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(STLToday)   Schools cancel typing classes since computer keyboards are obsolete dinosaurs of a bygone era   (stltoday.com) divider line 107
    More: Dumbass, dinosaurs, typing, schools  
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2953 clicks; posted to Geek » on 13 Apr 2013 at 6:53 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-13 12:28:22 PM  
It is and will always be a useful tool. Language skills suffered when Latin was pulled from school curriculum in the 60s and 70s. There are always repercussions.
 
2013-04-13 12:54:22 PM  
Until voice recognition is able to accurately write out what someone is saying at a normal pace and with a variety of accents then keyboards will always be needed. You can't type essays, articles, books, or letters on mobile devices comfortably. You can do it, but it'll be ten times as laborious.
 
2013-04-13 01:02:49 PM  

Slaxl: Until voice recognition is able to accurately write out what someone is saying at a normal pace and with a variety of accents then keyboards will always be needed. You can't type essays, articles, books, or letters on mobile devices comfortably. You can do it, but it'll be ten times as laborious.


Also you can't voice-to-text a computer program, or your login and password, or a bunch of other things.

There will always be a hand-to-communication method used by the majority of the population.  First it was writing, now it's writing + typing.  This will not change.  Some things should not be given voice.
 
2013-04-13 04:58:49 PM  

olddeegee: It is and will always be a useful tool. Language skills suffered when Latin was pulled from school curriculum in the 60s and 70s. There are always repercussions.


Right, but the amount of crap that students are expected to cover keeps increasing, and there are only so many instructional hours. The amount of history that there is to teach literally increases continuously, and there are many other subjects that have been emphasized more and more.

I guess that in your mind, we should go back to tradition, and only teach the Trivium and the Quadrivium? Or is that too old school, and the world should have only advanced to when you were growing up, and then become static?

/yeah, don't worry, I'm getting off your lawn
 
2013-04-13 05:17:04 PM  

Sid_6.7: olddeegee: It is and will always be a useful tool. Language skills suffered when Latin was pulled from school curriculum in the 60s and 70s. There are always repercussions.

Right, but the amount of crap that students are expected to cover keeps increasing, and there are only so many instructional hours. The amount of history that there is to teach literally increases continuously, and there are many other subjects that have been emphasized more and more.

I guess that in your mind, we should go back to tradition, and only teach the Trivium and the Quadrivium? Or is that too old school, and the world should have only advanced to when you were growing up, and then become static?

/yeah, don't worry, I'm getting off your lawn


More like the number of educational hours are fixed, but more and more time is being spent training students to fill in little boxes on standardized tests to make sure the teachers are up to snuff.
 
2013-04-13 06:02:56 PM  
Well back when I was in school we had a typing class, but most people I knew did not have a computer or a typewriter at home. So unless you were one of the few that had one or took a class it wasn't available so we wrote almost everything by hand. It wasn't until college when I did more papers by computer. I'm pretty sure most kids now grow up with computers and have been typing for years. So it doesn't seem like a major thing to scale back on typing classes when most people grow up with the basic skills already.

\do wish they would bring back dittos
 
2013-04-13 06:57:28 PM  
Predictive spelling works so well. I'm constantly having to undo that helpfulness.
 
2013-04-13 07:00:20 PM  
Most kids still type pathetically slow until they take a computer class to learn how to touch type, and it is, and will be for a while, a very useful skill to learn. Also, wtf was the article talking about the disappearance of cursive classes? That (now useless) shiat is still going on.
 
2013-04-13 07:00:44 PM  
I use swipe all the time. Right now even. It's definitely a lot faster than my on screen keyboard. That said, I hate typing any more than I am now without a real keyboard. And my speed us no where close to using a real keyboard either.
 
2013-04-13 07:02:20 PM  
In retrospect, typing was probably the most useful class I took in high school.  I've used it every day since and I'm not hunting and pecking for keys.  It as important as learning how to read and write.
 
2013-04-13 07:09:31 PM  

gadian: In retrospect, typing was probably the most useful class I took in high school.  I've used it every day since and I'm not hunting and pecking for keys.  It as important as learning how to read and write.


Hunt-and-peck is actually still my preferred method. I got taught the standard method; I just made the active decision to use hunt-and-peck anyway because it was more effective for me. The teachers pretty much backed off once they saw I was still going as fast as the people using all ten of their fingers. They eventually threw up their hands and went 'well, whatever works, I guess'.
 
2013-04-13 07:10:22 PM  

Tellingthem: Well back when I was in school we had a typing class, but most people I knew did not have a computer or a typewriter at home. So unless you were one of the few that had one or took a class it wasn't available so we wrote almost everything by hand. It wasn't until college when I did more papers by computer. I'm pretty sure most kids now grow up with computers and have been typing for years. So it doesn't seem like a major thing to scale back on typing classes when most people grow up with the basic skills already.

\do wish they would bring back dittos


My family got our first computer when I was 4 (20 years ago). I did not attend a formal typing class until I was 14. Thank God I did! Typing with just two fingers was only good for little projects on MS Paint or that one page book report due once a month. Anything more absolutely required a typing class, and at my school it was mandatory to take typing before going to High School.

Sure, it was farking boring and repetitive, typing long lines of single letters day after day. But just like that "wax on, wax off" stuff from the Karate Kid, my fingers eventually were conditioned to reach for particular letters on the keyboard and I now type pretty efficiently.

Typing should actually be ENCOURAGED MORE since computer use will continue to be on the rise. The last hand-written paper I ever had to turn in was in the 4th grade. Everything since then had to be typed.  You can't get even an entry level job in offices now without being able to type 40-50 wpm at least.

So yeah, thats my 2 cents.
 
2013-04-13 07:11:50 PM  
Some basic training with playing piano/keyboard at a young age goes a long way with typing co-ordination.
 
2013-04-13 07:17:07 PM  
I mean, typing is certainly useful and will be for a long, long, time. But I kind of feel like keyboards are so ubiquitous that most kids can probably go along at a good clip without actually having a whole class about it. Maybe have a typing refresher chapter once per year in computer class(do kids still have computer class? lol)

I took so many typing classes and it never stuck. I could never do anything but hunt and peck, despite 2 high school and 1 college typing class. Then came the Internets and irc. Then came mmorpgs.Then came internet porn and now I can go like 90wpm with either or both hands at once, heh.(wanks per minute).
 
2013-04-13 07:18:58 PM  
I don't really see a reason to have a dedicated typing class anymore.  Just run all students through a writing class in the computer lab and have the teacher cover typing along with the proper format of a 5 paragraph essay.  You can easily download program and practice more at home or ask for a pass during study hall.  Why babysit the kids through something that freeware will do for you.

I learned to touch type in 10th grade, learned in the sense I hit the WPM needed to get a B and never looked back.  I actually learned to really touch type in college when I met this thing called "your 20 page essay must be typed and is due three days from now."
 
2013-04-13 07:19:56 PM  
I don't know why kids need a course to teach them how to type.  It seems fairly straightforward to me.  The keyboard is not going away any time soon, though, for the reasons  Slaxl mentioned. Even if we get perfect voice recognition, it can't replace the editing you do by keyboard.  There are very few people who can ad lib a perfect paragraph by voice.
 
2013-04-13 07:22:43 PM  
When I was very young, I knew a very old WWI veteran. He always told his students to learn how to type.

He told us one day in tears that because he knew how to type, he was pulled from front line duty. All of his friends were killed in the trenches.
 
2013-04-13 07:23:02 PM  
Plus I'd argue touch typing, while awesome for some things, is overrated in many fields.  When I'm using more of my work related software, I normally have one hand on the mouse (fark you GUIs with no keyboard shortcuts) or have one hand off the home row while I hit a bunch of keyboard commands that involve Control + Shift + 9 + F11 + H (fark you people who hard code in insanely complex shortcut commands).

About the only times I'm really on the home row and typing away are message boards and email.
 
2013-04-13 07:25:47 PM  

gadian: In retrospect, typing was probably the most useful class I took in high school.  I've used it every day since and I'm not hunting and pecking for keys.  It as important as learning how to read and write.


No it is not, as evinced by a gander at any comments section of websites such as CNN or Fox. Every single person there can type, but most can't read or write.
 
2013-04-13 07:26:50 PM  

neongoats: Maybe have a typing refresher chapter once per year in computer class(do kids still have computer class? lol)


The real solution is likely to cut out some of home ec and shop class and create a general class on technology, ranging from typing to not getting your system infected with six million viruses (and maybe teaching a basic scripting or markup language as well).

One of my kids just had a home ec unit on balancing his checkbook in 12th grade, most pointless thing ever since he learned how to use a spreadsheet back in 6th grade for his science project.
 
2013-04-13 07:28:17 PM  
I rle y liekd my typigng clases!

$ well spnt
 
2013-04-13 07:29:29 PM  
I've never taken a typing class, yet years of using computer keyboards has made me a good enough touch typist that composing my thoughts and getting the wording right my big bottleneck. Typing class made sense back when first season Peggy Olsen was expected to take down Don's dictated memos and type them up quickly, but even season six Peggy is writing her own copy. With kids these days growing up with their own computers, they naturally develop good enough typing skills with practice. There's just not that many jobs where you need to be able to crank out 100 wpm for hours at a time anymore like the old secretarial pools.
 
2013-04-13 07:29:44 PM  

TheShavingofOccam123: When I was very young, I knew a very old WWI veteran. He always told his students to learn how to type.

He told us one day in tears that because he knew how to type, he was pulled from front line duty. All of his friends were killed in the trenches.


Well, CSB and stuff, but being able to type in the WW1 era was a fairly advanced job/life skill.

These days they have laptops on the front lines with them, the logic no longer works, lol.
 
2013-04-13 07:32:15 PM  

ha-ha-guy: neongoats: Maybe have a typing refresher chapter once per year in computer class(do kids still have computer class? lol)

The real solution is likely to cut out some of home ec and shop class and create a general class on technology, ranging from typing to not getting your system infected with six million viruses (and maybe teaching a basic scripting or markup language as well).

One of my kids just had a home ec unit on balancing his checkbook in 12th grade, most pointless thing ever since he learned how to use a spreadsheet back in 6th grade for his science project.


Right. Home ec for technology. How not to put your personal info in danger online, how not to get craigslist raped. How to use google, wikipedia, imdb and fark.com.

Teach a control group of kids in a remote place that everything on the internet is 100% true. See what happens.
 
2013-04-13 07:32:26 PM  

neongoats: TheShavingofOccam123: When I was very young, I knew a very old WWI veteran. He always told his students to learn how to type.

He told us one day in tears that because he knew how to type, he was pulled from front line duty. All of his friends were killed in the trenches.

Well, CSB and stuff, but being able to type in the WW1 era was a fairly advanced job/life skill.

These days they have laptops on the front lines with them, the logic no longer works, lol.


How about PowerPoint skills???
 
2013-04-13 07:33:22 PM  
howdo i keybord/
 
2013-04-13 07:33:23 PM  
I remember when they stopped teaching juggling in PE in grade school. We bullied the fark out of those kids.

Uncoordinated losers.
 
2013-04-13 07:38:07 PM  
Sid_6.7: ...the amount of crap that students are expected to cover keeps increasing, and there are only so many instructional hours. The amount of history that there is to teach literally increases continuously, and there are many other subjects that have been emphasized more and more.

That's a sad statement.  Compared to 100 years ago, yes, history teachers have to teach a whole maybe 80-90 more years of history. Compare the resources a teacher has now to those available to his counterpart 100 years ago. It should be possible to educate a child so much better and faster with the technology available to us today.  It isn't working. I'm not sure why, but..

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier:
More like the number of educational hours are fixed, but more and more time is being spent training students to fill in little boxes on standardized tests to make sure the teachers are up to snuff....

is probably close to the mark.
 
2013-04-13 07:45:05 PM  
TPYG;P;
 
2013-04-13 07:48:06 PM  

ElizaDoolittle: That's a sad statement.  Compared to 100 years ago, yes, history teachers have to teach a whole maybe 80-90 more years of history. Compare the resources a teacher has now to those available to his counterpart 100 years ago. It should be possible to educate a child so much better and faster with the technology available to us today.  It isn't working. I'm not sure why, but..


A) Technology really doesn't make learning any faster.  It's a '9 women can't produce a baby in one month' kind of problem.
B) We only have 100 more years of history (although they're honestly fuller of 'stuff to know' than the middle ages).  However, the 100-year-old textbook tended to condense 3000 years of Chinese or African history into "they were heathens who killed each other because they didn't know Jesus... now moving on".
 
2013-04-13 07:50:01 PM  

TheShavingofOccam123: neongoats: TheShavingofOccam123: When I was very young, I knew a very old WWI veteran. He always told his students to learn how to type.

He told us one day in tears that because he knew how to type, he was pulled from front line duty. All of his friends were killed in the trenches.

Well, CSB and stuff, but being able to type in the WW1 era was a fairly advanced job/life skill.

These days they have laptops on the front lines with them, the logic no longer works, lol.

How about PowerPoint skills???


Well , fark powerpoint in its stupid corporate drone loving ass.

But I think better would be to teach the basics of ui navigation. I mean really, at least 80% of using an Office Suite or group of tools for work efficiently is merely being aware of what UI elements mean what.
 
2013-04-13 08:10:35 PM  
Lawnchair:. Compare the resources a teacher has now to those available to his counterpart 100 years ago. It should be possible to educate a child so much better and faster with the technology available to us today.  It isn't working. I'm not sure why, but..

A) Technology really doesn't make learning any faster.  It's a '9 women can't produce a baby in one month' kind of problem.
B) We only have 100 more years of history (although they're honestly fuller of 'stuff to know' than the middle ages).  However, the 100-year-old textbook tended to condense 3000 years of Chinese or African history into "they were heathens who killed each other because they didn't know Jesus... now moving on".


I see your point, to an extent.  Technology will never produce a perfectly-educated 5-year-old, and history classes probably have to be more inclusive than they were 100 years ago.  However, are schools actually spending significantly more hours teaching history than they did in the 60s?  I don't think so.  Unless you have strong evidence that our schools have been taken over by vastly greater hours of history lessons at the expense of, say, basic English spelling and grammar, then history as a school subject is not relevant here.

When I was a kid, 100 years ago, my mother taught us all to spell and read and master basic grammar (the your vs. you're, they're vs. there vs. their sort) before we entered kindergarten.  She did it through endless pen and paper drills, flash card exercises, etc.  You'd think that could be done more effectively and faster on a computer.

And before the helicopter parents descend on me about how it might affect their little snowflakes' eyes or cause seizures:  How many hours does said snowflake spend watching video of some kind?
 
2013-04-13 08:14:49 PM  
My reaction to this is a big meh. I never learned how to type by taking typing classes, I learned to type by doing shiat in online forums. I learned where to put my hands, and then I just got practice by actually typing crap.

Teach a technology home ec. GUI navigation, sorting out scammers and rapists from the normal people. Kids are typing for papers, they're typing for fun, they get plenty of work in typing. They don't need a class.
 
2013-04-13 08:24:15 PM  
Christ I graduated HS in 2001 and our school hadn't had a typing class offered for years by that point. I never took one, and while I don't exactly type properly I am capable of touch typing with very few mistakes.   I primarily type with two fingers and still type faster than most people I know.
 
2013-04-13 08:27:14 PM  
CS,B:

I was reasonably smart, but my handwriting was such incorrigible crap that early on in elementary school they gave up and sent me up the hall to take typing classes with the upper classes rather than pound out rote cursive letters over and over. It actually did make a difference in my grades.

It came in handy later, I'm the fastest hunt-and-pecker of anyone I know.
 
2013-04-13 08:29:56 PM  
I can type about as fast as I can talk now. So I don't really care if voice to text takes off. By the time it does, I'll be faster.  Just spend some time on a keyboard and you'll naturally get faster over time.  There's also a sort of Neo, there is no spoon,  aspect to it.  Free your mind...
 
2013-04-13 08:31:48 PM  
I had typing games as a kid, but I never got the hang of it until I finally got internet in my room and my friends and I discovered IM/chat rooms. That's where you learn how to type.
 
2013-04-13 08:34:56 PM  

Trocadero: I had typing games as a kid, but I never got the hang of it until I finally got internet in my room and my friends and I discovered IM/chat rooms. That's where you learn how to type.


Yeah. Me too. undernet baby!
 
2013-04-13 08:36:32 PM  
You know.. a long time ago in the 10th grade we had to take typing class. Back then i thought it was total bull. Now that i have a 15 year long career writing code.. ? turns out it was the most valuable class i ever took. Who'd a thunk it.
 
2013-04-13 08:42:31 PM  

Sid_6.7: olddeegee: It is and will always be a useful tool. Language skills suffered when Latin was pulled from school curriculum in the 60s and 70s. There are always repercussions.

Right, but the amount of crap that students are expected to cover keeps increasing, and there are only so many instructional hours. The amount of history that there is to teach literally increases continuously, and there are many other subjects that have been emphasized more and more.

I guess that in your mind, we should go back to tradition, and only teach the Trivium and the Quadrivium? Or is that too old school, and the world should have only advanced to when you were growing up, and then become static?

/yeah, don't worry, I'm getting off your lawn


I am 43 and have had to tutor kids over the last five years for friends and family, and compared to when I was in school kids today learn virtually nothing.  Kids are not learning any history.  They cannot spell, read, or write, much less do any type of math without a calculator.
 
2013-04-13 08:49:36 PM  

ha-ha-guy: neongoats: Maybe have a typing refresher chapter once per year in computer class(do kids still have computer class? lol)

The real solution is likely to cut out some of home ec and shop class and create a general class on technology, ranging from typing to not getting your system infected with six million viruses (and maybe teaching a basic scripting or markup language as well).

One of my kids just had a home ec unit on balancing his checkbook in 12th grade, most pointless thing ever since he learned how to use a spreadsheet back in 6th grade for his science project.


Bolded for emphasis.. why? because home ec is about home economics. its not just about learning to sew and cook and all that crap, its about knowing how to manage a home's budget, what is important and what isn't.
Shop classes are about teaching basic skills where it comes to dealing with the crap in your life, in anything Shop classes need to be expanded to teach technology maintence. All you IT security and network admins out there.. I hate to break it to you but you are the tech nerd equivalent to a basic auto engine tech guy. nowadays. and a lot of basic engine mechanics and techs are now making more money an hour than y'all because everyone that should've been working on engines are working in computers instead and glutting your work base. and now you gotta pay out the ass for a toyota certified mech to change your damn spark plugs.

Keyboarding is useful knowledge and should be taught. band class is useful, auto, metal and wood shop is important.


shiat... if anything, I would hope this country educational system would go back to more of a mentor. apprentice system.
 
2013-04-13 08:52:53 PM  

theflatline: Sid_6.7: olddeegee: It is and will always be a useful tool. Language skills suffered when Latin was pulled from school curriculum in the 60s and 70s. There are always repercussions.

Right, but the amount of crap that students are expected to cover keeps increasing, and there are only so many instructional hours. The amount of history that there is to teach literally increases continuously, and there are many other subjects that have been emphasized more and more.

I guess that in your mind, we should go back to tradition, and only teach the Trivium and the Quadrivium? Or is that too old school, and the world should have only advanced to when you were growing up, and then become static?

/yeah, don't worry, I'm getting off your lawn

I am 43 and have had to tutor kids over the last five years for friends and family, and compared to when I was in school kids today learn virtually nothing.  Kids are not learning any history.  They cannot spell, read, or write, much less do any type of math without a calculator.


Well, I'm surprised I have to point this out, but thats literally one of the biggest consequences to living in the information age. Most people carry around the sum of all human knowledge in their pocket, accessible if only they knew how, and it was arranged in a way meaningful to them.

Being successful in the information age doesn't mean rote memorization, it means efficiently accessing the new knowledge, consuming it, understanding it, and being able to utilize it practically. And continuing to do, and be able to do so, basically until you die. There isn't none of this "mastering a field forever" and resting on your laurels. That's some old timey Victorian shiz.
 
2013-04-13 08:53:36 PM  
I'm okay with this.
My highschool forced me to waste a semester in a typing class by making it an unwavering requirement to take programming. I went into the class already typing in the range of 70-80 wpm, which was significantly faster than the instructor. Not to mention the class consisted of not more than what you would find by googling 'typing test'.
 
2013-04-13 08:57:48 PM  

Mytch: I'm okay with this.
My highschool forced me to waste a semester in a typing class by making it an unwavering requirement to take programming. I went into the class already typing in the range of 70-80 wpm, which was significantly faster than the instructor. Not to mention the class consisted of not more than what you would find by googling 'typing test'.


You know, my high school actually had some reasonable teachers. If I finished the farking english lit reading, my teacher would let me go bum it in the library. My typing teacher let me take the final and basically skip class for 4 months, worked for me.
 
2013-04-13 08:59:19 PM  
Typing classes may go away, but not because people don't need to learn to type.  They'll go away because by the time kids are 6 or 7 years old and going to school, they'll already have 6 or 7 years of using a keyboard and basic typing classes won't be needed.
 
2013-04-13 09:02:47 PM  

theflatline: I am 43 and have had to tutor kids over the last five years for friends and family, and compared to when I was in school kids today learn virtually nothing. Kids are not learning any history. They cannot spell, read, or write, much less do any type of math without a calculator.


Try taking account of all of their skills. They're probably very good with computers (mostly using software, as the whole "master of the computer" cliche doesn't apply to most kids, even so-called 'digital natives' (is that still the term?)) and have a lot of other skills involving things that didn't even exist when you were their age.

Or it just might be that you have a family and friends with dumb kids? Or perhaps they never took the time to help them outside of school themselves? That might be why they need tutoring!

LikeALeafOnTheWind: You know.. a long time ago in the 10th grade we had to take typing class. Back then i thought it was total bull. Now that i have a 15 year long career writing code.. ? turns out it was the most valuable class i ever took. Who'd a thunk it.


My typing class was a massive waste of time. I don't write "computer code" per se, mostly SQL, and perform data analysis, but I know where you're coming from. And I learned how to type playing MUDs. You damn well better know where the keys are so you don't die! As a result, my typing style is completely bizarre, but I can easily type 90+ WPM.

I just typed all of that above in no time, and I'm drunk!

ElizaDoolittle: It should be possible to educate a child so much better and faster with the technology available to us today.


Care to give an example of such technology? Due us possessing superior technology, have children magically evolved to be able to process information into their long-term memories more quickly?

ElizaDoolittle: When I was a kid, 100 years ago, my mother taught us all to spell and read and master basic grammar (the your vs. you're, they're vs. there vs. their sort) before we entered kindergarten. She did it through endless pen and paper drills, flash card exercises, etc. You'd think that could be done more effectively and faster on a computer.


If you want to teach grammar, then don't bother with that crap. Teach kids to read good! (that was intentional, and if you're cool you'll get the joke). Teach the kids to read, and then they can read lots of books, and the books will teach them proper grammar through context. No flash/drill/BS needed.

One of the most effective ways to teach a foreign language is through immersion, and one of the most effective ways to teach grammar for a native tongue is through immersion in the written word.

ElizaDoolittle: Compared to 100 years ago, yes, history teachers have to teach a whole maybe 80-90 more years of history.


There is probably more documentation about the last 100 years than exists for the last several thousand combined, and the increasing detail as you move through history books demonstrates that.

"Let's begin the first chapter of our history books: the Mesopotamians. They had cuneiform, lived near the Tigres and Euphrates...and oh, look at the time! So, the Ancient Greeks..."

Also, there's the massive obsession with WW2 that our culture has developed. Good thing we more or less skip WW1 and especially Korea. Saves a lot of time.

/one of the first times I started to feel really old (I'm 29) was a few years ago, when a 12-year-old had no idea who Robin Williams was
 
2013-04-13 09:08:04 PM  
I took typing several times in school.  First was seventh grade, again in the 10th grade when I had both a typing class on an old school typewriter as well as a computer class that was mostly typing, even though it was listed as an intro to computers class.  My favorite was the one in seventh grade because it wasn't just typing, it also was my first class that taught programming, unlike the others which was just copying text from a book.

The teachers in my two typing classes got on to me about changing words in what I had to type.  Changing circus to volcano sacrifice and changing elephant to virgin being tossed to appease our god Hu'nakwa wasn't acceptable.
 
2013-04-13 09:09:34 PM  
neongoats:Well, I'm surprised I have to point this out, but thats literally one of the biggest consequences to living in the information age. Most people carry around the sum of all human knowledge in their pocket, accessible if only they knew how, and it was arranged in a way meaningful to them.

Being successful in the information age doesn't mean rote memorization, it means efficiently accessing the new knowledge, consuming it, understanding it, and being able to utilize it practically. And continuing to do, and be able to do so, basically until you die. There isn't none of this "mastering a field forever" and resting on your laurels. That's some old timey Victorian shiz.


Was your post meant to be ironic?  You don't know how to spell "that's."   It's interesting that you don't know the meaning of the word "literally."  I doubt you have been "consuming" a lot of knowledge and understanding it and "utilizing" it.  You surely didn't mean to write "there isn't."  On the latter, I think you were trying to be cool and failed.
 
2013-04-13 09:14:36 PM  

ElizaDoolittle: neongoats:Well, I'm surprised I have to point this out, but thats literally one of the biggest consequences to living in the information age. Most people carry around the sum of all human knowledge in their pocket, accessible if only they knew how, and it was arranged in a way meaningful to them.

Being successful in the information age doesn't mean rote memorization, it means efficiently accessing the new knowledge, consuming it, understanding it, and being able to utilize it practically. And continuing to do, and be able to do so, basically until you die. There isn't none of this "mastering a field forever" and resting on your laurels. That's some old timey Victorian shiz.

Was your post meant to be ironic?  You don't know how to spell "that's."   It's interesting that you don't know the meaning of the word "literally."  I doubt you have been "consuming" a lot of knowledge and understanding it and "utilizing" it.  You surely didn't mean to write "there isn't."  On the latter, I think you were trying to be cool and failed.


*snert*
 
2013-04-13 09:15:24 PM  
I took typing classes when I was in junior high, before "online" was a thing. Once "online" became a thing I still took keyboarding classes because I had already taught myself to type very well hanging out in chatrooms on Cnet and WWIV bulletin boards.

Unfortunately back then long distance phone calls were still something you paid for and my dad to this day believes my typing lessons were WAY too expensive.
 
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