you dont understand emergencies that well do you?
 
2013-04-16 04:01:52 PM

what_now: Summoner101: Emergencies, especially ones with gross trauma, tend to make blood services lax their standards.

No they don't. I gave blood an hour ago. They went through every single test, and I saw them boot people.


so the next day?  yeah... ITS THE NEXT DAY
 
2013-04-16 04:02:14 PM

thurstonxhowell: sleeps in trees: Pontious Pilates: scottydoesntknow: [www.chailife.com image 600x389]

You know, the Mr. Rogers "look for the people helping" meme is one of the very few I can stand and don't think can be overused. There are at least 4-5 versions of it bumping around my facebook news feed, and it really does teach a valuable lesson about the good and hope that can come out of tragedy.

I'm thankful my little boy is too young to understand or care about what's going on in Boston. But in another few years he'll understand or care all too well and that Mr. Rogers quote will always be top of mind for me.

It's sad when my 16 year old has seen more crazy shiat in his lifetime than I did at his age. Between mass shootings, wars, bombings and planes being flown into buildings he's oddly well adjusted.

It is extremely unlikely that there were not mass shootings, war, or bombings in your first 16 years.

I'll grant you the planes and buildings thing. That one's fairly new, AFAIK.




I said seen. Back in the olden days we had one tv and the news "hour". I probably should have been clearer.
 
2013-04-16 04:02:45 PM

Summoner101: Russ1642: what_now: Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.

While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.

Do they even use blood that soon? I thought that donating blood immediately after a crisis didn't actually help even if there was a blood shortage.

It will still have to be processed and won't fulfill an immediate need, but it will bolster their reserves since these traumas will likely need transfusions over the coming weeks.


Provided the blood makes it through the morality screening. Don't want any of that gay or slutty blood.
 
2013-04-16 04:02:49 PM
Some of those weren't acts of kindness; they're just people tweeting a pic or link. The projection on the wall...

I'm just sayin', it's not kindness to make it so dusty in here. Really, really dusty.


/RIP Fred Rogers, and:
//Martin Richard, age 8
///Krystle Campbell, age 29
////unnamed 3rd person
 
2013-04-16 04:03:06 PM
Because faith in humanity is all that matters.

/or rather, it's all we have left since we aren't allowed to fight back any more
 
2013-04-16 04:04:25 PM
The Joe Andruzzi thing is fricking amazing.  If you didn't know this, his three brothers are all FDNY and were at the scene at Ground Zero.  You just can't mess with his family, period.
 
2013-04-16 04:05:39 PM
While I certainly appreciate much of what was in that link, I have a hard time categorizing ambulances waiting to transport patients as an "act of kindness".
 
2013-04-16 04:06:48 PM

Louisiana_Sitar_Club: Pontious Pilates: scottydoesntknow: [www.chailife.com image 600x389]

You know, the Mr. Rogers "look for the people helping" meme is one of the very few I can stand and don't think can be overused. There are at least 4-5 versions of it bumping around my facebook news feed, and it really does teach a valuable lesson about the good and hope that can come out of tragedy.

I'm thankful my little boy is too young to understand or care about what's going on in Boston. But in another few years he'll understand or care all too well and that Mr. Rogers quote will always be top of mind for me.

One day my 7 yr old niece came up to me after she had seen a school shooting on tv and asked me if that would ever happen at her school.  I didn't know what to say.  No one can predict where or when evil will strike.  So I just said, "Yeah, probably."


Ok, I actually chuckled at that one.
 
2013-04-16 04:07:06 PM

scottydoesntknow: [www.chailife.com image 600x389]


done in one.
 
2013-04-16 04:07:19 PM

Russ1642: what_now: Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.

While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.

Do they even use blood that soon? I thought that donating blood immediately after a crisis didn't actually help even if there was a blood shortage.


Actually, if I know my stuff- when an emergency like this happens, the surrounding medical facilities and blood banks are put on alert. Any available resources are sent where it is immediately needed, without depleting emergency supplies for any specific center.
All blood packs are kept track of through billing- center/hospital to the hospital that uses it, after the crisis is over. They still keep track of blood types and such throughout this process. Some ambulances and medical vehicles are transporting these supplies to where they are needed.

Any donations made by the runners that day, while still needing to be tested, and not able to be used immediately, will be needed to replenish the stock loss incurred by this whole process.
Even if it doesn't help at this particular event, it is thoughtful, and still helps  someone.
 
2013-04-16 04:07:21 PM

FriarReb98: The Joe Andruzzi thing is fricking amazing.  If you didn't know this, his three brothers are all FDNY and were at the scene at Ground Zero.  You just can't mess with his family, period.


Wait. Anyone else seeing a pattern here? I'm calling Alex Jones right now.
 
2013-04-16 04:08:44 PM

Louisiana_Sitar_Club: One day my 7 yr old niece came up to me after she had seen a school shooting on tv and asked me if that would ever happen at her school.  I didn't know what to say.  No one can predict where or when evil will strike.  So I just said, "Yeah, probably."


I was really becoming quite touched as I read that, and then once I hit that last sentence I farking LOL'd loud enough for all my co-workers to wonder what the hell is happening over here.
 
2013-04-16 04:10:28 PM

nekom: Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.

Godawful shiat like this does have a habit of bringing out the very best in humanity. Odd since the cause was part of the very worst of humanity. But there it is.


There's always good in humanity. Sometimes the degree of recognizable goodness increases as the need for it increases, such as in the face of tragedy.
 
2013-04-16 04:11:15 PM
 
2013-04-16 04:11:41 PM
That guy giving the women orange juice wins the coveted "Most Compassionate during a Disaster" award. That's not some store-brand orange drink. Thats the good shiat.

/double points if it had been Simply Lemonade
 
2013-04-16 04:11:51 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: My wow was not for the blood bank, but for the intent of those TRYING TO DO SOMETHING POSITIVE, even though most of us would say, "fark this noise, I wanna sit down."


The  intent is laudable, sure, but on the other hand there is a point to be made here. When it comes to mass casualty incidents, whether it's a major accident, natural disaster, or violent act such as yesterday, emergency response is already taxed. Unless you're capable and of sound mind and body, and have the expertise that can be put to use by coordinators, it's better to stay out of the way and act  if requested to by someone authoritative.

I'd bet a good number of runners, if not most of them, had to be turned away as already at health risk due to having just finished a marathon, let alone had some of them donated only to have complications from it. It takes manpower and time that is much better-allocated to receiving casualties, performing triage, and even processing paperwork, to turn otherwise well-meaning people away at the door especially during that first hour.
 
2013-04-16 04:12:45 PM

Louisiana_Sitar_Club: One day my 7 yr old niece came up to me after she had seen a school shooting on tv and asked me if that would ever happen at her school. I didn't know what to say. No one can predict where or when evil will strike. So I just said, "Yeah, probably."


Well played.
 
2013-04-16 04:13:39 PM

Russ1642: FriarReb98: The Joe Andruzzi thing is fricking amazing.  If you didn't know this, his three brothers are all FDNY and were at the scene at Ground Zero.  You just can't mess with his family, period.

Wait. Anyone else seeing a pattern here? I'm calling Alex Jones right now.


This made me chuckle.

DROxINxTHExWIND: That guy giving the women orange juice wins the coveted "Most Compassionate during a Disaster" award. That's not some store-brand orange drink. Thats the good shiat.

/double points if it had been Simply Lemonade


Triple for Indian River.
 
2013-04-16 04:13:48 PM

WTFDYW: what_now

Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.

While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.


You are kidding right?


Someone put their panty liner on tape said up this morning.
 
2013-04-16 04:14:35 PM
I'm probably just an arsehole for pointing out that "first responders doing what first responders do because it's their job" isn't really an act of kindness. Nor is a Mister Rogers Quote.
 
2013-04-16 04:15:38 PM
kvinesknows:
you dont understand emergencies that well do you?

Actually he is more than likely right which means you don't understand the requirements for functioning blood donations.  Not only is their blood lacking in oxygen but it will also contain high amounts of toxins the blood is trying to remove from the body not to mention the reduction of blood from the runners during their recovery would be very dangerous for them
 
2013-04-16 04:16:10 PM
It is very dusty in my office all of a sudden.  Very, very dusty.
 
2013-04-16 04:17:19 PM

Russ1642: Summoner101: Russ1642: what_now: Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.

While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.

Do they even use blood that soon? I thought that donating blood immediately after a crisis didn't actually help even if there was a blood shortage.

It will still have to be processed and won't fulfill an immediate need, but it will bolster their reserves since these traumas will likely need transfusions over the coming weeks.

Provided the blood makes it through the morality screening. Don't want any of that gay or slutty blood.


I've got an appointment to donate at MGH on Thursday, and I'm pretty sure (fingers crossed) they'll use mine. No sex, no drugs, and no foreign travel for me. My blood like freshly scrubbed linoleum, boring but clean.

/O+
 
2013-04-16 04:18:06 PM

LumberJack: I'm probably just an arsehole for pointing out that "first responders doing what first responders do because it's their job" isn't really an act of kindness. Nor is a Mister Rogers Quote.


Posting an inspirational quote is nice and all, but it's as useful as prayer. Make yourself feel like you're helping without actually doing anything.
 
2013-04-16 04:19:14 PM
media2.wptv.com
This makes me feel a little better.
 
2013-04-16 04:23:46 PM

dazed420: kvinesknows:
you dont understand emergencies that well do you?

Actually he is more than likely right which means you don't understand the requirements for functioning blood donations.  Not only is their blood lacking in oxygen but it will also contain high amounts of toxins the blood is trying to remove from the body not to mention the reduction of blood from the runners during their recovery would be very dangerous for them


you dont get them either it seems,
 
2013-04-16 04:24:25 PM

LumberJack: I'm probably just an arsehole for pointing out that "first responders doing what first responders do because it's their job" isn't really an act of kindness. Nor is a Mister Rogers Quote.


4/10 - Telegraphed it a bit, but you should get a few bites.
 
2013-04-16 04:24:53 PM

LumberJack: I'm probably just an arsehole for pointing out that "first responders doing what first responders do because it's their job" isn't really an act of kindness. Nor is a Mister Rogers Quote.


No, you're not, but it doesn't mean you're also right.  Yes, it's their job, but there's real kindness to be found in the fact that they accept that job to begin with.  People that knowingly run toward the danger instead of away have my respect.  And why can't a quote be a kindness?  If it helps people focus and banish despondency, it's a kindness, even if it was easy.
 
2013-04-16 04:26:06 PM
Looking at that reminded me of The Dark Knight:

"Sometimes people deserve more. Sometimes people deserve to have their faith rewarded"
 
2013-04-16 04:26:33 PM

Russ1642: LumberJack: I'm probably just an arsehole for pointing out that "first responders doing what first responders do because it's their job" isn't really an act of kindness. Nor is a Mister Rogers Quote.

Posting an inspirational quote is nice and all, but it's as useful as prayer. Make yourself feel like you're helping without actually doing anything.


And biatching how much those don't help on an internet forum is accomplishing what exactly?
 
2013-04-16 04:27:05 PM
It's important to acknowledge the work that people do to help one another.  That said, if you're someone who continually needs to have your faith in humanity restored, you're either part of the problem or just not paying attention.
 
2013-04-16 04:27:14 PM

kvinesknows: dazed420: kvinesknows:
you dont understand emergencies that well do you?

Actually he is more than likely right which means you don't understand the requirements for functioning blood donations.  Not only is their blood lacking in oxygen but it will also contain high amounts of toxins the blood is trying to remove from the body not to mention the reduction of blood from the runners during their recovery would be very dangerous for them

you dont get them either it seems,


What don't they get about emergencies? That only marathon runners have blood?
 
2013-04-16 04:27:42 PM
I see someone let the trolls off their leash.  meh. Part of returning to normalcy, I guess.

/the stupid part
 
2013-04-16 04:28:08 PM

Summoner101: what_now: Summoner101: Emergencies, especially ones with gross trauma, tend to make blood services lax their standards.

No they don't. I gave blood an hour ago. They went through every single test, and I saw them boot people.

Noticed I said lax not get rid of them entirely considering the infectious diseases screening would still get you booted as that puts the person receiving the blood in danger.  However, a marathon runner who would have marginally qualified due to the effects of the race would have been more likely to get through due to necessity granted they would have watched them afterwards more closely.


Just curious, how do you know this?  Is there a second standard for times of crisis?
 
2013-04-16 04:31:07 PM

ChipNASA: Oh LOOTIE!!!
[www.deque.com image 227x222]
Really????, injured people feet away and folks are LOOTING MARATHON JACKETS?!?!?!?


How is anyone able to think about "free t-shirts" at a time like that? Seems like it has to be fake, on human nature alone. Now, if it were stolen gold bars that were lying around...
mimg.ugo.com
 
2013-04-16 04:31:23 PM

jcooli09: Just curious, how do you know this?  Is there a second standard for times of crisis?


Yes, it's called "let's make sure donors are physically capable of donating at this time, lest they keel over while donating and inadvertently add to the number of inpatients, when we're already overloaded and people are still coming in".
 
2013-04-16 04:32:12 PM
Friend was running in the race. Wife was in the stands. Pregnant. Wife got pierced with shrapnel, Emergency C section later, the kid is alive. In an incubator for now ,but still. Jeepers.  Name for now is "Mike Lucky", lol.  Just name the kid lucky and be done with it.
 
2013-04-16 04:34:01 PM

dazed420: kvinesknows:
you dont understand emergencies that well do you?

Actually he is more than likely right which means you don't understand the requirements for functioning blood donations.  Not only is their blood lacking in oxygen but it will also contain high amounts of toxins the blood is trying to remove from the body not to mention the reduction of blood from the runners during their recovery would be very dangerous for them


Provided they are healthy(they ran 26 miles, and have been training for months), and they are hydrated (yay for volunteers) and they rest for an hour or two (probably the time they had to wait to donate) and maybe eat a snack/drink some fluids(key words: cookie/o.j.) they should be fine to donate.

It won't help anyone injured immediately at this event, but it may help them recover from a possible bleed out due to surgical complications days from now, or the survivors of a car wreck 30 miles from Boston two weeks from now. Who's to say?
That you are knocking them for trying to help in the best way they can says loads about you.
 
2013-04-16 04:34:10 PM

Quigs: Friend was running in the race. Wife was in the stands. Pregnant. Wife got pierced with shrapnel, Emergency C section later, the kid is alive. In an incubator for now ,but still. Jeepers.  Name for now is "Mike Lucky", lol.  Just name the kid lucky and be done with it.


How about naming him Boris, as in Boris the Bullet Dodger.
 
2013-04-16 04:37:03 PM

Quigs: Friend was running in the race. Wife was in the stands. Pregnant. Wife got pierced with shrapnel, Emergency C section later, the kid is alive. In an incubator for now ,but still. Jeepers.  Name for now is "Mike Lucky", lol.  Just name the kid lucky and be done with it.


That sounds like the beginning of the next Jean Claude Van Damme movie... if he can show his face in front of a camera again.
 
2013-04-16 04:38:00 PM

that bosnian sniper: Benevolent Misanthrope: My wow was not for the blood bank, but for the intent of those TRYING TO DO SOMETHING POSITIVE, even though most of us would say, "fark this noise, I wanna sit down."

The  intent is laudable, sure, but on the other hand there is a point to be made here. When it comes to mass casualty incidents, whether it's a major accident, natural disaster, or violent act such as yesterday, emergency response is already taxed. Unless you're capable and of sound mind and body, and have the expertise that can be put to use by coordinators, it's better to stay out of the way and act  if requested to by someone authoritative.

I'd bet a good number of runners, if not most of them, had to be turned away as already at health risk due to having just finished a marathon, let alone had some of them donated only to have complications from it. It takes manpower and time that is much better-allocated to receiving casualties, performing triage, and even processing paperwork, to turn otherwise well-meaning people away at the door especially during that first hour.


All that aside, hasn't it occurred to anyone that that story implies that these runners went ahead and finished the race AFTER the explosions?
 
2013-04-16 04:40:25 PM
Ya know, it was working, it was working, my faith was coming back and then..then I looked at the picture of Martin Richard again. Oop, faith no more.
i229.photobucket.com
 
2013-04-16 04:41:25 PM

mr_bunny: It is so beautiful to see so much good in the face of so much evil.


Are you referring to the bombing, or to it being in a slideshow?
 
2013-04-16 04:41:42 PM

Russ1642: LumberJack: I'm probably just an arsehole for pointing out that "first responders doing what first responders do because it's their job" isn't really an act of kindness. Nor is a Mister Rogers Quote.

Posting an inspirational quote is nice and all, but it's as useful as prayer. Make yourself feel like you're helping without actually doing anything.


So it would be better to just sit around and do absolutely nothing at all? People are scared and confused right now. Letting them know that others are thinking about them does a lot towards reducing those feelings of fear and isolation. That's why the President goes on TV and gives a speech that really says very little, but reminds us we're all Americans right now, or why feel-good stories about anonymous heroes giving strangers orange juice make headlines coast to coast. Because otherwise we'd have a lot of Bostonians wandering around in shock and feeling like nobody gives a shiat--even their fellow Bostonians across the Commons who weren't directly affected by the blast.

It's called compassion and empathy, which evidently is sorely lacking amongst the troll population.
 
2013-04-16 04:42:11 PM

stevetherobot: that bosnian sniper: Benevolent Misanthrope: My wow was not for the blood bank, but for the intent of those TRYING TO DO SOMETHING POSITIVE, even though most of us would say, "fark this noise, I wanna sit down."

The  intent is laudable, sure, but on the other hand there is a point to be made here. When it comes to mass casualty incidents, whether it's a major accident, natural disaster, or violent act such as yesterday, emergency response is already taxed. Unless you're capable and of sound mind and body, and have the expertise that can be put to use by coordinators, it's better to stay out of the way and act  if requested to by someone authoritative.

I'd bet a good number of runners, if not most of them, had to be turned away as already at health risk due to having just finished a marathon, let alone had some of them donated only to have complications from it. It takes manpower and time that is much better-allocated to receiving casualties, performing triage, and even processing paperwork, to turn otherwise well-meaning people away at the door especially during that first hour.

All that aside, hasn't it occurred to anyone that that story implies that these runners went ahead and finished the race AFTER the explosions?


If a bomb went off behind me I'd sure as hell have finished the damn race. In record time too.
 
2013-04-16 04:42:20 PM
LumberJack: I'm probably just an arsehole for pointing out that "first responders doing what first responders do because it's their job" isn't really an act of kindness. Nor is a Mister Rogers Quote.

GoldSpider: 4/10 - Telegraphed it a bit, but you should get a few bites.

No, I'm not trolling.

treesloth: No, you're not, but it doesn't mean you're also right.  Yes, it's their job, but there's real kindness to be found in the fact that they accept that job to begin with.  People that knowingly run toward the danger instead of away have my respect.  And why can't a quote be a kindness?  If it helps people focus and banish despondency, it's a kindness, even if it was easy.


... but I am an arsehole then. Called it.

My works towards erasing the dilution of the meaning of certain words/phrases (i.e. "Hero") continues.
 
2013-04-16 04:42:29 PM

stevetherobot: that bosnian sniper: Benevolent Misanthrope: My wow was not for the blood bank, but for the intent of those TRYING TO DO SOMETHING POSITIVE, even though most of us would say, "fark this noise, I wanna sit down."

The  intent is laudable, sure, but on the other hand there is a point to be made here. When it comes to mass casualty incidents, whether it's a major accident, natural disaster, or violent act such as yesterday, emergency response is already taxed. Unless you're capable and of sound mind and body, and have the expertise that can be put to use by coordinators, it's better to stay out of the way and act  if requested to by someone authoritative.

I'd bet a good number of runners, if not most of them, had to be turned away as already at health risk due to having just finished a marathon, let alone had some of them donated only to have complications from it. It takes manpower and time that is much better-allocated to receiving casualties, performing triage, and even processing paperwork, to turn otherwise well-meaning people away at the door especially during that first hour.

All that aside, hasn't it occurred to anyone that that story implies that these runners went ahead and finished the race AFTER the explosions?


According to reports last night roughly 4,000 were redirected and never finished the race
 
2013-04-16 04:42:56 PM

stevetherobot: that bosnian sniper: Benevolent Misanthrope: My wow was not for the blood bank, but for the intent of those TRYING TO DO SOMETHING POSITIVE, even though most of us would say, "fark this noise, I wanna sit down."

The  intent is laudable, sure, but on the other hand there is a point to be made here. When it comes to mass casualty incidents, whether it's a major accident, natural disaster, or violent act such as yesterday, emergency response is already taxed. Unless you're capable and of sound mind and body, and have the expertise that can be put to use by coordinators, it's better to stay out of the way and act  if requested to by someone authoritative.

I'd bet a good number of runners, if not most of them, had to be turned away as already at health risk due to having just finished a marathon, let alone had some of them donated only to have complications from it. It takes manpower and time that is much better-allocated to receiving casualties, performing triage, and even processing paperwork, to turn otherwise well-meaning people away at the door especially during that first hour.

All that aside, hasn't it occurred to anyone that that story implies that these runners went ahead and finished the race AFTER the explosions?


Probably they were quite a ways away when the bombs went off. Imagine running up on a scene like that when you just finished running 26 miles? 
WTF?
I'd keep running too.
 
2013-04-16 04:42:58 PM

that bosnian sniper: jcooli09: Just curious, how do you know this?  Is there a second standard for times of crisis?

Yes, it's called "let's make sure donors are physically capable of donating at this time, lest they keel over while donating and inadvertently add to the number of inpatients, when we're already overloaded and people are still coming in".


If they rest a bit, and take in some food and drink while they are waiting to donate, they should be fine to do so. I don't know where this "OMG! They lack oxygen/iron!" b.s. came from. They are marathon runners- most of whom have been training for months to do this, i.e. run 26 miles, without collapsing, on the way. If you're healthy and hydrated, your physical recovery time is relatively quick.
 
2013-04-16 04:44:11 PM
that bosnian sniper:  ...Unless you're capable and of sound mind and body, and have the expertise that can be put to use by coordinators, it's better to stay out of the way and act  if requested to by someone authoritative...

If someone gets their leg blown off 10 feet from me, or has any other major wound they are bleeding out from, I'm not going to stay out of the way, I'm going to try to stop their bleeding. I don't even know CPR, but I damn well know enough about first-aid to perform that first-two-minutes-triage that can make all the difference in the world.

If someone gets their leg blown off 2 miles from me, I'm probably just going to find the best bug-out direction, and comply with law enforcement when requested.
 
2013-04-16 04:44:35 PM
Yep, this is a tragedy.

Meanwhile, thousands of people have been killed by American drones in Asia and Africa with no pretence of arrest or trial, including hundreds even the US government says were certainly innocent.

Do you think... maybe... that might have annoyed some people enough to bomb you back?
 
2013-04-16 04:45:03 PM
I especially like the part where the police, in bright yellow vests, are simply rushing to & fro, not sure what to do, so not doing a damn thing except pushing folks. Then the military dudes in camo come in & start pulling the barricade back from the wounded. So the cops realise they can now do SOMETHING... without getting too close.
 
2013-04-16 04:45:24 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.


The first Marathon runner died.
Now, we just keep going... and have ourselves bled.
Progress.
 
2013-04-16 04:47:58 PM

Suede head: Yep, this is a tragedy.

Meanwhile, thousands of people have been killed by American drones in Asia and Africa with no pretence of arrest or trial, including hundreds even the US government says were certainly innocent.

Do you think... maybe... that might have annoyed some people enough to bomb you back?


Yes, America was dressed the part, hence asking for rape, so that justifies it.

/Have you considered it might be a in-house job?
 
2013-04-16 04:48:45 PM

that bosnian sniper: jcooli09: Just curious, how do you know this?  Is there a second standard for times of crisis?

Yes, it's called "let's make sure donors are physically capable of donating at this time, lest they keel over while donating and inadvertently add to the number of inpatients, when we're already overloaded and people are still coming in".


That's kind of what I was thinking, but for some reason Summoner101 gave me the impression that he knows something that I don't.

I was married to a red cross phlebotomist for a while and know some of the drill from 20 years ago.  The hoops they jumped through to ensure the safety of the donor and the eventual beneficiary were pretty intense and not at all optional.  It's hard for me to imagine them just relaxing their standards for a while to "whatever, we really need blood right now".

I got trolled, didn't I?
 
2013-04-16 04:49:02 PM

ChipNASA: Oh LOOTIE!!!

[www.deque.com image 227x222]
Really????, injured people feet away and folks are LOOTING MARATHON JACKETS?!?!?!?


Actually looks like a pretty good mix of looters and people desperately trying to find clothing.
 
2013-04-16 04:50:40 PM
While the Mr. Rogers quote is good, it's been overused, so instead...

It's like in the great stories, Mr. Frodo. The ones that really mattered. Full of darkness and danger, they were. And sometimes you didn't want to know the end. Because how could the end be happy? How could the world go back to the way it was when so much bad had happened? But in the end, it's only a passing thing, this shadow. Even darkness must pass. A new day will come. And when the sun shines it will shine out the clearer. Those were the stories that stayed with you. That meant something, even if you were too small to understand why. But I think, Mr. Frodo, I do understand. I know now. Folk in those stories had lots of chances of turning back, only they didn't. They kept going. Because they were holding on to something.
 
2013-04-16 04:51:34 PM

FLMountainMan: ChipNASA: Oh LOOTIE!!!

[www.deque.com image 227x222]
Really????, injured people feet away and folks are LOOTING MARATHON JACKETS?!?!?!?

Actually looks like a pretty good mix of looters and people desperately trying to find clothing.


Inclined to agree.  Given that the temperature in Boston yesterday wasn't exactly balmy only about 48F and you have runners and spectators with severe shock and injuries, getting warm clothing to them ASAP could be pretty important.

idk I can't watch the video, I could be wrong...but I'd like to not think the worst.
 
2013-04-16 04:52:04 PM

Suede head: Yep, this is a tragedy.

Meanwhile, thousands of people have been killed by American drones in Asia and Africa with no pretence of arrest or trial, including hundreds even the US government says were certainly innocent.

Do you think... maybe... that might have annoyed some people enough to bomb you back?


Not to mention millions of Iraqis and Afghans.
 
2013-04-16 04:52:10 PM

LandOfChocolate: Perhaps its the cynic in me but the "Pay only if you can" restaurant tweet seems opportunistic

Who are they really targeting here?  Who was affected by this tragedy that is going to go out for tapas and because of the event, cannot afford to pay/


Imagine if you were running and your supporters with your clothes, wallet etc. were in the explosion.

10s of 1000s of people were in from out of town. Some of them had to stay in town unexpectedly for injured friends and relatives.

People near the blasts dropped their belongings and ran.

There were runners who literally had only the clothes on their back.  It was 40 degrees F last night.
 
2013-04-16 04:54:40 PM

SultanofSchwing: FLMountainMan: ChipNASA: Oh LOOTIE!!!

[www.deque.com image 227x222]
Really????, injured people feet away and folks are LOOTING MARATHON JACKETS?!?!?!?

Actually looks like a pretty good mix of looters and people desperately trying to find clothing.

Inclined to agree.  Given that the temperature in Boston yesterday wasn't exactly balmy only about 48F and you have runners and spectators with severe shock and injuries, getting warm clothing to them ASAP could be pretty important.

idk I can't watch the video, I could be wrong...but I'd like to not think the worst.


Oh I was completely being snarky and referring to the demographics of those looting.

That said, I'm glad you see the good side of people.
 
2013-04-16 04:55:18 PM

tlars699: dazed420: kvinesknows:
you dont understand emergencies that well do you?

Actually he is more than likely right which means you don't understand the requirements for functioning blood donations.  Not only is their blood lacking in oxygen but it will also contain high amounts of toxins the blood is trying to remove from the body not to mention the reduction of blood from the runners during their recovery would be very dangerous for them

Provided they are healthy(they ran 26 miles, and have been training for months), and they are hydrated (yay for volunteers) and they rest for an hour or two (probably the time they had to wait to donate) and maybe eat a snack/drink some fluids(key words: cookie/o.j.) they should be fine to donate.

It won't help anyone injured immediately at this event, but it may help them recover from a possible bleed out due to surgical complications days from now, or the survivors of a car wreck 30 miles from Boston two weeks from now. Who's to say?
That you are knocking them for trying to help in the best way they can says loads about you.


Yeah, they should be fine to donate. They're certainly not going to have low iron or oxygen. Marathon runners are likely to have polycythemia rather than anemia and I'm pretty sure their lungs work fine.

They might have a bit of impact hemolysis, but that's a minor thing.

As far as nonspecific "toxins:" no such thing. I don't care what Dr. Oz has been telling you.

There might be some myoglobin and free hemoglobin floating around, but these are serum proteins. Unless someone is in fulminant rhabdomyolysis, its fine. Also, people with rhabdo tend to pee dark brown, feel like shiat, and die of renal failure. Not likely to pass Red Cross screening.

In any case, blood is dispensed as PRBCs: packed red blood cells. No serum. No floating proteins. No lactate floating around either.
 
2013-04-16 04:57:32 PM

Big Man On Campus: that bosnian sniper:  ...Unless you're capable and of sound mind and body, and have the expertise that can be put to use by coordinators, it's better to stay out of the way and act  if requested to by someone authoritative...

If someone gets their leg blown off 10 feet from me, or has any other major wound they are bleeding out from, I'm not going to stay out of the way, I'm going to try to stop their bleeding. I don't even know CPR, but I damn well know enough about first-aid to perform that first-two-minutes-triage that can make all the difference in the world.

If someone gets their leg blown off 2 miles from me, I'm probably just going to find the best bug-out direction, and comply with law enforcement when requested.


Learn CPR. I think everyone should. It's easy, there are lots of videos online, and if you look around you might find a fire department event or similar in your area where they'll have a practice dummy and teach you for free. Hell, there was that story a few weeks ago about that 9-year-old who raced over to a neighbor's house and saved the life of a baby with it when the mother didn't know what to do. That was just from memorizing a poster in the school cafeteria.

I was a lifeguard for a number of years as a teen and certified in CPR, but I never had to use it. I still watch a video and go over the steps regularly to refresh myself in case I'm ever in a situation like this.
 
2013-04-16 04:58:27 PM

FLMountainMan: SultanofSchwing: FLMountainMan: ChipNASA: Oh LOOTIE!!!

[www.deque.com image 227x222]
Really????, injured people feet away and folks are LOOTING MARATHON JACKETS?!?!?!?

Actually looks like a pretty good mix of looters and people desperately trying to find clothing.

Inclined to agree.  Given that the temperature in Boston yesterday wasn't exactly balmy only about 48F and you have runners and spectators with severe shock and injuries, getting warm clothing to them ASAP could be pretty important.

idk I can't watch the video, I could be wrong...but I'd like to not think the worst.

Oh I was completely being snarky and referring to the demographics of those looting.

That said, I'm glad you see the good side of people.


I have my mix of snark usually, but yeah...I am trying.  I don't even live anywhere near Boston but this whole thing has me pretty angry.
 
2013-04-16 04:58:51 PM

Big Man On Campus: ChipNASA: Oh LOOTIE!!!
[www.deque.com image 227x222]
Really????, injured people feet away and folks are LOOTING MARATHON JACKETS?!?!?!?

How is anyone able to think about "free t-shirts" at a time like that? Seems like it has to be fake, on human nature alone. Now, if it were stolen gold bars that were lying around...
[mimg.ugo.com image 288x288]


I figured they took them to use as bandages. A lot of people needed something to stop the blood.
 
2013-04-16 05:00:21 PM

dazed420: Not only is their blood lacking in oxygen but it will also contain high amounts of toxins

You body is not full of toxins."Toxins" is marketing talk from people who want to sell you something or make you a Scientologist.
 
2013-04-16 05:01:01 PM
GoldSpider

Don't worry, this will all balance out when the recovering victims start suing the people who saved their lives with first aid.

I hope this would never happen but I live in America and I have seen that no good deed goes unpunished.

Who gets sued first
 
2013-04-16 05:02:02 PM
Heartwarming stories.

God was really looking out for the people of Boston yesterday.
 
2013-04-16 05:02:19 PM
The Fred Rogers quote came in handy when i had to explain what had happened to my own son.  He's about the same age as the little boy who died. .

I had explained that there are some desperate, dispicable men out there whose world view is so dimented that the not only belive tht thier acts are justified, but they are rightous.   Struggling to help him make sense of a sensless act it was good to show him that we as a species are not so doomed.

.
 
2013-04-16 05:02:53 PM

THX 1138: While I certainly appreciate much of what was in that link, I have a hard time categorizing ambulances waiting to transport patients as an "act of kindness".


That would be an "act of extortion".

"Here, have a $1,200 ride, and you do not have a choice." Have a nice day :)
 
2013-04-16 05:03:03 PM

Suede head: Yep, this is a tragedy.

Meanwhile, thousands of people have been killed by American drones in Asia and Africa with no pretence of arrest or trial, including hundreds even the US government says were certainly innocent.

Do you think... maybe... that might have annoyed some people enough to bomb you back?



www.knology.net
 
2013-04-16 05:04:09 PM

jaytkay: Heartwarming stories.

God was really looking out for the people of Boston yesterday.


I don't mean to kill the sentiment, but I think he forgot about Boston yesterday...
 
2013-04-16 05:05:19 PM
Maybe it is because I've just had too much black-market cyberware installed,  but these "le faith in le humanity restored" memes don't do anything for me. These kind of acts happen all the time, but now they don't count unless someone recorded it so they could submit it to a webzone so they could get upboats and likes it you "cry every teim"
 
2013-04-16 05:05:47 PM

Maud Dib: Suede head: Yep, this is a tragedy.

Meanwhile, thousands of people have been killed by American drones in Asia and Africa with no pretence of arrest or trial, including hundreds even the US government says were certainly innocent.

Do you think... maybe... that might have annoyed some people enough to bomb you back?


[www.knology.net image 60x55]


Thank you.
I was composing a response, refreshed, and saw that you had it covered.
 
2013-04-16 05:07:09 PM

albuquerquehalsey: Maybe it is because I've just had too much black-market cyberware installed,  but these "le faith in le humanity restored" memes don't do anything for me. These kind of acts happen all the time, but now they don't count unless someone recorded it so they could submit it to a webzone so they could get upboats and likes it you "cry every teim"


How does that lessen the act?  Whether it was recorded or not.  Unless you're specifically aiming this at the point doing the recording and deifying the subject.
 
2013-04-16 05:07:45 PM

jaytkay: Heartwarming stories.

God was really looking out for the people of Boston yesterday.


Then why did he let the asshole plant that bomb if he was watching out for them?  Or if you want to argue "free will", how come this omnipotent, telepathic, omni-present God let over 100 people get injured and 3 die because of it?  I mean, really.  And did God transport people to the hospital?  Nooooo, he let them lie there and suffer until the barricades could be torn down and people put themselves at risk to save them.

This God character seems kind of a dick if you ask me.
 
2013-04-16 05:07:45 PM

SultanofSchwing: albuquerquehalsey: Maybe it is because I've just had too much black-market cyberware installed,  but these "le faith in le humanity restored" memes don't do anything for me. These kind of acts happen all the time, but now they don't count unless someone recorded it so they could submit it to a webzone so they could get upboats and likes it you "cry every teim"

How does that lessen the act?  Whether it was recorded or not.  Unless you're specifically aiming this at the person doing the recording and deifying the subject.


ftfm
 
2013-04-16 05:08:10 PM
My works towards erasing the dilution of the meaning of certain words/phrases (i.e. "Hero") continues.


How do you feel about "hoagie?"
 
2013-04-16 05:11:45 PM

darknys: tlars699: dazed420: kvinesknows:
you dont understand emergencies that well do you?

Actually he is more than likely right which means you don't understand the requirements for functioning blood donations.  Not only is their blood lacking in oxygen but it will also contain high amounts of toxins the blood is trying to remove from the body not to mention the reduction of blood from the runners during their recovery would be very dangerous for them

Provided they are healthy(they ran 26 miles, and have been training for months), and they are hydrated (yay for volunteers) and they rest for an hour or two (probably the time they had to wait to donate) and maybe eat a snack/drink some fluids(key words: cookie/o.j.) they should be fine to donate.

It won't help anyone injured immediately at this event, but it may help them recover from a possible bleed out due to surgical complications days from now, or the survivors of a car wreck 30 miles from Boston two weeks from now. Who's to say?
That you are knocking them for trying to help in the best way they can says loads about you.

Yeah, they should be fine to donate. They're certainly not going to have low iron or oxygen. Marathon runners are likely to have polycythemia rather than anemia and I'm pretty sure their lungs work fine.

They might have a bit of impact hemolysis, but that's a minor thing.

As far as nonspecific "toxins:" no such thing. I don't care what Dr. Oz has been telling you.

There might be some myoglobin and free hemoglobin floating around, but these are serum proteins. Unless someone is in fulminant rhabdomyolysis, its fine. Also, people with rhabdo tend to pee dark brown, feel like shiat, and die of renal failure. Not likely to pass Red Cross screening.

In any case, blood is dispensed as PRBCs: packed red blood cells. No serum. No floating proteins. No lactate floating around either.


Thanks for your knowledgeable input!

Also, an FYI to those who may not know:
http://www.aabb.org/pressroom/statements/Pages/statement061510.aspx

There is still a 12 month wait time to donate if you're a man, and you've had any(even protected) kind of sex with a man. This means you have to wait a year, with no sex as a homosexual dude, to donate blood.

There is no similar ban on people who have had promiscuous, unprotected, heterosexual or female homosexual sex who haven't been testing themselves for STD's.

There is only a 12 month ban if you have had contact with someone known to have an STD, or know that you have had one within the past year.
 
2013-04-16 05:12:40 PM

jaytkay: Heartwarming stories.

God was really looking out for the people of Boston yesterday.


Reminds me of one of my favourite Simpsons scenes where they cut to sunday school just as the teacher is saying "...and that's why god causes train wrecks."
 
2013-04-16 05:14:53 PM

tlars699: darknys: tlars699: dazed420: kvinesknows:
you dont understand emergencies that well do you?

Actually he is more than likely right which means you don't understand the requirements for functioning blood donations.  Not only is their blood lacking in oxygen but it will also contain high amounts of toxins the blood is trying to remove from the body not to mention the reduction of blood from the runners during their recovery would be very dangerous for them

Provided they are healthy(they ran 26 miles, and have been training for months), and they are hydrated (yay for volunteers) and they rest for an hour or two (probably the time they had to wait to donate) and maybe eat a snack/drink some fluids(key words: cookie/o.j.) they should be fine to donate.

It won't help anyone injured immediately at this event, but it may help them recover from a possible bleed out due to surgical complications days from now, or the survivors of a car wreck 30 miles from Boston two weeks from now. Who's to say?
That you are knocking them for trying to help in the best way they can says loads about you.

Yeah, they should be fine to donate. They're certainly not going to have low iron or oxygen. Marathon runners are likely to have polycythemia rather than anemia and I'm pretty sure their lungs work fine.

They might have a bit of impact hemolysis, but that's a minor thing.

As far as nonspecific "toxins:" no such thing. I don't care what Dr. Oz has been telling you.

There might be some myoglobin and free hemoglobin floating around, but these are serum proteins. Unless someone is in fulminant rhabdomyolysis, its fine. Also, people with rhabdo tend to pee dark brown, feel like shiat, and die of renal failure. Not likely to pass Red Cross screening.

In any case, blood is dispensed as PRBCs: packed red blood cells. No serum. No floating proteins. No lactate floating around either.

Thanks for your knowledgeable input!

Also, an FYI to those who may not know:
http://www.aabb.org/pressroom/statements/Pages/statement061510.aspx

There is still a 12 month wait time to donate if you're a man, and you've had any(even protected) kind of sex with a man. This means you have to wait a year, with no sex as a homosexual dude, to donate blood.

There is no similar ban on people who have had promiscuous, unprotected, heterosexual or female homosexual sex who haven't been testing themselves for STD's.

There is only a 12 month ban if you have had contact with someone known to have an STD, or know that you have had one within the past year.


They also require a recent pay stub and net worth statement to make sure they get only blood from the right stock.
 
2013-04-16 05:17:45 PM

Big Man On Campus: If someone gets their leg blown off 10 feet from me, or has any other major wound they are bleeding out from, I'm not going to stay out of the way, I'm going to try to stop their bleeding. I don't even know CPR, but I damn well know enough about first-aid to perform that first-two-minutes-triage that can make all the difference in the world.


That's fine and totally understandable, and laudable, but if a trained responder on the scene is trying to direct you,  listen to them. That  includes helping them, or getting out of the way if you're  not helping.

tlars699: If they rest a bit, and take in some food and drink while they are waiting to donate, they should be fine to do so.


Should be, yes. That's not what reporters on the scene said, however; what was reported, was people were showing up at hospitals  in the middle of the crisis to donate.

EMS and hospitals don't have infinite manpower, you know; resources (medical and administrative staff, bed space, equipment)delegated to dealing with would-be donors, no matter how well-intended, arenot being delegated to handling the crisis proper.
 
2013-04-16 05:19:38 PM
The way most of humanity feels after an obvious tragedy like this:  Interconnected, compassionate, attentive.

If we can somehow figure out a way to keep this sentiment alive well after a tragedy like this passes, we will have gone 90% of the way toward solving all of our problems as a species.  I don't know if many of you remember it clearly, but the weeks post 9-11 were almost surreal in this country.  For a short while there, people I met in the street were nicer.  Store clerks were more patient.  Disagreeable co-workers were more social.

It's paradoxical that horrible stuff like this is often what it takes to acknowledge the fact that we simply need to be better to each other.
 
2013-04-16 05:20:56 PM

Russ1642: tlars699: darknys: tlars699: dazed420: kvinesknows:


2/10- you almost got me.
 
2013-04-16 05:21:26 PM

contrapunctus: The way most of humanity feels after an obvious tragedy like this:  Interconnected, compassionate, attentive.

If we can somehow figure out a way to keep this sentiment alive well after a tragedy like this passes, we will have gone 90% of the way toward solving all of our problems as a species.  I don't know if many of you remember it clearly, but the weeks post 9-11 were almost surreal in this country.  For a short while there, people I met in the street were nicer.  Store clerks were more patient.  Disagreeable co-workers were more social.

It's paradoxical that horrible stuff like this is often what it takes to acknowledge the fact that we simply need to be better to each other.


So you're pro bombing. Nice.
 
2013-04-16 05:22:37 PM

what_now: Summoner101: Emergencies, especially ones with gross trauma, tend to make blood services lax their standards.

No they don't. I gave blood an hour ago. They went through every single test, and I saw them boot people.


One hour ago is not in the middle of the crisis.
 
2013-04-16 05:23:26 PM

tlars699: Russ1642: tlars699: darknys: tlars699: dazed420: kvinesknows:

2/10- you almost got me.


Wasn't really trolling with that one. The blood donation rules are based on morality from a century ago rather than science.
 
2013-04-16 05:23:52 PM

Russ1642: contrapunctus: The way most of humanity feels after an obvious tragedy like this:  Interconnected, compassionate, attentive.

If we can somehow figure out a way to keep this sentiment alive well after a tragedy like this passes, we will have gone 90% of the way toward solving all of our problems as a species.  I don't know if many of you remember it clearly, but the weeks post 9-11 were almost surreal in this country.  For a short while there, people I met in the street were nicer.  Store clerks were more patient.  Disagreeable co-workers were more social.

It's paradoxical that horrible stuff like this is often what it takes to acknowledge the fact that we simply need to be better to each other.

So you're pro bombing. Nice.


Lulz.
 
2013-04-16 05:25:39 PM
I can't be alone here, but I never lost faith.....

It pisses me off that people do things like this, but of the other 10 billion or so people in this world, they represent such a minuscule minority that their acts don't change my feelings about society as a whole.
I refuse to let this asshat ruin my outlook. Changing how you run your life because of these acts is exactly what these terrorists want, either foreign or domestic.
 
2013-04-16 05:29:15 PM
Now, he wasn't necessarily helping, (maybe indirectly by capturing video evidence) but the camera man at the finish line got my vote for pretty damn ballsy. Here he is just feet away from an explosion, and he keeps rolling while going RIGHT UP TO the explosion area and then captures the second one.

Crazy!
 
2013-04-16 05:29:23 PM

that bosnian sniper: Big Man On Campus: If someone gets their leg blown off 10 feet from me, or has any other major wound they are bleeding out from, I'm not going to stay out of the way, I'm going to try to stop their bleeding. I don't even know CPR, but I damn well know enough about first-aid to perform that first-two-minutes-triage that can make all the difference in the world.

That's fine and totally understandable, and laudable, but if a trained responder on the scene is trying to direct you,  listen to them. That  includes helping them, or getting out of the way if you're  not helping.

tlars699: If they rest a bit, and take in some food and drink while they are waiting to donate, they should be fine to do so.

Should be, yes. That's not what reporters on the scene said, however; what was reported, was people were showing up at hospitals  in the middle of the crisis to donate.

EMS and hospitals don't have infinite manpower, you know; resources (medical and administrative staff, bed space, equipment)delegated to dealing with would-be donors, no matter how well-intended, are not being delegated to handling the crisis proper.


I would think that these donors would then be directed to a different spot, where they could donate, or told to patiently wait their turn, and rest up in the meantime, which is probably what happened.

Also, not everyone who works in a hospital is necessarily required for an emergency- I'm sure the phlebotomists on staff, specifically the people who are only trained to draw blood from people for testing, storage, etc. were called in or showed up as needed to handle the donations. You also only need a chair to draw blood, not a bed.
 
2013-04-16 05:29:27 PM

contrapunctus: The way most of humanity feels after an obvious tragedy like this:  Interconnected, compassionate, attentive.

If we can somehow figure out a way to keep this sentiment alive well after a tragedy like this passes, we will have gone 90% of the way toward solving all of our problems as a species.  I don't know if many of you remember it clearly, but the weeks post 9-11 were almost surreal in this country.  For a short while there, people I met in the street were nicer.  Store clerks were more patient.  Disagreeable co-workers were more social.

It's paradoxical that horrible stuff like this is often what it takes to acknowledge the fact that we simply need to be better to each other.


Perhaps that's what Jefferson meant by keeping the tree of liberty watered with blood of patriots and enemies. I forget the exact quote and am too lazy to look it up.
 
2013-04-16 05:30:11 PM

Russ1642: jaytkay: Heartwarming stories.

God was really looking out for the people of Boston yesterday.

Reminds me of one of my favourite Simpsons scenes where they cut to sunday school just as the teacher is saying "...and that's why god causes train wrecks."


It's not complicated: God is love.  Love will get you an extra slice of pie, but it will never bake it for you.
 
2013-04-16 05:31:00 PM

The Incredible Sexual Egg: I've seen it so much over the last day or so, but that picture with the three cops is badass


I agree.  Sometimes cops don

Oldiron_79: So when are we gonna get serious and talk about banning high capacity assault cookware? No one needs a 30L pressure cooker.


No we don't need a 30 L pressure cooker, but imagine how much chili we could make.  About 7 gallons an hour as long as we got the meat, onions, peppers etc. (beans, you go sit over there 'till you're called).
 
2013-04-16 05:31:54 PM

Billy Bathsalt: Russ1642: jaytkay: Heartwarming stories.

God was really looking out for the people of Boston yesterday.

Reminds me of one of my favourite Simpsons scenes where they cut to sunday school just as the teacher is saying "...and that's why god causes train wrecks."

It's not complicated: God is love.  Love will get you an extra slice of pie, but it will never bake it for you.


wtf?
 
2013-04-16 05:31:59 PM

Suede head: Yep, this is a tragedy.

Meanwhile, thousands of people have been killed by American drones in Asia and Africa with no pretence of arrest or trial, including hundreds even the US government says were certainly innocent.

Do you think... maybe... that might have annoyed some people enough to bomb you back?


so if we'd sent manned planes instead of drones that would have been somehow better?
 
2013-04-16 05:32:01 PM

tlars699: I would think that these donors would then be directed to a different spot, where they could donate, or told to patiently wait their turn, and rest up in the meantime, which is probably what happened.

Also, not everyone who works in a hospital is necessarily required for an emergency- I'm sure the phlebotomists on staff, specifically the people who are only trained to draw blood from people for testing, storage, etc. were called in or showed up as needed to handle the donations. You also only need a chair to draw blood, not a bed.


they put the hospitals into lockdown, the swat teams rolled up and they kicked everyone who wasn't hurt or essential out.
 
2013-04-16 05:34:39 PM

tlars699: that bosnian sniper: Big Man On Campus: If someone gets their leg blown off 10 feet from me, or has any other major wound they are bleeding out from, I'm not going to stay out of the way, I'm going to try to stop their bleeding. I don't even know CPR, but I damn well know enough about first-aid to perform that first-two-minutes-triage that can make all the difference in the world.

That's fine and totally understandable, and laudable, but if a trained responder on the scene is trying to direct you,  listen to them. That  includes helping them, or getting out of the way if you're  not helping.

tlars699: If they rest a bit, and take in some food and drink while they are waiting to donate, they should be fine to do so.

Should be, yes. That's not what reporters on the scene said, however; what was reported, was people were showing up at hospitals  in the middle of the crisis to donate.

EMS and hospitals don't have infinite manpower, you know; resources (medical and administrative staff, bed space, equipment)delegated to dealing with would-be donors, no matter how well-intended, are not being delegated to handling the crisis proper.

I would think that these donors would then be directed to a different spot, where they could donate, or told to patiently wait their turn, and rest up in the meantime, which is probably what happened.

Also, not everyone who works in a hospital is necessarily required for an emergency- I'm sure the phlebotomists on staff, specifically the people who are only trained to draw blood from people for testing, storage, etc. were called in or showed up as needed to handle the donations. You also only need a chair to draw blood, not a bed.


'hospital beds' doesn't refer to actual beds but rather to patient capacity, usually limited by staff.
 
2013-04-16 05:34:49 PM

Russ1642: tlars699: Russ1642: tlars699: darknys: tlars699: dazed420: kvinesknows:

2/10- you almost got me.

Wasn't really trolling with that one. The blood donation rules are based on morality from a century ago rather than science.


Yes, but they don't require a paystub, just a proof of address/id so you can prove you are who you say you are.
I also wanted to point out the morality thing, and how a significant portion of that is promoted by the FDA. The Red Cross are the "nice" folks who say a year is all that's needed.

Facts are there would be less of a blood shortage, if people were less bigoted.
 
2013-04-16 05:35:27 PM
Big Man On Campus:

Yes, America was dressed the part, hence asking for rape, so that justifies it.

/Have you considered it might be a in-house job?


Sadly I have a strong suspicion that it is.  I know a lot of people are quick to point overseas but this doesn't strike me as their style.
 
2013-04-16 05:35:51 PM
At the other end of the spectrum, any idea how Bostonians will react to inevitable planned WBC picketing of the funerals? I can see them going for the kids', just to get people really riled up.
 
2013-04-16 05:35:54 PM
Russ1642:

'hospital beds' doesn't refer to actual beds but rather to patient capacity, usually limited by staff.

Fair enough.
 
2013-04-16 05:36:19 PM

WTFDYW: While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.


Running a marathon doesn't reduce the iron in your blood.  I'm not even sure what you're talking about when you say "there wouldn't be enough oxygen"-- they'd have the same oxygen in their blood they usually do.  And their blood pressure would be normal shortly after they stopped running.  None of those thing would affect blood donation.  They could be a little dehydrated, but that's not going to disqualify them either.  And assuming it takes them an hour or two post-race to actually get into the chair to donate, they'll be rehydrated anyway.
 
2013-04-16 05:38:48 PM
fifteen acts of kindness
twelve thousand acts of cowardice
three acts of murder
140 acts of terrorism
tens of thousands of pictures put online just to show the world that america is full of terrified grieving cowards.

Find em.  Bomb em. Rape their goats with chainsaws.  Teach their women to read and wear pants.
 
2013-04-16 05:39:04 PM

tlchwi02: tlars699: I would think that these donors would then be directed to a different spot, where they could donate, or told to patiently wait their turn, and rest up in the meantime, which is probably what happened.

Also, not everyone who works in a hospital is necessarily required for an emergency- I'm sure the phlebotomists on staff, specifically the people who are only trained to draw blood from people for testing, storage, etc. were called in or showed up as needed to handle the donations. You also only need a chair to draw blood, not a bed.

they put the hospitals into lockdown, the swat teams rolled up and they kicked everyone who wasn't hurt or essential out.


Okay- I didn't know that. I still think I covered it, but its nice to have confirmation from someone better inthe know.
 
2013-04-16 05:40:18 PM

sleeps in trees: It's sad when my 16 year old has seen more crazy shiat in his lifetime than I did at his age. Between mass shootings, wars, bombings and planes being flown into buildings he's oddly well adjusted.


That is probably because it is considered normal to him as that is all he knows.
 
2013-04-16 05:40:50 PM

louiedog: Big Man On Campus: that bosnian sniper:  ...Unless you're capable and of sound mind and body, and have the expertise that can be put to use by coordinators, it's better to stay out of the way and act  if requested to by someone authoritative...

If someone gets their leg blown off 10 feet from me, or has any other major wound they are bleeding out from, I'm not going to stay out of the way, I'm going to try to stop their bleeding. I don't even know CPR, but I damn well know enough about first-aid to perform that first-two-minutes-triage that can make all the difference in the world.

If someone gets their leg blown off 2 miles from me, I'm probably just going to find the best bug-out direction, and comply with law enforcement when requested.

Learn CPR. I think everyone should. It's easy, there are lots of videos online, and if you look around you might find a fire department event or similar in your area where they'll have a practice dummy and teach you for free. Hell, there was that story a few weeks ago about that 9-year-old who raced over to a neighbor's house and saved the life of a baby with it when the mother didn't know what to do. That was just from memorizing a poster in the school cafeteria.

I was a lifeguard for a number of years as a teen and certified in CPR, but I never had to use it. I still watch a video and go over the steps regularly to refresh myself in case I'm ever in a situation like this.


This.

Learn CPR and First Aid.

You won't be a paramedic but you might keep that limb or keep somone going until they can get to a hosptial.  If not, hey, you tried your very best.  I've had FA training since 1993.  It takes one day.
 
2013-04-16 05:42:27 PM
want to lose your faith in humanity again?  read through these comments.

/it's a vicious cycle
//dickheads
///slashed!
 
2013-04-16 05:43:09 PM

raygundan: WTFDYW: While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.

Running a marathon doesn't reduce the iron in your blood.  I'm not even sure what you're talking about when you say "there wouldn't be enough oxygen"-- they'd have the same oxygen in their blood they usually do.  And their blood pressure would be normal shortly after they stopped running.  None of those thing would affect blood donation.  They could be a little dehydrated, but that's not going to disqualify them either.  And assuming it takes them an hour or two post-race to actually get into the chair to donate, they'll be rehydrated anyway.


and they probably used IV drugs at least ONCE in their lives, like everyone else, thus disqualifying them.
 
2013-04-16 05:43:17 PM

Flappyhead: Big Man On Campus:

Yes, America was dressed the part, hence asking for rape, so that justifies it.

/Have you considered it might be a in-house job?

Sadly I have a strong suspicion that it is.  I know a lot of people are quick to point overseas but this doesn't strike me as their style.


I'm leaning toward domestic as well because it doesn't seem like an international terrorist plan. It reminds me more of Oklahoma City. Plus, at least from what we have been told, no terror chatter has claimed it.
 
2013-04-16 05:45:58 PM

what_now: Benevolent Misanthrope: Wow - runners crossed the finish line, and then kept running to the hospital to donate blood.

Just... wow.

While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.


I replied to the wrong post before-- my apologies to WTFDYW.

Running a marathon doesn't reduce the iron in your blood.  I'm not even sure what you're talking about when you say "there wouldn't be enough oxygen"-- they'd have the same oxygen in their blood they usually do.  And their blood pressure would be normal shortly after they stopped running-- not to mention that distance runners will have better blood pressure on average than the general population.  None of those thing would affect blood donation.  They could be a little dehydrated, but that's not going to disqualify them either.  And assuming it takes them an hour or two post-race to actually get into the chair to donate, they'll be rehydrated anyway.  There's no technical reason this story couldn't be true.
 
2013-04-16 05:46:52 PM
 
2013-04-16 05:50:24 PM
"Shall I tell you what I find beautiful about you?
...
You are at your very best when things are worst."
 
2013-04-16 05:51:30 PM
So, regarding the blood donation issues raised, I actually pulled my copy of the AABB Technical Manual (16th ed) off the shelf - the whole 4th chapter is on disaster management.

Testing and processing of the blood into components is going to take 24-48 hours. The hospital + local blood bank should have approximately a 5-7 day supply on hand and the AABB maintains a national network of blood centers to resupply the affected hospital within 12-24 hours. Blood has to be fully tested before being released, with the only exception noted if "all blood supplies are exhausted, that resupply is not possible, and that blood is needed immediately to save lives." They go on to state that samples should be retained for retrospective testing. Trauma centers have massive transfusion protocols and other means of managing their blood supply. I doubt in this case any rules were "relaxed."

The AABB actually warns against disaster-related donor surges when there isn't a need for blood products. They suggest having people schedule future donations in some cases. Blood has a shelf life, and it is better to have people come in over time to replenish depleted stores and otherwise help maintain our blood supply that to all donate in a very short time frame and then have a bunch of unused units expire right as we move into the summer (typically a 'low season' for blood donations).

In any case, donating blood is a very nice, very humanitarian thing to do if you are able... you really can save a life.
 
2013-04-16 05:52:25 PM

Krustofsky: https://twitter.com/Yankees/status/324259441715339267/photo/1


Next thing you know White Sox and Cub fans will stop beating the crap out of each other.
 
2013-04-16 05:53:21 PM

sleeps in trees: Pontious Pilates: scottydoesntknow: [www.chailife.com image 600x389]

You know, the Mr. Rogers "look for the people helping" meme is one of the very few I can stand and don't think can be overused. There are at least 4-5 versions of it bumping around my facebook news feed, and it really does teach a valuable lesson about the good and hope that can come out of tragedy.

I'm thankful my little boy is too young to understand or care about what's going on in Boston. But in another few years he'll understand or care all too well and that Mr. Rogers quote will always be top of mind for me.



It's sad when my 16 year old has seen more crazy shiat in his lifetime than I did at his age. Between mass shootings, wars, bombings and planes being flown into buildings he's oddly well adjusted.


You had the Internet, YouTube, smartphones, etc... when you were 16?
 
2013-04-16 05:54:37 PM

dazed420: kvinesknows:
you dont understand emergencies that well do you?

Actually he is more than likely right which means you don't understand the requirements for functioning blood donations.  Not only is their blood lacking in oxygen but it will also contain high amounts of toxins the blood is trying to remove from the body not to mention the reduction of blood from the runners during their recovery would be very dangerous for them


Where did this idea that blood is "lacking in oxygen" after running come from?  Or that you need extra blood during recovery?  Extra red cells are needed for maximal athletic performance, not for recovery.  Oxygen levels will be the same as they always are.  Blood pressure is elevated during the running (duh... the heart pumps harder) but returns to normal very quickly after you stop.

It's actually fairly common for runners to donate shortly after a big race, because the downtime/easy training/recovery period after a race is the one time in their training schedule where they won't notice the absence of a few red cells.  I usually donate the evening after a race, for example.  Never had an issue qualifying to donate, or after the donation.
 
2013-04-16 05:55:05 PM

R.A.Danny: Krustofsky: https://twitter.com/Yankees/status/324259441715339267/photo/1

Next thing you know White Sox and Cub fans will stop beating the crap out of each other.


You're funny, even if chicago split in half and was being overrun by zombie aliens, a sox fan would let a cubs fan fall into the great chasm to save their own ass (and vice versa).
 
2013-04-16 05:55:19 PM

Russ1642: LumberJack: I'm probably just an arsehole for pointing out that "first responders doing what first responders do because it's their job" isn't really an act of kindness. Nor is a Mister Rogers Quote.

Posting an inspirational quote is nice and all, but it's as useful as prayer. Make yourself feel like you're helping without actually doing anything.


No, it just restores your faith in humanity, jackass.  What else are people supposed to do who don't live in the area and can't offer homes for stranded travelers, other than:

biohazard76: The AABB actually warns against disaster-related donor surges when there isn't a need for blood products. They suggest having people schedule future donations in some cases. Blood has a shelf life, and it is better to have people come in over time to replenish depleted stores and otherwise help maintain our blood supply that to all donate in a very short time frame and then have a bunch of unused units expire right as we move into the summer (typically a 'low season' for blood donations).

In any case, donating blood is a very nice, very humanitarian thing to do if you are able... you really can save a life.


THIS.

I can't donate for a few more weeks anyhow.  And since donating blood is all I can really do as far as this situation goes, so it goes I suppose.

/donate blood, people
//and sign your organ donor card while you're at it
 
2013-04-16 05:56:24 PM

Godscrack: [imageshack.us image 592x476]


That's Koko, the gorilla who speaks in American Sign Language. And they gave her a kitten. She named it "All Ball". Researchers said that she tried to nurse All Ball and was very gentle and loving.  When someone let the kitten out, it was hit and killed by a car. She signed "Bad, sad, bad" and "Frown, cry, frown, sad". Her handler also reported later hearing Koko making a sound similar to human weeping.

So they gave other kittens. She named the later ones "Lipstick" and "Smokey".

And we shoot those gorillas in the wild for meat.

/and, yes, I am loads of fun at parties
 
2013-04-16 05:56:52 PM
Sometimes, this species is capable of such evil. But, at the same time, holds great promise of greatness.

I'd like to think the good outnumbers the evil.
 
2013-04-16 05:58:09 PM
www.titanic-magazin.de
 
2013-04-16 05:58:12 PM

StreetlightInTheGhetto: /donate blood, people

... in a few weeks, then keep doing it on a regular clip.

/FTFM
//your local blood bank will appreciate it much more if you show up to donate in May than tonight.
 
2013-04-16 06:00:09 PM

TheShavingofOccam123: Godscrack: [imageshack.us image 592x476]

That's Koko, the gorilla who speaks in American Sign Language. And they gave her a kitten. She named it "All Ball". Researchers said that she tried to nurse All Ball and was very gentle and loving.  When someone let the kitten out, it was hit and killed by a car. She signed "Bad, sad, bad" and "Frown, cry, frown, sad". Her handler also reported later hearing Koko making a sound similar to human weeping.

So they gave other kittens. She named the later ones "Lipstick" and "Smokey".

And we shoot those gorillas in the wild for meat.

/and, yes, I am loads of fun at parties


"We" who? I don't. No one I know does.
 
2013-04-16 06:04:47 PM

Jon iz teh kewl: raygundan: WTFDYW: While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.

Running a marathon doesn't reduce the iron in your blood.  I'm not even sure what you're talking about when you say "there wouldn't be enough oxygen"-- they'd have the same oxygen in their blood they usually do.  And their blood pressure would be normal shortly after they stopped running.  None of those thing would affect blood donation.  They could be a little dehydrated, but that's not going to disqualify them either.  And assuming it takes them an hour or two post-race to actually get into the chair to donate, they'll be rehydrated anyway.

and they probably used IV drugs at least ONCE in their lives, like everyone else, thus disqualifying them.


What?
 
2013-04-16 06:05:25 PM

SultanofSchwing: R.A.Danny: Krustofsky: https://twitter.com/Yankees/status/324259441715339267/photo/1

Next thing you know White Sox and Cub fans will stop beating the crap out of each other.

You're funny, even if chicago split in half and was being overrun by zombie aliens, a sox fan would let a cubs fan fall into the great chasm to save their own ass (and vice versa).


Without a square to spare.
 
2013-04-16 06:10:19 PM

Jon iz teh kewl: raygundan: WTFDYW: While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.

Running a marathon doesn't reduce the iron in your blood.  I'm not even sure what you're talking about when you say "there wouldn't be enough oxygen"-- they'd have the same oxygen in their blood they usually do.  And their blood pressure would be normal shortly after they stopped running.  None of those thing would affect blood donation.  They could be a little dehydrated, but that's not going to disqualify them either.  And assuming it takes them an hour or two post-race to actually get into the chair to donate, they'll be rehydrated anyway.

and they probably used IV drugs at least ONCE in their lives, like everyone else, thus disqualifying them.


Do you mean illegal IV drugs?  That'll get you a ban.  Prescription IV drugs are fine.  I'm willing to bet a sizeable majority of marathon runners have never used illegal IV drugs, but if you have information to the contrary, I'll concede the point.
 
2013-04-16 06:11:27 PM

tlars699: I would think that these donors would then be directed to a different spot, where they could donate, or told to patiently wait their turn, and rest up in the meantime, which is probably what happened.

Also, not everyone who works in a hospital is necessarily required for an emergency- I'm sure the phlebotomists on staff, specifically the people who are only trained to draw blood from people for testing, storage, etc. were called in or showed up as needed to handle the donations. You also only need a chair to draw blood, not a bed.


Well, as someone already said "bed space" refers to general patient capacity, not the actual number of beds the hospital has.

And, a note: in a mass trauma incident the phlebotomists are going to be  very busy. Trauma cases still need blood work, especially in the event a patient is too seriously injured or deeply in shock to tell responders their blood type. If I remember right (I'd have to contact an ex- of mine for confirmation), full blood count, UEC, arterial blood gas, and cross-matching tests are standard  anywaysin the event of a major trauma case.
 
2013-04-16 06:13:22 PM

raygundan: Jon iz teh kewl: raygundan: WTFDYW: While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.

Running a marathon doesn't reduce the iron in your blood.  I'm not even sure what you're talking about when you say "there wouldn't be enough oxygen"-- they'd have the same oxygen in their blood they usually do.  And their blood pressure would be normal shortly after they stopped running.  None of those thing would affect blood donation.  They could be a little dehydrated, but that's not going to disqualify them either.  And assuming it takes them an hour or two post-race to actually get into the chair to donate, they'll be rehydrated anyway.

and they probably used IV drugs at least ONCE in their lives, like everyone else, thus disqualifying them.

Do you mean illegal IV drugs?  That'll get you a ban.  Prescription IV drugs are fine.  I'm willing to bet a sizeable majority of marathon runners have never used illegal IV drugs, but if you have information to the contrary, I'll concede the point.


I don't know about IV drugs specifically, but it's pretty well known that runners ingest narcotics to help keep their energy levels up during marathons. Have you never heard of a "runner's high"?
 
2013-04-16 06:13:35 PM

Captain Steroid: Sometimes, this species is capable of such evil. But, at the same time, holds great promise of greatness.

I'd like to think the good outnumbers the evil.


I was told there would BE NO MATH!!!
 
2013-04-16 06:14:42 PM

WelldeadLink: mr_bunny: It is so beautiful to see so much good in the face of so much evil.

Are you referring to the bombing, or to it being in a slideshow?


You magnificent bastard.
 
2013-04-16 06:15:26 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: raygundan: Jon iz teh kewl: raygundan: WTFDYW: While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.

Running a marathon doesn't reduce the iron in your blood.  I'm not even sure what you're talking about when you say "there wouldn't be enough oxygen"-- they'd have the same oxygen in their blood they usually do.  And their blood pressure would be normal shortly after they stopped running.  None of those thing would affect blood donation.  They could be a little dehydrated, but that's not going to disqualify them either.  And assuming it takes them an hour or two post-race to actually get into the chair to donate, they'll be rehydrated anyway.

and they probably used IV drugs at least ONCE in their lives, like everyone else, thus disqualifying them.

Do you mean illegal IV drugs?  That'll get you a ban.  Prescription IV drugs are fine.  I'm willing to bet a sizeable majority of marathon runners have never used illegal IV drugs, but if you have information to the contrary, I'll concede the point.

I don't know about IV drugs specifically, but it's pretty well known that runners ingest narcotics to help keep their energy levels up during marathons. Have you never heard of a "runner's high"?


I'll await your defense of that statement when someone else questions it before giving a score.
 
2013-04-16 06:19:59 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: raygundan: Jon iz teh kewl: raygundan: WTFDYW: While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.

Running a marathon doesn't reduce the iron in your blood.  I'm not even sure what you're talking about when you say "there wouldn't be enough oxygen"-- they'd have the same oxygen in their blood they usually do.  And their blood pressure would be normal shortly after they stopped running.  None of those thing would affect blood donation.  They could be a little dehydrated, but that's not going to disqualify them either.  And assuming it takes them an hour or two post-race to actually get into the chair to donate, they'll be rehydrated anyway.

and they probably used IV drugs at least ONCE in their lives, like everyone else, thus disqualifying them.

Do you mean illegal IV drugs?  That'll get you a ban.  Prescription IV drugs are fine.  I'm willing to bet a sizeable majority of marathon runners have never used illegal IV drugs, but if you have information to the contrary, I'll concede the point.

I don't know about IV drugs specifically, but it's pretty well known that runners ingest narcotics to help keep their energy levels up during marathons. Have you never heard of a "runner's high"?


It is true that runners are notorious addicts, although I don't think I've heard about any use of narcotics.  Endorphins are widespread, though.  Fortunately for most runners, endogenous endorphin use is not illegal or on the list of things that will get you banned from donating blood.
 
2013-04-16 06:23:01 PM

Pair-o-Dice: Captain Steroid: Sometimes, this species is capable of such evil. But, at the same time, holds great promise of greatness.

I'd like to think the good outnumbers the evil.

I was told there would BE NO MATH!!!


i1182.photobucket.com
 
2013-04-16 06:26:17 PM
We have nothing to say but want to cash in on ad revenue, so here's screenshots of fifteen Twitter posts!
 
2013-04-16 06:26:19 PM
70,000 innocents killed in syria - a "meh" from the world

2 people dead and 20 injured suddenly the whole world is "outraged"


yeah, a belief in humanity... that we care more about our own people than anyone else's.

go species human,
 
2013-04-16 06:27:16 PM

raygundan: Jon iz teh kewl: raygundan: WTFDYW: While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.

Running a marathon doesn't reduce the iron in your blood.  I'm not even sure what you're talking about when you say "there wouldn't be enough oxygen"-- they'd have the same oxygen in their blood they usually do.  And their blood pressure would be normal shortly after they stopped running.  None of those thing would affect blood donation.  They could be a little dehydrated, but that's not going to disqualify them either.  And assuming it takes them an hour or two post-race to actually get into the chair to donate, they'll be rehydrated anyway.

and they probably used IV drugs at least ONCE in their lives, like everyone else, thus disqualifying them.

Do you mean illegal IV drugs?  That'll get you a ban.  Prescription IV drugs are fine.  I'm willing to bet a sizeable majority of marathon runners have never used illegal IV drugs, but if you have information to the contrary, I'll concede the point.


i thought everyone shoots heroin at least once in their lives
 
2013-04-16 06:29:58 PM

deplorable: 70,000 innocents killed in syria - a "meh" from the world

2 people dead and 20 injured suddenly the whole world is "outraged"


yeah, a belief in humanity... that we care more about our own people than anyone else's.

go species human,


All species care more about their immediate group than the rest of the species at large. Don't like it, take it up with Gawd or Darwin or whoever.
 
2013-04-16 06:31:43 PM

Jon iz teh kewl: raygundan: Jon iz teh kewl: raygundan: WTFDYW: While that's a nice story and everything, there is no way anyone would accept the blood of someone who just ran 26 miles. They're blood pressure would be far too high and there wouldn't have nearly enough oxygen and iron in their blood to qualify.

Running a marathon doesn't reduce the iron in your blood.  I'm not even sure what you're talking about when you say "there wouldn't be enough oxygen"-- they'd have the same oxygen in their blood they usually do.  And their blood pressure would be normal shortly after they stopped running.  None of those thing would affect blood donation.  They could be a little dehydrated, but that's not going to disqualify them either.  And assuming it takes them an hour or two post-race to actually get into the chair to donate, they'll be rehydrated anyway.

and they probably used IV drugs at least ONCE in their lives, like everyone else, thus disqualifying them.

Do you mean illegal IV drugs?  That'll get you a ban.  Prescription IV drugs are fine.  I'm willing to bet a sizeable majority of marathon runners have never used illegal IV drugs, but if you have information to the contrary, I'll concede the point.

i thought everyone shoots heroin at least once in their lives


Easy mistake.  That's an average.  It's actually just one guy who has done heroin seven billion times.
 
2013-04-16 06:41:34 PM
Not really subs, since I recall a time when it didn`t take a tragedy for us to be kind to each other.

No wait, I don`t.
 
2013-04-16 06:42:27 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: sleeps in trees: Pontious Pilates: scottydoesntknow: [www.chailife.com image 600x389]

You know, the Mr. Rogers "look for the people helping" meme is one of the very few I can stand and don't think can be overused. There are at least 4-5 versions of it bumping around my facebook news feed, and it really does teach a valuable lesson about the good and hope that can come out of tragedy.

I'm thankful my little boy is too young to understand or care about what's going on in Boston. But in another few years he'll understand or care all too well and that Mr. Rogers quote will always be top of mind for me.

It's sad when my 16 year old has seen more crazy shiat in his lifetime than I did at his age. Between mass shootings, wars, bombings and planes being flown into buildings he's oddly well adjusted.

You had the Internet, YouTube, smartphones, etc... when you were 16?




That was my point.
 
2013-04-16 07:03:28 PM
 
2013-04-16 07:09:24 PM

FC Exile: Wow. Stealing jackets during the aftermath.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=1hM7Ura6Q4w


Thought earlier in another thread, couldn't see the video linked, it may have been people looking for jackets to keep victims warm...I don't see much urgency in those people to get the jackets back to people in need...

What a pile of farkers.
 
2013-04-16 07:21:00 PM
Welp, that faith died again as soon as I read the comments here.

/needs a hug
 
2013-04-16 07:24:38 PM
 
2013-04-16 07:27:25 PM

flamingboar: Welp, that faith died again as soon as I read the comments here.

/needs a hug


Apologies. I find it very difficult to allow blatantly untrue assertions stand when they are so close to my field of expertise.
 
2013-04-16 07:30:38 PM

deplorable: 70,000 innocents killed in syria - a "meh" from the world

2 people dead and 20 injured suddenly the whole world is "outraged"


yeah, a belief in humanity... that we care more about our own people than anyone else's.

go species human,


your nick is well-chosen.
 
2013-04-16 07:41:34 PM

ancker: I can't be alone here, but I never lost faith.....

It pisses me off that people do things like this, but of the other 10 billion or so people in this world, they represent such a minuscule minority that their acts don't change my feelings about society as a whole.
I refuse to let this asshat ruin my outlook. Changing how you run your life because of these acts is exactly what these terrorists want, either foreign or domestic.


The reason that the average idiot freaks out and demands shiat like the PATRIOT act and gun bans is the same reason that people play the lottery. People in general don't easily comprehend large numbers or statistics, so they think the "bad people" are waaaay more common than they actually are. I have lost faith. The people around me may be well meaning, but they are well-meaning idiots.
 
2013-04-16 07:43:26 PM

flamingboar: Welp, that faith died again as soon as I read the comments here.

/needs a hug


(hug)

/I would in person if I could; free hugs should be a human right
 
2013-04-16 07:47:08 PM
If I could ask a question to someone with knowledge in the medical community:  Would any of the Boston hospitals accept help from an out of town doctor?  Say a resident doctor from L.A. was in town for the marathon.  Would an out of town doctor offer their services to a hospital or is there a large amount of paperwork that would be needed and liability/insurance forms needing to be filled out before a doctor would e able to help/practice at the hospital?
 
2013-04-16 07:49:19 PM

LumberJack: LumberJack: I'm probably just an arsehole for pointing out that "first responders doing what first responders do because it's their job" isn't really an act of kindness. Nor is a Mister Rogers Quote.

GoldSpider: 4/10 - Telegraphed it a bit, but you should get a few bites.

No, I'm not trolling.

treesloth: No, you're not, but it doesn't mean you're also right.  Yes, it's their job, but there's real kindness to be found in the fact that they accept that job to begin with.  People that knowingly run toward the danger instead of away have my respect.  And why can't a quote be a kindness?  If it helps people focus and banish despondency, it's a kindness, even if it was easy.

... but I am an arsehole then. Called it.

My works towards erasing the dilution of the meaning of certain words/phrases (i.e. "Hero") continues.


You have a point. I've heard of firefighters saying that the most heroic thing they do is join up, and after that, they're just doing their job. However, IMHO, staying in the job counts too. I imagine having a close call, casualties (e.g., 9/11), and things you can't unsee are a good incentive to GTFO.

One more thing worth mentioning is that bombers sometimes set secondary explosives to go off later to kill emergency personnel. First responders are trained (at least in some departments) to NOT enter the area until a sweep for those is made. In this case, they charged right in -- which may wrong, stupid, etc., but shows courage nonetheless. It's impressive that they cleared the wounded in minutes; at least that minimized the danger and no doubt saved some lives.
 
2013-04-16 07:53:39 PM
My faith in humanity is restored in that this is not a "featured partner" link and Farkers are allowed to comment on it.
 
2013-04-16 07:55:22 PM
www.nypost.com
My heart aches looking into the eyes of this innocent little boy who just wanted to watch his daddy finish the marathon.

Track down his killer(s) and punish them.  Their lives are now forfeit. If there is a God, I won't claim to understand it, nor do I care to.  There is no God if such evil acts are done.

There is evil in the world. It is of our own making. Rather than pray, I will choose vigilance and protection of my family and friends. And hold them close.
 
2013-04-16 08:06:17 PM

contrapunctus: It's paradoxical that horrible stuff like this is often what it takes to acknowledge the fact that we simply need to be better to each other.


There is no reasoning with someone still living in 12th century religious dogma.  Time to wake up Mr. Freeman, and smell the ashes.
 
2013-04-16 08:16:26 PM

Bschott007: If I could ask a question to someone with knowledge in the medical community:  Would any of the Boston hospitals accept help from an out of town doctor?  Say a resident doctor from L.A. was in town for the marathon.  Would an out of town doctor offer their services to a hospital or is there a large amount of paperwork that would be needed and liability/insurance forms needing to be filled out before a doctor would e able to help/practice at the hospital?


I imagine it's probably dependent on situation. I'm sure that now, when things are relatively calmer, they will not accept the help without a prohibitive amount of paperwork. In the acute situation, when 200+ traumas were coming in, the average ED doc would ask to see your hospital ID and then tell you to get busy. In that situation consequences can be managed later.
 
2013-04-16 08:25:16 PM

Lt. Cheese Weasel: [www.nypost.com image 524x350]
My heart aches looking into the eyes of this innocent little boy who just wanted to watch his daddy finish the marathon.

Track down his killer(s) and punish them.   Their lives are now forfeit. If there is a God, I won't claim to understand it, nor do I care to.  There is no God if such evil acts are done.

There is evil in the world. It is of our own making.
Rather than pray, I will choose vigilance and protection of my family and friends. And hold them close.


God doesn't make the world this way, we do.
 
2013-04-16 08:40:24 PM
Agent Smiths Laugh:

God doesn't make the world this way, we do.

Good point.  Our all knowing, all powerful God just sits back and lets it happen.
 
2013-04-16 08:42:10 PM

SultanofSchwing: jaytkay: Heartwarming stories.

God was really looking out for the people of Boston yesterday.

I don't mean to kill the sentiment, but I think he forgot about Boston yesterday...


My dad once saw a guy in front of him run his car into a ditch.  He stopped to see if the driver was okay and the guy said, "I'm okay.  God was with me."  My dad said, "You better let him ride with me from now on."  "Why's that?"  "You're gonna kill him driving like that."

/Probably not true, but my dad HAS been trolling hard since the 40s.
 
2013-04-16 08:44:38 PM

fireclown: [media2.wptv.com image 640x480]
This makes me feel a little better.


And it's 100% made up:

http://www.telegram.com/article/20130416/NEWS/104169917

There were 3 types of runners in the marathon: 1) Those who finished well before the explosions; 2) Those caught up in the explosions; and 3) Those diverted because of the explosion and did not finish.

Regarding 3: Runners were immediately diverted to a community area from the explosion area, and then the marathon was stopped.  These people did not know what was going on and did not "continue running to the hospital after crossing the finish line". They never crossed the finish line.  They may have eventually made their way to a hospital to donate blood but it definitely wasn't a "continuously keep running right to the hospital".

Regarding 1:  People who had already crossed the finish line didn't know the explosion occurred and therefore didn't "continue running to the hospital".  One of my friends ran and finished an hour before the bombs went off.  He had already been back to his hotel room, showered, and gone out to get a drink when he saw it on the TV.

Regarding 2: The people who were caught up in the explosion, or finishing right before or after it, most assuredly did not run to a hospital to donate blood. It was complete chaos and pandemonium, no one was thinking "shiat, I'll go donate blood".  They were focused on reuniting with their friends, family, providing immediate help, or getting the hell out of Dodge.

But hey, it might be true in a metaphorical sense in which "kept running to the hospital after you crossed the finish line" means "I decided to head over to the hospital after a time lapse and figuring out what the hell was going on".
 
2013-04-16 09:03:06 PM

Persnickety: Agent Smiths Laugh:

God doesn't make the world this way, we do.

Good point.  Our all knowing, all powerful God just sits back and lets it happen.


Kinda hard for him to do otherwise with that whole not existing problem he's got.

/but people just can't live with personal responsibility
 
2013-04-16 09:43:05 PM

Meatybrain: [i1222.photobucket.com image 850x420]


I love the sentiment, but why this pic of Patton?
 
2013-04-16 09:48:56 PM
R.I.P. Krystle Campbell.

Ugh...just, ugh.
 
2013-04-16 10:14:02 PM

sleeps in trees: It's sad when my 16 year old has seen more crazy shiat in his lifetime than I did at his age. Between mass shootings, wars, bombings and planes being flown into buildings he's oddly well adjusted.


It was there. We just didn't have multiple 24/7 news channels.
We just had Walter Cronkite with 'the body count today...-'.
 
2013-04-16 11:16:56 PM

BraniacsDaughtr: Meatybrain: [i1222.photobucket.com image 850x420]

I love the sentiment, but why this pic of Patton?


It's Patton. Why would I pick a normal picture when that one is out there?

YouPeopleAreCrazy: sleeps in trees: It's sad when my 16 year old has seen more crazy shiat in his lifetime than I did at his age. Between mass shootings, wars, bombings and planes being flown into buildings he's oddly well adjusted.

It was there. We just didn't have multiple 24/7 news channels.
We just had Walter Cronkite with 'the body count today...-'.


I am way older than your 16 year old. It was there, all right. but it was up closer and personaller.

We had at least a dozen shootings at my (otherwise) very non-violent suburban high school during my time there.

When I was in junior high two planes collided over my house and landed in the schoolyard. There was a person-shaped dent in the basketball court.  We were picking hamburger out of the camellias for weeks.

That happened about the same time we abandoned Southeast Asia, ending the abovementioned daily body counts that had been a part of the news since my earliest memories. The dead students at Kent State? The VC guy getting his brains blown out? The little naked girl running from her flambeed village? Those weren't  memes, those were news.

And our Bad President was so evil the GOP told him to quit before he went to farking jail. Top that, GW Bush, you ignorant snickering ten-gallon asshat.

And before that, we actually practiced ducking and covering so our tiny little plywood half-desks would protect us from the atomic blasts and the flying glass and the fireball and such like.

Andplusalso, when I was a wee sprat the Manson murders took place basically in my back yard.

I lived through all that and more, but I managed to turn out just ... um.. oh, crap. Never mind.

p.s. where I grew up blowjobs were illegal until I was halfway through high school.
 
2013-04-16 11:20:39 PM

Godscrack: [imageshack.us image 592x476]


I just laughed WAY too hard at this. I have tears. Hahahahhahaha
 
2013-04-17 12:17:22 AM

Meatybrain: BraniacsDaughtr: Meatybrain: [i1222.photobucket.com image 850x420]

I love the sentiment, but why this pic of Patton?

It's Patton. Why would I pick a normal picture when that one is out there?

YouPeopleAreCrazy: sleeps in trees: It's sad when my 16 year old has seen more crazy shiat in his lifetime than I did at his age. Between mass shootings, wars, bombings and planes being flown into buildings he's oddly well adjusted.

It was there. We just didn't have multiple 24/7 news channels.
We just had Walter Cronkite with 'the body count today...-'.

I am way older than your 16 year old. It was there, all right. but it was up closer and personaller.

We had at least a dozen shootings at my (otherwise) very non-violent suburban high school during my time there.

When I was in junior high two planes collided over my house and landed in the schoolyard. There was a person-shaped dent in the basketball court.  We were picking hamburger out of the camellias for weeks.

That happened about the same time we abandoned Southeast Asia, ending the abovementioned daily body counts that had been a part of the news since my earliest memories. The dead students at Kent State? The VC guy getting his brains blown out? The little naked girl running from her flambeed village? Those weren't  memes, those were news.

And our Bad President was so evil the GOP told him to quit before he went to farking jail. Top that, GW Bush, you ignorant snickering ten-gallon asshat.

And before that, we actually practiced ducking and covering so our tiny little plywood half-desks would protect us from the atomic blasts and the flying glass and the fireball and such like.

Andplusalso, when I was a wee sprat the Manson murders took place basically in my back yard.

I lived through all that and more, but I managed to turn out just ... um.. oh, crap. Never mind.

p.s. where I grew up blowjobs were illegal until I was halfway through high school.


All of these. My sister and I were comparing "What's the first news story you remember?" once. The first one she recalls: The Attica riots, and seeing the smoke rising over the prison. Mine was Cooper's skyjacking.

When I was in high school, there were two near-miss nuclear incidents back-to-back traced to faulty computer chips; sandwiched between news reports of the hostage crisis. Terrorist reports from Europe were so common, they barely rated front-page coverage unless more than one American was killed.

It's just not new, or even unusual. Kids will survive.
 
2013-04-17 12:26:44 AM

Lt. Cheese Weasel: [www.nypost.com image 524x350]
My heart aches looking into the eyes of this innocent little boy who just wanted to watch his daddy finish the marathon.

Track down his killer(s) and punish them.  Their lives are now forfeit. If there is a God, I won't claim to understand it, nor do I care to.  There is no God if such evil acts are done.

There is evil in the world. It is of our own making. Rather than pray, I will choose vigilance and protection of my family and friends. And hold them close.


Hippie cat stands with you.
 
2013-04-17 12:52:07 AM
There should have been a pic of  Carlos Arredondo, the "Boston Marathon Cowboy."
 
2013-04-17 01:05:35 AM

Gyrfalcon: Terrorist reports from Europe were so common, they barely rated front-page coverage unless more than one American was killed.


Ye gods, I totally forgot about that. My former penis-warmer grew up in Frenchland, and he always marveled at how easily America lost its poop over terrorism when he grew up with it as part of daily life. I remember it, but only as part of the background noise: the Vietnam conflicts, home and away; race riots; OPEC getting a hold of the whole world's balls; the cold war; and, of course, chicks and darkies getting all uppity. My parents' America was rotting from the inside and the out.

And there was still some leftover bad buju from the JFK RFK MLK dipshiat marksman trifecta, too.

I miss Mister Rogers...
 
2013-04-17 01:28:09 PM

LumberJack: ... but I am an arsehole then. Called it.

My works towards erasing the dilution of the meaning of certain words/phrases (i.e. "Hero") continues.


No, one can be wrong without being an asshole.  One can hold a sincere, incorrect conviction.  In this case, you're arguing against the dilution of the word "kindness".  While I very much favor helping words retain their meaning and potency, in this case the word is being used correctly.  It is a kindness.  There has been no dilution.
 
2013-04-17 01:31:16 PM

Gyrfalcon: All of these. My sister and I were comparing "What's the first news story you remember?" once. The first one she recalls: The Attica riots, and seeing the smoke rising over the prison. Mine was Cooper's skyjacking.


Interesting question actually. I wonder what mine would be.  Maybe the 1993 WTC bombing... I remember asking my parents what terrorism was. Though it's sort of hard to believe I can't remember anything from at least a couple years earlier. It's hard in retrospect to separate what you knew at the time from what you've learned since.
 
2013-04-17 02:49:46 PM

LumberJack: ... but I am an arsehole then. Called it.

My works towards erasing the dilution of the meaning of certain words/phrases (i.e. "Hero") continues.


You're an arsehole because you think you're important enough to take on a task so very.... important.

It's a kindness, no matter the job, and those people are heroes
 
Displayed 213 of 213 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report