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(Confluence Denver)   Visionary scientist is designing stem-cell technology that could regenerate damaged brain cells in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients. Oh, and she's 12   (confluence-denver.com) divider line 39
    More: Hero, stem cells, brain cells, Swathi Kompella, Parkinson, Alzheimer's Disease, Cure Alzheimer, Kompella, Swathi  
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2705 clicks; posted to Geek » on 12 Apr 2013 at 7:53 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-12 07:55:13 AM  
Let me guess. Indian or Chinese?

/dnrtfa
 
2013-04-12 08:04:05 AM  
Swathi first worked with a team in 2012 that tackled a stem-cell treatment for baldness, a project that led to her ideas for neural stem cells.

What kind of 11 year old is on a team of scientists? How does that even happen?
 
2013-04-12 08:09:13 AM  
No mention of a lab or methods or even an actual design.

She apparently has a vision though.
 
2013-04-12 08:12:55 AM  
I have a vision of unicorns that pee out cancer cures.
 
2013-04-12 08:24:32 AM  
I wonder if she has a boyfriend already.
 
2013-04-12 08:30:10 AM  
Best of luck to her, and I really hope she gets her ideas off the ground.
 
2013-04-12 08:36:30 AM  

uberaverage: I have a vision of unicorns that pee out cancer cures.


That's a load of bunk, everyone knows that only Unicorn farts are therapeutic.
 
2013-04-12 08:38:18 AM  
When I was 12, I was still learning how to wave bye-bye.
 
2013-04-12 08:50:25 AM  
So my kids aren't smarter than every one elses?  What a let down..


/tiger mom to the rescue!
//100% is no longer acceptable!
 
2013-04-12 09:01:16 AM  
At 12 I was using all my brainpower to figure out better ways to get porn out of America Online.

The science fair that year was pretty awkward for all involved.
 
2013-04-12 09:04:50 AM  
www.oxmonline.com

Knows something about stem-cell technology used to regenerate damaged cells.
 
2013-04-12 09:05:54 AM  

nocturnal001: At 12 I was using all my brainpower to figure out better ways to get porn out of America Online.

The science fair that year was pretty awkward for all involved.



When I was 12, all we had was the Sears catalogladies underwear section, BUT WE FAPPED TO IT ANYWAY!
 
2013-04-12 09:07:14 AM  

abhorrent1: Let me guess. Indian or Chinese?

/dnrtfa


Of course.  White kids are too busy updating their Facebook status, tweeting or stuck in the basement with their x-box or watching the Kardashians     Their parents are either putting them in bubble wrap  or letting the day care facility/school system be responsible for their upbringing College majors of choice will be psychology, sociology, womyns' studies or scumsuckingmaggot lawyer..  Anything as long as there is no math

Black kids don't need none of that academic stuff as that would be acting white.  Besides  they are too busy keeping it real while killing each other and celebrating their thug culture. when not wallowing in victim-hood. Parenthood is often undermined and college is also acting white.

Hispanic kids commit parenthood much too early to get involved in that academic  science stuff besides not enough of it is in their version of the Spanish language as the country has been much too slow in adapting to them and their culture.  Instead the country still has some expectation that they learn English..  Besides those vegetables need picked and lawns need cut.

Asian kids wreck the grade curve.
 
2013-04-12 09:07:19 AM  

HotWingConspiracy: No mention of a lab or methods or even an actual design.

She apparently has a vision though.


Yeah, she apparently does.  And please enlighten us all, what were you doing at 11-12 years old?  I would have thought that someone of your advanced age might be appreciative, rather than jealous of a slightly younger generation.

/guarantee that most Farkers had no idea what stem cells were when they were 11 years old.
/I know I didn't, but then again, I'm ancient in Fark years
 
2013-04-12 09:16:09 AM  

Lost_in_Korea: HotWingConspiracy: No mention of a lab or methods or even an actual design.

She apparently has a vision though.

Yeah, she apparently does.  And please enlighten us all, what were you doing at 11-12 years old?


Well if we're going by this criteria, I was designing advanced star fighters.

  I would have thought that someone of your advanced age might be appreciative, rather than jealous of a slightly younger generation.

Yeah I'm very jealous that she...wait what am I supposed to be jealous of here?

/guarantee that most Farkers had no idea what stem cells were when they were 11 years old.
/I know I didn't, but then again, I'm ancient in Fark years


They were discovered in 1978. To be aware of stem cells today you just have to watch or read news.
 
2013-04-12 09:18:57 AM  
hasty ambush:

Asian kids of 1st generation parents wreck the grade curve.

I think this is more accurate now.
 
2013-04-12 09:21:15 AM  

HotWingConspiracy: Lost_in_Korea: HotWingConspiracy: No mention of a lab or methods or even an actual design.

She apparently has a vision though.

Yeah, she apparently does.  And please enlighten us all, what were you doing at 11-12 years old?

Well if we're going by this criteria, I was designing advanced star fighters.

  I would have thought that someone of your advanced age might be appreciative, rather than jealous of a slightly younger generation.

Yeah I'm very jealous that she...wait what am I supposed to be jealous of here?

/guarantee that most Farkers had no idea what stem cells were when they were 11 years old.
/I know I didn't, but then again, I'm ancient in Fark years

They were discovered in 1978. To be aware of stem cells today you just have to watch or read news.


And I was already in the Army in 1978, so I was well past 11-12 years old
 
2013-04-12 09:28:05 AM  

give me doughnuts: nocturnal001: At 12 I was using all my brainpower to figure out better ways to get porn out of America Online.

The science fair that year was pretty awkward for all involved.


When I was 12, all we had was the Sears catalogladies underwear section, BUT WE FAPPED TO IT ANYWAY!


Kids today have no idea how tough it was on their elders.   Oh well, I suppose they will say the same thing in 20 years when we all have holodecks. "oh, you had to look at 1080p free porn videos to fap? Wow, why not just draw a picture in the dirt Mr. Caveman!"
 
2013-04-12 09:28:28 AM  
... so?

We really need to stop freaking out every time some under 18 does some support-level lab work.  Research isn't some sort of magical wizard-land where everyone involved has to be a super-genius with the  library of congress surgically implanted into their head.  If you can basically keep your shiat straight and can pay attention to something for weeks or months at a time, and you can convince a project lead of this, they'll find something for you to do.  I have undergrads who don't know refraction from diffraction running photoelectron analyses in my lab all the time.

Is it common to have a 12-year-old in your lab?  Sure.  But it's a matter of attention span, most 12-year-olds are more than  intelligent enough to contribute and even design subsidiary projects.  Science fair stuff and actual research science aren't all that different in difficulty level, the reason there are advisors and grad students running most of it is about knowing what isn't known yet and where to look more than anything else.

//Short version: I'm tired of these stories, and you'd think the fact that there's a new one every other week would eventually clue the news in to it not being particularly newsworthy.
 
2013-04-12 09:29:55 AM  
er, "is it  uncommon", rather.

Clearly, I am not an English postdoc (assuming those exist).
 
2013-04-12 09:37:33 AM  
I was about 8 when my school project was about creating sugar substitutes, much earlier than when they actually came out... if I could have patented it then, I'd be rich today.

It's all about having access to the right things, labs, people, etc.
 
2013-04-12 09:38:00 AM  
I know a 12 year old who wants to become president and has a great idea on how to bring peace to the middle east. Can we give him the hero tag too?
 
2013-04-12 09:47:14 AM  

Jim_Callahan: ... so?

We really need to stop freaking out every time some under 18 does some support-level lab work.  Research isn't some sort of magical wizard-land where everyone involved has to be a super-genius with the  library of congress surgically implanted into their head.  If you can basically keep your shiat straight and can pay attention to something for weeks or months at a time, and you can convince a project lead of this, they'll find something for you to do.  I have undergrads who don't know refraction from diffraction running photoelectron analyses in my lab all the time.

Is it common to have a 12-year-old in your lab?  Sure.  But it's a matter of attention span, most 12-year-olds are more than  intelligent enough to contribute and even design subsidiary projects.  Science fair stuff and actual research science aren't all that different in difficulty level, the reason there are advisors and grad students running most of it is about knowing what isn't known yet and where to look more than anything else.

//Short version: I'm tired of these stories, and you'd think the fact that there's a new one every other week would eventually clue the news in to it not being particularly newsworthy.


Perhaps the biggest benefit of these articles is inspiring smart/motivated 12-year-olds to realize that they might be able to do bigger and better things than their peers are usually doing, and demonstrating to adults that the kids can do it.
 
2013-04-12 09:55:17 AM  

GypsyJoker: Perhaps the biggest benefit of these articles is inspiring smart/motivated 12-year-olds to realize that they might be able to do bigger and better things than their peers are usually doing, and demonstrating to adults that the kids can do it.


Your assumptions being:
1) 12yr olds read these articles.
2) Are sufficiently mature, and possessing the necessary attention spans, to derive some form of inspiration from them.

In reality, these sort of articles are manufactured filler. They contain all the information content of a bad case of flatulence and should be treated as such.

Much like the "Science says green twigs cause cancer!" tripe that appears every 2 days like clockwork.
 
2013-04-12 10:07:41 AM  
*yawn* no mention of what it is she actually  does for this project.  As a matter of fact, it doesnt state how this supposed technology is going to work or how they are approaching it at all.  Its just a "wouldnt it be nice if...."

so... whatever.
 
2013-04-12 10:09:45 AM  

hasty ambush: Asian kids wreck the grade curve.


I know I'm a bad person for thinking this, but I was always amused by the "non-Asian minority" classification.
It must be very unsettling to believe for your entire life that the reason you're not achieving is because the white man is keeping you down. And then those damn asians had to show up and ruin everything.
 
2013-04-12 10:13:25 AM  
As has been pointed out, this is mostly a bs article. My nephew of the same age has a vision for mining asteroids and comets with lasers, but it really doesn't matter because he's 12. Now, if they have an actual working device and a contract with the appropriate corporations to create the devices specifically from their designs, then that is a story at a completely different level.
 
2013-04-12 10:19:22 AM  
Can we get her on the same team as that British 17 y/o who built a home PCR machine out of spare parts and 800$ of supplies?  I'm sure if we gave those two a good lab and a big budget they would push science forward by leaps and bounds.
 
2013-04-12 10:35:38 AM  

Alonjar: *yawn* no mention of what it is she actually  does for this project.  As a matter of fact, it doesnt state how this supposed technology is going to work or how they are approaching it at all.  Its just a "wouldnt it be nice if...."

so... whatever.


This specific article aside, do you really expect a casual article to give you enough information to properly understand the potential of Stem Cell therapies, and the specifics of the work being done? It's a Denver site, not a Scholarly Journal.
 
2013-04-12 10:49:19 AM  
LasersHurt:
This specific article aside, do you really expect a casual article to give you enough information to properly understand the potential of Stem Cell therapies, and the specifics of the work being done? It's a Denver site, not a Scholarly Journal.

No it's a focus on the cute kid piece.  Totally fluff & filler.  The curious thing is that this is a child working, yet where is the moral outrage from people who were very much "evil corporations, child slave labour" last year over Foxconn?   It's a given that if this article is real and she is both 11 and working.... some corporation somewhere is sponsoring the research.
 
2013-04-12 10:55:28 AM  

Vaneshi: LasersHurt:
This specific article aside, do you really expect a casual article to give you enough information to properly understand the potential of Stem Cell therapies, and the specifics of the work being done? It's a Denver site, not a Scholarly Journal.

No it's a focus on the cute kid piece.  Totally fluff & filler.  The curious thing is that this is a child working, yet where is the moral outrage from people who were very much "evil corporations, child slave labour" last year over Foxconn?   It's a given that if this article is real and she is both 11 and working.... some corporation somewhere is sponsoring the research.


Working in a shiatball factory at 16 for 60hrs/wk because your family needs money is slightly different than doing something you like a couple hours a day or a couple hours a week.
 
2013-04-12 11:58:12 AM  

pkellmey: As has been pointed out, this is mostly a bs article. My nephew of the same age has a vision for mining asteroids and comets with lasers, but it really doesn't matter because he's 12. Now, if they have an actual working device and a contract with the appropriate corporations to create the devices specifically from their designs, then that is a story at a completely different level.


Pretty much this. The majority of a scientist's job is to raise funds to pay for the next experiment, before it taken away by a corporation that keeps all the profits and dumps you to the curve when a hotter piece of tail walks by. It is the way of things.
 
2013-04-12 01:35:52 PM  

EvilEgg: Swathi first worked with a team in 2012 that tackled a stem-cell treatment for baldness, a project that led to her ideas for neural stem cells.

What kind of 11 year old is on a team of scientists? How does that even happen?


Good thing no one gave her a secret lab in the crater of an extinct volcano.....
 
2013-04-12 02:19:03 PM  
Sounds great.

Just waiting for the religious zealots and their politicians to speak up and condemn this research.
 
2013-04-12 03:53:09 PM  
Meanwhile... My kid just sniffed his hand after scratching his balls.
 
2013-04-12 05:14:42 PM  
Just when I thought I couldn't be any dumber. . . .good for her though.
 
2013-04-12 10:23:48 PM  
I never had stem cells to play with when I was 12 years old.
 
2013-04-13 01:20:19 AM  

give me doughnuts: nocturnal001: At 12 I was using all my brainpower to figure out better ways to get porn out of America Online.

The science fair that year was pretty awkward for all involved.


When I was 12, all we had was the Sears catalogladies underwear section, BUT WE FAPPED TO IT ANYWAY!


LUXURY! When I was young, we would have loved to have seen a Sears catalog--all we had were Betty and Veronica comics with pictures of Veronica sliding down the banister!
 
2013-04-13 08:48:27 AM  

GentlemanJ: give me doughnuts: nocturnal001: At 12 I was using all my brainpower to figure out better ways to get porn out of America Online.

The science fair that year was pretty awkward for all involved.


When I was 12, all we had was the Sears catalogladies underwear section, BUT WE FAPPED TO IT ANYWAY!

LUXURY! When I was young, we would have loved to have seen a Sears catalog--all we had were Betty and Veronica comics with pictures of Veronica sliding down the banister!


You were lucky, All we had was Betty Boop, I still don't know how we managed to find that sexy enough to fap to, but there was fapping to be done and we used what was at hand.
 
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