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(Oxford University)   What if you were under constant surveillance by a computer programmed to write speeding tickets? You'd be a good case study of ambiguous specifications   (blog.practicalethics.ox.ac.uk) divider line 8
    More: Interesting, case study, programming, specifications, surveillance, automated system, environmental mitigation, regulatory offences, algorithm design  
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1973 clicks; posted to Geek » on 12 Apr 2013 at 11:49 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-12 11:51:00 AM
Nothing to see here citizen.
 
2013-04-12 12:13:02 PM
There was a kerfuffle when open-road tolling was adopted here. Some tinfoil-hat realized that They could measure the time between toll sensors, and deduce one's speed, and issue a ticket if warranted. Never materalized - but they may just have been ahead of their time.
 
2013-04-12 01:04:10 PM
"You have one point left on your license."

www.tasteofcinema.com
 
2013-04-12 02:17:24 PM
The end of the article notes that going down hill with cruise control on the car exceeded the speed limit and "This inability for a driver to have precision control over her speed provides justification for a buffer zone." I fully agree with buffer zones, and I feel the limits are too low in many open places in NA, but to say you can;t have presision control over the speed of a vehicle with both accelerator and brake pedals is insane.

People would revolt if this type of thing happened on a grand scale. It is dehumanizing to have computers watch and control every move we make.

/I know this is on it's way
//I support the watching because it yeilds usefull scientific data, it's the control I don't like.
 
2013-04-12 02:26:08 PM

Ajanu: //I support the watching because it yeilds usefull scientific data, it's the control I don't like.


Watching human behavior always leads to someone wanting to change human behavior.  Given the nature of government, that typically means coercion or force.  So I don't support the watching.
 
2013-04-12 02:35:24 PM

Ajanu: The end of the article notes that going down hill with cruise control on the car exceeded the speed limit and "This inability for a driver to have precision control over her speed provides justification for a buffer zone." I fully agree with buffer zones, and I feel the limits are too low in many open places in NA, but to say you can;t have presision control over the speed of a vehicle with both accelerator and brake pedals is insane.

People would revolt if this type of thing happened on a grand scale. It is dehumanizing to have computers watch and control every move we make.

/I know this is on it's way
//I support the watching because it yeilds usefull scientific data, it's the control I don't like.


We should not have precision control of speed like that.  It is not real-world applicable.  To have that kind of control would make travel a very sterile experience.  You want that, then take the train or a bus.
 
2013-04-12 10:43:16 PM
Then depending on how they configure it I would get lots of speeding tickets. Once someone figures out how much they're allowed to go over before getting a ticket they'll run that speed. Then there's the idea that a single ticket would be issued per driving cycle based on time and amount over the limit. That's actually an interesting concept that you could go an entire day at 5 over and get some ticket that covers that, or maybe go 50 over for a little while and end up with a similar ticket.

Then again I am surprised they haven't tried to speed limit cars based on GPS location. If you're in a 55 zone you only get to go maybe 60 or 65 tops. It would absolutely suck and I'd want nothing to do with it. But, I'm surprised it hasn't been tried.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-04-13 09:09:19 AM
NBSV

It's been done.

Search terms: acme rent-a-car speed ticket

A rental car company programmed its computers to bill the customer $150 every time the car exceeded a designated speed for some amount of time. The company lost the ensuing lawsuit. The fee bore no rational relation to actual costs, making it an illegal penalty clause. A penalty can be disclosed in giant flashing neon lights and it's still unenforceable.
If they wanted their cars to go slow they could have had the engine control computer reprogrammed.
 
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