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(RedOrbit)   Breakthrough allows researchers to actually map brain activity associated with pain. Researchers used an MRI and the complete first season of Here Comes Honey Boo Boo, which seems unnecessarily cruel   (redorbit.com) divider line 17
    More: Interesting, brain activity, researchers, multiple systems, University of Colorado at Boulder, psychological pain, data mining, pain  
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900 clicks; posted to Geek » on 12 Apr 2013 at 2:49 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-12 10:05:02 AM
www.nextmovie.com

Unimpressed
 
2013-04-12 10:10:34 AM
images.christianpost.com
i177.photobucket.com
 
2013-04-12 12:31:40 PM

SmackLT: [images.christianpost.com image 262x393]
[i177.photobucket.com image 400x287]


that would be the emotional kind of pain ...
it is expected that emotional and physical pain would register differently and they did ...

will be more interesting if patients subjective reporting of pain matches up with the objective fMRIs.

http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.com/2010/02/boyfriend-doesnt-have- eb ola-probably.html

this is the pain chart which should be used ....

3.bp.blogspot.com

4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-04-12 02:58:33 PM
What do I care for your suffering? Pain, even agony, is no more than information before the senses, data fed to the computer of the mind. The lesson is simple: you have received the information, now act on it. Take control of the input and you shall become master of the output.

Chairman Sheng-ji Yang, "Essays on Mind and Matter"
 
2013-04-12 03:26:20 PM
This is why PETA will always ahve the moral high ground, people.
 
2013-04-12 03:31:54 PM
I don't buy all that research junk.

/adjusts nipple clamps
 
2013-04-12 03:36:47 PM
Heard about this on NPR the other morning along with thoughtful speculation on whether there's a danger of lazy doctors using this tech as a substitute for actually talking with and listening to their patients.

I suppose, if nothing else, this will be useful for identifying painkiller addicts trying to scam physicians.
 
2013-04-12 03:54:36 PM

phaseolus: Heard about this on NPR the other morning along with thoughtful speculation on whether there's a danger of lazy doctors using this tech as a substitute for actually talking with and listening to their patients.

I suppose, if nothing else, this will be useful for identifying painkiller addicts trying to scam physicians.


or we could just legalize drugs and not care that a small fraction of the people trying to get pain meds are addicts and the rest are actually in PAIN.
Strangely enough, this method could be used to HELP addicts.
By being able to separate the two groups, we could treat them appropriately.

/or we can continue to treat patients as criminals, with the wonderful outcomes which we currently have.
 
2013-04-12 04:05:26 PM

phaseolus: Heard about this on NPR the other morning along with thoughtful speculation on whether there's a danger of lazy doctors using this tech as a substitute for actually talking with and listening to their patients.


There is no substitute for when you walk into the doctor's office and hear those comforting words, "please state the nature of the medical emergency"
 
2013-04-12 04:10:24 PM
Come inside my astral plane
 
2013-04-12 07:05:17 PM

phaseolus: Heard about this on NPR the other morning along with thoughtful speculation on whether there's a danger of lazy doctors using this tech as a substitute for actually talking with and listening to their patients.


Listening would involve making judgements, which could wind up being incorrect. The MRI provides a quantifiable number and at its worst is 90% accurate. I'll go with the MRI, I don't want some doc saying the pain is just all in my head.
 
2013-04-12 07:13:31 PM
A thread in geek must always be in need of an xkcd comic.
imgs.xkcd.com

/hot
 
2013-04-13 09:08:36 AM

Arthur Jumbles: phaseolus: Heard about this on NPR the other morning along with thoughtful speculation on whether there's a danger of lazy doctors using this tech as a substitute for actually talking with and listening to their patients.

Listening would involve making judgements, which could wind up being incorrect. The MRI provides a quantifiable number and at its worst is 90% accurate. I'll go with the MRI, I don't want some doc saying the pain is just all in my head.


"The results showed a dulling effect in the brain-pain response in subjects who were given either a painkiller or placebo. "

The article doesn't come out and say it, but it does seem that what they are seeing in the brain is the extent the pain has an effect on you, not how much injury there is. In other words, it is all in your head. Someone with minor back pain from muscle over-exertion who has a low tolerance to pain would show more on an fMRI than someone with a bulging disc who has a high tolerance. Having a high tolerance for pain can be a problem when your doctor doesn't think you are in much pain because he doesn't see you react as much as the normal person would. My doctor didn't decide to send me to get an MRI on my back until I told him I couldn't tell how full my bladder was to know when I had to pee because the pain was masking it, as an after-thought during my visit. The look on his face went from "Ok, you are having a little back pain" to "OMG, why aren't you writhing on the floor".
 
2013-04-13 10:31:17 AM
Open challenge to AGW supporteers. I'll put you in this thing and then tell you climate change has just been proved not to be a problem. If the machine shows that you are relieved, I'll give you $100. If you experience pain at this good news, you give me $100 and I kick you in the balls.
 
2013-04-13 10:45:45 AM

MarkEC: Arthur Jumbles: phaseolus: Heard about this on NPR the other morning along with thoughtful speculation on whether there's a danger of lazy doctors using this tech as a substitute for actually talking with and listening to their patients.

Listening would involve making judgements, which could wind up being incorrect. The MRI provides a quantifiable number and at its worst is 90% accurate. I'll go with the MRI, I don't want some doc saying the pain is just all in my head.

"The results showed a dulling effect in the brain-pain response in subjects who were given either a painkiller or placebo. "

The article doesn't come out and say it, but it does seem that what they are seeing in the brain is the extent the pain has an effect on you, not how much injury there is. In other words, it is all in your head. Someone with minor back pain from muscle over-exertion who has a low tolerance to pain would show more on an fMRI than someone with a bulging disc who has a high tolerance. Having a high tolerance for pain can be a problem when your doctor doesn't think you are in much pain because he doesn't see you react as much as the normal person would. My doctor didn't decide to send me to get an MRI on my back until I told him I couldn't tell how full my bladder was to know when I had to pee because the pain was masking it, as an after-thought during my visit. The look on his face went from "Ok, you are having a little back pain" to "OMG, why aren't you writhing on the floor".


That's why the fMRI is better because it is removes the judgement calls, a person's perception of their pain is their pain.
 
2013-04-13 12:37:51 PM

Arthur Jumbles: That's why the fMRI is better because it is removes the judgement calls, a person's perception of their pain is their pain.


It could weed out liars trying to get pain meds, but it could also falsely make doctors assume that because it's not showing that you are in much pain that they don't need to look further into your complaint that is an actual medical condition.  A person who has a high tolerance for pain can ignore pain symptoms that would have other people doubling over and getting rushed to the ER. I don't take Novocaine for dental work including getting crowns. My dentist draws the line at root canals though. The last root canal I had he drilled down to the roots and shot it straight into the roots instead of numbing my whole lower jaw.
 
2013-04-13 01:11:18 PM

MarkEC: Arthur Jumbles: That's why the fMRI is better because it is removes the judgement calls, a person's perception of their pain is their pain.

It could weed out liars trying to get pain meds, but it could also falsely make doctors assume that because it's not showing that you are in much pain that they don't need to look further into your complaint that is an actual medical condition.  A person who has a high tolerance for pain can ignore pain symptoms that would have other people doubling over and getting rushed to the ER. I don't take Novocaine for dental work including getting crowns. My dentist draws the line at root canals though. The last root canal I had he drilled down to the roots and shot it straight into the roots instead of numbing my whole lower jaw.


It will be a great boon for people who suffer from chronic pain who can't get medical personnel to take their condition seriously because they can't find an underlying medical cause or believe that the condition they do know about shouldn't be causing that level of pain. This will tell doctors that a person's pain is real, that it exists, and that it needs to be treated.
 
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