If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The Verge)   Fark transparent aluminum, gimme some of this stuff   (theverge.com) divider line 40
    More: Cool, Cyanobacteria, plant biology, high fiber, cellulose, genetic engineering, American Chemical Society, Kevlar, Algae  
•       •       •

8855 clicks; posted to Geek » on 13 Apr 2013 at 8:10 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



40 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2013-04-13 04:26:14 AM
I always thought that had to be grown under a pre-nova sun. The Sarkites are going to flip out when they hear about this...

/obscure?
 
2013-04-13 07:44:15 AM
2.bp.blogspot.com
I picked the wrong week to stop sniffing algae
 
2013-04-13 08:11:50 AM
You just wait until that shiat is growing all over your backyard. You'll miss the carefree days of kudzu.
 
2013-04-13 08:15:05 AM
It was a large mattress, and probably one of quite high quality. Very few things actually get manufactured these days, because in an infinitely large Universe such as, for instance, the one in which we live, most things one could possibly imagine, and a lot of things one would rather not, grow somewhere. A forest was discovered recently in which most of the trees grew ratchet screwdrivers as fruit. The life cycle of ratchet screwdriver fruit it quite interesting. Once picked it needs a dark dusty drawer in which it can lie undisturbed for years. Then one night it suddenly hatches, discards its outer skin which crumbles into dust, and emerges as a totally unidentifiable little metal object with flanges at both ends and a sort of ridge and a sort of hole for a screw. This, when found, will get thrown away. No one knows what it is supposed to gain from this. Nature, in her infinite wisdom, is presumably working on it.
 
2013-04-13 08:16:08 AM
 Oh, Edmund... can it be true? That I hold here, in my mortal hand, a nugget of purest Green?
 2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-04-13 08:19:56 AM
how quaint.
 
2013-04-13 08:26:04 AM
Ever get an ingrown hair from shaving? Those suckers have to be at least ten times as strong as carbon fiber.
 
2013-04-13 08:31:34 AM
They produce their own food from sunlight and water

Basic science fail... Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic, but they require nutrients (i.e. fixing nitrogen and sequestering carbon) in addition to sunlight and water.
 
2013-04-13 08:36:39 AM
imgs.xkcd.com
As always there's an xkcd to translate the "punchline" of that entire article.  Five to 10 years.....
 
2013-04-13 08:41:52 AM
Kink-springs anyone?

/Can I get my Windup Girl now?
 
2013-04-13 09:36:17 AM
Star Trek 6
 
2013-04-13 09:37:17 AM
i.dailymail.co.uk
 
2013-04-13 09:54:39 AM

I Ate Shergar: I always thought that had to be grown under a pre-nova sun. The Sarkites are going to flip out when they hear about this...

/obscure?


Isaac Asimov would like a word...
 
2013-04-13 10:04:07 AM

The Snow Dog: Kink-springs anyone?

/Can I get my Windup Girl now?


Screw that.  I'll take a Megadont.
 
2013-04-13 10:06:05 AM
"...lightweight body armor..."

Good.
 
2013-04-13 10:24:45 AM

I Ate Shergar: I always thought that had to be grown under a pre-nova sun. The Sarkites are going to flip out when they hear about this...

/obscure?


While Asimov in general isn't obscure, that certainly is one of his lesser-known novels. Good job.
 
2013-04-13 10:25:12 AM

Macular Degenerate: They produce their own food from sunlight and water

Basic science fail... Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic, but they require nutrients (i.e. fixing nitrogen and sequestering carbon) in addition to sunlight and water.


TFA explicitly mentions that they fix carbon from atmospheric CO2, which is useful. Since cellulose contains only carbon, oxygen and hydrogen, you would presumably be able to do something close to a closed cycle for nitrogen and all the other necessary nutrients.
 
2013-04-13 11:41:18 AM
It's made of people, article lies
 
2013-04-13 11:46:12 AM
"stiffer than Kevlar, thinner than paper"

/thinks he's found a new pickup line.
 
2013-04-13 12:11:27 PM
"We need to have more funds in this area," Brown told reporters. "So having the chance to tell the world more about this new microorganism will, I think, help tip the funding. I hope so."

Damn, and I just invested my millions in these magic beans perpetual motion device automatic snake de-oiling machine patents...
 
2013-04-13 12:13:04 PM

Macular Degenerate: They produce their own food from sunlight and water

Basic science fail... Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic, but they require nutrients (i.e. fixing nitrogen and sequestering carbon) in addition to sunlight and water.


The author also seems to think Cyanobacteria = genetically modified bacteria.
 
2013-04-13 12:13:33 PM
Dr. Brown was on my buddies PhD advising committee.  He is incredibly nice and incredibly smart.  Congrats on the breakthrough!
 
2013-04-13 12:31:44 PM
First off, Kevlar isn't very stiff at all. It has a very high tensile strength, which means you can pull on it hard without it breaking.

Secondly while there's no known pure aluminum form that is transparent, there is a crystalline aluminum oxide that's pretty damn strong and transparent: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corundum


I know, I should lighten up.
 
2013-04-13 12:38:38 PM

TonySoprano: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 468x313]


Good to know the ascot will never go out of style.
 
2013-04-13 12:44:35 PM

Angry Buddha: The author also seems to think Cyanobacteria = genetically modified bacteria.


You can misread the article in that way, so it could have been phrased more clearly, but I thought overall it was pretty well-done.

Of course, since this is a GM strain, there'll be all sorts of protests about how it's going to destroy the Earth by replacing good old pulp-mills with ZOMG FRANKENsomething.
 
2013-04-13 12:50:02 PM

Esc7: It has a very high tensile strength, which means you can pull on it hard without it breaking.


/thinks he's found a new pickup line.
 
2013-04-13 01:07:01 PM

Brontes: Dr. Brown was on my buddies PhD advising committee.  He is incredibly nice and incredibly smart.  Congrats on the breakthrough!



i105.photobucket.com
 
2013-04-13 01:55:59 PM

Fizpez: [imgs.xkcd.com image 507x431]
As always there's an xkcd to translate the "punchline" of that entire article.  Five to 10 years.....


Came for this.
 
2013-04-13 02:22:15 PM

pyrotek85: Fizpez: [imgs.xkcd.com image 507x431]
As always there's an xkcd to translate the "punchline" of that entire article.  Five to 10 years.....

Came for this.


/thinks he's found a new pickup line...
 
2013-04-13 03:28:15 PM

TonySoprano: Star Trek 6


My first thought also.
 
2013-04-13 05:19:43 PM
Green science.
 
2013-04-13 08:44:43 PM
OMFG

Yes its a very cool discovery, but there is soooooo much stupid in the article. It reads like it was written by a stoner whose only association with green science is his firm belief that pot cures glaucoma and that he must be suffering from glaucoma.

For instance..... algae absorbs carbon dioxide....which could help reduce that greenhouse gas!   Well duh, all plants absorb carbon dioxide. But they only reduce atmospheric carbon if they trap the Co2 in some form. Growing blue green algae mats on the ocean surface and then allowing them to sink would be one way of locking the carbon out of the atmosphere.

and again....one pound of nano-cellulose aerogell could make a boat capable of supporting 1000 pounds of cargo.   So much stupid here. Boats displace water which is what gives them boyancy. It has no relationship to the weight of the boat, but rather to the volume of water displaced being more massive than the weight of the boat plus cargo. Now maybe the original source meant that a pound of aerogel could hold enough air to displace 1000 pounds of water, this allowing it to be used to float 1000 pounds of cargo. But the shape of the boat is as important as the weight and the articles author just doesnt understand what any of it means.
 
2013-04-13 09:26:57 PM

The Snow Dog: Kink-springs anyone?


Don't open any envelopes from AgriGen unless you want cibiscosis.
 
2013-04-13 11:33:51 PM

Theaetetus: Esc7: It has a very high tensile strength, which means you can pull on it hard without it breaking.

/thinks he's found a new pickup line.


Niiiice.
 
2013-04-14 12:52:16 AM

Vodka Zombie: The Snow Dog: Kink-springs anyone?

/Can I get my Windup Girl now?

Screw that.  I'll take a Megadont.


My apartment only allows pets up to 20 pounds.
 
2013-04-14 02:55:39 AM

jfarkinB: Macular Degenerate: They produce their own food from sunlight and water

Basic science fail... Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic, but they require nutrients (i.e. fixing nitrogen and sequestering carbon) in addition to sunlight and water.

TFA explicitly mentions that they fix carbon from atmospheric CO2, which is useful. Since cellulose contains only carbon, oxygen and hydrogen, you would presumably be able to do something close to a closed cycle for nitrogen and all the other necessary nutrients.


The whole Idea that this is a carbon fix is overblown. The scale is tiny. Even if they replace all the structural steel on the planet with nano-cellulose its still a negligible amount of carbon since the entire point of a nano-cellulose is to be very strong compared to volume or mass of material.

If you are really interested in fixing carbon out of the atmosphere you need a natural process that you can piggy-back onto.

There are two really good ones....

Dr Savory has a system that reverses desertification by using densly packed herds of bovines to stimulate the evolutionary process that originally sustained the african grasslands. The amount of carbon fixed back into the vegetation is enormous when taken to include all the areas that are desert today but which could be grassland within a few years.

One of the side effects of the plan Marshall Savage promoted in his millenial project was the growth of huge mats of blue green algae in floating beds. If you could grow massive quantities of algae in controlled mats on the surface of the sea and then let it sink you would be fixing that carbon for potentially hundreds of years.

The first is more doable than the second, but both use natural processes to fix carbon with minimal human input per ton of carbon fixed.

Both have the potential to fix more than enough carbon to offset any amount of AGW you care to predict.

Plus the first generates a massive amount of edible cow, which can feed both people and african predators. The Second generates enormous mariculture potential, and the algae is actually perfectly edible when dried. Its like a sushi factory.
 
2013-04-14 03:06:05 AM
It has a tensile strength of 500 Megapascals. Kevlar's is over 3,000 MPa. I don't think we're going to be seeing algae armor anytime soon.
 
2013-04-14 09:39:43 AM

archichris: OMFG

Yes its a very cool discovery, but there is soooooo much stupid in the article. It reads like it was written by a stoner whose only association with green science is his firm belief that pot cures glaucoma and that he must be suffering from glaucoma.

For instance..... algae absorbs carbon dioxide....which could help reduce that greenhouse gas!   Well duh, all plants absorb carbon dioxide. But they only reduce atmospheric carbon if they trap the Co2 in some form. Growing blue green algae mats on the ocean surface and then allowing them to sink would be one way of locking the carbon out of the atmosphere.

and again....one pound of nano-cellulose aerogell could make a boat capable of supporting 1000 pounds of cargo.   So much stupid here. Boats displace water which is what gives them boyancy. It has no relationship to the weight of the boat, but rather to the volume of water displaced being more massive than the weight of the boat plus cargo. Now maybe the original source meant that a pound of aerogel could hold enough air to displace 1000 pounds of water, this allowing it to be used to float 1000 pounds of cargo. But the shape of the boat is as important as the weight and the articles author just doesnt understand what any of it means.


Huh?
 
2013-04-14 12:18:23 PM
Today, most non-bacterial nanocellulose is produced from compressed and homogenized wood pulp - a relatively inexpensive, but resource-heavy process.

Brown's method, by contrast, is vastly more efficient and environmentally friendly, requiring only sunlight, water, and algae.


Guess what? Trees only need two out of those three.
 
2013-04-14 03:38:01 PM
It's Green
 
Displayed 40 of 40 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report