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(Geek.com)   Magnets, how do they melt metal?   (geek.com) divider line 43
    More: Interesting, electromagnets, magnetic fields  
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6198 clicks; posted to Geek » on 14 Apr 2013 at 5:23 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-13 09:50:51 PM  
That was impressive.  Now I want to know who the electricity was hooked up to the copper coil.
 
2013-04-13 10:31:06 PM  

Frederick: That was impressive.  Now I want to know HOW the electricity was hooked up to the copper coil.

-=-
Yeah, that was cool. I am curious of the amperage, voltage, used to do this.
If you put a die just below that, you could just about form something... like bullets.
 
2013-04-13 10:38:57 PM  
i1158.photobucket.com
 
2013-04-13 10:53:57 PM  
This looks like a great way to spread molten metal around the shop.

The size of the wire would imply some heavy current.  The oscillation would indicate they are using A/C but it could be rectified .  I'm thinking the best thing to start with would be an old soldering gun transformer and run that into a coil of wire.  Just cut a nick in the new wire so that when it overheats, you know to stop before you burn up the transformer.
 
2013-04-13 10:59:08 PM  
Note that the coil wraps backwards after one turn.  This reverses the magnetic field, and is probably what suspends the metal, and what causes the electron switcharound in the apparent AC current as DON.MAC points out, to induce heat.
 
2013-04-13 11:07:49 PM  

Stoker: If you put a die just below that


That was my next thought as well.  I was surprised there wasnt one.
 
2013-04-14 02:20:21 AM  
eddy currents.

looks more like copper tubing than wire.
 
2013-04-14 03:55:36 AM  
www.ruthlessreviews.com

"That's a good looking induction."
 
2013-04-14 05:51:06 AM  
So somebody built their own magnetic pulse welder without any of the safety features?

What could possibly go wrong.
 
2013-04-14 05:55:03 AM  
OOps scratch that, this is just induction welding.
 
2013-04-14 05:56:14 AM  
How does my induction cooker work?
 
2013-04-14 05:59:16 AM  
that was pretty cool.

What metal were they melting?
 
2013-04-14 05:59:35 AM  

Frederick: Stoker: If you put a die just below that

That was my next thought as well.  I was surprised there wasnt one.


I thought this as well. The obvious form would be a cube so you're back to where you started.

There's an Induction / Inception joke there but I'm too tired to think of it...
 
2013-04-14 06:02:01 AM  
Now that I think about it, could you create a contraption that would melt a slug, then launch it like a railgun.
 
2013-04-14 06:04:58 AM  

lordargent: Now that I think about it, could you create a contraption that would melt a slug, then launch it like a railgun.


You probably could, but why would you?
 
2013-04-14 06:11:26 AM  
That was farking cool.
 
2013-04-14 06:14:14 AM  
Magnets are witchcraft and the work of Satan.
 
2013-04-14 06:15:48 AM  

pup.socket: lordargent: Now that I think about it, could you create a contraption that would melt a slug, then launch it like a railgun.

You probably could, but why would you?


Nothing says "bad ass!" quite like spraying molten metal into a wide, quickly cooling, mist.
 
2013-04-14 06:23:10 AM  

lordargent: Now that I think about it, could you create a contraption that would melt a slug, then launch it like a railgun.


When your projectile fired at hypersonic speeds impacts anything, you're going to get all the heat you want or need.  Something like nano-grained tungsten would even be self sharpening and pyrophoric.  Where firing hypersonic molten metal into the air is probably not real great for anything directly in front of your gun, or the gun itself.
 
2013-04-14 06:46:29 AM  
pup.socket: You probably could, but why would you?

I was just wondering what sort of "particles" were actually fired by an ER PPC.
 
2013-04-14 07:35:13 AM  
Apos:
[www.ruthlessreviews.com image 550x413]

"That's a good looking induction."


"They just invented my Fleshlight."
 
2013-04-14 07:47:18 AM  
works under the same principle:

mathewpeet.org
 
2013-04-14 07:57:10 AM  

pup.socket: How does my induction cooker work?


A local company makes railroad spikes this way.  Rectangular metal bars are moved rapidly through four induction "ovens."  Cold steel goes in one end, and hot, glowing steel comes out the other a second or two later.  The next machine chops the hot bars into spike lengths, and the next compresses one end to a point and flattens the other end.  The final product is sent outside to cool and for quality inspection.

Devilry . . . pure devilry.


/ csb
// the "s" is for "science."
 
2013-04-14 08:44:54 AM  
I think that they used copper tubing as their wire so that they can cool it from the inside.  Otherwise, they risk melting the copper with the heat radiating from the chunk of metal in the coil.
 
2013-04-14 08:59:21 AM  

uttertosh: that was pretty cool.

What metal were they melting?


I've seen this vid before (what can I say? things of little use to me hold my interest). This was a little over a gram of aluminum. There are much better and cooler things being done out there that are also of little use to me.

/yeah, it's still cool
//used to be a foundryman
///you know, back when we made things in the US
 
2013-04-14 10:15:54 AM  

Coronach: uttertosh: that was pretty cool.

What metal were they melting?

I've seen this vid before (what can I say? things of little use to me hold my interest). This was a little over a gram of aluminum. There are much better and cooler things being done out there that are also of little use to me.

/yeah, it's still cool
//used to be a foundryman
///you know, back when we made things in the US


I figured something like that. Thanks for the response!

Any funnier vids to direct us to that are of little use, but great interest?
 
2013-04-14 11:09:43 AM  
Induction heating using your microwave oven: http://www.talisman.org/~erlkonig/misc/microwave-metal-casting.html
 
2013-04-14 12:40:44 PM  
Waiting for one of my Facebook friends to post this with a, "Your move, Christianity" bullshiat.
 
2013-04-14 12:43:49 PM  
You can run water through the copper tubing to cool it, but they're probably just using it because of the skin effect. At radio frequencies, most of the current is in the outermost layer of the conductor, so if you use tubing, you don't need as much copper.

I'd never seen a coil with the reverse-twist at the top like that. I guess it's to help keep the workpiece from shooting out the top. I thought the demo I'd seen previously had a single coil, but it might have been a separate upper and lower coil.
 
2013-04-14 01:23:06 PM  
Do not taunt the floating, glowing ball of metal.
 
2013-04-14 01:35:04 PM  
This is just the standard induction heating demo. The BBC used to trot it out on a regular basis during their science documentaries in the early sixties. I never tired of watching this on TV when I was a kid.
 
2013-04-14 01:45:55 PM  
Our second child just turned 18, and wanted a tattoo.  So, he goes to the tattoo parlor, and while the guy is getting ready to get started on it, the kid asks the guy to tell him how tattoo guns work.  So, the guy goes into this awesome explanation, and in the middle, he mentions that there are a pair of magnets in the tattoo gun, and the kid interrupts him, and says "Magnets?  How do they farkin work?" and the tattoo guy stopped for a second, realized he was being trolled, and busted out laughing so hard it took him about 10 minutes before he was able to resume working.
 
2013-04-14 02:20:58 PM  

lordargent: I was just wondering what sort of "particles" were actually fired by an ER PPC.


ER PPC's are just superior versions of the normal PPC. PPC's are ion cannons. They fire streams of charged particles, either atoms or molecules. I have no idea if any source books go into more detail on what particular particles are used, and it could vary between PPC types and manufacturers.
 
2013-04-14 02:24:12 PM  
If the "metal" is suspended in a magnetic field, doesn't that imply that it is ferrous based?  Why are they calling it some mystery "metal".
 
2013-04-14 02:57:52 PM  
Sid_6.7: ER PPC's are just superior versions of the normal PPC. PPC's are ion cannons. They fire streams of charged particles, either atoms or molecules. I have no idea if any source books go into more detail on what particular particles are used, and it could vary between PPC types and manufacturers.

Yeah, I'm thinking, do they just suck in air and superheat it until it's just a cloud of protons/neutrons/electrons.

Or do they start off with a metal slug of some sort.

Probably the former, since there's no ammo counter. In which case, couldn't you use waste heat from the reactor? Who needs heat sinks, just dump it all into a bunch of PPCs. FIring a PPC should reduce your heat, not increase it.

Look buddy, I want nothing but ER PPCs on this thing, no heatsinks, you got that. Yeah that means I have to constantly fire to cool down, but I'm OK with that.
 
2013-04-14 04:13:24 PM  
It looks more like the heating coil from an electric stove, wrapped into that shape, than hollow copper tubes, to me.
 
2013-04-14 05:34:39 PM  

lordargent: Probably the former, since there's no ammo counter. In which case, couldn't you use waste heat from the reactor? Who needs heat sinks, just dump it all into a bunch of PPCs. FIring a PPC should reduce your heat, not increase it.


I think it might be highly accelerated reaction mass from the fusion reactor (just a tiny bit, not enough to reduce engine power, just like jump jets or flamers). The heat would probably result from both venting the reaction mass to the weapon and the actual system that accelerates it.
 
2013-04-14 06:46:15 PM  

Coronach: uttertosh: that was pretty cool.

What metal were they melting?

I've seen this vid before (what can I say? things of little use to me hold my interest). This was a little over a gram of aluminum. There are much better and cooler things being done out there that are also of little use to me.

/yeah, it's still cool
//used to be a foundryman
///you know, back when we made things in the US




The US is the largest manufacturer in the world. It's just that the humans have been replaced.
 
2013-04-14 07:48:39 PM  

SCUBA_Archer: If the "metal" is suspended in a magnetic field, doesn't that imply that it is ferrous based?  Why are they calling it some mystery "metal".


Nope. Pure aluminum (as well as a lot of other things, such as frogs) can be levitated via magnetic fields.
 
2013-04-14 11:31:13 PM  

SCUBA_Archer: If the "metal" is suspended in a magnetic field, doesn't that imply that it is ferrous based?  Why are they calling it some mystery "metal".


No.

ArcadianRefugee: SCUBA_Archer: If the "metal" is suspended in a magnetic field, doesn't that imply that it is ferrous based?  Why are they calling it some mystery "metal".

Nope. Pure aluminum (as well as a lot of other things, such as frogs) can be levitated via magnetic fields.


Yeah, and you don't even need anything particularly off the wall either.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E97CYWlALEs
 
2013-04-14 11:35:45 PM  

lordargent: Sid_6.7: ER PPC's are just superior versions of the normal PPC. PPC's are ion cannons. They fire streams of charged particles, either atoms or molecules. I have no idea if any source books go into more detail on what particular particles are used, and it could vary between PPC types and manufacturers.

Yeah, I'm thinking, do they just suck in air and superheat it until it's just a cloud of protons/neutrons/electrons.

Or do they start off with a metal slug of some sort.

Probably the former, since there's no ammo counter. In which case, couldn't you use waste heat from the reactor? Who needs heat sinks, just dump it all into a bunch of PPCs. FIring a PPC should reduce your heat, not increase it.

Look buddy, I want nothing but ER PPCs on this thing, no heatsinks, you got that. Yeah that means I have to constantly fire to cool down, but I'm OK with that.


Except, you're generating more heat while you're venting the reactor through your ER PPCs.  At the very least, the electromagnets you're using to channel the plasma would generate additional waste heat.

You could have them always on, so every time you start the mech up you're constantly venting heat by hosing everything in every direction within several dozen hexes, but you'd still either explode or shut down eventually.  That'd still be pretty farkin awesome, though.  Fear my Timberwolf Plasma Abomination!
 
2013-04-15 04:02:16 AM  
either i'm on the internet too much or fark has a glitch-- this is as old as balls on a bull...
 
2013-04-15 11:49:42 AM  

Frederick: That was impressive.  Now I want to know who the electricity was hooked up to the copper coil.


My dad designed induction furnaces for 30 years at Inductotherm Corp. He actually patented a levitation casting technology, probably what this video is based on.

I saw it done with aluminum and copper.

At one point I worked in the manufacturing plant, and what they used to provide the massive amounts of electricity were thick plates of copper called a "bus" for the induction furnaces. I can't even tell you the specifics on how much electricity.

Levitation casting is desirable for the creation of parts that are as pure as possible, with no impurities. When you put hot metal into a crucible, it gets small amounts of contamination in the casting. If it's levitated while it melts, when it drops into the crucible, it cools too fast for them to make their way inside the form.

They worked on it for several years to try and turn it into a industrialized process to make ultra-pure copper cables, but they couldn't keep it going for days at a time.
 
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