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(Salon)   Social networking determines whether or not parents will vaccinate their children   (salon.com) divider line 90
    More: Strange, Texas State University, vaccination schedule, Montessori school  
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4080 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Apr 2013 at 12:48 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-15 11:16:28 AM  
Is it wrong to hope for a big epidemic and resulting fatalities of preventable diseases to decrease the population of idiots?
 
2013-04-15 11:16:50 AM  
It will also help to repeatedly kick people like Mike Adams (Natural News) in the balls until they shut up.

Unfortunately the tin-hat brigade has Internet access and they're willing to use it.

Perhaps they enjoy seeing children get the measles.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-04-15 11:34:29 AM  
How many standard vaccines are new in the past 30 years? I only remember having to take half the vaccines the CDC wants these days. Polio and DPT, I think. Probably more beore I was old enough to remember them, but the 18 months to 18 years is definitely much bigger than I remember. And that's not counting any that pharmaceutical lobbyists have sold to local school boards.
 
2013-04-15 11:43:27 AM  
 
2013-04-15 12:13:23 PM  

ZAZ: How many standard vaccines are new in the past 30 years? I only remember having to take half the vaccines the CDC wants these days. Polio and DPT, I think. Probably more beore I was old enough to remember them, but the 18 months to 18 years is definitely much bigger than I remember. And that's not counting any that pharmaceutical lobbyists have sold to local school boards.


Pharmaceutical companies are immune to lawsuits for the side affects or fatalities from these vaccinations.
 
2013-04-15 12:52:10 PM  
Fortunately this is an issue a lot of moms are very passionate about. I mentally tag the anti-vaxxers as people not to associate with and won't let my kid play with theirs. Not that I'm worried he'll catch anything (because he's vaccinated), but because I don't want him picking up any bad habits (ie, idiocy).
 
2013-04-15 12:53:45 PM  

basemetal: Is it wrong to hope for a big epidemic and resulting fatalities of preventable diseases to decrease the population of idiots?


That depends.  Are you talking about Captain Tripps level of epidemic or 1918 flu level?
 
2013-04-15 12:56:27 PM  

I_Am_Weasel: It will also help to repeatedly kick people like Mike Adams (Natural News) in the balls until they shut up.

Unfortunately the tin-hat brigade has Internet access and they're willing to use it.

Perhaps they enjoy seeing children get the measles.


I don't know about measels-- but apparently these idiots like watching their kids get chicken pox-- to the point where they even host "chicken pox parties" so that their kids can infect other kids.
 
2013-04-15 12:57:53 PM  
So, parents are letting their friends and family members help decide they don't want their children vaccinated.

Since they are friends and family members, their kids probably play together frequently.

So if just one of them gets, say, polio...
 
2013-04-15 12:58:02 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: basemetal: Is it wrong to hope for a big epidemic and resulting fatalities of preventable diseases to decrease the population of idiots?

That depends.  Are you talking about Captain Tripps level of epidemic or 1918 flu level?


1918 level - just enough to thin the herd, decrease un-employment and improve the morning commute.

/probably would play havock with home prices though.
 
2013-04-15 12:58:07 PM  
i.chzbgr.com
 
2013-04-15 12:59:01 PM  
A new study found that an overwhelming majority of vaccination "naysayer" parents surveyed were influenced by friends, family and other non-medical peer recommendations when deciding whether or not to vaccinate their child.

Well, they're certainly not going to get that advice from anyone who actually knows what they're talking about.
 
2013-04-15 12:59:04 PM  
I can't understand the mentality of people who ignore what their doctors tell them and listen to what Jenny McCarthy tells them. Yes because celebrities know best right?

"Vaccines are bad mmkay?"

frepowfilms.files.wordpress.com
 
zez
2013-04-15 01:00:11 PM  
I totally believe this. I have a friend who decided to homeschool because her local school district is dangerous and otherwise not very good, so joins a few homeschooling boards. Next thing I know she's questioning vaccinating and posting WND pieces on her facebook wall.
 
2013-04-15 01:02:32 PM  
People who surround themselves with ignorant friends tend to act more like their ignorant friends?  You don't say.
 
2013-04-15 01:02:37 PM  

Rurouni: I can't understand the mentality of people who ignore what their doctors tell them and listen to what Jenny McCarthy tells them. Yes because celebrities know best right?

"Vaccines are bad mmkay?"

[frepowfilms.files.wordpress.com image 507x373]


I'm sure her kid with autism has nothing to do with all the drugs she did before she had her little shiat sandwich.
 
2013-04-15 01:06:32 PM  

Rurouni: I can't understand the mentality of people who ignore what their doctors tell them and listen to what Jenny McCarthy tells them. Yes because celebrities know best right?

"Vaccines are bad mmkay?"


Because...conspiracy.

The anti-vax people present their cases on websites like Naturalnews.com and people eat it up.  These websites tell us the truth is hidden to fatten the wallets of doctors and pharmaceutics companies and the media is complicit.  They've got the "inside scoop".  Those that follow this sort of nonsense will tell you that "they know the REAL truth" that has been hidden by us ignorant, gullible sheep.  The same websites also present arguments that Sandy Hook never occurred and 9/11 was most certainly an inside job.  Otherwise functioning human beings believe it all, because they read it from somewhere that "dares tell the truth".  And we're left to explain why  you shouldn't listen to Uncle Bob, even if Uncle Bob says "your parents are lying to you".

...but I'm not bitter.
 
2013-04-15 01:07:08 PM  
I wish I could rejoice in the fact that there is a strong Darwinian component in anti-vaxxing and that thining the herd of certifiable idiots is a good thing, unfortunately it is not the certifiably idiotic parents who get culled from the herd, but their innocent children and the too young to vaccinate children of non-idiotic parents.
 
2013-04-15 01:07:56 PM  
The study's conclusion is plausible, but I'm going to toss a quick nitpick out there anyways.

Anti-vaccers spend more time looking for validation of their non-mainstream position. Thus, they'd have more anti-vaccer links in their social network. The researchers of this study may be reversing the cause and the effect.
 
2013-04-15 01:10:44 PM  

ZAZ: How many standard vaccines are new in the past 30 years? I only remember having to take half the vaccines the CDC wants these days. Polio and DPT, I think. Probably more beore I was old enough to remember them, but the 18 months to 18 years is definitely much bigger than I remember. And that's not counting any that pharmaceutical lobbyists have sold to local school boards.


Or, alternatively, more vaccines have been developed for diseases that we didn't have vaccines for previously.  Case and point: chicken pox (vaccine introduced in 1995).  More vaccinations than when we were younger does not (necessarily) equal greater lobbying efforts by pharma.  Additionally, greater lobbying efforts by pharma does not exclude the possibility that the use of more vaccinations isn't warranted.

The way I look at it, just like I look at many advances, is that we have more safety nets now.  Look at cars.  When i was a kid, not all cars had even shoulder straps on the seatbelts in front.  Now we have:
-shoulder straps throughout
-front impact airbags
-side impact airbags
-crumple zones
-mirrors on both passenger and driver side (wasn't always that way!)

I don't have the data in front of me, but we very well may have more traffic fatalities now.  Is this because of the additional safety features, or in spite of them?  There are other explanations why there might be more fatalities (larger population, greater population density, more distracted driving)
 
2013-04-15 01:11:52 PM  
I feel the need to link this again.

Warning: Weapons grade derp
 
2013-04-15 01:16:47 PM  
If you choose to get your facts from Bob the delivery-van driver down the street rather than from people who actually know what they're talking about, then it doesn't surprise me when you end up making the wrong decisions (that goes for real-world social networks as well as virtual ones).
 
2013-04-15 01:16:55 PM  

ZAZ: How many standard vaccines are new in the past 30 years? I only remember having to take half the vaccines the CDC wants these days. Polio and DPT, I think. Probably more beore I was old enough to remember them, but the 18 months to 18 years is definitely much bigger than I remember. And that's not counting any that pharmaceutical lobbyists have sold to local school boards.


Hepatitis B for one. Wife had some concerns about vaccinating against something with near zero chance of infection of our newborn and wanted to talk it over with the Doc before delivery. She did what everyone should - addressed them with her OBGYN. We as a society have gone from four vaccines before the age of two in the 1950s (diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, polio, and smallpox) to fourteen or sixteen depending on which country you live in and whether or not you decide to include influenza as of 2009.

Now I'm not one of those Jenny McCarthy "vaccines cause autism that I later cured" dipshiats. But I also think a little healthy (ahem) skepticism might be necessary when it comes to asking "Is too much of a good thing a bad thing?" Especially considering some of the side-effects of these vaccines and the less-than-fleshed-out data about what happens when they are used in conjunction with one another.

Also especially when it comes to making a decision based on information provided by big pharmaceutical manufacturers...
 
2013-04-15 01:18:07 PM  
good vaccination = eugenics in the nwo as they & our UN brand manchurian president's goal is agenda 21~
 
2013-04-15 01:18:57 PM  
All natural, no dyes. That's a good business - all-natural children's toys. Those toy companies, they don't arbitrarily mark up their frogs. They don't lie about how much they spend on research and development. And the worst that a toy company can be accused of is making a really boring frog. Gribbit, gribbit, gribbit. You know another really good business? Teeny tiny baby coffins. You can get them in frog green, fire engine red. Really. The antibodies in yummy mummy only protect the kid for six months, which is why these companies think they can gouge you. They think that you'll spend whatever they ask to keep your kid alive. Want to change things? Prove them wrong. A few hundred parents like you decide they'd rather let their kid die then cough up 40 bucks for a vaccination, believe me, prices will drop really fast.
 
2013-04-15 01:21:19 PM  

I_Am_Weasel: It will also help to repeatedly kick people like Mike Adams (Natural News) in the balls until they shut up.

Unfortunately the tin-hat brigade has Internet access and they're willing to use it.

Perhaps they enjoy seeing children get the measles.


See UK measles outbreak among vaccinated children..Wakefield was another winner.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000142412788732382030457841047373930 8 256.html
 
2013-04-15 01:23:04 PM  

xxmedium: ZAZ: How many standard vaccines are new in the past 30 years? I only remember having to take half the vaccines the CDC wants these days. Polio and DPT, I think. Probably more beore I was old enough to remember them, but the 18 months to 18 years is definitely much bigger than I remember. And that's not counting any that pharmaceutical lobbyists have sold to local school boards.

Hepatitis B for one. Wife had some concerns about vaccinating against something with near zero chance of infection of our newborn and wanted to talk it over with the Doc before delivery. She did what everyone should - addressed them with her OBGYN. We as a society have gone from four vaccines before the age of two in the 1950s (diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, polio, and smallpox) to fourteen or sixteen depending on which country you live in and whether or not you decide to include influenza as of 2009.

Now I'm not one of those Jenny McCarthy "vaccines cause autism that I later cured" dipshiats. But I also think a little healthy (ahem) skepticism might be necessary when it comes to asking "Is too much of a good thing a bad thing?" Especially considering some of the side-effects of these vaccines and the less-than-fleshed-out data about what happens when they are used in conjunction with one another.

Also especially when it comes to making a decision based on information provided by big pharmaceutical manufacturers...



Did your skepticism lead you to review more research, or did your skepticism lead you to ignore the advice of your OBGYN without doing any more research?

I would personally call the first type "healthy" skepticism. I have a different name for the latter kind.

/There is a lot of research out there that is not at all funded by pharma companies.
 
2013-04-15 01:24:48 PM  

hiker9999: I_Am_Weasel: It will also help to repeatedly kick people like Mike Adams (Natural News) in the balls until they shut up.

Unfortunately the tin-hat brigade has Internet access and they're willing to use it.

Perhaps they enjoy seeing children get the measles.

I don't know about measels-- but apparently these idiots like watching their kids get chicken pox-- to the point where they even host "chicken pox parties" so that their kids can infect other kids.


That's how it was done in the 60's. Cycles repeat themselves.
Being vaccinated against this does not guarantee that you won't get it.

DrKillPatient: I_Am_Weasel: It will also help to repeatedly kick people like Mike Adams (Natural News) in the balls until they shut up.

Unfortunately the tin-hat brigade has Internet access and they're willing to use it.

Perhaps they enjoy seeing children get the measles.

See UK measles outbreak among vaccinated children..Wakefield was another winner.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000142412788732382030457841047373930 8 256.html


DrKillPatient: I_Am_Weasel: It will also help to repeatedly kick people like Mike Adams (Natural News) in the balls until they shut up.

Unfortunately the tin-hat brigade has Internet access and they're willing to use it.

Perhaps they enjoy seeing children get the measles.

See UK measles outbreak among vaccinated children..Wakefield was another winner.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000142412788732382030457841047373930 8 256.html


My daughter gor chicken pox after receiving the vaccines.
 
2013-04-15 01:25:16 PM  

I_Am_Weasel: It will also help to repeatedly kick people like Mike Adams (Natural News) in the balls until they shut up.

Unfortunately the tin-hat brigade has Internet access and they're willing to use it.

Perhaps they enjoy seeing children get the measles.


See UK measles outbreak among unvaccinated children..Wakefield was another winner.

http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronomy/2013/04/14/vaccine_and_auti sm _uk_measles_outbreaks_and_andrew_wakefield.html
 
2013-04-15 01:25:20 PM  
The former.

Our kid was not given Hep B before hospital discharge but has been given it since.
 
2013-04-15 01:26:29 PM  

basemetal: Is it wrong to hope for a big epidemic and resulting fatalities of preventable diseases to decrease the population of idiots?


Is it wrong for me to want to stop these idiots from providing the chance for these diseases to incubate and mutate into forms that can't be vaccinated against?
 
2013-04-15 01:35:49 PM  
hiker9999:

Perhaps they enjoy seeing children get the measles.

I don't know about measels-- but apparently these idiots like watching their kids get chicken pox-- to the point where they even host "chicken pox parties" so that their kids can infect other kids.


Chicken Pox parties have been around forever as a DIY vaccine program. In kids it's normally a fairly minor illness where they feel poorly for a couple of days and then have good immunity the rest of their lives, in adults it is a much more serious condition.
 
2013-04-15 01:37:20 PM  
Paging Dr McCarthy
Paging Dr McCarthy

.........your Facebook account needs attention.

img.timeinc.net


So does this qualify as some sort of new Homeopathic Social Media American Exceptionalism? A medical diagnosis of 140 characters or less as a path to freedom from the tyranny of sound medical advice?

Maybe it is something that can only be understood while piloting a helicopter and hovering over your kids.
 
2013-04-15 01:37:32 PM  
I don't know. I haven't inspected the actual study for design flaws, but that aside, you can't prove the null. I do know this - 30 years ago the rate of diagnosed autism was about 1 in 10,000. Now it is about 1 in 50. What is causing this? Improved diagnosis techniques seem implausible given the rate has increased steadily in the 2000s when autism was known and diagnosis procedures standardized I am not ruling out the possibility the researchers farked up. It's been known to happen
 
2013-04-15 01:37:50 PM  
Paging J. Frank Parnell and clemkadidlefark to thread 770318. We MUST know why Vaccines are bad and derp=potato, you two.

AbbeySomeone:
That's how it was done in the 60's. Cycles repeat themselves.
Being vaccinated against this does not guarantee that you won't get it.


Pox Parties are a REALLY Goddamn bad idea. If your kid doesn't die from that, he'll only be able to count to potato afterwords.

And because you don't trust Science, you've now set your child up for a horribly painful condition later in life. You loving mother you.
 
2013-04-15 01:38:45 PM  

RyansPrivates: ZAZ: How many standard vaccines are new in the past 30 years? I only remember having to take half the vaccines the CDC wants these days. Polio and DPT, I think. Probably more beore I was old enough to remember them, but the 18 months to 18 years is definitely much bigger than I remember. And that's not counting any that pharmaceutical lobbyists have sold to local school boards.

Or, alternatively, more vaccines have been developed for diseases that we didn't have vaccines for previously.  Case and point: chicken pox (vaccine introduced in 1995).  More vaccinations than when we were younger does not (necessarily) equal greater lobbying efforts by pharma.  Additionally, greater lobbying efforts by pharma does not exclude the possibility that the use of more vaccinations isn't warranted.

The way I look at it, just like I look at many advances, is that we have more safety nets now.  Look at cars.  When i was a kid, not all cars had even shoulder straps on the seatbelts in front.  Now we have:
-shoulder straps throughout
-front impact airbags
-side impact airbags
-crumple zones
-mirrors on both passenger and driver side (wasn't always that way!)

I don't have the data in front of me, but we very well may have more traffic fatalities now.  Is this because of the additional safety features, or in spite of them?  There are other explanations why there might be more fatalities (larger population, greater population density, more distracted driving)


Car fatality rates in the US peaked* at 26 per 100k in the late 60s and has decreased fairly consistently until now, when it is around 10 per 100k (2012 was a bit higher than 2011, but inside the normal statistical variation). Because the rate has decline fairly substantially, it means that even the absolute number of deaths (i.e. not factoring in population growth) in recent years is lower than it has been since the 50s - when the population was about half what it is now, but the rate was double.

*the most recent peak anyway, there was also a slightly higher peak in the 30s

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_motor_vehicle_deaths_in_U.S._by _y ear
 
2013-04-15 01:41:26 PM  

RyansPrivates: The way I look at it, just like I look at many advances, is that we have more safety nets now.  Look at cars.  When i was a kid, not all cars had even shoulder straps on the seatbelts in front.  Now we have:
-shoulder straps throughout
-front impact airbags
-side impact airbags
-crumple zones


The development of a standardized EMS system helped a lot too. Before 1965, many deaths from motor vehicle trauma prior to reaching the hospital were from largely preventable causes, such as airway obstruction. There was no guarantee that trained people would attend to an injured person, either - in some areas a funeral home hearse would throw you on a cot, and dash to the closest small hospital, while in others you might get a large van with a resident and a nurse on board.
 
2013-04-15 01:46:49 PM  

Pumpernickel bread: I don't know. I haven't inspected the actual study for design flaws, but that aside, you can't prove the null. I do know this - 30 years ago the rate of diagnosed autism was about 1 in 10,000. Now it is about 1 in 50. What is causing this? Improved diagnosis techniques seem implausible given the rate has increased steadily in the 2000s when autism was known and diagnosis procedures standardized I am not ruling out the possibility the researchers farked up. It's been known to happen


The MMR vaccine has been in use for 40 years.

But anyway - 30 years ago people were oddballs, socially awkward, eccentric, standoffish, obsessive in particular areas, had poor communication skills, shy, rude, kept to themselves and so on. Unless they could barely function they weren't diagnosed with anything and the families of those that were generally weren't keen on bringing it up.

Now we have adults who have managed to get by their entire lives in society while being a bit odd who get diagnosed with autism.
 
2013-04-15 01:46:55 PM  

xria: Car fatality rates in the US peaked* at 26 per 100k in the late 60s and has decreased fairly consistently until now, when it is around 10 per 100k (2012 was a bit higher than 2011, but inside the normal statistical variation). Because the rate has decline fairly substantially, it means that even the absolute number of deaths (i.e. not factoring in population growth) in recent years is lower than it has been since the 50s - when the population was about half what it is now, but the rate was double.

*the most recent peak anyway, there was also a slightly higher peak in the 30s

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_motor_vehicle_deaths_in_U.S._by _y ear


Thanks...was on a riff and didn't feel like jumping out to check.

hardinparamedic: The development of a standardized EMS system helped a lot too. Before 1965, many deaths from motor vehicle trauma prior to reaching the hospital were from largely preventable causes, such as airway obstruction. There was no guarantee that trained people would attend to an injured person, either - in some areas a funeral home hearse would throw you on a cot, and dash to the closest small hospital, while in others you might get a large van with a resident and a nurse on board.


Good point as well!

All of which shows that additional safeties, though initially onerous, actually reap benefits...
 
2013-04-15 01:47:29 PM  
This is old hat. Social scientists and epidemiologists have long known the best predictor of whether or not someone will use a condom is whether or not that person's friends use condoms. The best predictor of whether a mother will breastfeed is whether or not her friends breastfeed. Humans do what's socially acceptable in their immediate social circle. Go figure.
 
2013-04-15 01:57:07 PM  

Pumpernickel bread: I don't know. I haven't inspected the actual study for design flaws, but that aside, you can't prove the null. I do know this - 30 years ago the rate of diagnosed autism was about 1 in 10,000. Now it is about 1 in 50. What is causing this? Improved diagnosis techniques seem implausible given the rate has increased steadily in the 2000s when autism was known and diagnosis procedures standardized I am not ruling out the possibility the researchers farked up. It's been known to happen


Another possibility, having little or nothing to do with the standardization of the procedures:  people are asking for the diagnosis more because awareness is higher.  Look at it this way, a somewhat oddball kid through the decades as teacher use their (undue) influence

A weird kid named Johnny:
60's - 70's: teachers say "Johnny is a weird kid", ostracise him
80's: teachers: "Johnny is a weird kid. Send him to a counselor!"
90's: teachers say: "weird Johnny has ADD, parents need to get him on ADD medicine"
2000's: teachers say:  "Johnny is weird, have you had him check for Aspergers/Autism?"
 
2013-04-15 02:02:06 PM  

The Evil That Lies In The Hearts Of Men: Pumpernickel bread: I don't know. I haven't inspected the actual study for design flaws, but that aside, you can't prove the null. I do know this - 30 years ago the rate of diagnosed autism was about 1 in 10,000. Now it is about 1 in 50. What is causing this? Improved diagnosis techniques seem implausible given the rate has increased steadily in the 2000s when autism was known and diagnosis procedures standardized I am not ruling out the possibility the researchers farked up. It's been known to happen

The MMR vaccine has been in use for 40 years.

But anyway - 30 years ago people were oddballs, socially awkward, eccentric, standoffish, obsessive in particular areas, had poor communication skills, shy, rude, kept to themselves and so on. Unless they could barely function they weren't diagnosed with anything and the families of those that were generally weren't keen on bringing it up.

Now we have adults who have managed to get by their entire lives in society while being a bit odd who get diagnosed with autism.


^This.
 
2013-04-15 02:02:40 PM  
Time for this again:

http://thanatos.net/galleries/categories.php?cat_id=1

The site is a collection of postmortem photography from the 19thC. There's nothing tasteless or squeamish or gory about them. It's interesting to see the way the photographic styles change, the way the technology changes, the ways the fashions change.

What doesn't change is that the vast majority of pictures of are little kids. Little kids who died of things like measles, various fevers, pox, and so on. All the things we can prevent with a vaccine.  And antivaxxers want this to become the norm again.
 
2013-04-15 02:02:48 PM  

cefm: If you choose to get your facts from Bob the delivery-van driver down the street rather than from people who actually know what they're talking about, then it doesn't surprise me when you end up making the wrong decisions (that goes for real-world social networks as well as virtual ones).


More Americans Getting Their News From Bev
 
2013-04-15 02:11:13 PM  

basemetal: Is it wrong to hope for a big epidemic and resulting fatalities of preventable diseases to decrease the population of idiots?


Sadly it will be the kids not the idiot parents that will die.
 
2013-04-15 02:13:03 PM  

basemetal: Is it wrong to hope for a big epidemic and resulting fatalities of preventable diseases to decrease the population of idiots?


Unfortunately it seems like the only "idiots" who suffer the most are the kids, who don't have a choice.
 
2013-04-15 02:16:42 PM  

fredsnake: good vaccination = eugenics in the nwo as they & our UN brand manchurian president's goal is agenda 21~


Wait, did that book call out vaccines? I mean vilifying solar panels is bad enough, but that would take it to a whole new level.
 
2013-04-15 02:16:57 PM  

capt.hollister: I wish I could rejoice in the fact that there is a strong Darwinian component in anti-vaxxing and that thining the herd of certifiable idiots is a good thing, unfortunately it is not the certifiably idiotic parents who get culled from the herd, but their innocent children and the too young to vaccinate children of non-idiotic parents.


Kids get their smart/dumb genes from parents, right?  So the Darwinian process works, just takes one more generation.
 
2013-04-15 02:19:36 PM  

gadian: Fortunately this is an issue a lot of moms are very passionate about. I mentally tag the anti-vaxxers as people not to associate with and won't let my kid play with theirs. Not that I'm worried he'll catch anything (because he's vaccinated), but because I don't want him picking up any bad habits (ie, idiocy).


I am glad when stupid people get passionate about their beliefs because its easier to keep track of what sort of idiot Kool-Aid they're drinking. I like when people mention their cure-all chiropractor. Oh, yeah? He knows how to cure allergies? TELL ME MORE.

Your kid ran a fever for 13.5 minutes and you insisted they needed antibiotics?! YAY, you're just about the bestest Doctor Mommy, do share your secrets.

The people who secretly hold crazy town beliefs and spring them on their unsuspecting friends after years of peaceful coexistence, those are the dangerous ones.
 
2013-04-15 02:24:01 PM  

RyansPrivates: Pumpernickel bread: I don't know. I haven't inspected the actual study for design flaws, but that aside, you can't prove the null. I do know this - 30 years ago the rate of diagnosed autism was about 1 in 10,000. Now it is about 1 in 50. What is causing this? Improved diagnosis techniques seem implausible given the rate has increased steadily in the 2000s when autism was known and diagnosis procedures standardized I am not ruling out the possibility the researchers farked up. It's been known to happen

Another possibility, having little or nothing to do with the standardization of the procedures:  people are asking for the diagnosis more because awareness is higher.  Look at it this way, a somewhat oddball kid through the decades as teacher use their (undue) influence

A weird kid named Johnny:
60's - 70's: teachers say "Johnny is a weird kid", ostracise him
80's: teachers: "Johnny is a weird kid. Send him to a counselor!"
90's: teachers say: "weird Johnny has ADD, parents need to get him on ADD medicine"
2000's: teachers say:  "Johnny is weird, have you had him check for Aspergers/Autism?"


Absolutely. Instead of saying "Johnny is a weird kid" we now say that and assign a cause, be it legitimate or the flavor of the decade. Not sure if this is good or bad. Sometimes people are just weird, sometimes there is an underlying issue, sometimes not.
See both sides of immunization debate. I realize the benefits. I'm skeptical of the additional chemicals and the producers of said immunizations telling me "nothing to see here!"

/Immunized children, played the odds
//Has stepkids with severe ADHD
///Kids be trippin'
 
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