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(The New York Times)   So you're thinking all that brown rice is good for your heath? Sure, if by "health" you mean "arsenic poisoning"   (nytimes.com) divider line 49
    More: Scary, arsenic poisoning, Beet greens, Consumers Union, baking powder, blinis, ricotta, tomato sauces  
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49 Comments   (+0 »)
   

Archived thread
 
2013-04-15 11:58:02 PM
Rice used to be polished in people's mouths.
Factory food for life!
 
2013-04-16 12:55:57 AM
Goes in white, comes out brown.

You can't explain that.
 
2013-04-16 12:57:38 AM
god damn this so very much
 
2013-04-16 01:02:33 AM

Amos Quito: Goes in white, comes out brown.

You can't explain that.


billy
billy rubin
 
2013-04-16 01:06:32 AM
use of arsenic-laden manure as fertilizer and to prohibit the feeding of arsenic-containing drugs and animal byproducts to animals.

WTF?!

It was my understanding, some time ago, that no arsenic was allowed in any animal foods or fertilizers and damn little in drugs. I also understood that arsenic was forbidden in pesticides -- for the exact reason mentioned in the article.

It's a heavy metal. It doesn't go away. It tends to accumulate in the body.

Remember all of those old, old westerns (in black and white) where the cowboys would come upon 'sour' watering holes and wells? Usually they tended to notice the dead animals scattered about. Well, those holes were poisoned by natural arsenic in the ground.

In quite a few nations, they have problems with arsenic in their wells. Africa -- naturally -- has a big problem in some areas. Plenty of water, but it's lethal.

Processes can be used to remove the arsenic from the water, but high poverty areas can't afford them. Over the years, the arsenic accumulates in people, causing, among other things, neural damage which often can cause brain damage. (Which might explain a lot in Africa.)

People here in the US who have been deliberately poisoned by the stuff can be saved, but they'll forever have some physical and mental side effects. Those heavily poisoned will have years taken off their lives.

Arsenic was a favorite chemical used in embalming since in high doses, it stops bacterial growth.

I can't even think of any reason for arsenic to be in fertilizers. If arsenic is showing up in high concentrations in manure, imagine the levels in the contributing animal. At one time, it was used in medications, ages ago, until the cumulative effects became understood.

We stopped DDT because of the cumulative effects that started wiping out wild life -- though it was about the most efficient pesticide ever made. Anyone recall those fogging trucks that used to fog high school football games to kill the mosquitoes in the summer? No one minded and it didn't smell badly.

DDT.

It's not allowed anymore.

DDT is banned in the US and most advanced nations, however, we still make it, to sell it to third world nations who still use it. Like South America. It's excellent for killing off the huge swarms of disease carrying mosquitoes in the wet lands -- and poisoning everything in the area.

People like rice. Rice in many other nations is the basic staple like potatoes are here. So, people consume a lot of it. Like potatoes, a large amount of nutrients are in the 'peel' or husk. So people promote brown rice.

Over the years, rice paddies treated with arsenic accumulate quite a bit of it in the mud. Rice grows basically in ponds. That means a certain amount of the water will seep back into the ground and eventually into the aquifer -- taking the poison with it.

I'm not sure if any of you know what happened in the timber areas of the US decades ago. For some reason, Mercury was used by mills to help debark trees. These mills were right next to lakes and streams since they needed a lot of water.

It suddenly dawned on someone that the lakes and streams were poisoned by the Mercury and even today, you can dig down into the mud in some areas and actually see the silvery Mercury still there. So, the process was stopped.

That's one of the reasons why there's so much Mercury in the oceans now. It used to be used by the truck load. I still recall the shot of a guy stepping out of a boat, sinking into the mud and when he brought his boot up, silvery bits of Mercury shone through the muck caked on it.

You'd think agricultural regulators and farmers would have learned about the effects of heavy metals by now.

I mean, they took lead out of paints when they realized they were poisoning half the nation. They did away with lead solder and lead water pipes. Duck hunters were encouraged to use steel shot and not lead because the bottoms of duck ponds, used for generations, were covered on the bottom with lead shot, which the ducks ate and high levels of lead started showing up in the meat.

Do we have to start hitting these people over the head with bats to make them understand?

There's one thing about our current, very mobile civilization: we can transport poisons all over the globe and wind up poisoning lands that had no problem previously.
 
2013-04-16 01:15:04 AM
Whew! I love brown rice. We used to buy Lundberg's at Costco, but they stopped carrying it in Phoenix. So now it's Amazon.
 
2013-04-16 01:18:51 AM

Rik01: "Well, Prince, so Genoa and Lucca are now just family estates of the Buonapartes...


There's one thing about our current, very mobile civilization: we can transport poisons all over the globe and wind up poisoning lands that had no problem previously.

Another problem is that there's no way in hell anyone is making more than 5 paragraphs into your post.
 
2013-04-16 01:19:14 AM

namatad: Amos Quito: Goes in white, comes out brown.

You can't explain that.

billy
billy rubin



Okay, maybe so... but can you explain beets?
 
2013-04-16 01:20:59 AM

Rik01: WTF?!


That's as far as I got.
 
2013-04-16 02:06:22 AM

Amos Quito: namatad: Amos Quito: Goes in white, comes out brown.

You can't explain that.

billy
billy rubin


Okay, maybe so... but can you explain beets?


beets are farking evil and only insane people would ever eat them
 
2013-04-16 02:08:11 AM
This was in the news a while ago, particularly concerning baby food.

 

Rik01: It's a heavy metal. It doesn't go away. It tends to accumulate in the body.


Does it accumulate and never leave, or is it that as it moves up the food chain the concentration gets higher and species on top get the most of it (either way, sucks for us who love rice, fish and sushi)
 
2013-04-16 02:08:53 AM

ecmoRandomNumbers: Whew! I love brown rice. We used to buy Lundberg's at Costco, but they stopped carrying it in Phoenix. So now it's Amazon.


geekswithblogs.net

"If you could drain the ricefield right now, that would be great..."
 
2013-04-16 02:12:21 AM

staplermofo: Rik01: "Well, Prince, so Genoa and Lucca are now just family estates of the Buonapartes...

There's one thing about our current, very mobile civilization: we can transport poisons all over the globe and wind up poisoning lands that had no problem previously.

Another problem is that there's no way in hell anyone is making more than 5 paragraphs into your post.


Well *I* read the whole thing.
 
2013-04-16 02:12:44 AM

Rik01: DDT is banned in the US and most advanced nations, however, we still make it, to sell it to third world nations who still use it. Like South America. It's excellent for killing off the huge swarms of disease carrying mosquitoes in the wet lands -- and poisoning everything in the area.


Abuses happen, but I remember reading a report where targeted use of DDT can save a lot of lives at minimal cost - both financial and environmental.  Nobody's suggesting we go whole-hog with DDT as we did back in the day, but DDT was never a HUMAN poison.  The modern use of it is as a limited spray - you hit the doorways, windows, and other entrances to the building with it, which enables you to keep the building free of malaria carrying mosquitoes.

One of those fogger trucks at a football field would use enough in one game to supply an African city in the above usage for over a year.  The difference in usage amounts is night and day, and they haven't found anything better for taking out the mosquitoes that carry malaria, a much bigger killer there.
 
2013-04-16 02:15:20 AM
Hah! I'm getting a kick out of this as my mom just recently (read: this weekend) decided to switch over to brown rice only instead of white.

/no, literally
 
2013-04-16 02:15:58 AM
More than a few Native American tribes harvest and sell wild rice.  It is often a hell of a lot more expensive than regular store bought rice, but it is healthier and the money goes to people who actually need it.
 
2013-04-16 02:17:26 AM
There's so little arsenic in rice that it causes absolutely no proven problems. So, there's no reason to care.
 
2013-04-16 02:19:07 AM
you can only get brown rice with WIC checks.
 
2013-04-16 02:20:12 AM
It would seem perfectly clear that Rice Krispies will undoubtedly kill you, and that we've got to get Snap, Crackle, and Pop behind bars before those poisonous elves destroy countless generations of innocent youth. I never trusted them. Never.
 
2013-04-16 02:22:31 AM
I prefer brown rice the way nature intended...as white rice burnt to the bottom of the pot.
 
2013-04-16 02:28:12 AM

Rik01: You'd think agricultural regulators and farmers would have learned about the effects of heavy metals by now.


Some people try to take the easy way out.  Easier to poison the damn pest than to try to deal with what is aiding and abetting it being there.

Mock26: More than a few Native American tribes harvest and sell wild rice.  It is often a hell of a lot more expensive than regular store bought rice, but it is healthier and the money goes to people who actually need it.


Okay, look.  Wild rice != rice. It's awesome, but it's a grass AFAIK.  And if it's grown downsteam of farmers using crappy pesticides, the same problem arises.
 
2013-04-16 02:28:20 AM
Pesticides have arsenic and are sprayed on everything, so it's everywhere.

/Arsenic is natural.
 
2013-04-16 02:29:20 AM
"White rice grown in Arkansas, Louisiana, Missouri and Texas, which together account for 76 percent of the rice grown in the United States"

I'll ignore for a second the California type, since TONS of things grown in CA shouldn't be, but seriously? Texas? Missouri? Lousianna, I can see, since they have swampy areas, but those other states... yeah, stop growing things that are wildly out of the ecosystem.
 
2013-04-16 02:36:51 AM
Ugh. Really? Rice is my favorite grain these days. So... that's bad.

On the other hand, I've been digging into my bag of Calrose botan rice, so that's good. It was the jasmine that probably wasn't, in terms of arsenic. No idea about the Indian basmati, though.

/Food is dangerous.
//But so is not eating.
///Dilemma slashies.
 
2013-04-16 02:37:45 AM

ladyfortuna: "White rice grown in Arkansas, Louisiana, Missouri and Texas, which together account for 76 percent of the rice grown in the United States"

I'll ignore for a second the California type, since TONS of things grown in CA shouldn't be, but seriously? Texas? Missouri? Lousianna, I can see, since they have swampy areas, but those other states... yeah, stop growing things that are wildly out of the ecosystem.


Then prepare to not have those foods offseason.

/basic reason anything is grown "out of the ecosystem"
 
2013-04-16 02:45:58 AM
My heath?
 
2013-04-16 02:46:09 AM
This is about american grown rice and notably does not even include californian grown rice.

But if you are eating rice, you should be eating real rice, Himalayan basmati. You wouldn't buy "champagne" from alabama would you ?
 
2013-04-16 02:47:01 AM

StreetlightInTheGhetto: Rik01: You'd think agricultural regulators and farmers would have learned about the effects of heavy metals by now.

Some people try to take the easy way out.  Easier to poison the damn pest than to try to deal with what is aiding and abetting it being there.

Mock26: More than a few Native American tribes harvest and sell wild rice.  It is often a hell of a lot more expensive than regular store bought rice, but it is healthier and the money goes to people who actually need it.

Okay, look.  Wild rice != rice. It's awesome, but it's a grass AFAIK.  And if it's grown downsteam of farmers using crappy pesticides, the same problem arises.


Yes.  All species of rice are members of the grass family.
 
2013-04-16 02:48:01 AM

Rik01: Do we have to start hitting these people over the head with bats to make them understand?


They're rich, none of this affects them.
 
2013-04-16 02:50:05 AM
Subby, welcome to the media driven great arsenic rice scare (of last year)
 
2013-04-16 02:50:28 AM

pstudent12: This is about american grown rice and notably does not even include californian grown rice.

But if you are eating rice, you should be eating real rice, Himalayan basmati. You wouldn't buy "champagne" from alabama would you ?

That's available on vinyl, right?
 
2013-04-16 02:52:32 AM

fusillade762: staplermofo: Rik01: "Well, Prince, so Genoa and Lucca are now just family estates of the Buonapartes...

There's one thing about our current, very mobile civilization: we can transport poisons all over the globe and wind up poisoning lands that had no problem previously.

Another problem is that there's no way in hell anyone is making more than 5 paragraphs into your post.

Well *I* read the whole thing.


Same here. Very well written, succinct, and informative. Basically the polar opposite of anything in the Politics tab.
 
2013-04-16 02:55:44 AM

Rik01: use of arsenic-laden manure as fertilizer and to prohibit the feeding of arsenic-containing drugs and animal byproducts to animals.

WTF?!

It was my understanding, some time ago, that no arsenic was allowed in any animal foods or fertilizers and damn little in drugs. I also understood that arsenic was forbidden in pesticides -- for the exact reason mentioned in the article.

It's a heavy metal. It doesn't go away. It tends to accumulate in the body.

Remember all of those old, old westerns (in black and white) where the cowboys would come upon 'sour' watering holes and wells? Usually they tended to notice the dead animals scattered about. Well, those holes were poisoned by natural arsenic in the ground.

In quite a few nations, they have problems with arsenic in their wells. Africa -- naturally -- has a big problem in some areas. Plenty of water, but it's lethal.

Processes can be used to remove the arsenic from the water, but high poverty areas can't afford them. Over the years, the arsenic accumulates in people, causing, among other things, neural damage which often can cause brain damage. (Which might explain a lot in Africa.)

People here in the US who have been deliberately poisoned by the stuff can be saved, but they'll forever have some physical and mental side effects. Those heavily poisoned will have years taken off their lives.

Arsenic was a favorite chemical used in embalming since in high doses, it stops bacterial growth.

I can't even think of any reason for arsenic to be in fertilizers. If arsenic is showing up in high concentrations in manure, imagine the levels in the contributing animal. At one time, it was used in medications, ages ago, until the cumulative effects became understood.

We stopped DDT because of the cumulative effects that started wiping out wild life -- though it was about the most efficient pesticide ever made. Anyone recall those fogging trucks that used to fog high school football games to kill the mosquitoes in the summer? No ...


DDT is not banned, your eco hysteria is outdated, kinda like that beaded vest.  it WAS banned so long that something better has been developed, just a little too late for a few million malaria victims.  Thanks batshiat crazy "green" genocide fans.
 
2013-04-16 02:57:25 AM
Also, does anyone have a good recipe for rice pudding? I tried to make some as a side dish a few nights ago, basically just cooked some jasmine rice and then mixed it with some Jello chocolate pudding, and it tasted farking horrible. I've had good rice pudding before, just never made it.
 
2013-04-16 02:57:51 AM
Hmmmmm....what about my Japanese sake? I drink the stuff like water. LIke most people would drink water. Not like sake would drink water. That would be stupid. At $30 a 200ml bottle, the only thing that should be in it besides sake is is gold flakes and tiny tiny Faberge Eggs.
 
2013-04-16 02:58:16 AM

generallyso: Rik01: Do we have to start hitting these people over the head with bats to make them understand?

They're rich, none of this affects them.


"Hahaha, look honey. The poor people are being poisoned by 'health' food. Now pass me some caviar."
 
2013-04-16 02:58:58 AM
Sucks to be As rice eater.
 
2013-04-16 03:03:13 AM
Say, I heard the North Koreans could use some rice. Just sayin....
 
2013-04-16 03:07:42 AM
If you are going to avoid brown rice (I would because it sucks) then never go near tapioca or bamboo shoots. Not just because they make terrible food (they do)  but for the DANGER!

You should dig a hole, seal it off, then run a small gasoline generator in there so you can play candy crush until you fall asleep.  Entirely too many people with voices in this world.
 
2013-04-16 03:09:05 AM
And eat the green parts of the potato plant, fewer carbs.
 
2013-04-16 03:09:29 AM
bhcompy:
Then prepare to not have those foods offseason.


You know rice is dried and can be cooked year round, right? And that it requires a ton of water to grow which, newsflash, those states don't usually have?
 
2013-04-16 03:20:08 AM
This just in - Pretty much all food has been altered or tainted or screwed with by the the time it gets to you and most of it is actually done to make it better and safer and last longer.

Your body will react to things you put in your mouth.  Listen to your body.

Water is really good for you, drink a lot of that.

Read labels.  The days when you can just  look at something and say "that is one of those" are fading as we engineer our food into products.
 
2013-04-16 03:21:01 AM

miss diminutive: I prefer brown rice the way nature intended...as white rice burnt to the bottom of the pot.


That comment gave me the ol' spew and chuckle. Thanks!
 
2013-04-16 03:32:46 AM
Well, Rhonda had a house in Venice, lived on brown rice and cocaine.
 
2013-04-16 03:40:58 AM

Badgers: ecmoRandomNumbers: Whew! I love brown rice. We used to buy Lundberg's at Costco, but they stopped carrying it in Phoenix. So now it's Amazon.

[geekswithblogs.net image 400x345]

"If you could drain the ricefield right now, that would be great..."


LOLZ. I live equidistant between ABQ and PHX. There is no decent Chinese food within 4 hours, so I make my own P.F. Chang and Pei Wei rip-off recipes. My orange peel chicken, Mongolian beef, and lettuce wraps are dead-on imitations. I like the brown rice with those, just like the restaurant. I use the medium or short grain brown rice in a National brand rice maker from the 80s.
 
2013-04-16 03:41:59 AM

The Gordie Howe Hat Trick: miss diminutive: I prefer brown rice the way nature intended...as white rice burnt to the bottom of the pot.

That comment gave me the ol' spew and chuckle. Thanks!


I really wish I was joking, but somehow I can't cook rice to save my life. It's literally the easiest thing other than making toast, and I suck at it.

It's my not-so-secret shame.
 
2013-04-16 03:47:04 AM
Still healthier than running.

=Smidge=
/Too soon?
 
2013-04-16 03:51:28 AM

Smidge204: Still healthier than running.

=Smidge=
/Too soon?


I liked it.  Offensive and ultra topical.  +1 sir.
 
2013-04-16 08:48:50 PM

StreetlightInTheGhetto: Rik01: You'd think agricultural regulators and farmers would have learned about the effects of heavy metals by now.

Some people try to take the easy way out.  Easier to poison the damn pest than to try to deal with what is aiding and abetting it being there.

Mock26: More than a few Native American tribes harvest and sell wild rice.  It is often a hell of a lot more expensive than regular store bought rice, but it is healthier and the money goes to people who actually need it.

Okay, look.  Wild rice != rice. It's awesome, but it's a grass AFAIK.  And if it's grown downsteam of farmers using crappy pesticides, the same problem arises.


Research your product, duh.  Not all rice has this problem.
 
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