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(io9)   The possibility of an earth-like world orbiting our nearest neighbor has been a kind of holy grail of astronomy, but we found one   (io9.com) divider line 54
    More: Cool, astronomy, nearest neighbor search, logical possibility, Alpha Centauri A, Proxima Centauri, star systems  
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2013-04-11 07:32:33 PM
tfa: earth-sized, but not earth-like.
 
2013-04-11 07:40:01 PM

Sgygus: tfa: earth-sized, but not earth-like.


Beat me to it.
 
2013-04-11 07:43:38 PM
Unfortunately for any hope of finding life on this world, it orbits only about four million miles away. More than ten times closer than the distance between Mercury and our sun, and 23 times closer than the earth.

Subby picked the wrong cup...

4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-04-11 07:44:53 PM

scottydoesntknow: Unfortunately for any hope of finding life on this world, it orbits only about four million miles away. More than ten times closer than the distance between Mercury and our sun, and 23 times closer than the earth.

Subby picked the wrong cup...

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 450x300]


Maybe it's the planet of the Gorons.
 
2013-04-11 07:51:47 PM
Unfortunately for any hope of finding life on this world, it orbits only about four million miles away. More than ten times closer than the distance between Mercury and our sun, and 23 times closer than the earth.

"Sounds perfect!!!"
popgoestheweek.com
 
2013-04-11 08:33:42 PM
Awwe.  So close in other ways too.  Hopefully there are Earth-like planets in Earth-like orbits around each sun.
 
2013-04-11 09:10:24 PM
I hope in my lifetime that we will finally hear radio waves from other planets intelligent species.
 
2013-04-11 09:15:19 PM

cman: I hope in my lifetime that we will finally hear radio waves from other planets intelligent species.


And when those radio waves are decoded, they'll say, "Play more Zeppelin, Beatles and Stones.  Stop playing Nickelback and whatever the frak a Justin Bieber is."
 
2013-04-11 09:20:17 PM
Submitter should go to live there for a while and tell us how it is....
 
2013-04-11 09:25:25 PM
Me before reading this article: "Let me guess, we have not found anything resembling Earth except for specific characteristics"
Me after reading article: "I hate when I'm right"
 
2013-04-11 09:33:10 PM
even if its too hot for life, its still the closest star and thus a great canidate for future technologies to test their observational/scanning/whatever capabilities on.
 
2013-04-11 09:33:49 PM

cman: I hope in my lifetime that we will finally hear radio waves from other planets intelligent species.


I'll be fine if we can get some of our own broadcasts back! We lost 80% of the Patrick Troughton episodes due to stupidity at the BBC!
 
2013-04-11 09:34:45 PM
So there's an Earth-sized planet we can get to in a brief journey of 40,000 years?  fark this place, pack my bags!
 
2013-04-11 09:35:33 PM

Sgygus: tfa: earth-sized, but not earth-like.


rocky planets are all "earth-like"

Gas giants, earth-like, and Pluto.
 
2013-04-11 09:42:40 PM

doglover: Sgygus: tfa: earth-sized, but not earth-like.

rocky planets are all "earth-like"

Gas giants, earth-like, and Pluto.

images4.wikia.nocookie.net

You rang, doglover?
 
2013-04-11 09:44:41 PM

cman: I hope in my lifetime that we will finally hear radio waves from other planets intelligent species.


The thing that bothers me is we probably will never notice those. Radio popped up 100ish years ago. In that time it went from giant broadcast antennae with huge, clear, analogue signals to millions of tiny, little, digital things all over on all bands and a few big towers and satellites broadcasting DOWN.

But the vast majority of stuff is being converted into fiber optics already. Pretty soon, there's gonna be very little RF going up and even fewer ears on the sky. A turtle that might be visible from the outside but who isn't checking to see.

Besides, what if alien life communicates in gamma? It's highly energetic and blows through most obstacles. Why would they check radio?
 
2013-04-11 09:51:37 PM

AliceBToklasLives: So there's an Earth-sized planet we can get to in a brief journey of 40,000 years?  fark this place, pack my bags!


Venus and Mars are "earth sized" but hardly places you'd want to stay.
Alot goes into making a planet like earth, and this particular world seems to be missing most of it.

/Granted that these distances are almost "Reach out and touch" ranges. We'd be tempted to go just because we could.
 
2013-04-11 09:53:24 PM
When we do find an earth-like planet around alpha centauri, I call dibs on the religious fundy civ.
 
2013-04-11 09:55:29 PM
Just don't visit.  The native islanders will sex you up with fancy feasts and indigenous music but then they'll kill you before you leave...

/obscure?
 
2013-04-11 09:57:03 PM
Ugh.  I'm all for scientific progress, but it throws in harsh relief the idea that even though the universe is certainly teeming with life, we will just as certainly never know anything about said life.
 
2013-04-11 09:57:20 PM
 
2013-04-11 09:57:49 PM
To whom does the earth like world orbiting our nearest neighbor serve? Isn't that the question we need to ask?
 
2013-04-11 10:12:06 PM
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-04-11 10:15:39 PM

Precision Boobery: Ugh.  I'm all for scientific progress, but it throws in harsh relief the idea that even though the universe is certainly teeming with life, we will just as certainly never know anything about said life.


They will never know anything about us either, so don't lose any sleep over it...
 
2013-04-11 10:25:03 PM

Precision Boobery: Ugh.  I'm all for scientific progress, but it throws in harsh relief the idea that even though the universe is certainly teeming with life, we will just as certainly never know anything about said life.


You don't know that.

Could be someone unlocks teleportation tomorrow. Could be human colons produce alien ambergris and they really ARE butt farking hicks to harvest it. Could be the sun goes nova tomorrow.

No telling what's gonna happen so rather than making predictions about shiat you can't know about, just deal with the here and now and keep working at the good life.
 
2013-04-11 10:27:28 PM
We should totally capture this planet, bring it back here, put it in earth orbit and mine out all the platinum. We'd be rich!
 
2013-04-11 10:31:41 PM
MAKE NO ATTEMPTS TO LAND THERE.
 
2013-04-11 10:46:56 PM

doglover: rocky planets are all "earth-like"


Mercury is "earth-like"?  The moon is "earth-like"?

Bit of a stretch.

/to me, "earth-like" implies capable of having liquid water.
//to submitter, refer to doglover.
 
2013-04-11 10:49:10 PM

Precision Boobery: Ugh.  I'm all for scientific progress, but it throws in harsh relief the idea that even though the universe is certainly teeming with life, we will just as certainly never know anything about said life.


I believe we will some day.  Whether it takes 100 years, 1,000 years, or 100,000 years, we'll figure out FTL travel at some point.  It's a shame that none of us will likely be alive when it happens, but the one constant throughout history has been that no matter what the odds of getting there, or how inhospitable it may look, we don't stop trying to go to new places.
 
2013-04-11 10:53:01 PM

Sgygus: doglover: rocky planets are all "earth-like"

Mercury is "earth-like"?  The moon is "earth-like"?

Bit of a stretch.

/to me, "earth-like" implies capable of having liquid water.
//to submitter, refer to doglover.


To me, Earth-like, at a bare minimum, requires a molten spinning metal core, liquid water, and a gaseous atmosphere of some kind.
 
2013-04-11 10:58:58 PM

Sgygus: Mercury is "earth-like"? The moon is "earth-like"?


The moon's not a planet and ACCORDING TO WIKIPEDIA my definition is still in vogue.

I don't make this shiat up, I just read a lot.
 
2013-04-11 11:07:34 PM
"it orbits only about four million miles away"

S'mores!
 
2013-04-11 11:08:17 PM
I knew it was bullshiat when I saw "io9" next to the link. I clicked it anyway because I'm stupid like that.

This has to be the most-flogged media bullshiat headline in existence.
 
2013-04-11 11:08:37 PM
Since our nearest neighbor is the moon...
 
2013-04-11 11:09:09 PM

Sgygus: doglover: rocky planets are all "earth-like"

Mercury is "earth-like"?  The moon is "earth-like"?

Bit of a stretch.

/to me, "earth-like" implies capable of having liquid water.
//to submitter, refer to doglover.


Liquid water on a planet of our size is a tall order.   Can't be too close to the sun or too small left the solar wind carry it away.  Any bigger and gravity kills you as dead as the atmospheric pressure would.
Anything between Venus and Mars is practically workable.

/Right now its very difficult to detect planets smaller than Jupiter.
/Finding earth sized rocks is a big deal, even if they aren't perfect.
 
2013-04-11 11:10:59 PM

doglover: Sgygus: Mercury is "earth-like"? The moon is "earth-like"?

The moon's not a planet and ACCORDING TO WIKIPEDIA ACTUAL ASTRONOMERS my definition is still in vogue.

I don't make this shiat up, I just read a lot.


Reinforced that for you.

The inner planets, Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars, are referred to a terrestrial, because they're small and rocky and not giant blobs of gas.
 
2013-04-11 11:11:41 PM

doglover: I don't make this shiat up


To an astronomer, any atom larger that helium is a "metal" ...

I guess it depends upon your audience.
 
2013-04-11 11:15:13 PM
I went to a "does god exist" debate between two philosophy professors and both sides pissed me off. But the aspect that the non-theist went with that really grated on me was his namby  pamby "All this universe and we're the only life". And I wanted to jump down his throat with the astrobiologist idea that "We don't know what other life would even look like." SO, next time you read about earth sized or earth orbital zones keep in mind there could be all sorts of life we'd never recognize.

/Of course The Doctor created this universe
//You know, when he locked away Gallifrey
///Holy shiat, Gallifrey is in the Chrome spell check dictionary.
 
2013-04-11 11:22:02 PM

TuteTibiImperes: we'll figure out FTL travel at some point.


Sure, and Santa Claus really is a jolly fat man in a red suit that squeezes down chimneys. I really believe that will happen one day. I mean, if we can manipulate space/time and the energy levels to violate fundamental physical principles, what's a fat guy in a suit?

Um, I really want one of the new Litehawks, my cat chewed the rotors off the old one.

wildcardjack: "We don't know what other life would even look like."


Can we agree that it would use the same chemical elements we have here? The thing is, if you believe it won't, what the hell are our telescopes looking at when they look at spectral lines?
 
2013-04-11 11:23:03 PM
I came here to see the anti-space troll flailing in impotent frustration over wasted money on space exploration.

Sure, we should spend that money on twinkies for the poor of Mumbai instead.

Die.
 
2013-04-11 11:24:50 PM

Sgygus: tfa: earth-sized, but not earth-like.


I'll bet we could figure out a way to change planetary orbits if we really tried. Maybe start, ahem, "lassoing" asteroids and hurling them in a stream like a game of, uh, Asteroids. Once the orbit is more desirable, set up a robotic space station in Earth 2 orbit that produces drone rockets to gather resources around the system, and manipulate the atmosphere. Give the planet some time to recover from the asteroid strikes and such, then get the fark off this rock. Bonus: a lot of religionists wouldn't want to leave their beloved holy sites here on Earth- especially Muslims. Can't very well travel 4+light years to go on the Hajj. This sort of thing would take many years, of course, but I don't think any of the necessary technology is that far off. It wouldn't necessarily be as expensive as you might think, either. The way I see it, there are three basic technological hurdles: propulsion, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Propulsion would be fairly simple; we would need a new type of rocket technology, but there are several near-future ideas for that sort of thing, and even one we could potentially build now. If we could build a spaceship/factory with artificial intelligence sufficient to collect resources and carry out certain complex tasks, and capable of building robots and other machines, the rest of it would take care of itself in time. Obviously we aren't going to Alpha Centauri tomorrow, but considering the progress we've made in just the last few centuries, I'd be surprised if we weren't at least starting projects like this a thousand years from now, and probably quite a bit sonner.
 
2013-04-11 11:24:56 PM

wildcardjack: "All this universe and we're the only life"


I like to twist it around to "there is a 100% change of intelligent life developing in the Universe"
 
2013-04-11 11:25:31 PM

PC LOAD LETTER: wildcardjack: "All this universe and we're the only life"

I like to twist it around to "there is a 100% change of intelligent life developing in the Universe"


chance
 
2013-04-11 11:26:31 PM
And I had to find out about it from a shiatty Gawker site.
 
2013-04-11 11:28:35 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: TuteTibiImperes: we'll figure out FTL travel at some point.

Sure, and Santa Claus really is a jolly fat man in a red suit that squeezes down chimneys. I really believe that will happen one day. I mean, if we can manipulate space/time and the energy levels to violate fundamental physical principles, what's a fat guy in a suit?


Maybe it violates the laws of physics as we understand them now, but we're still trying to develop an understanding of how a lot works.  I have no solid idea of how we'd do it today, but I have plenty of faith that we won't stop until we find a way or the human race is no more.  If for no other reason, there wouldn't be all of that universe out there if there wasn't some means for us to explore it.

wildcardjack: "We don't know what other life would even look like."

Can we agree that it would use the same chemical elements we have here? The thing is, if you believe it won't, what the hell are our telescopes looking at when they look at spectral lines?


If we don't know what life evolved from a completely different set of circumstances and chemical bases than are found on Earth, how would we look for it?  It makes sense to start the searching looking for things that we know the look of.
 
2013-04-11 11:32:18 PM
All stars have terrestrial planets or moons in the habitable zone, near enough as makes no difference.
 
2013-04-11 11:36:37 PM
farking OLD news IS SO OLD

Discovery date16 October 2012so this is either a follow up or a repeat
or that abortion of a website just caught up with 9 months ago
 
2013-04-11 11:38:43 PM
I don't know about you, but I prefer to get my science news from I09. Followed closely by Subby's blog.
 
2013-04-11 11:40:21 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: TuteTibiImperes: we'll figure out FTL travel at some point.

Sure, and Santa Claus really is a jolly fat man in a red suit that squeezes down chimneys. I really believe that will happen one day. I mean, if we can manipulate space/time and the energy levels to violate fundamental physical principles, what's a fat guy in a suit?

Um, I really want one of the new Litehawks, my cat chewed the rotors off the old one.

wildcardjack: "We don't know what other life would even look like."

Can we agree that it would use the same chemical elements we have here? The thing is, if you believe it won't, what the hell are our telescopes looking at when they look at spectral lines?


Believing we will one day achieve FTL travel is like believing that we will overturn the laws of thermodynamics. It's not like breaking the sound barrier. Teleportation, Star Trek style, is pretty impossible.

I believe that Earthicans have a manifest destiny for the stars, but even at the speed of light, it would take us 8 minutes to reach the Sun.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_nearest_galaxies ; To get a sense of perspective, all the 'nearby' items on this list are thousands or millions of light years away. We ain't getting out of the Milky Way any time soon.
 
2013-04-11 11:40:33 PM

PC LOAD LETTER: wildcardjack: "All this universe and we're the only life"

I like to twist it around to "there is a 100% change of intelligent life developing in the Universe"


I know you're not new here. We assume humanity is intelligent but we have no proof that we are not just going thru the motions preset by some unknown actor or system.

Yes, it was that sort of debate.
 
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