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(Yahoo)   If you found a small amount of cash in a stray wallet on a park bench in New York City, would you take it? The NYPD hopes you do   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 185
    More: Asinine, New York Police Department, chess tactics, New York Civil Liberties Union, possession of stolen property, habitual offender, old single  
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19851 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Apr 2013 at 3:55 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-14 12:23:02 PM  
WTF is up with the NYPD? They clearly have WAY too many resources and a truly bad attitude toward their citizens.
 
2013-04-14 12:35:10 PM  

bronyaur1: WTF is up with the NYPD? They clearly have WAY too many resources and a truly bad attitude toward their citizens.


My brother in law is an extremely decorated NYPD officer.  He's a farking dumbshiat.  That tells me all I need to know.
 
2013-04-14 12:39:15 PM  
It's the kind of stuff cops do when they are bored and need to up the district's quality of life count.
 
2013-04-14 12:42:04 PM  
So I should stop picking up those nickels I find on the sidewalk?
 
2013-04-14 12:50:43 PM  
What if I take the cash and wallet to an NYPD station and report it as lost?

/DNRTFA
 
2013-04-14 12:56:40 PM  

Aar1012: What if I take the cash and wallet to an NYPD station and report it as lost?

/DNRTFA


See, that's the thing: the cops act as if the law says you must immediately run to the nearest officer to report the find; you don't. I'm pretty sure NY courts in the past have stated so, and that cops who acted otherwise were ignorant of the law, overzealous, or both.
 
2013-04-14 12:56:49 PM  
bronyaur1: WTF is up with the NYPD? They clearly have WAY too many resources and a truly bad attitude toward their citizens.

Look up the Lower Manhattan Security Initiative.
 
2013-04-14 12:58:03 PM  
Sounds like the NYPD are a real bunch of master baiters.
 
2013-04-14 01:03:22 PM  
Honestly, I would pay it forward.  For Mr. Foster.   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=txiW0Q4_Qsw
 
2013-04-14 01:04:42 PM  
Twenty-five years ago, I saw an unattended purse under a park bench downtown.  I watched it for few minutes, and nobody was anywhere around it.  It was an area known for lots of tourists.  I was inclined to just leave it there, but I kept thinking how somebody's vacation might be ruined.  Finally, against my better judgment, I picked it up and walked to the downtown police station, where I turned it in.  It turned out that it belonged to a teenaged tourist, and contained nearly four hundred dollars of her graduation gift money.

I almost didn't get involved.  I didn't want somebody to claim that the 6'5" pony-tailed man had just stolen the purse that he was carrying as he was walking down the city street. I did not want the owner to discover or allege any missing contents in the purse.  What if the purse contained drugs, or a weapon?  Should I open it before turning it in, just to be sure?

Thanks, NYPD, for further discouraging Good Samaritans.
 
2013-04-14 01:13:25 PM  

TexasPeace: Twenty-five years ago, I saw an unattended purse under a park bench downtown.  I watched it for few minutes, and nobody was anywhere around it.  It was an area known for lots of tourists.  I was inclined to just leave it there, but I kept thinking how somebody's vacation might be ruined.  Finally, against my better judgment, I picked it up and walked to the downtown police station, where I turned it in.  It turned out that it belonged to a teenaged tourist, and contained nearly four hundred dollars of her graduation gift money.

I almost didn't get involved.  I didn't want somebody to claim that the 6'5" pony-tailed man had just stolen the purse that he was carrying as he was walking down the city street. I did not want the owner to discover or allege any missing contents in the purse.  What if the purse contained drugs, or a weapon?  Should I open it before turning it in, just to be sure?

Thanks, NYPD, for further discouraging Good Samaritans.


These days, I'd be more worried that cops in such a situation would call in the bomb squad to detonate the `suspicious abandoned package'
 
2013-04-14 01:21:26 PM  
Not feeling any sympathy for people who take shiat that isn't theirs and then walk past uniformed officers without reporting it.
 
2013-04-14 01:28:12 PM  

nekom: TexasPeace: Twenty-five years ago, I saw an unattended purse under a park bench downtown.  I watched it for few minutes, and nobody was anywhere around it.  It was an area known for lots of tourists.  I was inclined to just leave it there, but I kept thinking how somebody's vacation might be ruined.  Finally, against my better judgment, I picked it up and walked to the downtown police station, where I turned it in.  It turned out that it belonged to a teenaged tourist, and contained nearly four hundred dollars of her graduation gift money.

I almost didn't get involved.  I didn't want somebody to claim that the 6'5" pony-tailed man had just stolen the purse that he was carrying as he was walking down the city street. I did not want the owner to discover or allege any missing contents in the purse.  What if the purse contained drugs, or a weapon?  Should I open it before turning it in, just to be sure?

Thanks, NYPD, for further discouraging Good Samaritans.

These days, I'd be more worried that cops in such a situation would call in the bomb squad to detonate the `suspicious abandoned package'


This actually happened at a convention I was at, once. Cleared the hotel for an hour. Police/Homeland security apparently thought loose bags were 'suspcious'. It's a bloody convention; absolutly everyone has a swag bag, nincompoops.
 
2013-04-14 01:34:53 PM  
If NYPD has enough time to conduct these pants-on-head retarded sting/entrapment operations I'm guessing there's too many of them with nothing useful to do and some need to be let go.
 
2013-04-14 01:37:21 PM  

TexasPeace: Twenty-five years ago, I saw an unattended purse under a park bench downtown.  I watched it for few minutes, and nobody was anywhere around it.  It was an area known for lots of tourists.  I was inclined to just leave it there, but I kept thinking how somebody's vacation might be ruined.  Finally, against my better judgment, I picked it up and walked to the downtown police station, where I turned it in.  It turned out that it belonged to a teenaged tourist, and contained nearly four hundred dollars of her graduation gift money.

I almost didn't get involved.  I didn't want somebody to claim that the 6'5" pony-tailed man had just stolen the purse that he was carrying as he was walking down the city street. I did not want the owner to discover or allege any missing contents in the purse.  What if the purse contained drugs, or a weapon?  Should I open it before turning it in, just to be sure?

Thanks, NYPD, for further discouraging Good Samaritans.


Get your phone out and video record yourself picking the thing up off the ground and keep it running your whole trip to the police station.
 
2013-04-14 01:50:44 PM  
It's good to know that there's no crime in NYC so cops have the time to engage in entrapment.
 
2013-04-14 02:18:50 PM  
How the fark is this not entrapment?  It's one thing to leave a car or bike in a high crime area and see if someone tries to openly steal it.  But to put on these performances designed to attract the curiosity of bystanders and then nab them for checking things out?  How can that be legal?
 
2013-04-14 02:25:53 PM  

GAT_00: bronyaur1: WTF is up with the NYPD? They clearly have WAY too many resources and a truly bad attitude toward their citizens.

Look up the Lower Manhattan Security Initiative.


I'm afraid to.
 
2013-04-14 02:36:20 PM  
I've picked up wallets and taken them home to try to find the owner myself.  There's always DL or student IDs, membership cards, etc.
There was only one time that there wasn't enough info to figure out who the owner was and how to get a hold of them.  That's when I turn the item in.

Do police actually bother trying to get found wallets to their owners?  The huge inventory at Stolen Item auctions always gave the impression that once they caught the thief, that was the end of it.  Original owners were just SOL.
 
2013-04-14 02:36:56 PM  
guilty until proven innocent, that's our way now.   put some drugs into those sting operations, maybe an unloaded weapon too...and then you can throw people into jail for weapons, drugs AND theft.  But its ok, because we're stopping 'terrorism' or something.  how does that saying go?  'if you've done nothing wrong you have nothing to fear'?

sleep well citizen.
 
2013-04-14 02:58:41 PM  
Glad to know that NYC is so free of crime that the cops have to entrap people to make arrests nowadays.
 
2013-04-14 03:03:50 PM  

Mentat: How the fark is this not entrapment?  It's one thing to leave a car or bike in a high crime area and see if someone tries to openly steal it.  But to put on these performances designed to attract the curiosity of bystanders and then nab them for checking things out?  How can that be legal?


Because the cops didn't give instructions to pick up the item; the person did it on their own.

If a[n undercover] cop said, "Go grab that wallet" or "please take the bag from my car and hide it" then it would be entrapment.

Leaving bait =/= entrapment.
 
2013-04-14 03:07:56 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: Sounds like the NYPD are a real bunch of master baiters.


I do not feel bad laughing at your pun. Such a jackass. A funny jackass, though.
 
2013-04-14 03:14:58 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: Leaving bait =/= entrapment.


Are you nuts? Of course it is. A bait car to catch car thieves in an area particularly hit hard by that type of crime is not entrapment but leaving a wallet unattended and then charging the first person who picks it up is blatant entrapment. There's no knowing if the person is picking it up to try and return it to the rightful owners or just taking it cos it's there. It's bullshiat and you are a fool for not seeing that.
 
2013-04-14 03:26:05 PM  
"You'd think that would run afoul of entrapment laws."

He said, naively.
 
2013-04-14 03:27:28 PM  
Isn't there a precedent here in the case of Finders vs Keepers?
 
2013-04-14 03:31:30 PM  
What happens when at the end of the day when the cops comes and picks up the wallet? Can you do a citizens arrest for theft? What goes around comes around.
 
2013-04-14 04:00:32 PM  
I can see a park bench or sidewalk being a pretty stupid thing to do. The lady in the article took it out of a car that wasnt hers, then there is this gem.


Myers, a 40-year-old single mother with no criminal record, has since sued the city, claiming she and her daughter were traumatized by a wrongful arrest in 2010.

You know how embarrassing and humiliating this was?" Myers said. "I'd never been stopped by the police for anything in my life."


Maybe you should steal shiat from peoples cars retard.
 
2013-04-14 04:02:05 PM  
Mentat: How the fark is this not entrapment?

For it to be entrapment, you have to be coerced into doing something you were not naturally inclined to do.

IE, there would basically have to be an undercover cop telling you to "take the purse", then you would say "no", and then the cop would say "come on dude, nobody is looking, take the purse and let's get some beers", and you finally cave in.
 
2013-04-14 04:04:39 PM  

Popcorn Johnny: Not feeling any sympathy for people who take shiat that isn't theirs and then walk past uniformed officers without reporting it.


I agree
 
2013-04-14 04:05:08 PM  

lordargent: Mentat: How the fark is this not entrapment?

For it to be entrapment, you have to be coerced into doing something you were not naturally inclined to do.

IE, there would basically have to be an undercover cop telling you to "take the purse", then you would say "no", and then the cop would say "come on dude, nobody is looking, take the purse and let's get some beers", and you finally cave in.


an argument could be made, not that I'm saying it would be successful in court (but it should be, imho), that if the police didn't put the wallet there, there would be no reason for you to commit a crime.
 
2013-04-14 04:06:23 PM  
I dunno, the little biatch tried to steal shiat out of an open car.
 
2013-04-14 04:06:58 PM  
Picking up a pack of unattended cigs is theft? Not only is that the most stupid thing I've heard, but I had already assumed Bloomberg had outlawed tobacco in NYC anyways.

By the way, NYPD, ten years ago I lost a bag of chips in the subway. I demand you find the perp.
 
2013-04-14 04:07:45 PM  
Don't blame the cops on the beat..... These are folks who are just making a living trying to keep order in a f*cked up society. Blame their superiors who assign them to these crappy stakeouts to bust others doing what simply comes naturally to a lot of people in a poor financial condition.

Bottom line? If it is yours, if it has value? Don't leave it unattended somewhere
 
2013-04-14 04:09:11 PM  
greatly damage the confidence and trust of the public in the fairness and effectiveness of the criminal justice system

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-04-14 04:12:02 PM  

Popcorn Johnny: Not feeling any sympathy for people who take shiat that isn't theirs and then walk past uniformed officers without reporting it.


Read the article the lady that was charged did not take anything she just looked in to the vehicle after her daughter asked her motther to come look at this. Neither daughter nor mother touched or took anything but yet charged the mother!
 
2013-04-14 04:13:19 PM  

I alone am best: I can see a park bench or sidewalk being a pretty stupid thing to do. The lady in the article took it out of a car that wasnt hers, then there is this gem.


Myers, a 40-year-old single mother with no criminal record, has since sued the city, claiming she and her daughter were traumatized by a wrongful arrest in 2010.

You know how embarrassing and humiliating this was?" Myers said. "I'd never been stopped by the police for anything in my life."

Maybe you should steal shiat from peoples cars retard.


Did you read the article? Neither her or her daughter touched anything in the car.
 
2013-04-14 04:13:23 PM  

Molavian: I dunno, the little biatch tried to steal shiat out of an open car.


The officers took them into custody, even though they never touched anything inside the car, the suit says...

But in the cops' defense, they were black and they were looking, so that's gotta break some law.
 
2013-04-14 04:13:47 PM  

I alone am best: Maybe you should steal shiat from peoples cars retard.



Try reading TFA:

"Myers' daughter, seeing that the driver left the car door open, went over and peered inside to see personal items that included what looked like a bundle of cash - in reality, a dollar bill wrapped around pieces of newspaper. The girl had called her mother over when another set of police officers suddenly pulled up in a van and forced them to the ground, according to Myers' account.
"Get on the floor? For what?" Myers recalled telling the officers.
The officers took them into custody, even though they never touched anything inside the car, the suit says. While entering a stationhouse in handcuffs, Myers spotted the driver of the car standing outside, smoking a cigarette. It dawned on her that he was an undercover with a starring role in the sting - a suspicion supported by the court ruling.
"I thought I was in 'The Twilight Zone,'" she said.
The girl ultimately wasn't charged. But her mother spent more than two years fighting charges of petty larceny and possession of stolen property.
"

Stealing usually implies physically taking the item in question, not just glancing in its general direction.
 
2013-04-14 04:14:10 PM  
SilentStrider: an argument could be made, not that I'm saying it would be successful in court

It wouldn't.

// unless they put a sign on the purse saying "free purse".
 
2013-04-14 04:14:42 PM  
Cue people saying this is entrapment using a completely fictional definition they picked up from absolutely nowhere in 5.. 4... whoops, too late.
 
2013-04-14 04:15:29 PM  
In NYC? No. I would assume someone took a dump in it.

Anywhere else? No. But legal tender found in the street all by itself is fair game. fark anyone who says it isn't.
 
2013-04-14 04:16:34 PM  
Petty larceny for looking without touching.  Theft of photons.
 
2013-04-14 04:18:20 PM  
Yeah...summer of 2001, I'm wandering somewhere up Midtown East after getting my mail one Monday morning when, I think it was a subway stop near Lexington, I saw a lady face down at the top of the stairs, apparently passed out. She was well-dressed with a conspicuous purse filled with instant lottery tickets sticking out of it by her side. People just walked right by her. Oh, but not Mr. Remarkable.

Like a foolish fool, I approached a police officer and pointed out her situation. I'll never forget the cop either, because he was only like five foot-six and his nameplate read "Cocks". Officer Cocks seemed real annoyed with me,  and suddenly a deluge of medical and police personnel appeared out of literally farking nowhere and swarmed around me and the scene. They propped the lady up and field tested her in front of me. She said she was fine, and they sent her on her way. A tall, stern looking medical type doctor man in a white body suit got in my face and loudly inquired, "Are you satisfied?"  I mumbled, "sure", not really fully grasping it yet.

Later in the day, I sat on a bench down across the street a ways, for no good reason. I could plainly see the same lady laying again on the ground at the top of the subway stop..
 
2013-04-14 04:20:02 PM  
Shouldn't those cops be busy busting people for oversized sodas?
Also, not exactly a shock that big city cops get overzealous and try set the stage for a crime to happen.
 
2013-04-14 04:21:36 PM  

quatchi: There's no knowing if the person is picking it up to try and return it to the rightful owners or just taking it cos it's there.


No, that might be false arrest; it's still not entrapment which is defined as what I said above.

According to Wikipedia, that's "conduct by a law enforcement agent inducing a person to commit an offense that the person would otherwise have been unlikely to commit".

As

lordargent puts it, "For it to be entrapment, you have to be coerced into doing something you were not naturally inclined to do. IE, there would basically have to be an undercover cop telling you to "take the purse"....

Providing someone with an opportunity to commit a crime is no entrapment; coercing them to commit a crime is.

SilentStrider: an argument could be made, not that I'm saying it would be successful in court (but it should be, imho), that if the police didn't put the wallet there, there would be no reason for you to commit a crime.


As you cite, that argument would fail. "I wouldn't have stolen Mr Miller's car if he hadn't left it on the road." "Hey, if he didn't want his home burned down, he shouldn't have built it outta wood." "I'm from New York; everybody there knows you keep your wallet in your front pocket unless you are just askin' ta have your pocket picked."
 
2013-04-14 04:22:37 PM  

MBrady: skinink: Picking up a pack of unattended cigs is theft? Not only is that the most stupid thing I've heard, but I had already assumed Bloomberg had outlawed tobacco in NYC anyways.

By the way, NYPD, ten years ago I lost a bag of chips in the subway. I demand you find the perp.

if the cops left a 32oz drink on a bench in Central Park and someone picked it up and took a sip from it, will Bloomy come and make the arrest?


only if you don't spit it out after tasting it to determine if it is diet
 
2013-04-14 04:22:49 PM  
Cop: Excuse me, sir, I dropped my wallet on the ground just there at your feet. I can't bend over to get it due to a slipped back. Could you please grab it and hand it to me.

Person: Okay [bends over and grabs wallet]

Cop: You have the right to remain silent....
 
2013-04-14 04:23:54 PM  

Hector Remarkable: Yeah...summer of 2001, I'm wandering somewhere up Midtown East after getting my mail one Monday morning when, I think it was a subway stop near Lexington, I saw a lady face down at the top of the stairs, apparently passed out. She was well-dressed with a conspicuous purse filled with instant lottery tickets sticking out of it by her side. People just walked right by her. Oh, but not Mr. Remarkable.

Like a foolish fool, I approached a police officer and pointed out her situation. I'll never forget the cop either, because he was only like five foot-six and his nameplate read "Cocks". Officer Cocks seemed real annoyed with me,  and suddenly a deluge of medical and police personnel appeared out of literally farking nowhere and swarmed around me and the scene. They propped the lady up and field tested her in front of me. She said she was fine, and they sent her on her way. A tall, stern looking medical type doctor man in a white body suit got in my face and loudly inquired, "Are you satisfied?"  I mumbled, "sure", not really fully grasping it yet.

Later in the day, I sat on a bench down across the street a ways, for no good reason. I could plainly see the same lady laying again on the ground at the top of the subway stop..


Those early days of "What Would You Do?" had a really pissy crew.
 
2013-04-14 04:24:04 PM  
RedPhoenix122: GAT_00: bronyaur1: WTF is up with the NYPD? They clearly have WAY too many resources and a truly bad attitude toward their citizens.

Look up the Lower Manhattan Security Initiative.

I'm afraid to.

It's fairly disturbing.  The NYPD basically has permanent martial law capabilities in lower Manhattan and it's extending north.  Plus use of basically every private security camera into a single feed to watch people all the time.
 
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