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(Marketwatch)   Now in vogue again: Your 1970's house. Groovy   (blogs.marketwatch.com) divider line 42
    More: Cool, chalets, stucco  
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3525 clicks; posted to Business » on 13 Apr 2013 at 11:07 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



42 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-04-13 08:14:02 AM  
Everything old becomes new again. And everything new gets old.
 
2013-04-13 08:21:08 AM  
Everything becomes interesting again around 40 years out.

/holding out for the 1980s to become cool again
 
2013-04-13 08:48:09 AM  
Did popcorn ceilings ever really go away?
 
2013-04-13 09:10:37 AM  

muck4doo: Did popcorn ceilings ever really go away?


Easiest way to cover shoddy drywall work.
 
2013-04-13 10:30:00 AM  
My 1970s house doesn't have a 6 million dollar asking price. It does have popcorn ceilings.
 
2013-04-13 10:37:06 AM  
That blue/green shag carpet sure got used up quickly by the dog. Whole room smelled like urine inside of a month.

The funny thing was the kids didn't care, much to the horror of mom.
 
2013-04-13 10:50:38 AM  
Every house described there is a luxury home.  Every. One.  And they've all undergone extensive renovations in the 6 to 7 figures.  So, no getting ideas about your cheap suburban split-levels, Farkers.
 
2013-04-13 11:20:07 AM  
If floral wallpaper comes back in style my parents house will be a gold mine. I tell them their bedroom is the room people walk into on House Hunters and just start laughing
 
2013-04-13 11:37:13 AM  
I admit, I really like the avocado green.  Would love that colour in a fridge/stove/dishwasher.
 
2013-04-13 11:39:23 AM  

L.D. Ablo: Everything becomes interesting again around 40 years out.


Especially broads, when they're newly divorced and craving cock.
 
2013-04-13 11:40:46 AM  
The "mushroom house" in the article made me think of this spaceship beauty I used to see near Chattanooga:

activerain.com
Don't know if it was built in the '70s, though.
 
2013-04-13 11:42:53 AM  
1.bp.blogspot.com

Fark party in the attic tonight, Baby
 
2013-04-13 11:46:46 AM  
I wanted to quote Ghastly and add "putty and paint make a job what it ain't " but fark wouldn't let me. Anyone find a pic of Woodstock's pimp bird crib?
 
2013-04-13 12:37:20 PM  
I shiat you not, I heard a hipster couple talking about this last night.
 
2013-04-13 12:40:08 PM  
70s home problems are mostly cosmetic(popcorn ceiling, awful tile, wood paneling, etc).  70s homes also have nice features: open floor plans, no formal dining room, decent sized bedrooms, vaulted ceilings(benefits of an A-frame style), good home to plot size ratio, no subarea, etc.  As far as brick fireplaces, brick never goes out of style.
 
2013-04-13 12:40:31 PM  
I'm sitting in my circa-1975 condo, and I love mid-century architecture, so I'm getting a bell-bottomed kick...
 
2013-04-13 12:57:51 PM  

Three Crooked Squirrels: The "mushroom house" in the article made me think of this spaceship beauty I used to see near Chattanooga:

[activerain.com image 640x480]
Don't know if it was built in the '70s, though.


Looks like a crappy knock-off of a Futuro house.

img.weburbanist.com

If it weren't for the oil crisis of the 70's (Futuros used a lot of plastics), they could have become more common.
 
2013-04-13 01:11:29 PM  
+1 too 'cause 1970s houses' production care/quality, like what preceded them, is usually pretty good. You can always mess with the cosmetics if you want.

Then again, there was that aluminum wiring fiasco when copper prices rose (late 60s, early 70s) that might scare me away from buying one:

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/02/19/realestate/19home.html
 
2013-04-13 01:24:05 PM  

bhcompy: 70s home problems are mostly cosmetic(popcorn ceiling

. . .

If you have a popcorn ceiling, and your house was built in the '70s, it is pretty likely that you have asbestos in your ceiling.  So, while most '70s problems are cosmetic, the popcorn ceiling can be a little more of a problem.  It isn't that your ceiling is going to kill you, but a prospective buyer might give pause.
 
2013-04-13 01:30:37 PM  
I would go back just a little further. My house was built in 1957. Back when materials and labor was cheaper. They didn't cut corners. The joists are larger and closer together than new built. The flooring is true hardwood not laminate on particle board. No drywall, plaster walls with cove ceilings. A lot of milled wood trim. All copper pipes, etc. I just have updates on the things they didn't do well. Such as windows and doors, and the furnace.

This for a smaller home, not a luxury one. It seems home building took a dive in the mid-70s. They were looking to cut costs. cheaper materials and design.

Downside is that they must have had fewer clothes back then. The master bedroom's closet is barely 5 ft long.
 
2013-04-13 01:30:47 PM  
I thought fireplaces NOT in brickwalls were weird.
 
2013-04-13 01:37:18 PM  

GrizzledVeteran: +1 too 'cause 1970s houses' production care/quality, like what preceded them, is usually pretty good. You can always mess with the cosmetics if you want.
Then again, there was that aluminum wiring fiasco when copper prices rose (late 60s, early 70s) that might scare me away from buying one:
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/02/19/realestate/19home.html


True. This should be better known than it is. The good thing is that many have been updating. So if you come across AL wiring in an area you like chances are there is one nearby that is updated. (At least in my area.)
 
2013-04-13 02:10:36 PM  
The first house I bought was built during the stock market crash in '29.  You could tell which rooms were done before and after the crash.  The lovely old dead woman, from whose estate we bought the house, covered every wall in the shared spaces with ugly faux wood paneling which she accented with yellow linoleum and thick green carpeting in some places.  The cabinets were the same ugly wood pattern and the appliances were much older than I was.

It was so damn liberating to free that house from the '70's.
 
2013-04-13 02:18:08 PM  

Three Crooked Squirrels: bhcompy: 70s home problems are mostly cosmetic(popcorn ceiling . . .

If you have a popcorn ceiling, and your house was built in the '70s, it is pretty likely that you have asbestos in your ceiling.  So, while most '70s problems are cosmetic, the popcorn ceiling can be a little more of a problem.  It isn't that your ceiling is going to kill you, but a prospective buyer might give pause.


Sure, cosmetic things always give pause.  When you don't live there, though, it's a lot easy to bargain for either safely removing the ceiling or sealing it in.  Asbestos isn't a problem unless you fark with it.
 
2013-04-13 03:02:28 PM  

Three Crooked Squirrels: bhcompy: 70s home problems are mostly cosmetic(popcorn ceiling . . .

If you have a popcorn ceiling, and your house was built in the '70s, it is pretty likely that you have asbestos in your ceiling.  So, while most '70s problems are cosmetic, the popcorn ceiling can be a little more of a problem.  It isn't that your ceiling is going to kill you, but a prospective buyer might give pause.




Don't forget the lead paint they until the late 70's.
 
2013-04-13 03:20:41 PM  
I have a 1964 California Contemporary.  13 ft. vaulted ceilings, a big brick fireplace with no mantle, real wood paneling in the daylight basement, a carport, turquoise blue tile in the bathrooms, wood floors, and high, narrow, out-of-building-code windows.  The most out of step thing with a house from that era are the tiny bathrooms.

My previous house was built in 1949 and the most out-of-date thing about that were that all the closets were the size of coat closets.  It reminds you that people in 1949 had much less clothes than people do today.
 
2013-04-13 03:28:46 PM  

The_Philosopher_King: Downside is that they must have had fewer clothes back then. The master bedroom's closet is barely 5 ft long.


I think at the time, you were supposed to get a bedroom set that included a matching wardrobe. So the housebuilders figured they could use the space for other purposes as the owner would effectively buy half a closet at the furniture store.
And they probably did have fewer clothes as well.
 
2013-04-13 03:29:23 PM  
I was just talking about this with a friend of mine - His house is 1970s and great.... they built most of his house with lots of light, and he's going to add some natural lighting in the places where it's needed. The only issue is that the kitchen is small, but they could probably expand that into living space someday if they really need to. Otherwise, it's a great layout.

Our layout isn't as great, but it still makes sense. The upside to 1980s houses is more light, and less asbestos/lead paint. The downsides are "builder" grade everything... they just fall apart faster. Though not as fast as houses from the 1990s which are overbearingly large, square/blocky and hard to maintain.

We went new house shopping recently and the thing now is to put the kids' rooms as far away from the parents as possible. Because, you know, god forbid anyone in the same house want to be near each other.
 
2013-04-13 03:50:50 PM  
As someone looking into building an underground house straight out of the late 70s, I'm...disappointed I won't have the funding in time to be trendy.
 
2013-04-13 04:09:51 PM  
No popcorn ceilings in my 1970's house. But I do have 1/3rd of an acre lot withing the city limits. That, really good insulation, and a heat pump.
 
2013-04-13 06:28:50 PM  
cdn.cstatic.net

If you visit Denver, this is the king.
 
2013-04-13 09:02:59 PM  
exhibits.mannlib.cornell.edu
 
2013-04-13 09:18:05 PM  
i-cdn.apartmenttherapy.com
 
2013-04-13 09:59:38 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: Every house described there is a luxury home.  Every. One.  And they've all undergone extensive renovations in the 6 to 7 figures.  So, no getting ideas about your cheap suburban split-levels, Farkers.


This.

When retro stuff comes back in style, your old shiat never qualifies. It has to be either authentic and rare, or new and expensive.
 
2013-04-13 10:53:29 PM  
fark that. I'm never going to avocado. Wood, steel, a bit of rock here and there. I'm happy.
 
2013-04-13 11:53:13 PM  
@Hassan Ben Sobr^^^^: postwar Lustron?
 
2013-04-14 12:22:40 AM  

Metaluna Mutant: [cdn.cstatic.net image 500x375]

If you visit Denver, this is the king.


I wonder if the Orgasmatron is still working.

whatculture.com
 
2013-04-14 02:30:02 AM  

ajgeek: fark that. I'm never going to avocado. Wood, steel, a bit of rock here and there. I'm happy.


You know the protective cling wrap that they put on new fridges?  You can paint that avocado before removing it just to see how bad that decision is.
 
2013-04-14 12:17:26 PM  
Another good thing about pre 1980s homes ... Pittsburgh steel pipes. In the late 70s they started bringing in crappy steel pipes from China, which are corroding like a mofo these days.
 
2013-04-14 05:45:48 PM  

MBrady: Our house was built in the 70's and has a brick wall fireplace in the family room.  My wife saw that and fell in love with it (as did I).  It is becoming the "county house" that we both want.

No popcorn ceilings though.  There was paneling in the family room (and fake beams), which I took down, put drywall up and painted.  Looks great.  The only thing I wish I could fix is that it is a sunken family room on a slab floor.  I with there was at least a crawl space or I would have preferred a full basement there.


You just described my childhood home to a "T" which we had built in 1974.   Why did you tear down those awesome fake beams and paneling?  I loved those!
 
2013-04-14 06:46:44 PM  

psychosis_inducing: The_Philosopher_King: Downside is that they must have had fewer clothes back then. The master bedroom's closet is barely 5 ft long.

I think at the time, you were supposed to get a bedroom set that included a matching wardrobe. So the housebuilders figured they could use the space for other purposes as the owner would effectively buy half a closet at the furniture store.
And they probably did have fewer clothes as well.


Until the '70's and the decline of American manufacturing, storebought clothes were more expensive (because they were made in the US) or they were made at home. Most retail stores had a fabric, pattern and notions counter, most women could and did sew regularly. It's only in the last forty or so years that it's become common to have piles of cheap clothes in every corner of your home.
 
2013-04-14 10:29:19 PM  
A local architect, father of a childhood friend of mine, built a house  that was essentially one huge spiral staircase with all the rooms off to the sides. Situated on on side of a wooded hill, the house had a central core that had a fountain in the top and you entered either through the garage at the lowest level or the front door halfway up.
And don't get me started on the built-in vacuum cleaning system.

Built about 1970. Way cool. Skylights in the bathrooms and everything.
 
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