Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Serious Eats)   The Return to the Fark Food Thread: Seared scallops? Grilled shrimp? Tilapia en papillote? Blackened catfish? When it's time to dress up your catch, how do you like to prepare seafood?   (seriouseats.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting  
•       •       •

1748 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Apr 2013 at 5:00 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



262 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-04-11 02:40:25 PM  
Achiote tilapia (or swai).
 
2013-04-11 02:40:26 PM  
fark YEAH FOOD THREAD!!!!

Who wants my recipe for smoked brook trout?!
 
2013-04-11 02:40:32 PM  
deep fry that whiskery sumbiatch.
 
2013-04-11 02:41:36 PM  
By the way is this going to go green like they used to or is it just for TFD? I might kick  out a sponsorship for a good recipe today...
 
2013-04-11 02:41:45 PM  
I wrap my skrimps in bacon.
 
2013-04-11 02:41:49 PM  
Sashimi.

That is all.
 
2013-04-11 02:42:00 PM  
I trust the good Captain Highliner. Just a little catsup for dipping the 'sticks and I'm good to go.
 
2013-04-11 02:42:03 PM  
One of my favorite dinners is pan-seared halibut served with a chipotle-lime-garlic-honey butter.
 
2013-04-11 02:42:10 PM  
I really like this mustard and brown sugar glaze on salmon (recipe)

farm4.static.flickr.com
 
2013-04-11 02:42:29 PM  
Pierre Franey Poached Cod in Lemon Butter Sauce

http://www.food.com/recipe/poached-cod-with-lemon-butter-sauce-15972 0

don't forget the chopped capers
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-11 02:42:51 PM  

make me some tea: Achiote tilapia (or swai).


Achiote? I know, googleFu and all, but.. what's that?


Sapper_Topo: fark YEAH FOOD THREAD!!!!

Who wants my recipe for smoked brook trout?!


Well, yeah, how do you smoke it? I loved smoked salmon when I tried it before, and I'm not even that big a salmon fan.
 
2013-04-11 02:43:11 PM  
For shrimp, you can't go wrong with this recipe.  Stupidly easy and delicious:


Ingredients:

1 pound large shrimp, peeled and deveined2 pounds broccoli florets4 Tablespoons olive oil, separatedZest of one lemonSalt and pepperGarlic powderDirections:

Preheat oven to 425°F.On a large cookie sheet, toss together broccoli and 2 tablespoons of olive oil.  Lightly sprinkle with salt, pepper, and garlic powder.  Spread into single layer and place in oven for 10 minutes.In a bowl, toss together shrimp, lemon zest, remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil, salt and pepper.Add shrimp to broccoli and carefully toss.  Place back in oven for 10 minutes, tossing once halfway through, or until broccoli is tender and brown around the edges.Remove from oven and serve!  farm8.staticflickr.com
 
2013-04-11 02:43:36 PM  

Rev.K: Sashimi.

That is all.


i could do this. If sushi and sashimi weren't so expensive at the restaurants, i'd be on it every day.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-11 02:43:43 PM  

ahab: I really like this mustard and brown sugar glaze on salmon (recipe)

[farm4.static.flickr.com image 500x333]


I remember when DonWrite tried that. He raved about it.
 
2013-04-11 02:44:18 PM  
Just a quick turn under the broiler, please.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-11 02:44:41 PM  

sleeping martyr: Rev.K: Sashimi.

That is all.

i could do this. If sushi and sashimi weren't so expensive at the restaurants, i'd be on it every day.


Sashimi grade tuna and such is pretty damn expensive, but when wifey and I got some a little while back and rolled our own maki it was 100% worth it. Wow was that a good (though messy) time.
 
2013-04-11 02:44:51 PM  

DGS: ahab: I really like this mustard and brown sugar glaze on salmon (recipe)

[farm4.static.flickr.com image 500x333]

I remember when DonWrite tried that. He raved about it.


Now that I think about it, it's almost the same as the glaze I put on my corned beef to make it awesome.
 
2013-04-11 02:44:59 PM  
i have a soft spot for angel hair pasta tossed in basil, garlic, shallot and butter then topped with grilled shrimp/scallops.
 
2013-04-11 02:45:42 PM  
Scallops I season with garlic powder and Old Bay, then sear in a hot pan with olive oil and butter, then serve over risotto.
Sole I make sole meuniere.
Trout I season and pan saute
Salmon I cook in a hot pan skin side down until the skin is crispy, then a hoisin glaze
Ahi I sear on one side with sesame oil
Skrimps are stir fried with veggies or grilled
Crab and lobster are steamed

That's pretty much my seafood repitoire besides fish sticks.
 
2013-04-11 02:49:10 PM  
Anyone try these yet? Bow hated them. I wouldn't even take one from him after I saw the look on his face when he put one in his mouth.

www.trbimg.com
 
2013-04-11 02:49:11 PM  
With fish, I'm all about toweling off the filet, then rubbing with spice mixtures like a good Indian curry, or a lemon-garlic-pepper thing.  I can't say enough good things about the recipes in Moosewood Restaurant's "Simple Suppers" which is, oddly enough vegetarian plus fish.  The Barbecue Bible is a can't miss source as well.

Once they've marinated/sat for a few hours I'll just put fillets under the broiler for a few minutes per side.  I usually f*ck up fish on the grill, mostly due to inexperience.
 
2013-04-11 02:49:40 PM  

DGS: make me some tea: Achiote tilapia (or swai).

Achiote? I know, googleFu and all, but.. what's that?


Sapper_Topo: fark YEAH FOOD THREAD!!!!

Who wants my recipe for smoked brook trout?!

Well, yeah, how do you smoke it? I loved smoked salmon when I tried it before, and I'm not even that big a salmon fan.


This is pretty complex so take notes. Keep in mind I learned how to smoke small brookies when I was about 8 years old. But I guarantee you that you will never have better smoked fish.

Mix a brine of salt water: Dissolve enough salt and water to float an egg in a container large enough to hols as many small brook trout as you have either caught or have on hand (I have used rainbow trout fillets but small gutted brookies work the best)

Brine the fish overnight in the salt water mixture.

Remove fish from brine and rinse in cold water.

Place in smoker with a mix of hardwood chips of your choice. (I use Alder and Cherry)

Smoke at roughly 165 degrees until flesh separates easily from the bone.

Let the fish cool and what you have is small tasty little fish jerkies! Your kids will eat them fast so eat a few before they get to them.
 
2013-04-11 02:50:36 PM  

GladGirl: One of my favorite dinners is pan-seared halibut served with a chipotle-lime-garlic-honey butter.


This, plus a couple of other favorites: Oil-poached halibut with a sherry-tomato vinaigrette, and baked sole fillets with some panko breadcrumbs and a garlic-herb butter.
 
2013-04-11 02:50:40 PM  

thismomentinblackhistory: Anyone try these yet? Bow hated them. I wouldn't even take one from him after I saw the look on his face when he put one in his mouth.

[www.trbimg.com image 580x326]


I tried them. The crust isn't crispy. I prefer the McFish sandwich.
 
2013-04-11 02:51:15 PM  
So is this going to green like the old food threads? anyone?
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-11 02:51:37 PM  
Tilapia (and spinach) en papillote has become one of my favorites. Quick and simple.

Use the thread's link to learn what en papillote means and how to arrange your parchment.

Preheat oven to 375F

Starting with the bottom layer and working up:
1) Put a huge pile of spinach down, it will wilt and the seemingly huge portion will dramatically shrink.
2) Salt/pepper to taste
3) 1-2 slices of lemon
4) Tilapia
5) Salt/pepper to taste (yes, both)
6) Oil or a little butter
7) Sprig of thyme, minced garlic (optional)

Seal the pouch and put it on a tray/sheet, then toss in the oven to steam for 18-20 minutes.

Already portioned meals that you can serve with a starch (bread, rice, whatever) if you wish.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-11 02:52:18 PM  

Sapper_Topo: So is this going to green like the old food threads? anyone?


Yes, it will be.
 
2013-04-11 02:54:04 PM  

DGS: Sapper_Topo: So is this going to green like the old food threads? anyone?

Yes, it will be.


Sweet! Liters better come ready with good fish recipes damnit!
 
2013-04-11 02:55:57 PM  
Pan fry or grill that shiat, yo.
 
2013-04-11 02:56:54 PM  

Sapper_Topo: So is this going to green like the old food threads? anyone?


Yeah, greener than garnish
 
2013-04-11 02:56:55 PM  
I think I'm coming to learn that I'm not the biggest seafood fan.  I mean, I like it, but I'll almost always prefer something that had legs.
 
2013-04-11 02:58:13 PM  
I tried butter poaching lobster recently. After bandaging the puncture wound I gave myself trying to get shell off, it turned out pretty good.
 
2013-04-11 02:58:18 PM  

DGS: make me some tea: Achiote tilapia (or swai).

Achiote? I know, googleFu and all, but.. what's that?


Sapper_Topo: fark YEAH FOOD THREAD!!!!

Who wants my recipe for smoked brook trout?!

Well, yeah, how do you smoke it? I loved smoked salmon when I tried it before, and I'm not even that big a salmon fan.


It's a paste made from ground annatto, salt and spices.

chilemojo.com.au

Basically break a piece off the brick, throw it in a bowl with minced or pressed garlic and juice of a lime, mush with a fork until it's a paste, and then use it to coat a fish filet, or pork steak, or chicken breast, even veggie if you want.

You end up with something like this:

yucatan.artist-at-large.com
 
2013-04-11 02:58:26 PM  

moogrum: I think I'm coming to learn that I'm not the biggest seafood fan.  I mean, I like it, but I'll almost always prefer something that had legs.


www.alaskaberingseacrabbers.org
Sup?
 
2013-04-11 02:59:34 PM  
Region Prep time / Cooking time
Normandy


10 min. / 30 min.

Ingredients
6 sole fillets (6 to 8 oz each)
8 tb salted butter
1 cup flour
1 lemon juice
Salt
Fresh black pepper
10 sprigs parsley

Sole Meuniere Recipe serve 6

Step 1: Remove the skin from the sole. Chop the parsley sprigs, discard the stems. Season fillets with salt and pepper.

Step 2: Spread the flour in a plate. Dredge fillets in flour, shaking off any excess flour.

Step 3: Melt 3 tablespoons of butter in a large skillet. Add a sole fillet or if the skillet is large enough, place 2 fillets at the same time. Cook over high heat for 5 minutes. Turn the fillet and cook on the other side for 5 minutes again.

Step 4: Set aside and keep fillets warm. Sprinkle with lemon juice and parsley. Cook the other sole fillets the same way. Add butter if needed.

Step 5: Melt the remaining butter in the skillet. When brown, remove from heat and place the sole fillets.

Serving: Serve immediately. Garnish with lemon slices. I add thin lemon slices to the pan while the butter browns. They are delicious.
 
2013-04-11 03:00:57 PM  
Blackened snapper is my favorite fish, conch puppies are my favorite overall.

And I'm getting a kick out of this thread because I own and operate a seafood market.
 
2013-04-11 03:01:16 PM  
Scallops in garlic butter served with homemade tzatziki sauce (that has marinated overnight).
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-11 03:02:17 PM  

SmackLT: moogrum: I think I'm coming to learn that I'm not the biggest seafood fan.  I mean, I like it, but I'll almost always prefer something that had legs.

[www.alaskaberingseacrabbers.org image 790x391]
Sup?


heh, nice.


make me some tea: It's a paste made from ground annatto, salt and spices.

[chilemojo.com.au image 308x225]

Basically break a piece off the brick, throw it in a bowl with minced or pressed garlic and juice of a lime, mush with a fork until it's a paste, and then use it to coat a fish filet, or pork steak, or chicken breast, even veggie if you want.

You end up with something like this:

[yucatan.artist-at-large.com image 800x533]


That looks interesting.. I just have no idea what that annatto tastes like. Methinks I'll have to try that out and see what the flavor is like. With wifey's tastes so different from mine, we often have to find middle ground. :D
 
2013-04-11 03:02:39 PM  

the biggest redneck here: Blackened snapper is my favorite fish, conch puppies are my favorite overall.

And I'm getting a kick out of this thread because I own and operate a seafood market.


MMmmmmm I am jealous.
 
2013-04-11 03:03:05 PM  
thanks to whoever submitted this thread!

I like salt-water fish and shellfish of all kinds.  all.kinds.

not so much for freshwater fish, but I do like good non-muddy-tasting catfish and I do like trout.
 
2013-04-11 03:03:09 PM  

ahab: I really like this mustard and brown sugar glaze on salmon


I do mustard and honey on salmon, same thing.  Recipe?  Combine equal amounts of honey and mustard (I use dijon) so you end up with enough to cover the salmon.  Bake salmon as usual (350 for 20 minutes for a nice thick fillet).
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-11 03:03:14 PM  

PrivateCaboose: Scallops in garlic butter served with homemade tzatziki sauce (that has marinated overnight).


Go on.... :D
 
2013-04-11 03:04:00 PM  
Or my favorite - home steaming a bunch of blue crabs in equal parts water and beer.  Cover them in Old Bay.  Serve with butter and cajun seasoning.  Mmmmmmm.
 
2013-04-11 03:05:00 PM  

DGS: PrivateCaboose: Scallops in garlic butter served with homemade tzatziki sauce (that has marinated overnight).

Go on.... :D


It's one of my favorites to serve to a dude who has never really seen me cook.  It comes together in like 15 minutes and makes a really tasty appetizer.  Sadly dude now has seen most of my kitchen tricks.
 
2013-04-11 03:05:20 PM  

ahab: For shrimp, you can't go wrong with this recipe.


Never tried it, but I'm guessing after 10 minutes in a 425F oven your shrimp will be way overcooked.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-11 03:06:34 PM  

Purelilac: Scallops I season with garlic powder and Old Bay, then sear in a hot pan with olive oil and butter, then serve over risotto.
Sole I make sole meuniere.
Trout I season and pan saute
Salmon I cook in a hot pan skin side down until the skin is crispy, then a hoisin glaze
Ahi I sear on one side with sesame oil
Skrimps are stir fried with veggies or grilled
Crab and lobster are steamed

That's pretty much my seafood repitoire besides fish sticks.


It wasn't until we got cast iron to cook on that I really felt good about cooking salmon. We'd always just bake it and I was only mildly fond of how it came out. Searing it until the skin is crispy, with dill and salt, then getting the top a quick sear to finish, turned out fantastic. Here's an example of one I did that wifey and I were both pleased with.

i.imgur.com
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-11 03:07:58 PM  

PrivateCaboose: DGS: PrivateCaboose: Scallops in garlic butter served with homemade tzatziki sauce (that has marinated overnight).

Go on.... :D

It's one of my favorites to serve to a dude who has never really seen me cook.  It comes together in like 15 minutes and makes a really tasty appetizer.  Sadly dude now has seen most of my kitchen tricks.


Yes, but I haven't, and I want to learn this trick myself! heh.
 
2013-04-11 03:08:22 PM  
I used to eat a lot of tilapia until a marine biologist friend of mine ruined it for me.

My wife doesn't care for fish much, so I rarely cook it.  I do grill shrimp stuffed with goat cheese and wrapped in pancetta.
 
2013-04-11 03:08:43 PM  

DGS: Purelilac: Scallops I season with garlic powder and Old Bay, then sear in a hot pan with olive oil and butter, then serve over risotto.
Sole I make sole meuniere.
Trout I season and pan saute
Salmon I cook in a hot pan skin side down until the skin is crispy, then a hoisin glaze
Ahi I sear on one side with sesame oil
Skrimps are stir fried with veggies or grilled
Crab and lobster are steamed

That's pretty much my seafood repitoire besides fish sticks.

It wasn't until we got cast iron to cook on that I really felt good about cooking salmon. We'd always just bake it and I was only mildly fond of how it came out. Searing it until the skin is crispy, with dill and salt, then getting the top a quick sear to finish, turned out fantastic. Here's an example of one I did that wifey and I were both pleased with.

[i.imgur.com image 383x400]


I like salmon broiled with lemon and pepper best.
 
2013-04-11 03:09:33 PM  
The only "sea"food I cook is freshwater stuff I've caught myself. I'll order it at restaurants, but I've never actually cooked it at home.
With sunfish or trout, I usually just use some salt, pepper, lemon, and butter, and have it with some sauteed farmstand asparagus or foraged fiddleheads, depending on the season. Yeah, our Bass might be runty in New England, but we grow some mean asparagus.
 
2013-04-11 03:11:10 PM  

DGS: PrivateCaboose: DGS: PrivateCaboose: Scallops in garlic butter served with homemade tzatziki sauce (that has marinated overnight).

Go on.... :D

It's one of my favorites to serve to a dude who has never really seen me cook.  It comes together in like 15 minutes and makes a really tasty appetizer.  Sadly dude now has seen most of my kitchen tricks.

Yes, but I haven't, and I want to learn this trick myself! heh.


Tzatziki - greek yogurt (8 ounces or so), 1/2 to 1 whole cucumber (peeled and seeded, chop it and salt it and leave it for 10 minutes then press out the excess water), juice of half a lemon or up to a whole lemon, four cloves of garlic (smashed and minced), two tablespoons of dill, salt and pepper to taste.  Leave it overnight for best flavor - lasts up to a week or two.

Sear the scallops in a screaming hot cast iron pan filled with butter and just barely browned garlic.  Make sure you don't overcook.  Serve the scallops over dollops of tzatziki.  Boom, done.
 
2013-04-11 03:11:35 PM  

PrivateCaboose: Or my favorite - home steaming a bunch of blue crabs in equal parts water and beer.  Cover them in Old Bay.  Serve with butter and cajun seasoning.  Mmmmmmm.


Try some JO spices, especially their #2 on crabs. I'll have my internet operation back up in the coming months (had to shut it down due to fatherhood, too busy for everything), and if you remember to check my profile in a couple months I'll have that info back up. I ship crabs and spices and everything else all over the country.
 
2013-04-11 03:11:43 PM  
So when it comes to fish I have a couple of thoughts. 1) Most of the fish we eat in our house we catch. So there was a lot more diversity when we lived in ND. We eat a lot of trout now. B) I like to keep fish simple. I am not one who will eat Walleye because it doesnt taste like fish. Truth is I like the flavor of fish so most of my recipes will not disguise the flavor of fish, they will enhance it.

That being said here is how my MIL taught me to cook croaker and it works equally well with Rainbow Trout.

Take however many Rainbows you have caught and cleaned.

Lightly brush them with sesame oil.

Evenly salt them with kosher salt

Coat the bottom of a frying pan with sesame oil (this will depend on the size of your pan)

Heat on medium to medium high heat until water dropped in pops.

Fry fish on both sides until skin is golden and flesh flakes but is still firm.

Serve hot with rice and fresh kimchee ENJOY!
 
2013-04-11 03:12:32 PM  

dolphkhan: The only "sea"food I cook is freshwater stuff I've caught myself. I'll order it at restaurants, but I've never actually cooked it at home.
With sunfish or trout, I usually just use some salt, pepper, lemon, and butter, and have it with some sauteed farmstand asparagus or foraged fiddleheads, depending on the season. Yeah, our Bass might be runty in New England, but we grow some mean asparagus.


If I lived in New England, I would not hesitate to get fish and cook it myself.
 
2013-04-11 03:13:00 PM  

Nabb1: I used to eat a lot of tilapia until a marine biologist friend of mine ruined it for me.

My wife doesn't care for fish much, so I rarely cook it.  I do grill shrimp stuffed with goat cheese and wrapped in pancetta.


The vast -- and I mean VAST -- majority of the tilapia on the American market is farmed (it's all farmed) in Asia. In places where there's not much in the way of regulation. Shipped in frozen, thawed, and sold to an unsuspecting public.
 
2013-04-11 03:13:19 PM  

the biggest redneck here: PrivateCaboose: Or my favorite - home steaming a bunch of blue crabs in equal parts water and beer.  Cover them in Old Bay.  Serve with butter and cajun seasoning.  Mmmmmmm.

Try some JO spices, especially their #2 on crabs. I'll have my internet operation back up in the coming months (had to shut it down due to fatherhood, too busy for everything), and if you remember to check my profile in a couple months I'll have that info back up. I ship crabs and spices and everything else all over the country.


My boyfriend is a Maryland boy - I'm pretty sure he'd murder me if I used anything other than Old Bay.  No need to ship crabs to the DC area :)
 
2013-04-11 03:13:50 PM  

DGS: It wasn't until we got cast iron to cook on that I really felt good about cooking salmon. We'd always just bake it and I was only mildly fond of how it came out. Searing it until the skin is crispy, with dill and salt, then getting the top a quick sear to finish, turned out fantastic. Here's an example of one I did that wifey and I were both pleased with.

[i.imgur.com image 383x400]


It really does make a difference. I only liked salmon raw before I started doing it that way.
 
2013-04-11 03:14:06 PM  

the biggest redneck here: Blackened snapper is my favorite fish, conch puppies are my favorite overall.

And I'm getting a kick out of this thread because I own and operate a seafood market.


What kind of seafood and do you ship? Its hell to get good fresh seafood in Montana. This could open up a whole new market for you... Seriously!
 
2013-04-11 03:14:59 PM  

PrivateCaboose: the biggest redneck here: PrivateCaboose: Or my favorite - home steaming a bunch of blue crabs in equal parts water and beer.  Cover them in Old Bay.  Serve with butter and cajun seasoning.  Mmmmmmm.

Try some JO spices, especially their #2 on crabs. I'll have my internet operation back up in the coming months (had to shut it down due to fatherhood, too busy for everything), and if you remember to check my profile in a couple months I'll have that info back up. I ship crabs and spices and everything else all over the country.

My boyfriend is a Maryland boy - I'm pretty sure he'd murder me if I used anything other than Old Bay.  No need to ship crabs to the DC area :)


JO is based in Marlyand, it's what most of the crab houses use. A bit less spicy than OB, with a healthy dose of rock salt. If you've ever wondered what they're using that's so salty, that's it.
 
2013-04-11 03:16:36 PM  

Sapper_Topo: the biggest redneck here: Blackened snapper is my favorite fish, conch puppies are my favorite overall.

And I'm getting a kick out of this thread because I own and operate a seafood market.

What kind of seafood and do you ship? Its hell to get good fresh seafood in Montana. This could open up a whole new market for you... Seriously!


Everything, shipped a box to Missoula last week. I did it for several years, but then got too busy with home life to keep it all going. Wish I had shut down the walk-in side and kept the web biz going instead. It'll get started back up in the coming weeks.
 
2013-04-11 03:18:55 PM  

the biggest redneck here: Sapper_Topo: the biggest redneck here: Blackened snapper is my favorite fish, conch puppies are my favorite overall.

And I'm getting a kick out of this thread because I own and operate a seafood market.

What kind of seafood and do you ship? Its hell to get good fresh seafood in Montana. This could open up a whole new market for you... Seriously!

Everything, shipped a box to Missoula last week. I did it for several years, but then got too busy with home life to keep it all going. Wish I had shut down the walk-in side and kept the web biz going instead. It'll get started back up in the coming weeks.


Im pretty sure I have EIP. So when you are up and running let me know. Hell my office alone could probably make it worth your while!
 
2013-04-11 03:19:49 PM  

DGS: That looks interesting.. I just have no idea what that annatto tastes like. Methinks I'll have to try that out and see what the flavor is like. With wifey's tastes so different from mine, we often have to find middle ground. :D


It's a carribbean/yucatecan thing. I bought some annatto spice mix when I was in Belize and brought it home and made chicken, I've been a huge fan of annatto ever since. The one I posted is a Rick Bayless thing, though. I can't explain the taste, it's sorta its own thing. Not weird though.
 
2013-04-11 03:21:04 PM  

make me some tea: DGS: That looks interesting.. I just have no idea what that annatto tastes like. Methinks I'll have to try that out and see what the flavor is like. With wifey's tastes so different from mine, we often have to find middle ground. :D

It's a carribbean/yucatecan thing. I bought some annatto spice mix when I was in Belize and brought it home and made chicken, I've been a huge fan of annatto ever since. The one I posted is a Rick Bayless thing, though. I can't explain the taste, it's sorta its own thing. Not weird though.


Deets?  I was looking to vacation there in December but it's been hell finding something that includes meals.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-11 03:21:13 PM  

PrivateCaboose: DGS: PrivateCaboose: DGS: PrivateCaboose: Scallops in garlic butter served with homemade tzatziki sauce (that has marinated overnight).

Go on.... :D

It's one of my favorites to serve to a dude who has never really seen me cook.  It comes together in like 15 minutes and makes a really tasty appetizer.  Sadly dude now has seen most of my kitchen tricks.

Yes, but I haven't, and I want to learn this trick myself! heh.

Tzatziki - greek yogurt (8 ounces or so), 1/2 to 1 whole cucumber (peeled and seeded, chop it and salt it and leave it for 10 minutes then press out the excess water), juice of half a lemon or up to a whole lemon, four cloves of garlic (smashed and minced), two tablespoons of dill, salt and pepper to taste.  Leave it overnight for best flavor - lasts up to a week or two.

Sear the scallops in a screaming hot cast iron pan filled with butter and just barely browned garlic.  Make sure you don't overcook.  Serve the scallops over dollops of tzatziki.  Boom, done.


Thanks!
 
2013-04-11 03:21:30 PM  

Sapper_Topo: the biggest redneck here: Sapper_Topo: the biggest redneck here: Blackened snapper is my favorite fish, conch puppies are my favorite overall.

And I'm getting a kick out of this thread because I own and operate a seafood market.

What kind of seafood and do you ship? Its hell to get good fresh seafood in Montana. This could open up a whole new market for you... Seriously!

Everything, shipped a box to Missoula last week. I did it for several years, but then got too busy with home life to keep it all going. Wish I had shut down the walk-in side and kept the web biz going instead. It'll get started back up in the coming weeks.

Im pretty sure I have EIP. So when you are up and running let me know. Hell my office alone could probably make it worth your while!


Will do. Put in 2,800 square feet of new tile on the retail side last month, re-did all the plumbing... with my daughter's health getting better all the time, the web biz will be the #1 priority in the coming months. Will be in touch by mid-summer at the latest...
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-11 03:22:48 PM  

make me some tea: DGS: That looks interesting.. I just have no idea what that annatto tastes like. Methinks I'll have to try that out and see what the flavor is like. With wifey's tastes so different from mine, we often have to find middle ground. :D

It's a carribbean/yucatecan thing. I bought some annatto spice mix when I was in Belize and brought it home and made chicken, I've been a huge fan of annatto ever since. The one I posted is a Rick Bayless thing, though. I can't explain the taste, it's sorta its own thing. Not weird though.


Sounds totally worth a try to me, and I like Bayless, so that works. Thanks for the idea. And that again gets me back to "let's do dinner", heh.
 
2013-04-11 03:29:00 PM  
Since the wife and I moved to Alaska, we've been catching massive amounts of fresh salmon and halibut.  I cook it every way I can, but one way I love is ceviche, especially in the summer.

Take two pounds of salmon fillets, and cut it into half inch chunks.  Then add some diced red onion, chopped tomatoes, two teaspoons of salt, some chopped fresh cilantro,, then cover everything with half a cup each of lemon and lime juice.  Add some hot sauce or cayenne pepper to taste.  Then let everything marinate in the fridge for a few hours.

I use it as a dip for tortilla chips, but my wife loves it straight out of the bowl.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-11 03:30:53 PM  

devildog123: Since the wife and I moved to Alaska, we've been catching massive amounts of fresh salmon and halibut.  I cook it every way I can, but one way I love is ceviche, especially in the summer.

Take two pounds of salmon fillets, and cut it into half inch chunks.  Then add some diced red onion, chopped tomatoes, two teaspoons of salt, some chopped fresh cilantro,, then cover everything with half a cup each of lemon and lime juice.  Add some hot sauce or cayenne pepper to taste.  Then let everything marinate in the fridge for a few hours.

I use it as a dip for tortilla chips, but my wife loves it straight out of the bowl.


I've never done this but I keep seeing it. I really have to give it a try.
 
2013-04-11 03:35:38 PM  
Upvote the threads he said.  We'll greenlight the good threads he said.

Unfreakable, we did not mean food threads!
 
2013-04-11 03:37:13 PM  
Catfish. Freshly caught = fantastic.

Filet the bastards and soak them in lemon juice, wasabi mustard, and a little bit of sweet white wine. I take 2 boxes of cornbread mix(although I'll be changing since I bought my grain mill). Add salt/pepper to taste, and give them a good coating. Fry 'em up in coconut oil.

/I sound fat
//Because I am fat
///Nom nom nom
 
2013-04-11 03:38:03 PM  

BusketsMcBride: Upvote the threads he said.  We'll greenlight the good threads he said.

Unfreakable, we did not mean food threads!


Phhhbt. It's once a week. You'll get over it.
 
2013-04-11 03:39:22 PM  

the biggest redneck here: Nabb1: I used to eat a lot of tilapia until a marine biologist friend of mine ruined it for me.

My wife doesn't care for fish much, so I rarely cook it.  I do grill shrimp stuffed with goat cheese and wrapped in pancetta.

The vast -- and I mean VAST -- majority of the tilapia on the American market is farmed (it's all farmed) in Asia. In places where there's not much in the way of regulation. Shipped in frozen, thawed, and sold to an unsuspecting public.


They are poop eaters.  Fish farms began stocking them to eat the poop generated by the other fish being raised.  Then they figured out they can sell the tilapia, too.  No matter where they came from, they were eating poop.  Either questionable, chemical and hormone-laden poop or all natural organic poop, but it was poop just the same.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-11 03:39:41 PM  

Purelilac: BusketsMcBride: Upvote the threads he said.  We'll greenlight the good threads he said.

Unfreakable, we did not mean food threads!

Phhhbt. It's once a week. You'll get over it.

 
2013-04-11 03:41:16 PM  
Can't believe I never had fish tacos until last year, but OH MY GOD WHAT HAVE I BEEN MISSING MY WHOLE LIFE.
 
2013-04-11 03:45:02 PM  

Nabb1: the biggest redneck here: Nabb1: I used to eat a lot of tilapia until a marine biologist friend of mine ruined it for me.

My wife doesn't care for fish much, so I rarely cook it.  I do grill shrimp stuffed with goat cheese and wrapped in pancetta.

The vast -- and I mean VAST -- majority of the tilapia on the American market is farmed (it's all farmed) in Asia. In places where there's not much in the way of regulation. Shipped in frozen, thawed, and sold to an unsuspecting public.

They are poop eaters.  Fish farms began stocking them to eat the poop generated by the other fish being raised.  Then they figured out they can sell the tilapia, too.  No matter where they came from, they were eating poop.  Either questionable, chemical and hormone-laden poop or all natural organic poop, but it was poop just the same.


So?  Don't catfish do the same, and crustaceans too?
 
2013-04-11 03:46:11 PM  

BusketsMcBride: Upvote the threads he said.  We'll greenlight the good threads he said.

Unfreakable, we did not mean food threads!


Actually, whenever there's a good TFD thread, also use the "Notify admins" link if it's got a lot of votes. Admins can clear out all of TFD with one click, and if we're processing a big queue, we don't always take the extra step of looking at what's been upvoted there before we get into the usual stuff.

But I don't see you guys upvote many TFD threads.
 
2013-04-11 03:48:34 PM  

PrivateCaboose: Nabb1: the biggest redneck here: Nabb1: I used to eat a lot of tilapia until a marine biologist friend of mine ruined it for me.

My wife doesn't care for fish much, so I rarely cook it.  I do grill shrimp stuffed with goat cheese and wrapped in pancetta.

The vast -- and I mean VAST -- majority of the tilapia on the American market is farmed (it's all farmed) in Asia. In places where there's not much in the way of regulation. Shipped in frozen, thawed, and sold to an unsuspecting public.

They are poop eaters.  Fish farms began stocking them to eat the poop generated by the other fish being raised.  Then they figured out they can sell the tilapia, too.  No matter where they came from, they were eating poop.  Either questionable, chemical and hormone-laden poop or all natural organic poop, but it was poop just the same.

So?  Don't catfish do the same, and crustaceans too?


My main problem with tilapia is that it's pretty flavorless, and not very healthy as far as fish goes.
 
2013-04-11 03:49:49 PM  

Unfreakable: But I don't see you guys upvote many TFD threads.


Because we're LAZY, that's why!
 
2013-04-11 03:50:16 PM  
Aw screw y'all with your fancy goddam fishes.

Here's how you cook crawdads.

First you gotta have a fryer or boiler, with a propane or NG burner to put it on.  Thus:
images-p.qvc.com

And some crawdads of course.  4-5lbs per person if they're big eaters.  Put them in a cooler and fill with water and a heavy shake of salt, let them sit 5 or so minutes, and then let the water out.  This will purge them.  Don't leave crawdads in standing water.  They'll die as soon as the oxygen runs out.  They can pull oxygen from the air instead, just let some water spray on them to keep them from drying out.  Pull out any dead ones you happen to see.

Fill the pot about 2/3 of the way with water, and drop in a stick of butter, and a bottle of crawfish/shrimp boil, and a bag of seasoning (your favorite brand) and a generous shake of chinese pepper.  Bring to boil.  Fill the basket with crawdads, and lower very carefully in to the pot.  Return to boil, and wait 5 minutes, then turn off the gas and steep for 10 minutes.  Then dump the crawdads into a cooler (or directly on a table).  Add more seasoning for the next batch.  If you're doing corn and potatoes, boil them first (they'll take longer than the crawdads).

Be very very careful with that much boiling water.  Gloves and pliers are heavily recommended.
 
2013-04-11 03:54:46 PM  
s3-media1.ak.yelpcdn.com
 
2013-04-11 03:56:21 PM  

hillbillypharmacist: Aw screw y'all with your fancy goddam fishes.

Here's how you cook crawdads.



My Papaw called them mudbugs.
 
2013-04-11 03:56:25 PM  

PrivateCaboose: make me some tea: DGS: That looks interesting.. I just have no idea what that annatto tastes like. Methinks I'll have to try that out and see what the flavor is like. With wifey's tastes so different from mine, we often have to find middle ground. :D

It's a carribbean/yucatecan thing. I bought some annatto spice mix when I was in Belize and brought it home and made chicken, I've been a huge fan of annatto ever since. The one I posted is a Rick Bayless thing, though. I can't explain the taste, it's sorta its own thing. Not weird though.

Deets?  I was looking to vacation there in December but it's been hell finding something that includes meals.


It was a Yucatan cruise I took in 2005. Just visited for the day. Snorkeled with stingrays at Caye Caulker and had the best fish burrito of my life on the dock.

I'd totally go back, and just go there, and screw the cruise.
 
2013-04-11 03:58:26 PM  

DGS: Sounds totally worth a try to me, and I like Bayless, so that works. Thanks for the idea. And that again gets me back to "let's do dinner", heh.


Yeah give it a shot! It works equally well on fish as it does meat and veggies. Probably be good with roasted potatoes too, never tried that though. Best under the broiler or pan fry in oil until it's crisped up. Break it up and make tacos out of it or just serve the filet with a veggie.
 
2013-04-11 04:12:58 PM  
Is it true Basa is crap as a food, and you should avoid it?
 
2013-04-11 04:14:53 PM  
Oh, and I had some tilapia last evening. baked - wrapped in foil with melted butter, dill, and beer. Tasty.
 
2013-04-11 04:38:57 PM  

gopher321: Is it true Basa is crap as a food, and you should avoid it?


I could be mistaken but I think its more crap because the way its farmed isnt very good for the environment. But I could be wrong. Ive eaten it nd its okay, its just another catfish type thing.
 
2013-04-11 04:51:55 PM  
A basic pan fry is still my favorite. Especially for pike. We used to go pike fishing after school and then take them home kill, clean, and cook them that very night.
 
2013-04-11 04:52:55 PM  

Sapper_Topo: gopher321: Is it true Basa is crap as a food, and you should avoid it?

I could be mistaken but I think its more crap because the way its farmed isnt very good for the environment. But I could be wrong. Ive eaten it nd its okay, its just another catfish type thing.


Pretty much. In terms of where it comes from and how it's raised, it's tilapia by a different name.
 
2013-04-11 05:03:52 PM  
With some fava beans and a nice chianti...
 
2013-04-11 05:06:20 PM  
Fresh Grouper filets: pan-fried in corn meal
Scallops: kabobs over wood fire
Crawfish: boiled in a giant steel tub with shrimp, sausage, potatoes, corn and a shiat-ton of creole seasoning.
 
2013-04-11 05:07:03 PM  
Catfish - Fried
shrimps - Fried, sauteed in garlic butter, shrimp creole, boiled
All else.... as simple as possible.  Nothing farks up seafood faster than smothering it in a lot of unnecessary shiat.
 
2013-04-11 05:07:46 PM  
How did this escape TFDammit?
 
2013-04-11 05:07:53 PM  

Uranus Is Huge!: Fresh Grouper filets: pan-fried in corn meal
Scallops: kabobs over wood fire
Crawfish: boiled in a giant steel tub with shrimp, sausage, potatoes, corn and a shiat-ton of creole seasoning.


Man.. I'm coming to your place for crawfish.  I was raised in sw La. and transplanted to ne Illinois years ago... I'm crawfish poor these days.
 
2013-04-11 05:09:45 PM  

Sapper_Topo: gopher321: Is it true Basa is crap as a food, and you should avoid it?

I could be mistaken but I think its more crap because the way its farmed isnt very good for the environment. But I could be wrong. Ive eaten it nd its okay, its just another catfish type thing.


I like it tastewise, it's just a neutral whitefish with a good texture, but yeah I've heard some bad things.
 
2013-04-11 05:09:52 PM  
Grill the Chum salmon until it is well done, and then cover in A1.
 
2013-04-11 05:10:27 PM  
I had a Vietnamese style spring roll the other day with fresh shrimp, cabbage, ginger and scallion in it. I enjoyed it and the rice paper was so thin and light.

but when it comes down to it I like pescado very un-farked up. give me a dozen fresh oysters from NY with lemon and vinegar and I am a happy girl.
 
2013-04-11 05:10:49 PM  
The headline title made me mentally reminisce about my filipino step mothers cooking. I never learned a damn things name, but so much was awesome...

Chicken marinated in something that makes it turn dark and grey colored, and then bbqed.
Big stuffed shrimp, breaded and deep fried. The stuffing was some kind of ground pork.
Thin, clear colored noodles with small chunks of chicken, assorted veggies, snow peas, etc
Chunks of beef and/or pork in a dark, oily sauce, eaten on jasmine rice.
Meatloaf made with beef, pork, and lamb, topped with bacon, haven't had a meatloaf I loved since.

It's been 20 years, but every time I think of all of it, I want to find myself a nice filipino girl who knows how to cook filipino food.

/opening the fridge and finding a pot with what appears to be nothing but slimy water and a fish head was the downside. /Not what this teenager wanted to eat, ever.
 
2013-04-11 05:11:02 PM  

thismomentinblackhistory: Just a quick turn under the broiler, please.


bim1154: All else.... as simple as possible. Nothing farks up seafood faster than smothering it in a lot of unnecessary shiat.


This.
 
2013-04-11 05:11:27 PM  
Salmon: pouch it up on a bed of sliced onion, oranges and lemons.  Top with a couple dill sprigs, salt, pepper and a splash of olive oil.  Throw on the grill over indirect heat for 20-30 minutes.

Shrimp:  marinate, grill and baste.

Marinade:
2 cups olive oil
4-5 cloves lightly crushed garlic
2-3 sprigs fresh rosemary
2 Tbsp. smoked paprika

Place everything in a small pot and warm on the stovetop just until you hear a light sizzle.
Let the oil cool to room temperature and strain out all the solids

Place 2 pounds peeled shrimp in the cooled marinade and refrigerate 4-6 hours.
Remove shrimp from marinade and thread onto skewers, leaving a fingertip-width gap between them
Grill shrimp over medium high indirect heat until done, basting often

Baste:
2 sticks butter
Juice of 2 limes
1 Tbsp ground white pepper
 
2013-04-11 05:12:29 PM  
Fish cooked is parchment paper does not need to be so carefully wrapped like this:

www.seriouseats.com

I just use a big piece of parchment paper, sloppily fold it up, and hold together with binder clips.

And it makes for a more dramatic presentations because it lowers expectations about what's inside.
 
2013-04-11 05:12:46 PM  
Tilapia en papillote?

Anything in papillote picks up a delicate flavor.  It is a technique worth learning: all that you're doing is wrapping your fish in parchment to seal in flavor and juices.  Our preferred recipe is with salmon:

1 salmon fillet (skin on or off), 6 to 8 ounces

*if you're cooking several, simply wrap them separately; if you're a romantic farker you can form a heart out of the parchment simply by folding 2" sections over each other and making the arches at the top


¼ tsp salt

¼ tsp freshly ground pepper

1 shallot, diced

1 slice of ginger, diced

¼ cup julienne of zucchini

¼ cup julienne of carrot

¼ cup thin slices of shiatake (fresh is better but dried shiatakes can be reconstituted and the water used for accompanying rice)


rectangular sheet of parchment paper, 24" x 16"

Preheat oven to 425oF or grill at 350-400oF.

Fold paper in half.Season fillet with salt & pepper and place it in center of parchment.Scatter vegetables and ginger about the fillet and top with butter.Season again with salt & pepper.


Fold and inflate parchment casing.Cook 10 minutes (or 10 minutes per inch with thicker fillets) on a grill tray.


Serve over rice by simply tearing open the parchment and emptying the content onto plates.
 
2013-04-11 05:13:17 PM  
On a fishing trip some of us were discussing how we most enjoyed cooking different kinds of fish when one old gentleman remarked, "frying, that's the great equalizer".
 
2013-04-11 05:13:52 PM  
Cedar Grilled Salmon:

Soak cedar plank in water for 2 hours.

Oil the skin side of a 1- 1.5 pound salmon filet.
Season both sides of filet and place it skin side down on the plank.
Put glaze over top and sides of filet.
Grill over indirect heat until golden brown.

Glaze:

1/2 cup mayo, 1/3 cup grainy brown mustard, 2 tbsp fresh dill, lemon juice and salt to taste.
 
2013-04-11 05:14:54 PM  
Well, fark, now I'm hungry for seafood. Specifically a nice whitefish, maybe haddock or cod. Hmmm....
 
2013-04-11 05:15:33 PM  
I put a couple of pillows on the table so she can recline comfortably, put the stirrups on the chair back and enjoy tuna pie until she's gone limp.
 
2013-04-11 05:15:55 PM  
Poisson Cru.  Think ceviche with coconut milk.  Absolutely magical.
 
2013-04-11 05:16:40 PM  

Anderson's Pooper: Cedar Grilled Salmon:

Soak cedar plank in water for 2 hours.

Oil the skin side of a 1- 1.5 pound salmon filet.
Season both sides of filet and place it skin side down on the plank.
Put glaze over top and sides of filet.
Grill over indirect heat until golden brown.

Glaze:

1/2 cup mayo, 1/3 cup grainy brown mustard, 2 tbsp fresh dill, lemon juice and salt to taste.


Try soaking the plank in apple cider.  You won't be disappointed.  I did this last year, with a salmon filet planked skin-side-down, topped with nothing but a simple sugar/brown sugar/salt layer.
 
2013-04-11 05:17:37 PM  

the biggest redneck here: Blackened snapper is my favorite fish, conch puppies are my favorite overall.

And I'm getting a kick out of this thread because I own and operate a seafood market.


Read that as "couch puppies".
 
2013-04-11 05:18:19 PM  
Grilled Tilapia:

Place each tilapia filets in a banana leaf.
Top filets with salt, butter, lemon slices and minced garlic
Wrap leaves into bundels and tie with string or leaf strips.
Grill over direct heat 8-10 minutes.
 
2013-04-11 05:19:41 PM  
Leviticus 11:9-12
 
2013-04-11 05:20:54 PM  

Somebody say crabs?


Green chile crab cakes.



I use panko rather than crackers.

i865.photobucket.com
 
2013-04-11 05:21:12 PM  

praxcelis: Try soaking the plank in apple cider. You won't be disappointed. I did this last year, with a salmon filet planked skin-side-down, topped with nothing but a simple sugar/brown sugar/salt layer.


I will give that a shot.  Every year I hit Home Depot, Lowes, etc. and pick up cheap grilling supplies at the end of "grilling season"  Hit a motherload of cedar planks for next to nothing last fall along with enough bamboo skewers to last me the rest of my life.
 
2013-04-11 05:21:57 PM  
Heat is a horrible thing to do to fish.

Raw, with rice, rice vinegar, wasabi, nori, and shoyu, please.  Nigiri or rolls, as appropriate.
 
2013-04-11 05:21:58 PM  
For skrimps Ill have to say scampi
 
2013-04-11 05:23:40 PM  
MURDERERS!
 
2013-04-11 05:25:16 PM  

geekbikerskum: Heat is a horrible thing to do to fish.

Raw, with rice, rice vinegar, wasabi, nori, and shoyu, please.  Nigiri or rolls, as appropriate.


This.
 
2013-04-11 05:25:37 PM  
My dad was in the Air Force and as a result we spent seven years in Japan. Great place, loved it there. My family basically doesn't eat seafood, though. At all. As it turns out, my mother is allergic to shellfish, though we didn't find out about that until after we came back to the US. It could be that that influenced our dining habits, but it seems odd to me because both my parents' families at a lot of fish.

I can do canned tuna. That's about it. Oh and that shrimp they throw in your mouth at the Japanese steakhouses. I'd kind of like to work up the courage to try fish, but I just find it so hard to approach. What's a good fish for a person afraid to eat fish?
 
2013-04-11 05:26:23 PM  

geekbikerskum: Heat is a horrible thing to do to fish.

Raw, with rice, rice vinegar, wasabi, nori, and shoyu, please.  Nigiri or rolls, as appropriate.


Fine. Come visit me here in Madison, and I will fix you up a big plate of Bluegill sushi from Lake Mendota.
 
2013-04-11 05:27:38 PM  

geekbikerskum: Heat is a horrible thing to do to fish.

Raw, with rice, rice vinegar, wasabi, nori, and shoyu, please.  Nigiri or rolls, as appropriate.


I love it that way as well.
 
2013-04-11 05:28:26 PM  
Best simple thing I do is season cod fillets and sear them off in a very hot pan.  Remove filets, add a couple tablespoons of butter and a couple tablespoons of capers.  Pour melted butter and capers over the fish.  Easiest thing the world. Super delicious.
 
2013-04-11 05:28:40 PM  
By having a steak or ribs instead.
 
2013-04-11 05:28:52 PM  

casual disregard: My dad was in the Air Force and as a result we spent seven years in Japan. Great place, loved it there. My family basically doesn't eat seafood, though. At all. As it turns out, my mother is allergic to shellfish, though we didn't find out about that until after we came back to the US. It could be that that influenced our dining habits, but it seems odd to me because both my parents' families at a lot of fish.

I can do canned tuna. That's about it. Oh and that shrimp they throw in your mouth at the Japanese steakhouses. I'd kind of like to work up the courage to try fish, but I just find it so hard to approach. What's a good fish for a person afraid to eat fish?


Any decent whitefish would be a good place to start.  Look upthread for some of the simpler preparations (I recommend any of the pouch or en papillote methods--they are hard to get wrong).  They'll be mild and less "fishy" than other varieties.  If you make it to a point where you like it, move on to salmon.  A little more attention needed to do well, but when done well is the king of fish.  (Disclaimer: I live in the Pacific Northwest, so good fresh wild salmon is kind of a thing here.)
 
2013-04-11 05:30:03 PM  
No one has said oysters, raw on half shell. Or soft shell crabs?
 
2013-04-11 05:31:01 PM  

the biggest redneck here: Nabb1: I used to eat a lot of tilapia until a marine biologist friend of mine ruined it for me.

My wife doesn't care for fish much, so I rarely cook it.  I do grill shrimp stuffed with goat cheese and wrapped in pancetta.

The vast -- and I mean VAST -- majority of the tilapia on the American market is farmed (it's all farmed) in Asia. In places where there's not much in the way of regulation. Shipped in frozen, thawed, and sold to an unsuspecting public.


Even better than that, they are used to clean a tank behind some better fish have had their turn. Raised exclusively on other fish's shiat. Used to grind em up, throw them out, now they have created a market for them...

/hate tilapia
 
2013-04-11 05:31:14 PM  
For Swai and Catfish: Flour, cornstarch, cayenne powder, garlic powder, black pepper, lemon or orange zest. Pan-fried in either butter or olive oil.

Tilapia/Flounder/Trout: flour, cornstarch, salt, black pepper, ground thyme, ground rosemary, ground sage. Pan-fried same as above.

Salmon: Way too many ways to count, but preferably mesquite-smoked. If not smoked, preferably poached or coated in butter, wrapped with herbs and lemon, and grilled for about 4 minutes each side.

And if it's from a source I can trust, raw all day.
 
2013-04-11 05:32:46 PM  
Hey, Farkers! By popular request, we're making fish tonight!

(Audience Shill: "You know what smells like fish?")

Your hair? Seriously, cod liver oil is taken INTERNALLY, not EXTERNALLY.

Acquire your ass some pound and a half of whitefish filets. I'm partial to haddock. Bear in mind, haddock is typically almost twice as large as the package suggests, due to being folded before wrapping. This can make thawing them tricky.

Preheat your oven for 450. This would be a good time to whip up some oven fries of some sort. Put 3 tbsp of veggie or canola oil in a bowl, and about a cup of panko (Japanese breadcrumbs) in another with some salt and pepper. Chop that fishy up into two inch long strips, about an inch wide. Moisten in the oil, roll in the crumbs (repeat once for a more pronounced coating). Put on lubed baking sheet. It's a breading assembly line, you should be able to do this in your sleep by now.

(Audience Shill: "You know what I can do in my sleep?")

Piss yourself? There are therapies to help with that.

Bake these fish strips for 15 minutes. Should be firm to the touch. Finish cooking and remove any potato products before continuing. Then, turn on your broiler and broil the fish for a few minutes about 8 inches away from the element. If you've got a shiatty "under the oven in a drawer" broiler rather than a "is part of the oven itself" type, you probably can't control this distance, so watch CAREFULLY. Haul it out when it's nice and brown.

(Audience Shill: "You know what else is brown?")

The contents of your skull?

Healthier than any frozen fish stick, I guarantee! I like to gobble these up with tartar sauce. You can put whatever you want on them, although ketchup is a bit gauche.

Recipe from The Way We Cook by Sheryl Julian and Julie Riven.
 
2013-04-11 05:33:16 PM  

sdd2000: No one has said oysters, raw on half shell. Or soft shell crabs?


I don't make soft shell crabs at home. I do make oysters rockefeller and oyster stew at home. Yum.
Grilled mussels, yum.
I haven't cooked raw clams yet.
 
2013-04-11 05:33:21 PM  
Take a couple of swordfish or tuna steaks, marinate in Italian dressing for good while, throw them on the grill.

easy and awesome.
 
2013-04-11 05:33:33 PM  

naugahyde monkey: the biggest redneck here: Nabb1: I used to eat a lot of tilapia until a marine biologist friend of mine ruined it for me.

My wife doesn't care for fish much, so I rarely cook it.  I do grill shrimp stuffed with goat cheese and wrapped in pancetta.

The vast -- and I mean VAST -- majority of the tilapia on the American market is farmed (it's all farmed) in Asia. In places where there's not much in the way of regulation. Shipped in frozen, thawed, and sold to an unsuspecting public.

Even better than that, they are used to clean a tank behind some better fish have had their turn. Raised exclusively on other fish's shiat. Used to grind em up, throw them out, now they have created a market for them...

/hate tilapia


Sorry I see someone beat me to it
 
2013-04-11 05:33:36 PM  
Simple and delicious:

Tinfoil.
Trout.
Lemon.
Pepper.
Grill.

Serve with brown rice and soy sauce.
 
2013-04-11 05:34:31 PM  
How do I prepare seafood?

I say "I'm gonna eat you. It'll only hurt for a second"
 
2013-04-11 05:35:33 PM  

sdd2000: No one has said oysters, raw on half shell. Or soft shell crabs?


Those ain't exactly a catch. More of a dig for/pot trap.

We're talking real man's sport, here.
 
2013-04-11 05:37:02 PM  

Oldiron_79: For skrimps Ill have to say scampi


http://www.weebls-stuff.com/songs/scampi/
 
2013-04-11 05:37:08 PM  
Blue Crabs smothered in old bay and steamed with Natty Bo.
Served with Malt Vinegar because dipping crabs in butter is a travesty.
 
2013-04-11 05:38:09 PM  
i46.tinypic.com
.
 
2013-04-11 05:38:20 PM  
Sometimes the simplicity is most delicious-

Grilled Red Snapper
Mojo de Ajo

/cold Modelo
 
2013-04-11 05:38:36 PM  
I wish FARK had a food tab. I have some delicious recipes that should be given out to the public.  Many like my chilli, and since I don't eat meat, I can promise that many will enjoy.  People like my vegetarian chilli more than meat-based chili.
 
2013-04-11 05:38:42 PM  

khyberkitsune: sdd2000: No one has said oysters, raw on half shell. Or soft shell crabs?

Those ain't exactly a catch. More of a dig for/pot trap.

We're talking real man's sport, here.


Peeler pottin' ain't for sissies. Tongin' ain't, either.
 
2013-04-11 05:39:05 PM  

CipollinaFan: Blue Crabs smothered in old bay and steamed with Natty Bo.
Served with Malt Vinegar because dipping crabs in butter is a travesty.


I like blue crabs dipped in butter on my grilled cheese sandwiches.
 
2013-04-11 05:39:52 PM  

CipollinaFan: Blue Crabs smothered in old bay and steamed with Natty Bo.
Served with Malt Vinegar because dipping crabs in butter is a travesty.


Location: Baltimore, MD

Yup, that's what I figured.

/Old Bay is made from vomit
 
2013-04-11 05:41:34 PM  
I like to whip up a little marinade of light sesame oil, hoisin sauce, rice wine vinegar, minced ginger, a dab of siracha and garlic. Then I put that and a nice, fat, sashimi-grade yellowfin steak in a zip-lok bag for an hour or two in the fridge. Then I crust it in sesame seeds and sear it or (very carefully) grill it on both sides for 2 or 3 minutes.

Tasty.
 
2013-04-11 05:41:56 PM  
Put me in the salmon and dill camp!  I fry mine up with a mixture of mayo, fresh dill and lemon juice, so good! Works well on other fish too. Think I'll have some for dinner tonight, damn you FARK!
 
2013-04-11 05:42:16 PM  

nirwana: CipollinaFan: Blue Crabs smothered in old bay and steamed with Natty Bo.
Served with Malt Vinegar because dipping crabs in butter is a travesty.

I like blue crabs dipped in butter on my grilled cheese sandwiches.


OK, I'll admit I'm a northwest boy.  Our crabs have to be cracked open so we can feast on the goo get at the meat inside.   You right-coasters really eat 'em whole?
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-11 05:42:28 PM  

JohnnyRebel88: I wish FARK had a food tab. I have some delicious recipes that should be given out to the public.  Many like my chilli, and since I don't eat meat, I can promise that many will enjoy.  People like my vegetarian chilli more than meat-based chili.


Well I'm definitely interested. I, too, wish there was a food tab. Still, I always watched out for these threads before.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-11 05:43:09 PM  

You are Borg: Put me in the salmon and dill camp!  I fry mine up with a mixture of mayo, fresh dill and lemon juice, so good! Works well on other fish too. Think I'll have some for dinner tonight, damn you FARK!


I don't feel guilty. :D
 
2013-04-11 05:44:05 PM  
Magnanimous Seafood Stew:

In a medium dutch oven heat up a few tblspoons of olive oil.

Saute half a diced onion till clear, then add half a diced fennel bulb (or celery) and 2 diced carrots, salt and pepper to taste. When those are all soft, add diced garlic and fresh thyme and cook for 2 or 3 minutes. Add one regular can of crushed tomatoes with their liquid, half cup of white wine and 3/4 cup of chicken stock. Add a couple bay leaves and let simmer for a few minutes.

Add whatever seafood you have. Literally whatever. I catch a lot of squid, so I often just use them, but ideally, I like at least 3 kinds of seafood. A white fleshed fish, cut into cubes, goes in first. Then either clams or mussels, toss them in and cover pot until they open. Then I like to add a few shrimp, but they don't need much time at all.
 
2013-04-11 05:44:23 PM  
Any excuse to break this out..
www.charlock.org
 
2013-04-11 05:44:43 PM  
My absolute favorite way to cook my catch is  en papillote. I've done this with both smallmouth bass and catfish (I prefer the bass), and I find it the best way to enjoy the pure, delicious flavor of a fresh caught fish. As with any recipe utilizing this technique, feel free to substitute ingredients for any other  fragrant ingredient you have on hand.

Steppenwolf's Smallmouth Bass en Papillote
2 fillets bass (skin on)/1 whole bass
1 tbsp minced shallot
3 sprigs fresh dill
1 tbsp minced hot chili
1 tbsp olive oil
1 tbsp fresh squeezed lemon juice
Sherry
Kosher salt and cracked black pepper

1. Preheat oven to 400°F.
2. Cut a sheet of parchment paper long enough to fold over itself and contain the filets/fish. Place the fish in the center near one of the ends, leaving a margin of paper around the fish.
2. Drizzle the fish with olive oil, lemon juice, and splash with sherry. Season aggressively with salt and pepper.
3. If you are using fillets, arrange the shallot, dill, and chilis on top of the fillets. If using whole fish, stuff the ingredients inside of the cavity of the fish.
4. Fold the tail of parchment of the fish, and starting at one of the corners, fold the parchment into itself, working your way around the seams. You should do this until you have a relatively tight seal all around the fish.
5. Bake on a sheet pan for 15 minutes.
6. Remove from the oven and rest for 5 minutes. Cut open the papillote at the time of serving so you or your guest gets a blast of savory, steamy goodness. Dig in!
 
2013-04-11 05:45:52 PM  

praxcelis: nirwana: CipollinaFan: Blue Crabs smothered in old bay and steamed with Natty Bo.
Served with Malt Vinegar because dipping crabs in butter is a travesty.

I like blue crabs dipped in butter on my grilled cheese sandwiches.

OK, I'll admit I'm a northwest boy.  Our crabs have to be cracked open so we can feast on the goo get at the meat inside.   You right-coasters really eat 'em whole?


Soft crabs, yes. Same species (blue crabs), just in their soft form. They shed their hard exoskeleton like a snake, and for a day or so they're soft and you can eat the whole thing. Most folks cut out the eyes and gills still, and some clean out the innards.
 
2013-04-11 05:46:02 PM  

praxcelis: nirwana: CipollinaFan: Blue Crabs smothered in old bay and steamed with Natty Bo.
Served with Malt Vinegar because dipping crabs in butter is a travesty.

I like blue crabs dipped in butter on my grilled cheese sandwiches.

OK, I'll admit I'm a northwest boy.  Our crabs have to be cracked open so we can feast on the goo get at the meat inside.   You right-coasters really eat 'em whole?


I'm a Third Coaster these days, but grew up in Dungy crab country. I eat alaskan salmon twice a week, and love most seafood. I don't give a damn how anybody else eats their food. There is no right or wrong way, now please pass the HP sauce.
 
2013-04-11 05:46:19 PM  

Jesterling: Any excuse to break this out..
[www.charlock.org image 488x1500]


Oh hell... wrong one.  Well I suppose one could add some salmon somewhere.
 
2013-04-11 05:47:19 PM  
www.funnytshop.com
 
2013-04-11 05:47:32 PM  

praxcelis: nirwana: CipollinaFan: Blue Crabs smothered in old bay and steamed with Natty Bo.
Served with Malt Vinegar because dipping crabs in butter is a travesty.

I like blue crabs dipped in butter on my grilled cheese sandwiches.

OK, I'll admit I'm a northwest boy.  Our crabs have to be cracked open so we can feast on the goo get at the meat inside.   You right-coasters really eat 'em whole?


You do that with softshell crabs. You fry them and serve it like a BLT.


 

the biggest redneck here: CipollinaFan: Blue Crabs smothered in old bay and steamed with Natty Bo.
Served with Malt Vinegar because dipping crabs in butter is a travesty.

Location: Baltimore, MD

Yup, that's what I figured.

/Old Bay is made from vomit


The vomit of the Gods maybe. Old Bay is the physical manifestation of the spice melange.
 
2013-04-11 05:48:05 PM  
heat, sesame oil, flipping at least once.
Sometimes pepper.

Tumbler of cold absinth on the side.

if you're putting ANYTHING saucy on seafood you might as well just cook bamboo sprouts.
 
2013-04-11 05:48:15 PM  
Salmon Chanted Evening.
 
2013-04-11 05:48:19 PM  
Season and pan sear the salmon on both sides to carmalize crust.   Deglaze the pan with some white wine,.  Add butter, lemon juice, a little fragrant balsamic and a dash of dijon mustard and a little honey and reduce.  Pour sauce over salmon.  Garnish with some fresh dill if available.   It will take you less time than it takes to drive and sit in a McDonald's drive through and won't cost you much more per serving if you're using farm raised salmon.
 
2013-04-11 05:48:28 PM  

PrivateCaboose: zatziki - greek yogurt (8 ounces or so), 1/2 to 1 whole cucumber (peeled and seeded, chop it and salt it and leave it for 10 minutes then press out the excess water), juice of half a lemon or up to a whole lemon, four cloves of garlic (smashed and minced), two tablespoons of dill, salt and pepper to taste.  Leave it overnight for best flavor - lasts up to a week or two.

Sear the scallops in a screaming hot cast iron pan filled with butter and just barely browned garlic.  Make sure you don't overcook.  Serve the scallops over dollops of tzatziki.  Boom, done.


Oh god, I gotta do this as soon as possible. I've never had scallops with tzatziki, and I'm pretty sure that would blow my mind.
 
2013-04-11 05:49:16 PM  
I've don't really find fish to be palatable, but the remaining creatures of the sea are fair game.

I'm somewhat fond of shrimp in a garlic butter sauce, served over pasta.

So easy to make, but so tasty as well.

sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net

But being from the caribbean means that I'm also fond of Salt Fish (or Bacalo if you're from Puerto Rico or another Spanish speaking island)

sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net
 
2013-04-11 05:49:54 PM  
Nobody likes live octopus dropped into boiling water, eh?  Must be a Korean thing.
 
2013-04-11 05:50:11 PM  

JohnnyRebel88: I wish FARK had a food tab. I have some delicious recipes that should be given out to the public.  Many like my chilli, and since I don't eat meat, I can promise that many will enjoy.  People like my vegetarian chilli more than meat-based chili.


That's not chili.
 
2013-04-11 05:50:25 PM  

naugahyde monkey: naugahyde monkey: the biggest redneck here: Nabb1: I used to eat a lot of tilapia until a marine biologist friend of mine ruined it for me.

My wife doesn't care for fish much, so I rarely cook it.  I do grill shrimp stuffed with goat cheese and wrapped in pancetta.

The vast -- and I mean VAST -- majority of the tilapia on the American market is farmed (it's all farmed) in Asia. In places where there's not much in the way of regulation. Shipped in frozen, thawed, and sold to an unsuspecting public.

Even better than that, they are used to clean a tank behind some better fish have had their turn. Raised exclusively on other fish's shiat. Used to grind em up, throw them out, now they have created a market for them...

/hate tilapia

Sorry I see someone beat me to it


I always laugh when I see it on the menu at a fancy restaurant. I have no idea why such a junk fish has gotten popular... unless it's because it's dirt cheep, and the general public can be conned into buying it for twenty bucks a plate.
 
2013-04-11 05:53:07 PM  
edibleblog.com
 
2013-04-11 05:53:08 PM  

TheShavingofOccam123: Pierre Franey Poached Cod in Lemon Butter Sauce

http://www.food.com/recipe/poached-cod-with-lemon-butter-sauce-15972 0

don't forget the chopped capers


Capers are too small to chop.
 
2013-04-11 05:53:15 PM  
For salmon, these are my three go to recipes:

1) 2 parts maple syrup + 1 part soy sauce.  Add garlic and S&P as desired.  Bake @ 400F for 15-20 mins.
2) Spread dijon on one side of salmon.  Wrap with prosciutto.  Season however.  Bake @ 400F for 15-20 mins.
3) Mix mayo with grated parm.  Spread over salmon.  Cover with a layer of cornmeal.  Add lemon juice to pan, and Bake at 400F for 15-20 mins.
 
2013-04-11 05:55:08 PM  
I forgot lox on a bagel w/ a shmear
 
2013-04-11 05:55:48 PM  
I live in Hungary, a landlocked country, so I don't really get much seafood. However,

4.bp.blogspot.com

Pike on potatoes, onions, and ham slices. Salt and pepper - strangely, no paprika.

upload.wikimedia.org

Hungarian fisherman's soup. Carp, onion,salt, and hot paprika. Maybe some wine. Tastes better than it looks. Actually, it tastes like heaven.
 
2013-04-11 05:56:38 PM  

Matt Foley: 3) Mix mayo with grated parm. Spread over salmon. Cover with a layer of cornmeal. Add lemon juice to pan, and Bake at 400F for 15-20 mins.


I do very nearly that exact preparation (minus cornmeal, but add black pepper) as a slow-cooker pouch method for whitefish.  Crock on low for 4-6 hours and any whitefish comes out delicious.
 
2013-04-11 05:58:24 PM  

dolphkhan: The only "sea"food I cook is freshwater stuff I've caught myself. I'll order it at restaurants, but I've never actually cooked it at home.
With sunfish or trout, I usually just use some salt, pepper, lemon, and butter, and have it with some sauteed farmstand asparagus or foraged fiddleheads, depending on the season. Yeah, our Bass might be runty in New England, but we grow some mean asparagus.


Your pee stinks...
/enjoys runty bass, grilled lightly with a hint of tur-yaki sauce
 
2013-04-11 05:58:47 PM  
Shrimp and crab boil in my backyard...

i697.photobucket.com
 
2013-04-11 06:00:33 PM  
I sell seafood for a living (retail to wanna be Rachel Rays at a not-quite-Whole Foods), have been a pro chef for 20+ years,  and I always tell my customers the same thing for any white fish.

Salt and white pepper, top with Bruschetta. Bake at 450 until bruschetta is lightly charred. Done.

Then I always offer to take any leftovers if the meal is not appreciated. Over 5 years and not one brown bag.

(reality, I would be happy if one of them actually looked close to Rachel, but instead I get the 65 year old pixies who have just had braces installed, and only eat Kosher chicken because its Wild. I have quite the dent in my head.)
 
2013-04-11 06:03:06 PM  
I bought some whole tilapia and was looking for a way to cook it when I stumbled on this little gem. Works great, takes ten minutes from start to finish and doesn't stink up my little house. You may have to adjust the cooking time depending on your microwave. I also add garlic and lime juice before hand and fiddle with it differently every time I make it. Really good and recommended for new or busy cooks. This link is Chinese style but I've done it "Mexican style" and "Lots of Lemons" style.

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/275360
 
2013-04-11 06:05:03 PM  
Last night I chopped up 3lbs of pollock, chopped up half a can of pineapples, mixed in 3 cups of panko and 3 eggs.  A healthy dose of salt, pepper and paprika for seasoning.  Bake at 350 until the fish is 165F.  Serve with green beans sauteed in pork fat.  Wash it down with the pineapple juice from the can mixed with an equal amount of vodak.

I'm not saying it was great but it made a turd.
 
2013-04-11 06:05:47 PM  

3StratMan: Shrimp and crab boil in my backyard...

[i697.photobucket.com image 850x478]


Looks great... just need to sprinkle some "Tony's" on it and you're good to go!
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-11 06:08:35 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: Last night I chopped up 3lbs of pollock, chopped up half a can of pineapples, mixed in 3 cups of panko and 3 eggs.  A healthy dose of salt, pepper and paprika for seasoning.  Bake at 350 until the fish is 165F.  Serve with green beans sauteed in pork fat.  Wash it down with the pineapple juice from the can mixed with an equal amount of vodak.

I'm not saying it was great but it made a turd.


Has there ever been a better selling point than that last sentence?
 
2013-04-11 06:09:32 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: Last night I chopped up 3lbs of pollock, chopped up half a can of pineapples, mixed in 3 cups of panko and 3 eggs.  A healthy dose of salt, pepper and paprika for seasoning.  Bake at 350 until the fish is 165F.  Serve with green beans sauteed in pork fat.  Wash it down with the pineapple juice from the can mixed with an equal amount of vodak.

I'm not saying it was great but it made a turd.


*blink*blink*

I...

You just...

Um...

*blink*

/castlespeechless.jpg
 
2013-04-11 06:09:44 PM  

ahab: I really like this mustard and brown sugar glaze on salmon (recipe)

[farm4.static.flickr.com image 500x333]


The only good salmon is raw salmon or cold smoked salmon.
 
2013-04-11 06:10:22 PM  

Ego edo infantia cattus: naugahyde monkey: naugahyde monkey: the biggest redneck here: Nabb1: I used to eat a lot of tilapia until a marine biologist friend of mine ruined it for me.

My wife doesn't care for fish much, so I rarely cook it.  I do grill shrimp stuffed with goat cheese and wrapped in pancetta.

The vast -- and I mean VAST -- majority of the tilapia on the American market is farmed (it's all farmed) in Asia. In places where there's not much in the way of regulation. Shipped in frozen, thawed, and sold to an unsuspecting public.

Even better than that, they are used to clean a tank behind some better fish have had their turn. Raised exclusively on other fish's shiat. Used to grind em up, throw them out, now they have created a market for them...

/hate tilapia

Sorry I see someone beat me to it

I always laugh when I see it on the menu at a fancy restaurant. I have no idea why such a junk fish has gotten popular... unless it's because it's dirt cheep, and the general public can be conned into buying it for twenty bucks a plate.


Winner winner shiatfish dinner!

Thats exactly why it is there. Commercial fisheries made a giant push to get it there, they sell it dirt cheap, and now they make a profit on their waste products.
 
2013-04-11 06:14:46 PM  
Buy the farm-raised salmon from the local grocery store when it's on sale. I'm in Iowa so any of the fancier, wild fish is usually crap and dried out. The farm fish have a lot of fat in them and they usually haven't been frozen. Be choosy about the fillets and get the ones that don't look like they've been hit with a stick.

Rinse it well - it's been in that display case for a while. Pat it dry.

Brush with oil and salt it up with Kosher or Sea salt. Liberally apply whatever spices you're jonesing for - chili powder is one of my faves or garlic powder and dill. My wife likes garlic pepper. Just my opinion, but lemon pepper has been overdone.

Let it sit out for at least an hour. The flesh should have sorta absorbed all the oil and spices into a glistening sheen.

Get your grill as hot as possible. Oil up the grates and throw the fish on - flesh down. Cover the grill and cook a few minutes. Open it up and flip the fillets. Close the grill and cook until it seems like it's probably a little too early to pull the fish off. Pull it off anyway. Let it sit and rest for a few minutes. Getting cooked is hard work.

Serve with rice and whatever veg looked the best at store.
 
2013-04-11 06:14:50 PM  

the biggest redneck here: CipollinaFan: Blue Crabs smothered in old bay and steamed with Natty Bo.
Served with Malt Vinegar because dipping crabs in butter is a travesty.

Location: Baltimore, MD

Yup, that's what I figured.

/Old Bay is made from vomit


Yep, they don't know how to cook crabs in MD. The gulf coast does 'em right - boiled in Zatarain's crab boil with new potatoes, onions, celery, and whatever else you want to throw in there (andouille sausage, garlic, and mushrooms are always winners)...
 
2013-04-11 06:16:17 PM  
Tilapia wettened with a spicy hot, buttery liquid and then dredged in panko bread crumbs. Baked for 20-25. Incredible!!!!!
 
2013-04-11 06:19:05 PM  

fartacus: the biggest redneck here: CipollinaFan: Blue Crabs smothered in old bay and steamed with Natty Bo.
Served with Malt Vinegar because dipping crabs in butter is a travesty.

Location: Baltimore, MD

Yup, that's what I figured.

/Old Bay is made from vomit

Yep, they don't know how to cook crabs in MD. The gulf coast does 'em right - boiled in Zatarain's crab boil with new potatoes, onions, celery, and whatever else you want to throw in there (andouille sausage, garlic, and mushrooms are always winners)...


You have no idea how butthurt the MD people are about to get. They all know everything about seafood. Ever. Just ask them. Or don't, because they'll tell you.
 
2013-04-11 06:22:54 PM  

the biggest redneck here: You have no idea how butthurt the MD people are about to get. They all know everything about seafood. Ever. Just ask them. Or don't, because they'll tell you.


I think that's true of every coastal region, everywhere.  I'm a Seattle boy so I sometimes partake in the local bias that the Atlantic just can't grow good seafood. Although I envy the easy access to lobster--out here it's a rare treat that has one thinking about financing options.

/The best fish and shellfish grow in cold Northern Pacific waters.
//Just sayin'
 
2013-04-11 06:23:24 PM  
Papillote Scotia:
Three rolls of thin White fish fillets wrapped around matchsticks of carrot, green and yellow zucchini. topped with a dill, mushroom, and tiny shrimp veloute' en papillote.
 
2013-04-11 06:25:51 PM  

praxcelis: the biggest redneck here: You have no idea how butthurt the MD people are about to get. They all know everything about seafood. Ever. Just ask them. Or don't, because they'll tell you.

I think that's true of every coastal region, everywhere.  I'm a Seattle boy so I sometimes partake in the local bias that the Atlantic just can't grow good seafood. Although I envy the easy access to lobster--out here it's a rare treat that has one thinking about financing options.

/The best fish and shellfish grow in cold Northern Pacific waters.
//Just sayin'


Nah, MD is the worst. BY FAR. Then LA folks can get like it sometimes, then Seattle people.
 
2013-04-11 06:25:57 PM  

the biggest redneck here: fartacus: the biggest redneck here: CipollinaFan: Blue Crabs smothered in old bay and steamed with Natty Bo.
Served with Malt Vinegar because dipping crabs in butter is a travesty.

Location: Baltimore, MD

Yup, that's what I figured.

/Old Bay is made from vomit

Yep, they don't know how to cook crabs in MD. The gulf coast does 'em right - boiled in Zatarain's crab boil with new potatoes, onions, celery, and whatever else you want to throw in there (andouille sausage, garlic, and mushrooms are always winners)...

You have no idea how butthurt the MD people are about to get. They all know everything about seafood. Ever. Just ask them. Or don't, because they'll tell you.


Oh I know... I was watching "Bizarre Foods America" the other night and the episode was in/around Baltimore. It was gut-wrenching to see all those good blue crabs wasted on people who have no clue what to do with them...
 
2013-04-11 06:27:43 PM  

praxcelis: the biggest redneck here: You have no idea how butthurt the MD people are about to get. They all know everything about seafood. Ever. Just ask them. Or don't, because they'll tell you.

I think that's true of every coastal region, everywhere.  I'm a Seattle boy so I sometimes partake in the local bias that the Atlantic just can't grow good seafood. Although I envy the easy access to lobster--out here it's a rare treat that has one thinking about financing options.

/The best fish and shellfish grow in cold Northern Pacific waters.
//Just sayin'


I grew up in Oregon, moved to Maryland for 13ish years, then just moved back to Oregon.  I can say without a doubt in my mind that Pacific salmon is in a completely different league from Atlantic salmon.
 
2013-04-11 06:28:36 PM  
Lime Cilantro Seared Scallops.

That's my big show.

/just starting to like seafood.
 
2013-04-11 06:28:53 PM  
Oscar.  Blackened catfish oscar.  Oscar.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-11 06:31:20 PM  

santadog: Lime Cilantro Seared Scallops.

That's my big show.

/just starting to like seafood.


That sounds good. Are the lime and cilantro both garnishes post sear, or is there something different to that?
 
2013-04-11 06:31:57 PM  
ecx.images-amazon.com
Best cookbook I've ever owned.
 
2013-04-11 06:36:36 PM  
Scallops wrapped in bacon skewered and grilled.  You really cannot get a more perfect food.
 
2013-04-11 06:46:21 PM  

fartacus: the biggest redneck here: fartacus: the biggest redneck here: CipollinaFan: Blue Crabs smothered in old bay and steamed with Natty Bo.
Served with Malt Vinegar because dipping crabs in butter is a travesty.

Location: Baltimore, MD

Yup, that's what I figured.

/Old Bay is made from vomit

Yep, they don't know how to cook crabs in MD. The gulf coast does 'em right - boiled in Zatarain's crab boil with new potatoes, onions, celery, and whatever else you want to throw in there (andouille sausage, garlic, and mushrooms are always winners)...

You have no idea how butthurt the MD people are about to get. They all know everything about seafood. Ever. Just ask them. Or don't, because they'll tell you.

Oh I know... I was watching "Bizarre Foods America" the other night and the episode was in/around Baltimore. It was gut-wrenching to see all those good blue crabs wasted on people who have no clue what to do with them...


I generally prefer steamed crabs over boiled, but we do them with all the extras you Gulf people like in JO #2. Kind of a mix in east coast and Gulf style.

And wild white Gulf skrimps are the only way to go. Boiled, of course.

/assuming pinks aren't available
 
2013-04-11 06:50:04 PM  
neongoats: The headline title made me mentally reminisce about my filipino step mothers cooking. I never learned a damn things name, but so much was awesome...

Chicken marinated in something that makes it turn dark and grey colored, and then bbqed.
Big stuffed shrimp, breaded and deep fried. The stuffing was some kind of ground pork.
Thin, clear colored noodles with small chunks of chicken, assorted veggies, snow peas, etc
Chunks of beef and/or pork in a dark, oily sauce, eaten on jasmine rice.
Meatloaf made with beef, pork, and lamb, topped with bacon, haven't had a meatloaf I loved since.

It's been 20 years, but every time I think of all of it, I want to find myself a nice filipino girl who knows how to cook filipino food.

/opening the fridge and finding a pot with what appears to be nothing but slimy water and a fish head was the downside. /Not what this teenager wanted to eat, ever.


Mama Sita can hook you up and you can do it yourself.  The sinigang mix makes trash fish from the pier f*cking delicious!
siamgroceryav.com
 
2013-04-11 06:51:37 PM  
The best way to prepare seafood? Leave it at the store and buy a steak instead. There's no seafood lover in me.
 
2013-04-11 06:52:50 PM  
Shrimp gumbo.  Somewhat surprised this hasn't been mentioned.
 
2013-04-11 07:00:17 PM  
Baked stuffed haddock

Buy 2 haddock filets of the same size, place one in the bottom of a baking dish and cover filet with seafood stuffing.  Lay the second filet over the stuffing and cover everything with stewed tomatoes.   Bake at 350 for +/-40 minutes until desired doneness.   You can substitute the tomatoes with crushed ritz crackers drenched in melted butter.  Stove Top stuffing will also work in a pinch.   Serve with rice pilaf.
 
2013-04-11 07:00:21 PM  

praxcelis: Smeggy Smurf: Last night I chopped up 3lbs of pollock, chopped up half a can of pineapples, mixed in 3 cups of panko and 3 eggs.  A healthy dose of salt, pepper and paprika for seasoning.  Bake at 350 until the fish is 165F.  Serve with green beans sauteed in pork fat.  Wash it down with the pineapple juice from the can mixed with an equal amount of vodak.

I'm not saying it was great but it made a turd.

*blink*blink*

I...

You just...

Um...

*blink*

/castlespeechless.jpg


Best reaction I could have hoped for
 
2013-04-11 07:12:33 PM  

the biggest redneck here: fartacus: the biggest redneck here: fartacus: the biggest redneck here: CipollinaFan: Blue Crabs smothered in old bay and steamed with Natty Bo.
Served with Malt Vinegar because dipping crabs in butter is a travesty.

Location: Baltimore, MD

Yup, that's what I figured.

/Old Bay is made from vomit

Yep, they don't know how to cook crabs in MD. The gulf coast does 'em right - boiled in Zatarain's crab boil with new potatoes, onions, celery, and whatever else you want to throw in there (andouille sausage, garlic, and mushrooms are always winners)...

You have no idea how butthurt the MD people are about to get. They all know everything about seafood. Ever. Just ask them. Or don't, because they'll tell you.

Oh I know... I was watching "Bizarre Foods America" the other night and the episode was in/around Baltimore. It was gut-wrenching to see all those good blue crabs wasted on people who have no clue what to do with them...

I generally prefer steamed crabs over boiled, but we do them with all the extras you Gulf people like in JO #2. Kind of a mix in east coast and Gulf style.

And wild white Gulf skrimps are the only way to go. Boiled, of course.

/assuming pinks aren't available


Agreed on the skrimps. I haven't tried the J.O. spices, and I've only had the steamed ones with Old Bay (I think my feelings on that are clear). Based upon my experience, I prefer boiled (gulf coast/Louisiana style) because the spices infuse the meat and all the extras, but it doesn't become a mess all over the shells and veggies/extras. I found the steamed crabs blander - they didn't pick up as much of the flavor of the spices, and I just prefer the spice blend in crab boil. I will give the JO #2 a try though, it deserves a fair shake.
 
2013-04-11 07:13:59 PM  

DGS: You are Borg: Put me in the salmon and dill camp!  I fry mine up with a mixture of mayo, fresh dill and lemon juice, so good! Works well on other fish too. Think I'll have some for dinner tonight, damn you FARK!

I don't feel guilty. :D


Good, you shouldn't. You should be jealous of my tasty dinner though :D
 
2013-04-11 07:15:20 PM  
i bought a giant bag of salmon filets on sale.  they're individually wrapped so ive been thawing them out 1 at a time and just winging it every time i make one.  the last one i did was a single filet in foil topped with 2 pats of salted butter, pepper, one wedge of orange squeezed (didnt have any lemon), one tablespoon of sriracha chili paste, two finely chopped pickled garlic cloves (a great snack btw) placed on top and then a ring of sriracha garlic sauce around it.  wrapped it up and placed in my toaster oven at 400 for 25 minutes.

it was not dry and pretty damn awesome for just winging it.  the remaining butter/sriracha sauce was drizzled over some steamed broccoli florets (frozen bag from kroger) and i had a slice of rye bread with butter and pepper on it (not toasted-just plain slice of bread).  im definitely making it again.  i also had a beer and it washed everything down pretty well.
 
2013-04-11 07:18:59 PM  

fartacus: the biggest redneck here: fartacus: the biggest redneck here: fartacus: the biggest redneck here: CipollinaFan: Blue Crabs smothered in old bay and steamed with Natty Bo.
Served with Malt Vinegar because dipping crabs in butter is a travesty.

Location: Baltimore, MD

Yup, that's what I figured.

/Old Bay is made from vomit

Yep, they don't know how to cook crabs in MD. The gulf coast does 'em right - boiled in Zatarain's crab boil with new potatoes, onions, celery, and whatever else you want to throw in there (andouille sausage, garlic, and mushrooms are always winners)...

You have no idea how butthurt the MD people are about to get. They all know everything about seafood. Ever. Just ask them. Or don't, because they'll tell you.

Oh I know... I was watching "Bizarre Foods America" the other night and the episode was in/around Baltimore. It was gut-wrenching to see all those good blue crabs wasted on people who have no clue what to do with them...

I generally prefer steamed crabs over boiled, but we do them with all the extras you Gulf people like in JO #2. Kind of a mix in east coast and Gulf style.

And wild white Gulf skrimps are the only way to go. Boiled, of course.

/assuming pinks aren't available

Agreed on the skrimps. I haven't tried the J.O. spices, and I've only had the steamed ones with Old Bay (I think my feelings on that are clear). Based upon my experience, I prefer boiled (gulf coast/Louisiana style) because the spices infuse the meat and all the extras, but it doesn't become a mess all over the shells and veggies/extras. I found the steamed crabs blander - they didn't pick up as much of the flavor of the spices, and I just prefer the spice blend in crab boil. I will give the JO #2 a try though, it deserves a fair shake.


I grew up in SW La. (Cameron Parish).  Zatarain's for crab, shrimp and crawfish boils was king.  We use to spend the weekends on Rutherford beach or Holly beach and my grandfather would set out crab lines and run them all day, then in the afternoon would boil the crabs in a #3 washtub with potatoes, corn and other things.
The white shrimp we use to get right off the boats.  Now that I live north of Chicago, I miss all that stuff we really did take for granted back then.

There use to be this one place in Big Lake called "The Reef".  They would have crab and shrimp boils all the time and they would just come and pour the food on the table covered up with newspapers... good times!
 
kth
2013-04-11 07:20:42 PM  
Two favorites in our house:

Trout with potatoes, green beans and pine nuts.

lightly cook beans, roast potatoes with onions and spices of whatever sort you like. Saute the trout with onions stuffed inside until barely cooked, add the rest of it and warm up. Squirt of lemon, sprinkle on pine nuts.

I think I've put this in a thread before, but wasabi soba.

Make wasabi paste (we use penzey's), and stir in some soy sauce to taste. Make soba noodles. In a wok or big pan, saute some of each vegetable you have in the house in veg oil with a little sesame oil and rice wine vinegar. Add noodles and wasabi/soy sauce paste. Stir. remove from pan and heat more oil in the pan. Sear cubed sushi grade tuna slightly, and then add that to the vegetables and noodles. Sprinkle with sesame seeds. Thank me later.

We keep on upping the amount of wasabi we use. We figure at some point it will be so hot that it is unpleasant, and we will back off .001% from there.

We love wasabi at our house.
 
Ant
2013-04-11 07:23:01 PM  
I like this:

Large scallops
Bacon
Spinach
Shallots
Wine

Pat scallops dry on both ends
Cut bacon into small pieces and fry until crisp.
Pour out all but about a tablespoon of grease
Get pan super hot and add scallops
Cook each side until the opacity reaches about a third of the way up. Set aside
Add minced shallots and saute
Add a bit of wine to get all the good bits off the pan
Cook the spinach until just wilted
Add bacon back to pan
Serve scallops on top of spinach/bacon
 
2013-04-11 07:29:01 PM  
shrimp goes in jambalaya!  (and pretty much any other animal you can catch can too)
 
Ant
2013-04-11 07:29:08 PM  
This looks super good right now
www.thetasteoforegon.com

And this
steamykitchen.com
 
2013-04-11 07:36:20 PM  

fartacus: the biggest redneck here: fartacus: the biggest redneck here: fartacus: the biggest redneck here: CipollinaFan: Blue Crabs smothered in old bay and steamed with Natty Bo.
Served with Malt Vinegar because dipping crabs in butter is a travesty.

Location: Baltimore, MD

Yup, that's what I figured.

/Old Bay is made from vomit

Yep, they don't know how to cook crabs in MD. The gulf coast does 'em right - boiled in Zatarain's crab boil with new potatoes, onions, celery, and whatever else you want to throw in there (andouille sausage, garlic, and mushrooms are always winners)...

You have no idea how butthurt the MD people are about to get. They all know everything about seafood. Ever. Just ask them. Or don't, because they'll tell you.

Oh I know... I was watching "Bizarre Foods America" the other night and the episode was in/around Baltimore. It was gut-wrenching to see all those good blue crabs wasted on people who have no clue what to do with them...

I generally prefer steamed crabs over boiled, but we do them with all the extras you Gulf people like in JO #2. Kind of a mix in east coast and Gulf style.

And wild white Gulf skrimps are the only way to go. Boiled, of course.

/assuming pinks aren't available

Agreed on the skrimps. I haven't tried the J.O. spices, and I've only had the steamed ones with Old Bay (I think my feelings on that are clear). Based upon my experience, I prefer boiled (gulf coast/Louisiana style) because the spices infuse the meat and all the extras, but it doesn't become a mess all over the shells and veggies/extras. I found the steamed crabs blander - they didn't pick up as much of the flavor of the spices, and I just prefer the spice blend in crab boil. I will give the JO #2 a try though, it deserves a fair shake.


Mid-Atlantic crabs have a more robust natural flavor than those out of the deep south. Crazy, but true. So a boil does infuse some flavor that the deep southern crabs can use. I go through a bunch of Gulf crabs in the winter. Big and cheap, but they don't have that "dirty water" taste the VA/MD/DE jimmies do.

I used to buy a lot of Gulf crabs off a guy who actually had live tanks for shrimp. Huge aquifiers on a giant trailer pulled behind a pickup. He'd make weekly runs from both FL and LA into NYC with live Gulf skrimps, damnedest thing I ever saw.
 
2013-04-11 07:44:16 PM  

Tellingthem: A basic pan fry is still my favorite. Especially for pike. We used to go pike fishing after school and then take them home kill, clean, and cook them that very night.


I know so many people that only catch slew sharks for sport. I cooked one up once and i thought it was great. Its a bit boney by if you prep the thing right its good stuff. Pickerel or perch cheeks. Oh my god i know you know about that stuff. Oh pickerel cheeks in a frying pan with butter on a fire...

One i really like that lives in our river (the Mighty Peace) is the 'Burbot' and its the best. The best. You nail its tail to a tree and cut around the base and then pull off its skin. The beautiful while flesh... oh my god. You just clean that sucker up and roast it on the fire. Or broil it, or cook it respectfully. And then you dip it in garlic butter.

Because it tastes -- almost exactly -- like lobster. It is so good. So incredibly good.

Usually any fish i make is just fried up with butter and lemon and dill -- but when we were down in Belize we went reef fishing and used our Grouper and Snapper to make a 'Belizian fish bake' that involved peppers and onions and tomatoes and some mayo and a some sort of red spice rub putty and black spice putty. My wife hates (HATES) fish and she thought it was pretty tasty. It was. I have no recipie. Go down to san pedro island for a fairly cheap and safe vacation... The food is amazing. And english is the first language in belize so it makes things so much easier. Lots of fishing. Every time my hook hit the water it was like BAM somethings on the line. And its all sorts of different fish.

But burbot is amazing.

Also i saw a cool video on making homemade caviar from perch roe... I have been wanting to try it.
 
2013-04-11 07:49:49 PM  
From Tahsis, BC in 2008:

www.jimsfishing.com

Chicken and Prawn Stirfry.
 
2013-04-11 07:53:31 PM  
Lemon-garlic-tarragon butter glaze on broiled halibut...simple...priceless.
 
2013-04-11 07:54:44 PM  

Aarontology: deep fry that whiskery sumbiatch.


This. But only if said sumbiatch was pulled out of the lake within the last 2 or 3 hours. Though preferably not shot (my neighbor is infamous for doing his trout fishing with a .270).
 
2013-04-11 08:00:42 PM  
my go to prep for salmon:  rub with olive oil, season with cayenne pepper and cumin, sear on the foreman grill.  spicy and delicious.
 
2013-04-11 08:05:34 PM  
I see the love for trout. Yum. I enjoy it grilled:

Take the fresh trout and gut them. I leave the rest of the fish intact though my wife always asks that I cut off the head.

Stuff the body cavity with butter and squeeze in fresh lemon juice.
Sprinkle in a bit of salt.
Wrap the whole thing in foil (I find it works best if each fish you have is wrapped individually)
Throw on a hot grill (450 degrees)
3 - 4 minutes per side. (It doesn't take long!)

I serve with broccoli and carrots and dirty rice.
 
2013-04-11 08:42:40 PM  

sdd2000: No one has said oysters, raw on half shell. Or soft shell crabs?


But I was thinking about them this whole time. I was.
 
2013-04-11 08:43:57 PM  
Grilled Wahoo.  It was the most delicious fish I've ever had.

Sitting down to dinner at the Almond Beach Club, a man leaned over from the next table and said, "I can't eat any more, I just caught it before dinner, would you care for the rest?

I didn't even put lemon on it -  the man that offered it to me was a god.  I never got his name and never saw him again.
I hope he see's this post so he realizes just how great an anonymous  gift it was, in 1996
 
2013-04-11 08:53:11 PM  
garlic, ginger, sesame oil, and lemon.

That is all.
 
2013-04-11 09:01:23 PM  
1.  Catch walleye
2. Clean walleye
3. Dip in light breading
4. Pan fry over wood fire
5. Serve with some potatoes, a hunk of fresh bread, a piece of cheddar cheese, and some bread & butter pickles.
6. Eat in the outdoors

/why yes, I am planning my summer trip to Canada.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-11 09:01:52 PM  

rwa2: garlic, ginger, sesame oil, and lemon.

That is all.


I do something similar with pan searing tuna with a sesame crust.
 
2013-04-11 09:02:59 PM  

fzumrk: 1.  Catch walleye
2. Clean walleye
3. Dip in light breading
4. Pan fry over wood fire
5. Serve with some potatoes, a hunk of fresh bread, a piece of cheddar cheese, and some bread & butter pickles.
6. Eat in the outdoors

/why yes, I am planning my summer trip to Canada.


Boundary Waters for me, in August.
 
2013-04-11 09:12:04 PM  
**wail**

But I LIKE tilapia!!
 
2013-04-11 09:20:23 PM  
Smoked dried arctic whitefish. The natives around here catch tons of them in nets and sell it off.

That stuff is amazing. That and a ziplock bag full of shoe string moose? (Raw strips of moose cut into strings and cold smoked...they smell like new (unworn) moccasin leather). Its illegal to own as a white person but damnit its good.

Illegal to own as in you cant buy it. You have to either recieve it as a gift or barter goods and services for it. No money transactions for native caught game. But its soooo good if you grew up in the sticks and you know the right people...
 
2013-04-11 09:23:00 PM  

Sapper_Topo: So when it comes to fish I have a couple of thoughts. 1) Most of the fish we eat in our house we catch. So there was a lot more diversity when we lived in ND. We eat a lot of trout now. B) I like to keep fish simple. I am not one who will eat Walleye because it doesnt taste like fish. Truth is I like the flavor of fish so most of my recipes will not disguise the flavor of fish, they will enhance it.

That being said here is how my MIL taught me to cook croaker and it works equally well with Rainbow Trout.

Take however many Rainbows you have caught and cleaned.

Lightly brush them with sesame oil.

Evenly salt them with kosher salt

Coat the bottom of a frying pan with sesame oil (this will depend on the size of your pan)

Heat on medium to medium high heat until water dropped in pops.

Fry fish on both sides until skin is golden and flesh flakes but is still firm.

Serve hot with rice and fresh kimchee ENJOY!


Kimchee in Montana?  Wow, mind blown.
 
2013-04-11 09:23:38 PM  

fzumrk: 1.  Catch walleye
2. Clean walleye
3. Dip in light breading
4. Pan fry over wood fire
5. Serve with some potatoes, a hunk of fresh bread, a piece of cheddar cheese, and some bread & butter pickles.
6. Eat in the outdoors

/why yes, I am planning my summer trip to Canada.


Some of the best fish eating I've ever had was at God's Lake, Manitoba.  The shore lunches were better than anything you could get in a restaurant.
 
2013-04-11 09:34:24 PM  
I'm lucky enough to be in New England, raised to eat any any all fruits of the sea.  A good fish and chips is hard to beat, but if I'm doing the cooking, then the seafood is practically naked.  Just a little Old Bay or tartar sauce will do; I prefer the seafood as it was.

One day I shall be truly sad, for I will have eaten the very last of the scallops on the planet.  Unless I win the lottery, in which case I'll be trying my hand at farm-raising them, and trying not to eat the profits.
 
2013-04-11 09:49:13 PM  

mikefinch: Smoked dried arctic whitefish. The natives around here catch tons of them in nets and sell it off.

That stuff is amazing. That and a ziplock bag full of shoe string moose? (Raw strips of moose cut into strings and cold smoked...they smell like new (unworn) moccasin leather). Its illegal to own as a white person but damnit its good.

Illegal to own as in you cant buy it. You have to either recieve it as a gift or barter goods and services for it. No money transactions for native caught game. But its soooo good if you grew up in the sticks and you know the right people...


Moose is the best red meat there is. Yummmm.
 
2013-04-11 09:51:05 PM  
Salt-crusted roasted whole fish.

If you can:
1) buy a fish
2) make a sand castle
3) turn on an oven
4) tell time
You will have the richest, most flavorful, perfectly cooked piece of protein on earth.

/odd this thread came up since I made this last night
//arctic char FTW
 
2013-04-11 09:52:59 PM  
Lots of grilling, roasting, charing, blackening, crusting...

I think I'll soak mine in gasoline and fire it out of a spud gun.
 
2013-04-11 09:55:43 PM  
for the lemon/dill crowd... try lime/thyme once.
 
2013-04-11 09:55:58 PM  
Mussels in Garlic Cream

1/4 cup olive oil
6-8 large peeled garlic cloves finely minced
1/4 cup diced shallots or sweet onions
2-3 chives chopped
8 oz heavy cream
Tony Chaceheres Cajun seasoning to taste
1/4 tsp thyme
cracked back peer to taste
Tabasco (optional)
1/2 stick butter cut into two pieces
1/3 cup white wine
2-3 lbs fresh mussels*

*flash frozen mussels may be substituted (Believe it or not Walmart has an EXCELLENT 32 0z Bag of Chilean farm-raised frozen mussels wrapped in two individual 1 ib. bags for only about $4.00)

Pour olive oil in large 6-8 qt stock pot. Melt one piece of your butter in oil until first starts to brown (Do not overheat olive oil as this actually will ruin olive oil and can even make it 'rancid' by heating more than 350 degrees.
Add minced onions or  and heat until onions turn translucent. Add garlic and continue to heat for 30-60 seconds. Do not overcook garlic! Pour in fresh mussels. All Tony's seasoning, cracked black pepper and stir mussels in oil/garlic/onion mixture. Keep flame high and add white wine. Heat for 2-3 minutes to allow wine to steam open mussels and for alcohol to evaporate from wine. Add 4-6 oz's of heavy cream and
chopped chives. Keep high flame under pot until cream comes to boil.
  remain on high heat until cream comes to rapid boil. Kill heat and stir in last piece of butter which will now be slightly softened. I like to add a couple dash's of Tabasco, but that's just my personal preference.
Serve with toasted french bread for dipping into sauce. These are some of the best mussels. I always get complements. If you must use the frozen boil-in-bag mussels, they work fine. Just steam in bag, per instructions and drain. Add to pot as you would with fresh mussels immediately after the garlic begins to get soft. The mussels will pop open and can be eaten right out of the shell. The juice in the bottom will all disappear if you have warm fresh or lightly toasted french bread. Feel free toadd some rosemary or parsley for a taste variant.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-11 09:58:46 PM  

voodoomedic: Salt-crusted roasted whole fish.

If you can:
1) buy a fish
2) make a sand castle
3) turn on an oven
4) tell time
You will have the richest, most flavorful, perfectly cooked piece of protein on earth.

/odd this thread came up since I made this last night
//arctic char FTW


Not so odd.. we were watching you and it looked good.

/what's the duration on that 'tell time' part, and the temp?
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-11 10:01:15 PM  

sno man: for the lemon/dill crowd... try lime/thyme once.


I dare say I shall. I like lime more than lemon, anyway.
 
2013-04-11 10:10:26 PM  

Jesterling: Any excuse to break this out..
[www.charlock.org image 488x1500]


I don't care that you posted meat, egg, and cheese in a seafood thread, I only care that you lead me to something sinfully delicious.  Serious Noms were had.  So thanks!
 
2013-04-11 10:20:30 PM  
Baked wahoo in Roasted red pepper mayo

4-6 nice 6 oz filets of wahoo or fresh white fish.
1 red pepper roasted (broil in oven whole until charred black. Peel, seed and DO NOT RINSE)
I cup mayo
1-2 tsp Cajun seasoning (Paul Prudhomme's Blackened Redfish Season ROCKS this dish and is widely available!)
2 tsp lime juice
Preheat oven to 375 degrees

Wahoo is awesome. The Japanese in Hawaii call it 'ono' which means 'good to eat'. Pat fish dry and LIGHTLY season with salt and pepper to taste. Puree roasted red pepper and stir into mayo. Add lime juice. Do Not use cheap mayo. High quality or homemade mayo is a must! Coat fish in mayo/red pepper/lime juice mixture. Lay fish in single layer of large baking dish with spaces between. Lightly season with Cajun blackened season. Any premixed Cajun seasonings will work, but beware some have very high salt content.
Cover baking dish tightly with aluminum foil and bake on top shelf of preheated oven for approx 20 minutes depending on thickness of filets. Uncover and bake additional 3-5 minutes. Really yummy way to bake fresh fish. Swordfish also works well with this dish. The oil in the mayo keeps fish moist and the egg in the mayo makes for a really nice lightly toasted piece of fish.

On a side note, you may also make a delicious roasted red pepper tartar sauce by adding sweet pickle relish, Tabasco and cracked pepper to the mayo mixture and serve with fried fish dishes.
 
2013-04-11 10:20:53 PM  
lightly pan fried flounder
 
2013-04-11 10:26:57 PM  

DGS: voodoomedic: Salt-crusted roasted whole fish.

If you can:
1) buy a fish
2) make a sand castle
3) turn on an oven
4) tell time
You will have the richest, most flavorful, perfectly cooked piece of protein on earth.

/odd this thread came up since I made this last night
//arctic char FTW

Not so odd.. we were watching you and it looked good.

/what's the duration on that 'tell time' part, and the temp?


375 x 25-30 min. Super easy bc the salt is an insulator. You can fall asleep drinking and barely overcooked it this way. Spoken from experience. Besides, the presentation wows the $433t out of your people. Like archaeology when you crack it open and start to brush off the salt.
 
2013-04-11 10:34:48 PM  

Dahnkster: Mussels in Garlic Cream

1/4 cup olive oil
6-8 large peeled garlic cloves finely minced
1/4 cup diced shallots or sweet onions
2-3 chives chopped
8 oz heavy cream
Tony Chaceheres Cajun seasoning to taste
1/4 tsp thyme
cracked back peer to taste
Tabasco (optional)
1/2 stick butter cut into two pieces
1/3 cup white wine
2-3 lbs fresh mussels*

*flash frozen mussels may be substituted (Believe it or not Walmart has an EXCELLENT 32 0z Bag of Chilean farm-raised frozen mussels wrapped in two individual 1 ib. bags for only about $4.00)

Pour olive oil in large 6-8 qt stock pot. Melt one piece of your butter in oil until first starts to brown (Do not overheat olive oil as this actually will ruin olive oil and can even make it 'rancid' by heating more than 350 degrees.
Add minced onions or  and heat until onions turn translucent. Add garlic and continue to heat for 30-60 seconds. Do not overcook garlic! Pour in fresh mussels. All Tony's seasoning, cracked black pepper and stir mussels in oil/garlic/onion mixture. Keep flame high and add white wine. Heat for 2-3 minutes to allow wine to steam open mussels and for alcohol to evaporate from wine. Add 4-6 oz's of heavy cream and
chopped chives. Keep high flame under pot until cream comes to boil.
  remain on high heat until cream comes to rapid boil. Kill heat and stir in last piece of butter which will now be slightly softened. I like to add a couple dash's of Tabasco, but that's just my personal preference.
Serve with toasted french bread for dipping into sauce. These are some of the best mussels. I always get complements. If you must use the frozen boil-in-bag mussels, they work fine. Just steam in bag, per instructions and drain. Add to pot as you would with fresh mussels immediately after the garlic begins to get soft. The mussels will pop open and can be eaten right out of the shell. The juice in the bottom will all disappear if you have warm fresh or lightly toasted french bread. Feel free toadd some rosemary or parsley for a taste variant.


I'm going to trust you this one time...the idea to have allmost two pounds of cooked mussels for around $6 in land locked Oklahoma. Frozen fish from Walmart goes against everything I know. I will get back to you by Monday.
 
2013-04-11 10:39:52 PM  
Here's a nice marinade for grilled shrimp:

1/3 cup lime juice
1/3 cup honey
teaspoon of soy sauce
teaspoon of vegetable or light olive oil
teaspoon of hot sauce (whichever you like best)
two tablespoons Jamaican jerk seasoning
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper

Marinate for an hour, skewer those shrimps up and grill em up.  It's a sweet/spicy blend of deliciousness.
 
gja
2013-04-11 10:50:22 PM  
Asian/citrus glazed Salmon with a caper/white wine/spice remoulade.
 
2013-04-11 11:10:58 PM  
Just adding one of the finest fish dinners I ever hosted from back in my college days.  My father & I would spend quite a few evenings fishing for crappie and come home with 20-30 dinner plate sized fish.  We would practice our skills with filet knives and fill a couple cardboard half gallon milk containers full of fish.
www.crappie.com
In preparation for our feast, my friends procured a half keg of draft beer (Iron City Dark or Schaeffer's Dark - this was close to 40 years ago, shut up with this micro brew hoo haa - back then even Budweiser was palatable -but, I digress.)  The wimmenfolk were tasked with procuring an acceptable potato salad. Several containers of filets had been properly defrosted and I set up the assembly line.

One bowl containing several eggs, beaten. Add dark beer to thin to a more liquid texture.

Dip filets in egg/beer wash.

Drop into medium sized paper bag containing several cups of all purpose flour, salt, pepper and paprika for color. Shake vigorously to coat.

Drop into 4-5" hot oil - fish will cook quickly. Basically, as soon as the filet is fully firm, it is done.Drain on paper toweling. Serve with cold draft beer & potato salad (corn on the cob, if in season.) Heaven.
 
2013-04-11 11:27:16 PM  
I do a Maple soy glaze on my salmon.  1/4 c maple syrup, 1/4c soy sauce, 3 Tbls minced garlic, 3 Tbls Oil.

And ALLWAYS grill it on a plank.
 
2013-04-11 11:55:37 PM  

BarkingUnicorn: Nobody likes live octopus dropped into boiling water, eh?  Must be a Korean thing.


I am so glad I wasn't reincarnated into this life as an animal living in Asia. Any animal, as they all seem to be fair game. Someone once told me there is a Chinese saying that "as long as its asshole points down, we'll eat it." I can believe it.

I spent years living in Asia & my wife is Asian - we had great seafood last night. For great entertainment, take a walk through the markets in just about any Asian city. Bangkok for example. Farkin amazing what is sold there and destined to end up on the dinner table.
 
2013-04-12 12:47:12 AM  

fzumrk: 1.  Catch walleye
2. Clean walleye
3. Dip in light breading
4. Pan fry over wood fire
5. Serve with some potatoes, a hunk of fresh bread, a piece of cheddar cheese, and some bread & butter pickles.
6. Eat in the outdoors

/why yes, I am planning my summer trip to Canada.


I go to Glendo, WY and follow that recipe.

Replace the Pickles with squash pan-fried butter with parmesan cheese and it's a real gourmet.
 
2013-04-12 01:57:12 AM  
There are so many ways to prepare seafood, but if I'm feeling lazy, there's always the old standby....

Old bay, minced garlic, cracked black pepper, lemon.

ninecooks.typepad.com
 
2013-04-12 03:15:20 AM  
the easy solution for newbs

www.lawrys.com
 
2013-04-12 08:55:22 AM  
Okay, someone mentioned it earlier, so I guess I'll post it.

** Pan-Fried Softshell Crab

Pat dry the crab ( I always get mine already cleaned. I don't catch enough to be an expert at it.)

Place 1/2 cup flour, dash of Salt/Pepper to taste in a paper/ziploc baggie.
Shake the crab in the seasoned flour to coat, place to the side.

Heat a pat of butter in a cast iron skillet until foamy.
Place the crabs face down in the pan, no more then 3-4 at a time depending on the size of the skillet.
Fry until Golden-brown-and-delicious, then flip over and repeat.

Serve on sandwich bread with a light shmear of mayo or butter, and possibly with a leaf or two of lettuce for some colour.
 
2013-04-12 09:05:46 AM  
Two words. Mayonnaise.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-12 09:06:56 AM  

TheOriginalEd: Two words. Mayonnaise.


Is the second word "bleeeeaaaaaachhhhx"?
 
2013-04-12 10:35:36 AM  

TheShavingofOccam123: Lots of grilling, roasting, charing, blackening, crusting...

I think I'll soak mine in gasoline and fire it out of a spud gun.


Having thought about this joke all last night, I'm convinced it's doable. If you had the right trajectory--which would yield a decent burn time--and the right clean-burning fuel, you could fire a fish filet down range.

By the time the fish landed on a plate several hundred yards down range, it would be seared to perfection.

Maybe a cedar plank sabot, too...

It should be done at nigh obviously.
 
2013-04-12 10:55:05 AM  

DGS: santadog: Lime Cilantro Seared Scallops.

That's my big show.

/just starting to like seafood.

That sounds good. Are the lime and cilantro both garnishes post sear, or is there something different to that?


Ingredients
2 tablespoons cooking olive oil (virgin olive oil is better for frying because it has a higher burn temperature than extra virgin)
1 pound sea scallops
Juice of one lime
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
Handful of cilantro (leaves only), coarsely chopped
Kosher or sea salt and freshly ground pepper

Arrange the scallops on a plate, and season them with salt and fresh pepper.Put an empty glass casserole dish into the oven and set the temperature at 200° F which is warm enough to keep food warm but not cook it further.In a large fry or sauté pan, heat one tablespoon of the olive oil, and let the pan get hot although not smoking.Add about eight scallops to the pan, leaving a fair amount of room between each as they cook.  Cook them for approximately two and a half minutes per side, or until a nice golden colorPut the first batch of scallops in the empty casserole dish to be kept warm in the oven.Add the second tablespoon of oil to the pan, and repeat the process with the second batch of scallops.Once all the scallops are in the oven, do a quick wipe of the pan, not cleaning it, just clearing the surface a bit.  Add the butter and melt it.Add the lime juice and cilantro to the melted butter and let it simmer for about 30 seconds.Return the scallops to the pan, and toss them so they're coated in the lime/cilantro butter.Serve immediately.
 
2013-04-12 11:05:23 AM  
Shrimp Etouffe ( apologies to any cajun farkers out there)

Roux: 1/2 cup oil ( Vegetable or Canola) , 1/2 Cup flour.


3 Tablespoon Old Bay ( or your favorite Crab boil / Spice blend )


Trinity : 1/2 Cup chopped Green Pepper, 1 cup chopped Celery, 1 cup chopped Yellow Onion


3 cloves of garlic, minced

2 to 3 dashes hot sauce of choice

1 (14.5-ounce) can Rotel Tomatoes ( the ones with the chiles )

2 cups Chicken Broth

Salt

2 pounds raw shrimp , peeled & de-veined

Diced green onions, for garnish.

Rice, for serving.


Prepare the Roux :  In a Dutch Oven over medium heat, combine the Oil and Flour to make a paste. Stir constantly until it turns a Golden-brown colour and smells like roasted nuts.

Add the Old Bay.

Add the Trinity to the pan and cook for about 8-10 minutes, until the peppers get slightly soft.Then add in the garlic. Stir frequently.

Add the Rotel tomatoes, undrained.

Add the chicken broth and stir, it should resemble a chunky tomato-gravy like concotion. Bring to a boil, then turn the heat down to low and simmer for about 10-15 minutes.

Add the Shrimp, stir and turn off the heat. Let it sit , covered, for about 5 minutes.

Serve over rice, and garnish with green onions.
 
2013-04-12 11:15:21 AM  
<ctrl-f>scallops<enter>
<ctrl-c><alt-tab><ctrl-v>
Repeat as necessary
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-12 11:22:19 AM  

santadog: DGS: santadog: Lime Cilantro Seared Scallops.

That's my big show.

/just starting to like seafood.

That sounds good. Are the lime and cilantro both garnishes post sear, or is there something different to that?

Ingredients
2 tablespoons cooking olive oil (virgin olive oil is better for frying because it has a higher burn temperature than extra virgin)
1 pound sea scallops
Juice of one lime
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
Handful of cilantro (leaves only), coarsely chopped
Kosher or sea salt and freshly ground pepper

Arrange the scallops on a plate, and season them with salt and fresh pepper.Put an empty glass casserole dish into the oven and set the temperature at 200° F which is warm enough to keep food warm but not cook it further.In a large fry or sauté pan, heat one tablespoon of the olive oil, and let the pan get hot although not smoking.Add about eight scallops to the pan, leaving a fair amount of room between each as they cook.  Cook them for approximately two and a half minutes per side, or until a nice golden colorPut the first batch of scallops in the empty casserole dish to be kept warm in the oven.Add the second tablespoon of oil to the pan, and repeat the process with the second batch of scallops.Once all the scallops are in the oven, do a quick wipe of the pan, not cleaning it, just clearing the surface a bit.  Add the butter and melt it.Add the lime juice and cilantro to the melted butter and let it simmer for about 30 seconds.Return the scallops to the pan, and toss them so they're coated in the lime/cilantro butter.Serve immediately.


Oh that sounds good, thanks for the follow up. What do you like to serve that with?

I think my biggest issue with scallops are I often feel like the options I have are not fresh. I read about it a bit and don't know how to tell by eye which scallops were previously frozen and thawed up, soaked in water (adding to the weight and hiding that they're not fresh). It has kept me from getting scallops more frequently. Wifey and I both love them, and one time I got some I thought were -great-.. and it turns out they'd had so much water that it was hard to get a good sear on it, it just released all that water and messed up the cooking. Perhaps I just didn't have a good technique to right that ship instead of helplessly watching it sink my plans for the dish.
 
2013-04-12 12:11:54 PM  

DGS: I think my biggest issue with scallops are I often feel like the options I have are not fresh. I read about it a bit and don't know how to tell by eye which scallops were previously frozen and thawed up, soaked in water (adding to the weight and hiding that they're not fresh).


Smell them.  If there's any odor that doesn't smell like seawater, don't buy.  Also, take a look at the ice or the tray they were sitting in.  If it looks like the scallops were sitting in a milk bath, skip them.

If I recall correctly, there's been more than a few distributors which soak scallops (especially those destined for non-coastal markets) in some chemical bath to increase their shelf life and to cause them to hold on to water to increase the scale weight.  It's supposed to have a distinctive smell, and truly fresh scallops won't smell like anything but brine.

/Favorite scallop dish: pan seared in lemon butter and served with red pesto linguine
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-12 12:15:13 PM  

praxcelis: DGS: I think my biggest issue with scallops are I often feel like the options I have are not fresh. I read about it a bit and don't know how to tell by eye which scallops were previously frozen and thawed up, soaked in water (adding to the weight and hiding that they're not fresh).

Smell them.  If there's any odor that doesn't smell like seawater, don't buy.  Also, take a look at the ice or the tray they were sitting in.  If it looks like the scallops were sitting in a milk bath, skip them.

If I recall correctly, there's been more than a few distributors which soak scallops (especially those destined for non-coastal markets) in some chemical bath to increase their shelf life and to cause them to hold on to water to increase the scale weight.  It's supposed to have a distinctive smell, and truly fresh scallops won't smell like anything but brine.

/Favorite scallop dish: pan seared in lemon butter and served with red pesto linguine


Good thoughts. Thanks for the suggestion/feedback.
 
2013-04-12 12:47:19 PM  

DGS: santadog: DGS: santadog: Lime Cilantro Seared Scallops.

That's my big show.

/just starting to like seafood.

That sounds good. Are the lime and cilantro both garnishes post sear, or is there something different to that?

Ingredients
2 tablespoons cooking olive oil (virgin olive oil is better for frying because it has a higher burn temperature than extra virgin)
1 pound sea scallops
Juice of one lime
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
Handful of cilantro (leaves only), coarsely chopped
Kosher or sea salt and freshly ground pepper

Arrange the scallops on a plate, and season them with salt and fresh pepper.Put an empty glass casserole dish into the oven and set the temperature at 200° F which is warm enough to keep food warm but not cook it further.In a large fry or sauté pan, heat one tablespoon of the olive oil, and let the pan get hot although not smoking.Add about eight scallops to the pan, leaving a fair amount of room between each as they cook.  Cook them for approximately two and a half minutes per side, or until a nice golden colorPut the first batch of scallops in the empty casserole dish to be kept warm in the oven.Add the second tablespoon of oil to the pan, and repeat the process with the second batch of scallops.Once all the scallops are in the oven, do a quick wipe of the pan, not cleaning it, just clearing the surface a bit.  Add the butter and melt it.Add the lime juice and cilantro to the melted butter and let it simmer for about 30 seconds.Return the scallops to the pan, and toss them so they're coated in the lime/cilantro butter.Serve immediately.

Oh that sounds good, thanks for the follow up. What do you like to serve that with?

I think my biggest issue with scallops are I often feel like the options I have are not fresh. I read about it a bit and don't know how to tell by eye which scallops were previously frozen and thawed up, soaked in water (adding to the weight and hiding that they're not fresh). It has kept me from getting scallops more freque ...


I've been serving it with a spicy avocado salad and Mango salsa.    I'm very new to seafood.  Avoided it all my life.  Recently did a Vietnamese seafood boil with Lobster, shrimp and scallops that turned out well.
I only buy seafood when I can get to a proper market.  I live in a mountain town, so it's not until I take a trip to Denver and hit the Asian markets.  Iced cooler ready.  I'll be moving to Ohio next year, and the West Side Market in Cleveland will be where I get my seafood.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-12 01:00:03 PM  

santadog: DGS: santadog: DGS: santadog: Lime Cilantro Seared Scallops.

That's my big show.

/just starting to like seafood.

That sounds good. Are the lime and cilantro both garnishes post sear, or is there something different to that?

Ingredients
2 tablespoons cooking olive oil (virgin olive oil is better for frying because it has a higher burn temperature than extra virgin)
1 pound sea scallops
Juice of one lime
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
Handful of cilantro (leaves only), coarsely chopped
Kosher or sea salt and freshly ground pepper

Arrange the scallops on a plate, and season them with salt and fresh pepper.Put an empty glass casserole dish into the oven and set the temperature at 200° F which is warm enough to keep food warm but not cook it further.In a large fry or sauté pan, heat one tablespoon of the olive oil, and let the pan get hot although not smoking.Add about eight scallops to the pan, leaving a fair amount of room between each as they cook.  Cook them for approximately two and a half minutes per side, or until a nice golden colorPut the first batch of scallops in the empty casserole dish to be kept warm in the oven.Add the second tablespoon of oil to the pan, and repeat the process with the second batch of scallops.Once all the scallops are in the oven, do a quick wipe of the pan, not cleaning it, just clearing the surface a bit.  Add the butter and melt it.Add the lime juice and cilantro to the melted butter and let it simmer for about 30 seconds.Return the scallops to the pan, and toss them so they're coated in the lime/cilantro butter.Serve immediately.

Oh that sounds good, thanks for the follow up. What do you like to serve that with?

I think my biggest issue with scallops are I often feel like the options I have are not fresh. I read about it a bit and don't know how to tell by eye which scallops were previously frozen and thawed up, soaked in water (adding to the weight and hiding that they're not fresh). It has kept me from getting scallops more f ...


I have some low quality fishmongers near me that are meh.. but the one in Chelsea Market is seriously good, even if it's pretty expensive. They're closed for now, renovating, and expected back open soon. I love that place.. I just try to avoid it because I want to stop in the Kitchen Supply shop, which is more deadly for me than buying the King Salmon and Lobster nearby.
 
2013-04-12 03:22:58 PM  
thawed tilapia filets
pepper n salt, lemon pepper kicks ass
olive oil
wok

do a little fry up on medium after heating the oil proper
cuz I don't wanna phaser-baste them

them poopfish are all righty
 
2013-04-13 12:02:07 AM  
i love low country cuisine and all the ways they cook seafood. charleston, savannah and wilmington
do it up right. shrimp and grits, stuffed flounder, fried soft shell crab, etc etc.

i used to love the conch fritters at snook's in key largo. they were served with a perfect sauce. i asked the waitress for the sauce recipe, and she said, " mayo and tobasco."  so there you go....
 
2013-04-13 12:49:34 PM  

praxcelis: DGS: I think my biggest issue with scallops are I often feel like the options I have are not fresh. I read about it a bit and don't know how to tell by eye which scallops were previously frozen and thawed up, soaked in water (adding to the weight and hiding that they're not fresh).

Smell them.  If there's any odor that doesn't smell like seawater, don't buy.  Also, take a look at the ice or the tray they were sitting in.  If it looks like the scallops were sitting in a milk bath, skip them.

If I recall correctly, there's been more than a few distributors which soak scallops (especially those destined for non-coastal markets) in some chemical bath to increase their shelf life and to cause them to hold on to water to increase the scale weight.  It's supposed to have a distinctive smell, and truly fresh scallops won't smell like anything but brine.

/Favorite scallop dish: pan seared in lemon butter and served with red pesto linguine


You're right about the chemicals, but wrong about the other stuff.

The easiest way to get good scallops is to go to a high-end place that shows their shiat and ask for "dry" scallops. 10/20 is generally the best size.

Dry scallops are those without the water/chemical bath, and "wet" scallops are the soaked ones. Frankly, it's sometimes difficult to find dry scallops, and they're a bit more expensive, but they're FAR better after being cooked. The natural smell of scallops is actually not unlike that of a human fart. They're gassy, that's just the reality, so the chemical bath kills that smell. It's what most people want, so the industry gives it to them. But that smell will get cooked out of them, and your final product is MUCH better with dry scallops. Just got to get past the smell a "milky" look of them first.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-13 01:56:16 PM  

the biggest redneck here: praxcelis: DGS: I think my biggest issue with scallops are I often feel like the options I have are not fresh. I read about it a bit and don't know how to tell by eye which scallops were previously frozen and thawed up, soaked in water (adding to the weight and hiding that they're not fresh).

Smell them.  If there's any odor that doesn't smell like seawater, don't buy.  Also, take a look at the ice or the tray they were sitting in.  If it looks like the scallops were sitting in a milk bath, skip them.

If I recall correctly, there's been more than a few distributors which soak scallops (especially those destined for non-coastal markets) in some chemical bath to increase their shelf life and to cause them to hold on to water to increase the scale weight.  It's supposed to have a distinctive smell, and truly fresh scallops won't smell like anything but brine.

/Favorite scallop dish: pan seared in lemon butter and served with red pesto linguine

You're right about the chemicals, but wrong about the other stuff.

The easiest way to get good scallops is to go to a high-end place that shows their shiat and ask for "dry" scallops. 10/20 is generally the best size.

Dry scallops are those without the water/chemical bath, and "wet" scallops are the soaked ones. Frankly, it's sometimes difficult to find dry scallops, and they're a bit more expensive, but they're FAR better after being cooked. The natural smell of scallops is actually not unlike that of a human fart. They're gassy, that's just the reality, so the chemical bath kills that smell. It's what most people want, so the industry gives it to them. But that smell will get cooked out of them, and your final product is MUCH better with dry scallops. Just got to get past the smell a "milky" look of them first.


Very interesting. It never occurred to me to ask for dry scallops. Thanks!
 
2013-04-13 02:15:31 PM  

DGS: the biggest redneck here: praxcelis: DGS: I think my biggest issue with scallops are I often feel like the options I have are not fresh. I read about it a bit and don't know how to tell by eye which scallops were previously frozen and thawed up, soaked in water (adding to the weight and hiding that they're not fresh).

Smell them.  If there's any odor that doesn't smell like seawater, don't buy.  Also, take a look at the ice or the tray they were sitting in.  If it looks like the scallops were sitting in a milk bath, skip them.

If I recall correctly, there's been more than a few distributors which soak scallops (especially those destined for non-coastal markets) in some chemical bath to increase their shelf life and to cause them to hold on to water to increase the scale weight.  It's supposed to have a distinctive smell, and truly fresh scallops won't smell like anything but brine.

/Favorite scallop dish: pan seared in lemon butter and served with red pesto linguine

You're right about the chemicals, but wrong about the other stuff.

The easiest way to get good scallops is to go to a high-end place that shows their shiat and ask for "dry" scallops. 10/20 is generally the best size.

Dry scallops are those without the water/chemical bath, and "wet" scallops are the soaked ones. Frankly, it's sometimes difficult to find dry scallops, and they're a bit more expensive, but they're FAR better after being cooked. The natural smell of scallops is actually not unlike that of a human fart. They're gassy, that's just the reality, so the chemical bath kills that smell. It's what most people want, so the industry gives it to them. But that smell will get cooked out of them, and your final product is MUCH better with dry scallops. Just got to get past the smell a "milky" look of them first.

Very interesting. It never occurred to me to ask for dry scallops. Thanks!


Most places don't carry them. And even the owners of high-end places like me often don't just because they're a bit of a grumble to deal with. Customers want them cheap and not stinky (neither of which fits the description of a dry scallop), so even though I'd much rather sell dry than wet, wet is what I carry. I used to carry only dry, but people would complain about their smell just hours off the boat. Then the price went wild a few years ago, and it';s been all wet for me ever since. Drives me crazy to sell a product that I know is inferior, but that's what both the customers and market demands.
 
2013-04-13 03:30:13 PM  

the biggest redneck here: DGS: the biggest redneck here: praxcelis: DGS: I think my biggest issue with scallops are I often feel like the options I have are not fresh. I read about it a bit and don't know how to tell by eye which scallops were previously frozen and thawed up, soaked in water (adding to the weight and hiding that they're not fresh).

Smell them.  If there's any odor that doesn't smell like seawater, don't buy.  Also, take a look at the ice or the tray they were sitting in.  If it looks like the scallops were sitting in a milk bath, skip them.

If I recall correctly, there's been more than a few distributors which soak scallops (especially those destined for non-coastal markets) in some chemical bath to increase their shelf life and to cause them to hold on to water to increase the scale weight.  It's supposed to have a distinctive smell, and truly fresh scallops won't smell like anything but brine.

/Favorite scallop dish: pan seared in lemon butter and served with red pesto linguine

You're right about the chemicals, but wrong about the other stuff.

The easiest way to get good scallops is to go to a high-end place that shows their shiat and ask for "dry" scallops. 10/20 is generally the best size.

Dry scallops are those without the water/chemical bath, and "wet" scallops are the soaked ones. Frankly, it's sometimes difficult to find dry scallops, and they're a bit more expensive, but they're FAR better after being cooked. The natural smell of scallops is actually not unlike that of a human fart. They're gassy, that's just the reality, so the chemical bath kills that smell. It's what most people want, so the industry gives it to them. But that smell will get cooked out of them, and your final product is MUCH better with dry scallops. Just got to get past the smell a "milky" look of them first.

Very interesting. It never occurred to me to ask for dry scallops. Thanks!

Most places don't carry them. And even the owners of high-end places like me often don't just because they ...


And I learned something today.  Thanks for that.
 
2013-04-13 07:39:29 PM  

WalMartian: the biggest redneck here: Blackened snapper is my favorite fish, conch puppies are my favorite overall.

And I'm getting a kick out of this thread because I own and operate a seafood market.

Read that as "couch puppies".


Conch fritters are SO good. I wish I could get conch here (landlocked in Cincy).

/The sad will never end.
 
Displayed 262 of 262 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter








In Other Media
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report