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(Serious Eats)   The Return to the Fark Food Thread: Seared scallops? Grilled shrimp? Tilapia en papillote? Blackened catfish? When it's time to dress up your catch, how do you like to prepare seafood?   (seriouseats.com) divider line 262
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1731 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Apr 2013 at 5:00 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-12 11:22:19 AM

santadog: DGS: santadog: Lime Cilantro Seared Scallops.

That's my big show.

/just starting to like seafood.

That sounds good. Are the lime and cilantro both garnishes post sear, or is there something different to that?

Ingredients
2 tablespoons cooking olive oil (virgin olive oil is better for frying because it has a higher burn temperature than extra virgin)
1 pound sea scallops
Juice of one lime
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
Handful of cilantro (leaves only), coarsely chopped
Kosher or sea salt and freshly ground pepper

Arrange the scallops on a plate, and season them with salt and fresh pepper.Put an empty glass casserole dish into the oven and set the temperature at 200° F which is warm enough to keep food warm but not cook it further.In a large fry or sauté pan, heat one tablespoon of the olive oil, and let the pan get hot although not smoking.Add about eight scallops to the pan, leaving a fair amount of room between each as they cook.  Cook them for approximately two and a half minutes per side, or until a nice golden colorPut the first batch of scallops in the empty casserole dish to be kept warm in the oven.Add the second tablespoon of oil to the pan, and repeat the process with the second batch of scallops.Once all the scallops are in the oven, do a quick wipe of the pan, not cleaning it, just clearing the surface a bit.  Add the butter and melt it.Add the lime juice and cilantro to the melted butter and let it simmer for about 30 seconds.Return the scallops to the pan, and toss them so they're coated in the lime/cilantro butter.Serve immediately.


Oh that sounds good, thanks for the follow up. What do you like to serve that with?

I think my biggest issue with scallops are I often feel like the options I have are not fresh. I read about it a bit and don't know how to tell by eye which scallops were previously frozen and thawed up, soaked in water (adding to the weight and hiding that they're not fresh). It has kept me from getting scallops more frequently. Wifey and I both love them, and one time I got some I thought were -great-.. and it turns out they'd had so much water that it was hard to get a good sear on it, it just released all that water and messed up the cooking. Perhaps I just didn't have a good technique to right that ship instead of helplessly watching it sink my plans for the dish.
 
2013-04-12 12:11:54 PM

DGS: I think my biggest issue with scallops are I often feel like the options I have are not fresh. I read about it a bit and don't know how to tell by eye which scallops were previously frozen and thawed up, soaked in water (adding to the weight and hiding that they're not fresh).


Smell them.  If there's any odor that doesn't smell like seawater, don't buy.  Also, take a look at the ice or the tray they were sitting in.  If it looks like the scallops were sitting in a milk bath, skip them.

If I recall correctly, there's been more than a few distributors which soak scallops (especially those destined for non-coastal markets) in some chemical bath to increase their shelf life and to cause them to hold on to water to increase the scale weight.  It's supposed to have a distinctive smell, and truly fresh scallops won't smell like anything but brine.

/Favorite scallop dish: pan seared in lemon butter and served with red pesto linguine
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-12 12:15:13 PM

praxcelis: DGS: I think my biggest issue with scallops are I often feel like the options I have are not fresh. I read about it a bit and don't know how to tell by eye which scallops were previously frozen and thawed up, soaked in water (adding to the weight and hiding that they're not fresh).

Smell them.  If there's any odor that doesn't smell like seawater, don't buy.  Also, take a look at the ice or the tray they were sitting in.  If it looks like the scallops were sitting in a milk bath, skip them.

If I recall correctly, there's been more than a few distributors which soak scallops (especially those destined for non-coastal markets) in some chemical bath to increase their shelf life and to cause them to hold on to water to increase the scale weight.  It's supposed to have a distinctive smell, and truly fresh scallops won't smell like anything but brine.

/Favorite scallop dish: pan seared in lemon butter and served with red pesto linguine


Good thoughts. Thanks for the suggestion/feedback.
 
2013-04-12 12:47:19 PM

DGS: santadog: DGS: santadog: Lime Cilantro Seared Scallops.

That's my big show.

/just starting to like seafood.

That sounds good. Are the lime and cilantro both garnishes post sear, or is there something different to that?

Ingredients
2 tablespoons cooking olive oil (virgin olive oil is better for frying because it has a higher burn temperature than extra virgin)
1 pound sea scallops
Juice of one lime
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
Handful of cilantro (leaves only), coarsely chopped
Kosher or sea salt and freshly ground pepper

Arrange the scallops on a plate, and season them with salt and fresh pepper.Put an empty glass casserole dish into the oven and set the temperature at 200° F which is warm enough to keep food warm but not cook it further.In a large fry or sauté pan, heat one tablespoon of the olive oil, and let the pan get hot although not smoking.Add about eight scallops to the pan, leaving a fair amount of room between each as they cook.  Cook them for approximately two and a half minutes per side, or until a nice golden colorPut the first batch of scallops in the empty casserole dish to be kept warm in the oven.Add the second tablespoon of oil to the pan, and repeat the process with the second batch of scallops.Once all the scallops are in the oven, do a quick wipe of the pan, not cleaning it, just clearing the surface a bit.  Add the butter and melt it.Add the lime juice and cilantro to the melted butter and let it simmer for about 30 seconds.Return the scallops to the pan, and toss them so they're coated in the lime/cilantro butter.Serve immediately.

Oh that sounds good, thanks for the follow up. What do you like to serve that with?

I think my biggest issue with scallops are I often feel like the options I have are not fresh. I read about it a bit and don't know how to tell by eye which scallops were previously frozen and thawed up, soaked in water (adding to the weight and hiding that they're not fresh). It has kept me from getting scallops more freque ...


I've been serving it with a spicy avocado salad and Mango salsa.    I'm very new to seafood.  Avoided it all my life.  Recently did a Vietnamese seafood boil with Lobster, shrimp and scallops that turned out well.
I only buy seafood when I can get to a proper market.  I live in a mountain town, so it's not until I take a trip to Denver and hit the Asian markets.  Iced cooler ready.  I'll be moving to Ohio next year, and the West Side Market in Cleveland will be where I get my seafood.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-12 01:00:03 PM

santadog: DGS: santadog: DGS: santadog: Lime Cilantro Seared Scallops.

That's my big show.

/just starting to like seafood.

That sounds good. Are the lime and cilantro both garnishes post sear, or is there something different to that?

Ingredients
2 tablespoons cooking olive oil (virgin olive oil is better for frying because it has a higher burn temperature than extra virgin)
1 pound sea scallops
Juice of one lime
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
Handful of cilantro (leaves only), coarsely chopped
Kosher or sea salt and freshly ground pepper

Arrange the scallops on a plate, and season them with salt and fresh pepper.Put an empty glass casserole dish into the oven and set the temperature at 200° F which is warm enough to keep food warm but not cook it further.In a large fry or sauté pan, heat one tablespoon of the olive oil, and let the pan get hot although not smoking.Add about eight scallops to the pan, leaving a fair amount of room between each as they cook.  Cook them for approximately two and a half minutes per side, or until a nice golden colorPut the first batch of scallops in the empty casserole dish to be kept warm in the oven.Add the second tablespoon of oil to the pan, and repeat the process with the second batch of scallops.Once all the scallops are in the oven, do a quick wipe of the pan, not cleaning it, just clearing the surface a bit.  Add the butter and melt it.Add the lime juice and cilantro to the melted butter and let it simmer for about 30 seconds.Return the scallops to the pan, and toss them so they're coated in the lime/cilantro butter.Serve immediately.

Oh that sounds good, thanks for the follow up. What do you like to serve that with?

I think my biggest issue with scallops are I often feel like the options I have are not fresh. I read about it a bit and don't know how to tell by eye which scallops were previously frozen and thawed up, soaked in water (adding to the weight and hiding that they're not fresh). It has kept me from getting scallops more f ...


I have some low quality fishmongers near me that are meh.. but the one in Chelsea Market is seriously good, even if it's pretty expensive. They're closed for now, renovating, and expected back open soon. I love that place.. I just try to avoid it because I want to stop in the Kitchen Supply shop, which is more deadly for me than buying the King Salmon and Lobster nearby.
 
2013-04-12 03:22:58 PM
thawed tilapia filets
pepper n salt, lemon pepper kicks ass
olive oil
wok

do a little fry up on medium after heating the oil proper
cuz I don't wanna phaser-baste them

them poopfish are all righty
 
2013-04-13 12:02:07 AM
i love low country cuisine and all the ways they cook seafood. charleston, savannah and wilmington
do it up right. shrimp and grits, stuffed flounder, fried soft shell crab, etc etc.

i used to love the conch fritters at snook's in key largo. they were served with a perfect sauce. i asked the waitress for the sauce recipe, and she said, " mayo and tobasco."  so there you go....
 
2013-04-13 12:49:34 PM

praxcelis: DGS: I think my biggest issue with scallops are I often feel like the options I have are not fresh. I read about it a bit and don't know how to tell by eye which scallops were previously frozen and thawed up, soaked in water (adding to the weight and hiding that they're not fresh).

Smell them.  If there's any odor that doesn't smell like seawater, don't buy.  Also, take a look at the ice or the tray they were sitting in.  If it looks like the scallops were sitting in a milk bath, skip them.

If I recall correctly, there's been more than a few distributors which soak scallops (especially those destined for non-coastal markets) in some chemical bath to increase their shelf life and to cause them to hold on to water to increase the scale weight.  It's supposed to have a distinctive smell, and truly fresh scallops won't smell like anything but brine.

/Favorite scallop dish: pan seared in lemon butter and served with red pesto linguine


You're right about the chemicals, but wrong about the other stuff.

The easiest way to get good scallops is to go to a high-end place that shows their shiat and ask for "dry" scallops. 10/20 is generally the best size.

Dry scallops are those without the water/chemical bath, and "wet" scallops are the soaked ones. Frankly, it's sometimes difficult to find dry scallops, and they're a bit more expensive, but they're FAR better after being cooked. The natural smell of scallops is actually not unlike that of a human fart. They're gassy, that's just the reality, so the chemical bath kills that smell. It's what most people want, so the industry gives it to them. But that smell will get cooked out of them, and your final product is MUCH better with dry scallops. Just got to get past the smell a "milky" look of them first.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-13 01:56:16 PM

the biggest redneck here: praxcelis: DGS: I think my biggest issue with scallops are I often feel like the options I have are not fresh. I read about it a bit and don't know how to tell by eye which scallops were previously frozen and thawed up, soaked in water (adding to the weight and hiding that they're not fresh).

Smell them.  If there's any odor that doesn't smell like seawater, don't buy.  Also, take a look at the ice or the tray they were sitting in.  If it looks like the scallops were sitting in a milk bath, skip them.

If I recall correctly, there's been more than a few distributors which soak scallops (especially those destined for non-coastal markets) in some chemical bath to increase their shelf life and to cause them to hold on to water to increase the scale weight.  It's supposed to have a distinctive smell, and truly fresh scallops won't smell like anything but brine.

/Favorite scallop dish: pan seared in lemon butter and served with red pesto linguine

You're right about the chemicals, but wrong about the other stuff.

The easiest way to get good scallops is to go to a high-end place that shows their shiat and ask for "dry" scallops. 10/20 is generally the best size.

Dry scallops are those without the water/chemical bath, and "wet" scallops are the soaked ones. Frankly, it's sometimes difficult to find dry scallops, and they're a bit more expensive, but they're FAR better after being cooked. The natural smell of scallops is actually not unlike that of a human fart. They're gassy, that's just the reality, so the chemical bath kills that smell. It's what most people want, so the industry gives it to them. But that smell will get cooked out of them, and your final product is MUCH better with dry scallops. Just got to get past the smell a "milky" look of them first.


Very interesting. It never occurred to me to ask for dry scallops. Thanks!
 
2013-04-13 02:15:31 PM

DGS: the biggest redneck here: praxcelis: DGS: I think my biggest issue with scallops are I often feel like the options I have are not fresh. I read about it a bit and don't know how to tell by eye which scallops were previously frozen and thawed up, soaked in water (adding to the weight and hiding that they're not fresh).

Smell them.  If there's any odor that doesn't smell like seawater, don't buy.  Also, take a look at the ice or the tray they were sitting in.  If it looks like the scallops were sitting in a milk bath, skip them.

If I recall correctly, there's been more than a few distributors which soak scallops (especially those destined for non-coastal markets) in some chemical bath to increase their shelf life and to cause them to hold on to water to increase the scale weight.  It's supposed to have a distinctive smell, and truly fresh scallops won't smell like anything but brine.

/Favorite scallop dish: pan seared in lemon butter and served with red pesto linguine

You're right about the chemicals, but wrong about the other stuff.

The easiest way to get good scallops is to go to a high-end place that shows their shiat and ask for "dry" scallops. 10/20 is generally the best size.

Dry scallops are those without the water/chemical bath, and "wet" scallops are the soaked ones. Frankly, it's sometimes difficult to find dry scallops, and they're a bit more expensive, but they're FAR better after being cooked. The natural smell of scallops is actually not unlike that of a human fart. They're gassy, that's just the reality, so the chemical bath kills that smell. It's what most people want, so the industry gives it to them. But that smell will get cooked out of them, and your final product is MUCH better with dry scallops. Just got to get past the smell a "milky" look of them first.

Very interesting. It never occurred to me to ask for dry scallops. Thanks!


Most places don't carry them. And even the owners of high-end places like me often don't just because they're a bit of a grumble to deal with. Customers want them cheap and not stinky (neither of which fits the description of a dry scallop), so even though I'd much rather sell dry than wet, wet is what I carry. I used to carry only dry, but people would complain about their smell just hours off the boat. Then the price went wild a few years ago, and it';s been all wet for me ever since. Drives me crazy to sell a product that I know is inferior, but that's what both the customers and market demands.
 
2013-04-13 03:30:13 PM

the biggest redneck here: DGS: the biggest redneck here: praxcelis: DGS: I think my biggest issue with scallops are I often feel like the options I have are not fresh. I read about it a bit and don't know how to tell by eye which scallops were previously frozen and thawed up, soaked in water (adding to the weight and hiding that they're not fresh).

Smell them.  If there's any odor that doesn't smell like seawater, don't buy.  Also, take a look at the ice or the tray they were sitting in.  If it looks like the scallops were sitting in a milk bath, skip them.

If I recall correctly, there's been more than a few distributors which soak scallops (especially those destined for non-coastal markets) in some chemical bath to increase their shelf life and to cause them to hold on to water to increase the scale weight.  It's supposed to have a distinctive smell, and truly fresh scallops won't smell like anything but brine.

/Favorite scallop dish: pan seared in lemon butter and served with red pesto linguine

You're right about the chemicals, but wrong about the other stuff.

The easiest way to get good scallops is to go to a high-end place that shows their shiat and ask for "dry" scallops. 10/20 is generally the best size.

Dry scallops are those without the water/chemical bath, and "wet" scallops are the soaked ones. Frankly, it's sometimes difficult to find dry scallops, and they're a bit more expensive, but they're FAR better after being cooked. The natural smell of scallops is actually not unlike that of a human fart. They're gassy, that's just the reality, so the chemical bath kills that smell. It's what most people want, so the industry gives it to them. But that smell will get cooked out of them, and your final product is MUCH better with dry scallops. Just got to get past the smell a "milky" look of them first.

Very interesting. It never occurred to me to ask for dry scallops. Thanks!

Most places don't carry them. And even the owners of high-end places like me often don't just because they ...


And I learned something today.  Thanks for that.
 
2013-04-13 07:39:29 PM

WalMartian: the biggest redneck here: Blackened snapper is my favorite fish, conch puppies are my favorite overall.

And I'm getting a kick out of this thread because I own and operate a seafood market.

Read that as "couch puppies".


Conch fritters are SO good. I wish I could get conch here (landlocked in Cincy).

/The sad will never end.
 
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