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(Springfield News-Leader)   Reasons not to call 911   (news-leader.com) divider line 31
    More: Amusing  
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9374 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Apr 2013 at 1:02 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-12 11:27:44 AM  
Yeah, there are more reasons than that. Not really better, but certainly more.
 
2013-04-12 11:32:18 AM  
According to police records, the man has made similar calls since 2010 for non-emergency issues. In total, they say, he's abused the system 77 times.

I guess it's only fair that the system ignores 77 real emergency calls to his house.

/let's see him survive 77 heart attacks
//is an eye for an eye kinda girl
 
2013-04-12 11:58:42 AM  
0. It's joke where you live
 
2013-04-12 12:23:43 PM  
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-04-12 01:07:45 PM  
FTA: Misuse of 911 is a class B misdemeanor. If convicted, a jail sentence could not exceed six months. ...also... This man, who has not been arrested for the incident

May I ask why he hasn't been arrested, especially after 77 times?!
 
2013-04-12 01:19:26 PM  
Another good reason not to call the cops?
Because they will farking kill you for shiats and giggles and get away with it.
cdn.ebaumsworld.com
Cops all need to go away or we will never progress as a society.
 
2013-04-12 01:35:18 PM  
According to the article, Jimmy John's serves rye bread.  I wasn't aware of that.

I forget what the rest of the piece was about.
 
2013-04-12 01:37:07 PM  
"Hello, 911?  Fark is running Daily Mail links again!"
 
2013-04-12 01:43:00 PM  
Another good reason: police officer bleeding to death at roadside. Notify them by postal mail instead to be safe.

Wait, I take that back; that would be an emergency. Who knows what diseases that blood may contain? Call the fire department for a wash down.

/hyperbole
 
2013-04-12 01:49:43 PM  
More seriously, part of the problem is that 911 is a standard number, but who the fark knows that the non-emergency number is, even in their own town? You used to be able to call the operator or 411 information to get that information for free in non-emergency-yet-urgent situations, but no more.

The 911 system here is a regional dispatch center that lands you in a phone tree to select town and police/fire/ambulance. Common sense would dictate that one option encompass non-emergency calls, but that would need to be implemented everywhere or it would cause additional non-emergency calls clogging systems not equipped to handle them.

Doesn't NYC have a 311 or similar number for reporting potholes and similar non-emergency things of interest to the local government? Something like that on a national basis for reporting petty theft like "McDonalds gave me the wrong change" would be useful. "Stay right there. We'll be out in 3 weeks to yake your report"
 
2013-04-12 01:53:55 PM  
Alternative: Town prints up credit card sized calendars (to encourage people to keep them in wallet, etc) with a bunch of town numbers printed on the reverse. Send them out with property tax bills so there won't be any additional postage expense. Probably pay for itself in increased efficiency at the local town offices.

(I long for the ability to edit comments...)
 
2013-04-12 01:54:17 PM  

orclover: Cops all need to go away or we will never progress as a society.


Yes, because anarchy has proven to be so successful.

DarkSoulNoHope: May I ask why he hasn't been arrested, especially after 77 times?!


He's probably one of the local nut job.  Dispatchers and first responders in every area know theirs by name.  As long as they aren't reporting false emergencies (which endanger everyone because of the elevated emergency response they require) it is often just easier to deal with in the field rather than go to the trouble of charging them.

If he gets charged, he'll get a public defender (on the taxpayer's dime).  Everyone who touched the call will have to appear in court (on the taxpayer's dime).  He'll plead guilty or get convicted and will be sentenced to a fine and at most a few days in the county jail.  He'll do the time (being fed and housed on the taxpayer's dime) but he won't pay the fine, which will lead to him being arrested and again provided several days of room and board (again, on the taxpayer's dime).  That's a whole lot of money and time wasted on a guy who's just going to do the same thing again the next time it suits him.

An ass-kicking or two MIGHT slow him down, but even that approach would probably only be a short term deterrent and there's that pesky cruel and unusual punishment thing too.
 
2013-04-12 01:57:41 PM  
When people hear that I used to be a police dispatcher, they ask why I quit. It's because of wackos like this who abuse both the emergency and non-emergency lines. Look, dude, I'm not going to find you a hooker because you took Viagra and your date cancelled on you. Order a 'movie' from HBO and find a bottle of hand lotion. Use liberally and have a towel close by to clean up the mess. Problem: solved.

AndreMA: More seriously, part of the problem is that 911 is a standard number, but who the fark knows that the non-emergency number is, even in their own town? You used to be able to call the operator or 411 information to get that information for free in non-emergency-yet-urgent situations, but no more.

The 911 system here is a regional dispatch center that lands you in a phone tree to select town and police/fire/ambulance. Common sense would dictate that one option encompass non-emergency calls, but that would need to be implemented everywhere or it would cause additional non-emergency calls clogging systems not equipped to handle them.

Doesn't NYC have a 311 or similar number for reporting potholes and similar non-emergency things of interest to the local government? Something like that on a national basis for reporting petty theft like "McDonalds gave me the wrong change" would be useful. "Stay right there. We'll be out in 3 weeks to yake your report"


Several areas use 311 in that way, but it hasn't been universally adapted. Also, LA has 1-877-ASK-LAPD.
 
2013-04-12 02:17:15 PM  
Every community should have a web site like this:

http://whentocall911.com/call911.htm
 
2013-04-12 02:21:08 PM  

aevorea:

Several areas use 311 in that way, but it hasn't been universally adapted. Also, LA has 1-877-ASK-LAPD.


There's the problem, yes. Especially for someone passing through or visiting; they're unlikely to know the appropriate local number and fall back on 911. Number portability and cellphones complicate matters. Maybe a national system with a similar number where one selects location by either zip code or tradtitional area code + exchange. I don't think cell phone tower triangulation works in realtime.

Thanks for your time as a dispatcher -- often a thankless job, I'm sure.
 
2013-04-12 02:29:54 PM  

xtrc8u: Every community should have a web site like this:

http://whentocall911.com/call911.htm


That looks good, but seems geared toward medical emergencies.

Hypothetical: I have a court date and some idiot is illegally parked, blocking my driveway. If I don't appear, a warrant will be issued; I need that car moved immediately! (Assume I'm poor and can't afford a taxi, and no public transit is available). I'd call 911 in that case if only to create a record of the reason for my non-appearance (I'd also obviously also call the courthouse).

Parking violations in general are not life-threatening emergencies and are an inappropriate use of 911. What if there's a large fire, growing in magnitude, and a car is illegally parked in front of a hydrant that I think is likely to be needed shortly? What about a police officer blocking a handicapped spot when not on an emergency call (example: visibly just buying something at a convenience store)?
 
2013-04-12 02:30:01 PM  
Leaving This Here:

i102.photobucket.com
 
2013-04-12 02:35:58 PM  

AndreMA: xtrc8u: Every community should have a web site like this:

http://whentocall911.com/call911.htm

That looks good, but seems geared toward medical emergencies.

Hypothetical: I have a court date and some idiot is illegally parked, blocking my driveway. If I don't appear, a warrant will be issued; I need that car moved immediately! (Assume I'm poor and can't afford a taxi, and no public transit is available). I'd call 911 in that case if only to create a record of the reason for my non-appearance (I'd also obviously also call the courthouse).

Parking violations in general are not life-threatening emergencies and are an inappropriate use of 911. What if there's a large fire, growing in magnitude, and a car is illegally parked in front of a hydrant that I think is likely to be needed shortly? What about a police officer blocking a handicapped spot when not on an emergency call (example: visibly just buying something at a convenience store)?


I don't disagree with you.  I tend to focus on one function of 911.
 
2013-04-12 03:26:01 PM  
Not sure those are " reasons not to call" as much as " inadequate reasons for calling."
 
2013-04-12 03:59:52 PM  
The cops will show up and they're almost all assholes?
 
2013-04-12 04:11:30 PM  
Pocket-dialed "Emergency" last night when I left home. Stupid phone will dial emergency if you hit '999', '000', or other odd combinations including '911'. Even if the keypad is locked.

Got a call back, and they were understanding. They didn't even bother to check up on my residence after they learned I pocket-dialed and my girlfriend was asleep. I appreciate that they didn't go to my home and wake up my girlfriend, though I told them that I understood if they had to follow protocol and check to make everything was okay. But, what if I was beating my girlfriend and she called 911, and I took the phone and ran?

On the one hand I appreciate not being checked up on and having my girlfriend woken up. On the other, what if that situation were the case? Maybe they could tell by my apologetic nature that everything was okay, but what if I were a pathological liar?

I'm so torn about it.

/CSB
//Phone in pocket is a bad reason to call 911
 
2013-04-12 04:21:22 PM  
All 911 calls should be forwarded to the caller's mom for pre-screening.
 
2013-04-12 04:22:21 PM  
Or  give the dispatchers a button that charges $50 to a caller's phone bill.
 
2013-04-12 04:29:06 PM  

BarkingUnicorn: All 911 calls should be forwarded to the caller's mom for pre-screening.


BarkingUnicorn: Or  give the dispatchers a button that charges $50 to a caller's phone bill.


I like both of these ideas.
 
2013-04-12 05:52:27 PM  
911 just rings here.
I have 160 acres, I have numerous places to hide objectionable visitors. Not to mention the wildlife.
Shortwave radio works just fine though
/hillbilly
 
2013-04-12 05:52:42 PM  

AndreMA: xtrc8u: Every community should have a web site like this:

http://whentocall911.com/call911.htm

That looks good, but seems geared toward medical emergencies.

Hypothetical: I have a court date and some idiot is illegally parked, blocking my driveway. If I don't appear, a warrant will be issued; I need that car moved immediately! (Assume I'm poor and can't afford a taxi, and no public transit is available). I'd call 911 in that case if only to create a record of the reason for my non-appearance (I'd also obviously also call the courthouse).

Parking violations in general are not life-threatening emergencies and are an inappropriate use of 911. What if there's a large fire, growing in magnitude, and a car is illegally parked in front of a hydrant that I think is likely to be needed shortly? What about a police officer blocking a handicapped spot when not on an emergency call (example: visibly just buying something at a convenience store)?


Calling the regular police department line to make a report will cover those situations. The police will be more than happy to promptly to ticket the idiot and have him/her towed. Those fines are money-makers for the PD. And if there's a large fire, the police are more than likely already on the scene.
 
2013-04-12 06:10:42 PM  
National Telecommunicator Week starts Monday.

Hug a dispatcher


/I will be accepting hugs because it is a cheap way to cop a feel

*wiggles eyebrows*
 
2013-04-12 06:53:54 PM  

AndreMA: More seriously, part of the problem is that 911 is a standard number, but who the fark knows that the non-emergency number is, even in their own town? You used to be able to call the operator or 411 information to get that information for free in non-emergency-yet-urgent situations, but no more.

The 911 system here is a regional dispatch center that lands you in a phone tree to select town and police/fire/ambulance. Common sense would dictate that one option encompass non-emergency calls, but that would need to be implemented everywhere or it would cause additional non-emergency calls clogging systems not equipped to handle them.

Doesn't NYC have a 311 or similar number for reporting potholes and similar non-emergency things of interest to the local government? Something like that on a national basis for reporting petty theft like "McDonalds gave me the wrong change" would be useful. "Stay right there. We'll be out in 3 weeks to yake your report"


Or you could google it.

If you don't have google you do have a phone book
 
2013-04-13 01:44:51 AM  

GrizzlyPouch: Or you could google it.

If you don't have google you do have a phone book


I go out of my way to get the most basic cell phone possible, and pester my carrier to disable SMS and internet access. I want a phone that is a phone.
 
2013-04-13 02:31:06 AM  

WordyGrrl: Calling the regular police department line to make a report will cover those situations.


Last time I did that (five or six years ago, in San Francisco) I was on hold for over 20 minutes.

As compared to 911, where the hold times are under a minute.

/watched a group of guys chase down some guy on the street, start beating him.  911 had me on hold for probably 45 seconds
//you'd be surprised how badly a guy can get beat up in 45 seconds.
///dispatcher told me to stay there until the cops arrived. Uh, and wait for those guys to see me, looking at them, on the phone? Don't think so.
 
2013-04-13 02:00:56 PM  

JustGetItRight: orclover: Cops all need to go away or we will never progress as a society.

Yes, because anarchy has proven to be so successful.


Actually, there are some places where public order is maintained by local gangs instead. No idea how effective that is, though.
 
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