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(Ars Technica)   Russian company builds 26th fastest computer in the world. Gets 1 billion floating point operations on a gallon of heavy fuel oil   (arstechnica.com) divider line 6
    More: Unlikely, Russians, United States, trade restriction, belly-flops, u.s. national, high-performance computing, Nuclear Physics, supercomputers  
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916 clicks; posted to Geek » on 12 Apr 2013 at 10:32 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-12 10:50:20 AM
Russians can't sell to US because import / export restrictions. Wonder where they will sell them to.
 
2013-04-12 10:55:49 AM
Two questions.

1. Why do you need to do such constant testing of nuclear whatevers in super computers that it merits 24/7 testing and constantly upgrading hardware?

2. Why did this Russian firm (apparently) get added to the threat list by merely building a super computer?
 
2013-04-12 11:01:23 AM
Just use OpenCL and chain a bunch of ATI 7970 cards together.  At 4.3 TFLOPS a card, you'll get there at some point.  At 200W a card though, better stock up on nice power supplies.
 
2013-04-12 12:10:05 PM
Guess it takes a super-computer to control a multi-million bot spam army.
 
2013-04-12 12:11:50 PM
Dr. Goldshnoz:

1. Why do you need to do such constant testing of nuclear whatevers in super computers that it merits 24/7 testing and constantly upgrading hardware?

The argument goes something like this:  People want to know if (1) the nuclear stockpile still works as intended, and (2) if it does begin to fail, whether new weapons designs will work.  This has to be done by pure simulation, since new nuclear tests are banned.  Despite having giant supercomputers, simulation a nuclear explosion is extremely difficult and relies on a number of untested or partially tested approximations.  So people want to keep improving the simulations and see how much the predictions change.  You can get by with fewer approximations if you increase the computational complexity of the simulation.  This requires bigger supercomputers.  The testing isn't 24/7; it takes time to develop and valdiate new simulations before they can be used in new tests.

2. Why did this Russian firm (apparently) get added to the threat list by merely building a super computer?

The article says:  "As for why T-Platforms was named to the Entity List, the notice states that the company was 'listed as the ultimate consignee on multiple automated export system (AES) records filed for the export of dual-use items controlled for national security reasons but shipped without the required licenses.'"  I can't quite parse the legal-ese, but it sounds like they were importing controlled hardware without authorization.
 
2013-04-13 04:20:22 PM
"PUT IT IN "H"!!!"
 
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