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(WRAL)   In today's official report of You Don't Say, North Carolina is deficient in math and science education   (wraltechwire.com) divider line 110
    More: Obvious, North Carolina, secondary education, report cards, achievement gap, primary care physicians  
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1618 clicks; posted to Politics » on 11 Apr 2013 at 4:26 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-12 08:51:53 AM
Well considering we just voted in a republican governor after 23 years and prior to that the democrats ran the state for 100 years. Whose fault is it? The republican who has only been on office12 weeks of course.
 
2013-04-12 08:57:02 AM

Onkel Buck: Well considering we just voted in a republican governor after 23 years and prior to that the democrats ran the state for 100 years. Whose fault is it? The republican who has only been on office12 weeks of course.


This is not a party issue, it is a state issue (where NC is not alone) minimal emphasis on education is catching up to them.
 
2013-04-12 09:01:35 AM

monoski: Onkel Buck: Well considering we just voted in a republican governor after 23 years and prior to that the democrats ran the state for 100 years. Whose fault is it? The republican who has only been on office12 weeks of course.

This is not a party issue, it is a state issue (where NC is not alone) minimal emphasis on education is catching up to them.


I agree, but its more fun to pass blame and you know it! That way you dont have to fix it.
 
2013-04-12 09:07:01 AM

Onkel Buck: monoski: Onkel Buck: Well considering we just voted in a republican governor after 23 years and prior to that the democrats ran the state for 100 years. Whose fault is it? The republican who has only been on office12 weeks of course.

This is not a party issue, it is a state issue (where NC is not alone) minimal emphasis on education is catching up to them.

I agree, but its more fun to pass blame and you know it! That way you dont have to fix it.


And your original statement wasn't entirely accurate.  Jim Holshouser and Jim Martin were Republican Governors (73-77, 85-93).
 
2013-04-12 09:18:49 AM

UNC_Samurai: This is where you see the Hispanic influx, to work the various cotton, strawberry, corn, sweet potatoes, and tobacco fields.


How can you mention the changing demographics with the Hispanic influx and not mention my lovely home town of 'Little Mexico' (Sanford)?

Shame on you.
 
2013-04-12 09:32:11 AM

Lost Thought 00: Most notably, if you have the skillset to work in a STEM job (horrible buzzword acronym), you have the opportunity to work in almost any major city in the country. Why would you choose to subject yourself to NC?


As somebody who recently took a STEM job in NC, kick, reply, etc...

However, in my field (chemistry) there is very little geographical selection in applying for jobs. I can say "I want to apply for X type of job" be it academic, industrial or governmental and then you see who is hiring and where their R&D center or campus is. If you apply to Dow Chemical, for instance, you could end up in Midland, MI. Conoco Philips has a big center in Bartlesville, OK. There are a couple in big cities -- Eli Lilly in Indianapolis and P&G in Cincinnati, but that's not the rule. Academic jobs are obviously all over the map -- there's a lot of them in "college towns", obviously.

How many people do you think decide "I want to live in Bartlesville, OK" and then start looking to see what kind of work is there for a Ph.D. chemist?
 
2013-04-12 09:49:54 AM

CapeFearCadaver: Mrtraveler01: Is this true in Charlotte and the Triangle too.

No. The triangle is almost a blue utopia. All the metropolitan areas are fine, the rest of the state... well, while beautiful and wonderful to visit, it's best not to discuss anything besides the weather or fishing with rural locals.


A great big THIS. I live in Raleigh but my work takes me all over the state, often to small towns and rural areas well away from the more metropolitan cities. The level of ignorance, insularity, small-mindedness and bigotry demonstrated even by educated people in the rural areas especially is very discouraging. NC is a very beautiful state from one end to the other, but the people living outside the big cities really are from another world.

/once had a surveyor refuse to step onto a property owner's land
//said he wouldn't go on that 'devil worshiper's' property
///he had carved a totem pole out of a tree trunk and stood it up in front of his house
 
2013-04-12 09:57:50 AM

CapeFearCadaver: well, while beautiful and wonderful to visit, it's best not to discuss anything besides the weather or fishing with rural locals.


Kinda how I feel about Chicago.
 
2013-04-12 11:18:16 AM

Donnchadha: Lost Thought 00: Most notably, if you have the skillset to work in a STEM job (horrible buzzword acronym), you have the opportunity to work in almost any major city in the country. Why would you choose to subject yourself to NC?

As somebody who recently took a STEM job in NC, kick, reply, etc...

However, in my field (chemistry) there is very little geographical selection in applying for jobs. I can say "I want to apply for X type of job" be it academic, industrial or governmental and then you see who is hiring and where their R&D center or campus is. If you apply to Dow Chemical, for instance, you could end up in Midland, MI. Conoco Philips has a big center in Bartlesville, OK. There are a couple in big cities -- Eli Lilly in Indianapolis and P&G in Cincinnati, but that's not the rule. Academic jobs are obviously all over the map -- there's a lot of them in "college towns", obviously.

How many people do you think decide "I want to live in Bartlesville, OK" and then start looking to see what kind of work is there for a Ph.D. chemist?


Thing is in NC, there are a lot of chemistry jobs with pharma companies, but there is an income gap between chemists that work in companies located in the research triangle and those outside of that area.  This trend might be true for other states with metropolitan centers, but the educated people often flee to the higher pay and leave the core populace in the rural areas a little less educated in the process.  I don't see companies changing this pay disparity because cheap labor is an appeal to operating in NC.  The state does have several universities to pipe out chemists at an alarming rate.
 
2013-04-12 11:27:49 AM

garlicmonkey: Donnchadha: Lost Thought 00: Most notably, if you have the skillset to work in a STEM job (horrible buzzword acronym), you have the opportunity to work in almost any major city in the country. Why would you choose to subject yourself to NC?

As somebody who recently took a STEM job in NC, kick, reply, etc...

However, in my field (chemistry) there is very little geographical selection in applying for jobs. I can say "I want to apply for X type of job" be it academic, industrial or governmental and then you see who is hiring and where their R&D center or campus is. If you apply to Dow Chemical, for instance, you could end up in Midland, MI. Conoco Philips has a big center in Bartlesville, OK. There are a couple in big cities -- Eli Lilly in Indianapolis and P&G in Cincinnati, but that's not the rule. Academic jobs are obviously all over the map -- there's a lot of them in "college towns", obviously.

How many people do you think decide "I want to live in Bartlesville, OK" and then start looking to see what kind of work is there for a Ph.D. chemist?

Thing is in NC, there are a lot of chemistry jobs with pharma companies, but there is an income gap between chemists that work in companies located in the research triangle and those outside of that area.  This trend might be true for other states with metropolitan centers, but the educated people often flee to the higher pay and leave the core populace in the rural areas a little less educated in the process.  I don't see companies changing this pay disparity because cheap labor is an appeal to operating in NC.  The state does have several universities to pipe out chemists at an alarming rate.


The one upside of the Triangle's sprawl is Wake County is now expensive to live in, and while the schools are good it's an absolute nightmare dealing with a borderline retarded county school board and a hundred thousand parents all pulling in different directions.

As a result, places like Johnston, Nash, and Wilson counties are becoming bedroom communities for Raleigh, meaning the economic windfall actually does trickle out to cities like Smithfield, Wilson, and Zebulon. But further out in towns like Ahoskie, there's nothing to help them.
 
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