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(Serious Eats)   The Return to the Fark Food Thread: Seared scallops? Grilled shrimp? Tilapia en papillote? Blackened catfish? When it's time to dress up your catch, how do you like to prepare seafood?   (seriouseats.com) divider line 262
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1731 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Apr 2013 at 5:00 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-11 05:12:46 PM
Tilapia en papillote?

Anything in papillote picks up a delicate flavor.  It is a technique worth learning: all that you're doing is wrapping your fish in parchment to seal in flavor and juices.  Our preferred recipe is with salmon:

1 salmon fillet (skin on or off), 6 to 8 ounces

*if you're cooking several, simply wrap them separately; if you're a romantic farker you can form a heart out of the parchment simply by folding 2" sections over each other and making the arches at the top


¼ tsp salt

¼ tsp freshly ground pepper

1 shallot, diced

1 slice of ginger, diced

¼ cup julienne of zucchini

¼ cup julienne of carrot

¼ cup thin slices of shiatake (fresh is better but dried shiatakes can be reconstituted and the water used for accompanying rice)


rectangular sheet of parchment paper, 24" x 16"

Preheat oven to 425oF or grill at 350-400oF.

Fold paper in half.Season fillet with salt & pepper and place it in center of parchment.Scatter vegetables and ginger about the fillet and top with butter.Season again with salt & pepper.


Fold and inflate parchment casing.Cook 10 minutes (or 10 minutes per inch with thicker fillets) on a grill tray.


Serve over rice by simply tearing open the parchment and emptying the content onto plates.
 
2013-04-11 05:13:17 PM
On a fishing trip some of us were discussing how we most enjoyed cooking different kinds of fish when one old gentleman remarked, "frying, that's the great equalizer".
 
2013-04-11 05:13:52 PM
Cedar Grilled Salmon:

Soak cedar plank in water for 2 hours.

Oil the skin side of a 1- 1.5 pound salmon filet.
Season both sides of filet and place it skin side down on the plank.
Put glaze over top and sides of filet.
Grill over indirect heat until golden brown.

Glaze:

1/2 cup mayo, 1/3 cup grainy brown mustard, 2 tbsp fresh dill, lemon juice and salt to taste.
 
2013-04-11 05:14:54 PM
Well, fark, now I'm hungry for seafood. Specifically a nice whitefish, maybe haddock or cod. Hmmm....
 
2013-04-11 05:15:33 PM
I put a couple of pillows on the table so she can recline comfortably, put the stirrups on the chair back and enjoy tuna pie until she's gone limp.
 
2013-04-11 05:15:55 PM
Poisson Cru.  Think ceviche with coconut milk.  Absolutely magical.
 
2013-04-11 05:16:40 PM

Anderson's Pooper: Cedar Grilled Salmon:

Soak cedar plank in water for 2 hours.

Oil the skin side of a 1- 1.5 pound salmon filet.
Season both sides of filet and place it skin side down on the plank.
Put glaze over top and sides of filet.
Grill over indirect heat until golden brown.

Glaze:

1/2 cup mayo, 1/3 cup grainy brown mustard, 2 tbsp fresh dill, lemon juice and salt to taste.


Try soaking the plank in apple cider.  You won't be disappointed.  I did this last year, with a salmon filet planked skin-side-down, topped with nothing but a simple sugar/brown sugar/salt layer.
 
2013-04-11 05:17:37 PM

the biggest redneck here: Blackened snapper is my favorite fish, conch puppies are my favorite overall.

And I'm getting a kick out of this thread because I own and operate a seafood market.


Read that as "couch puppies".
 
2013-04-11 05:18:19 PM
Grilled Tilapia:

Place each tilapia filets in a banana leaf.
Top filets with salt, butter, lemon slices and minced garlic
Wrap leaves into bundels and tie with string or leaf strips.
Grill over direct heat 8-10 minutes.
 
2013-04-11 05:19:41 PM
Leviticus 11:9-12
 
2013-04-11 05:20:54 PM

Somebody say crabs?


Green chile crab cakes.



I use panko rather than crackers.

i865.photobucket.com
 
2013-04-11 05:21:12 PM

praxcelis: Try soaking the plank in apple cider. You won't be disappointed. I did this last year, with a salmon filet planked skin-side-down, topped with nothing but a simple sugar/brown sugar/salt layer.


I will give that a shot.  Every year I hit Home Depot, Lowes, etc. and pick up cheap grilling supplies at the end of "grilling season"  Hit a motherload of cedar planks for next to nothing last fall along with enough bamboo skewers to last me the rest of my life.
 
2013-04-11 05:21:57 PM
Heat is a horrible thing to do to fish.

Raw, with rice, rice vinegar, wasabi, nori, and shoyu, please.  Nigiri or rolls, as appropriate.
 
2013-04-11 05:21:58 PM
For skrimps Ill have to say scampi
 
2013-04-11 05:23:40 PM
MURDERERS!
 
2013-04-11 05:25:16 PM

geekbikerskum: Heat is a horrible thing to do to fish.

Raw, with rice, rice vinegar, wasabi, nori, and shoyu, please.  Nigiri or rolls, as appropriate.


This.
 
2013-04-11 05:25:37 PM
My dad was in the Air Force and as a result we spent seven years in Japan. Great place, loved it there. My family basically doesn't eat seafood, though. At all. As it turns out, my mother is allergic to shellfish, though we didn't find out about that until after we came back to the US. It could be that that influenced our dining habits, but it seems odd to me because both my parents' families at a lot of fish.

I can do canned tuna. That's about it. Oh and that shrimp they throw in your mouth at the Japanese steakhouses. I'd kind of like to work up the courage to try fish, but I just find it so hard to approach. What's a good fish for a person afraid to eat fish?
 
2013-04-11 05:26:23 PM

geekbikerskum: Heat is a horrible thing to do to fish.

Raw, with rice, rice vinegar, wasabi, nori, and shoyu, please.  Nigiri or rolls, as appropriate.


Fine. Come visit me here in Madison, and I will fix you up a big plate of Bluegill sushi from Lake Mendota.
 
2013-04-11 05:27:38 PM

geekbikerskum: Heat is a horrible thing to do to fish.

Raw, with rice, rice vinegar, wasabi, nori, and shoyu, please.  Nigiri or rolls, as appropriate.


I love it that way as well.
 
2013-04-11 05:28:26 PM
Best simple thing I do is season cod fillets and sear them off in a very hot pan.  Remove filets, add a couple tablespoons of butter and a couple tablespoons of capers.  Pour melted butter and capers over the fish.  Easiest thing the world. Super delicious.
 
2013-04-11 05:28:40 PM
By having a steak or ribs instead.
 
2013-04-11 05:28:52 PM

casual disregard: My dad was in the Air Force and as a result we spent seven years in Japan. Great place, loved it there. My family basically doesn't eat seafood, though. At all. As it turns out, my mother is allergic to shellfish, though we didn't find out about that until after we came back to the US. It could be that that influenced our dining habits, but it seems odd to me because both my parents' families at a lot of fish.

I can do canned tuna. That's about it. Oh and that shrimp they throw in your mouth at the Japanese steakhouses. I'd kind of like to work up the courage to try fish, but I just find it so hard to approach. What's a good fish for a person afraid to eat fish?


Any decent whitefish would be a good place to start.  Look upthread for some of the simpler preparations (I recommend any of the pouch or en papillote methods--they are hard to get wrong).  They'll be mild and less "fishy" than other varieties.  If you make it to a point where you like it, move on to salmon.  A little more attention needed to do well, but when done well is the king of fish.  (Disclaimer: I live in the Pacific Northwest, so good fresh wild salmon is kind of a thing here.)
 
2013-04-11 05:30:03 PM
No one has said oysters, raw on half shell. Or soft shell crabs?
 
2013-04-11 05:31:01 PM

the biggest redneck here: Nabb1: I used to eat a lot of tilapia until a marine biologist friend of mine ruined it for me.

My wife doesn't care for fish much, so I rarely cook it.  I do grill shrimp stuffed with goat cheese and wrapped in pancetta.

The vast -- and I mean VAST -- majority of the tilapia on the American market is farmed (it's all farmed) in Asia. In places where there's not much in the way of regulation. Shipped in frozen, thawed, and sold to an unsuspecting public.


Even better than that, they are used to clean a tank behind some better fish have had their turn. Raised exclusively on other fish's shiat. Used to grind em up, throw them out, now they have created a market for them...

/hate tilapia
 
2013-04-11 05:31:14 PM
For Swai and Catfish: Flour, cornstarch, cayenne powder, garlic powder, black pepper, lemon or orange zest. Pan-fried in either butter or olive oil.

Tilapia/Flounder/Trout: flour, cornstarch, salt, black pepper, ground thyme, ground rosemary, ground sage. Pan-fried same as above.

Salmon: Way too many ways to count, but preferably mesquite-smoked. If not smoked, preferably poached or coated in butter, wrapped with herbs and lemon, and grilled for about 4 minutes each side.

And if it's from a source I can trust, raw all day.
 
2013-04-11 05:32:46 PM
Hey, Farkers! By popular request, we're making fish tonight!

(Audience Shill: "You know what smells like fish?")

Your hair? Seriously, cod liver oil is taken INTERNALLY, not EXTERNALLY.

Acquire your ass some pound and a half of whitefish filets. I'm partial to haddock. Bear in mind, haddock is typically almost twice as large as the package suggests, due to being folded before wrapping. This can make thawing them tricky.

Preheat your oven for 450. This would be a good time to whip up some oven fries of some sort. Put 3 tbsp of veggie or canola oil in a bowl, and about a cup of panko (Japanese breadcrumbs) in another with some salt and pepper. Chop that fishy up into two inch long strips, about an inch wide. Moisten in the oil, roll in the crumbs (repeat once for a more pronounced coating). Put on lubed baking sheet. It's a breading assembly line, you should be able to do this in your sleep by now.

(Audience Shill: "You know what I can do in my sleep?")

Piss yourself? There are therapies to help with that.

Bake these fish strips for 15 minutes. Should be firm to the touch. Finish cooking and remove any potato products before continuing. Then, turn on your broiler and broil the fish for a few minutes about 8 inches away from the element. If you've got a shiatty "under the oven in a drawer" broiler rather than a "is part of the oven itself" type, you probably can't control this distance, so watch CAREFULLY. Haul it out when it's nice and brown.

(Audience Shill: "You know what else is brown?")

The contents of your skull?

Healthier than any frozen fish stick, I guarantee! I like to gobble these up with tartar sauce. You can put whatever you want on them, although ketchup is a bit gauche.

Recipe from The Way We Cook by Sheryl Julian and Julie Riven.
 
2013-04-11 05:33:16 PM

sdd2000: No one has said oysters, raw on half shell. Or soft shell crabs?


I don't make soft shell crabs at home. I do make oysters rockefeller and oyster stew at home. Yum.
Grilled mussels, yum.
I haven't cooked raw clams yet.
 
2013-04-11 05:33:21 PM
Take a couple of swordfish or tuna steaks, marinate in Italian dressing for good while, throw them on the grill.

easy and awesome.
 
2013-04-11 05:33:33 PM

naugahyde monkey: the biggest redneck here: Nabb1: I used to eat a lot of tilapia until a marine biologist friend of mine ruined it for me.

My wife doesn't care for fish much, so I rarely cook it.  I do grill shrimp stuffed with goat cheese and wrapped in pancetta.

The vast -- and I mean VAST -- majority of the tilapia on the American market is farmed (it's all farmed) in Asia. In places where there's not much in the way of regulation. Shipped in frozen, thawed, and sold to an unsuspecting public.

Even better than that, they are used to clean a tank behind some better fish have had their turn. Raised exclusively on other fish's shiat. Used to grind em up, throw them out, now they have created a market for them...

/hate tilapia


Sorry I see someone beat me to it
 
2013-04-11 05:33:36 PM
Simple and delicious:

Tinfoil.
Trout.
Lemon.
Pepper.
Grill.

Serve with brown rice and soy sauce.
 
2013-04-11 05:34:31 PM
How do I prepare seafood?

I say "I'm gonna eat you. It'll only hurt for a second"
 
2013-04-11 05:35:33 PM

sdd2000: No one has said oysters, raw on half shell. Or soft shell crabs?


Those ain't exactly a catch. More of a dig for/pot trap.

We're talking real man's sport, here.
 
2013-04-11 05:37:02 PM

Oldiron_79: For skrimps Ill have to say scampi


http://www.weebls-stuff.com/songs/scampi/
 
2013-04-11 05:37:08 PM
Blue Crabs smothered in old bay and steamed with Natty Bo.
Served with Malt Vinegar because dipping crabs in butter is a travesty.
 
2013-04-11 05:38:09 PM
i46.tinypic.com
.
 
2013-04-11 05:38:20 PM
Sometimes the simplicity is most delicious-

Grilled Red Snapper
Mojo de Ajo

/cold Modelo
 
2013-04-11 05:38:36 PM
I wish FARK had a food tab. I have some delicious recipes that should be given out to the public.  Many like my chilli, and since I don't eat meat, I can promise that many will enjoy.  People like my vegetarian chilli more than meat-based chili.
 
2013-04-11 05:38:42 PM

khyberkitsune: sdd2000: No one has said oysters, raw on half shell. Or soft shell crabs?

Those ain't exactly a catch. More of a dig for/pot trap.

We're talking real man's sport, here.


Peeler pottin' ain't for sissies. Tongin' ain't, either.
 
2013-04-11 05:39:05 PM

CipollinaFan: Blue Crabs smothered in old bay and steamed with Natty Bo.
Served with Malt Vinegar because dipping crabs in butter is a travesty.


I like blue crabs dipped in butter on my grilled cheese sandwiches.
 
2013-04-11 05:39:52 PM

CipollinaFan: Blue Crabs smothered in old bay and steamed with Natty Bo.
Served with Malt Vinegar because dipping crabs in butter is a travesty.


Location: Baltimore, MD

Yup, that's what I figured.

/Old Bay is made from vomit
 
2013-04-11 05:41:34 PM
I like to whip up a little marinade of light sesame oil, hoisin sauce, rice wine vinegar, minced ginger, a dab of siracha and garlic. Then I put that and a nice, fat, sashimi-grade yellowfin steak in a zip-lok bag for an hour or two in the fridge. Then I crust it in sesame seeds and sear it or (very carefully) grill it on both sides for 2 or 3 minutes.

Tasty.
 
2013-04-11 05:41:56 PM
Put me in the salmon and dill camp!  I fry mine up with a mixture of mayo, fresh dill and lemon juice, so good! Works well on other fish too. Think I'll have some for dinner tonight, damn you FARK!
 
2013-04-11 05:42:16 PM

nirwana: CipollinaFan: Blue Crabs smothered in old bay and steamed with Natty Bo.
Served with Malt Vinegar because dipping crabs in butter is a travesty.

I like blue crabs dipped in butter on my grilled cheese sandwiches.


OK, I'll admit I'm a northwest boy.  Our crabs have to be cracked open so we can feast on the goo get at the meat inside.   You right-coasters really eat 'em whole?
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-11 05:42:28 PM

JohnnyRebel88: I wish FARK had a food tab. I have some delicious recipes that should be given out to the public.  Many like my chilli, and since I don't eat meat, I can promise that many will enjoy.  People like my vegetarian chilli more than meat-based chili.


Well I'm definitely interested. I, too, wish there was a food tab. Still, I always watched out for these threads before.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-04-11 05:43:09 PM

You are Borg: Put me in the salmon and dill camp!  I fry mine up with a mixture of mayo, fresh dill and lemon juice, so good! Works well on other fish too. Think I'll have some for dinner tonight, damn you FARK!


I don't feel guilty. :D
 
2013-04-11 05:44:05 PM
Magnanimous Seafood Stew:

In a medium dutch oven heat up a few tblspoons of olive oil.

Saute half a diced onion till clear, then add half a diced fennel bulb (or celery) and 2 diced carrots, salt and pepper to taste. When those are all soft, add diced garlic and fresh thyme and cook for 2 or 3 minutes. Add one regular can of crushed tomatoes with their liquid, half cup of white wine and 3/4 cup of chicken stock. Add a couple bay leaves and let simmer for a few minutes.

Add whatever seafood you have. Literally whatever. I catch a lot of squid, so I often just use them, but ideally, I like at least 3 kinds of seafood. A white fleshed fish, cut into cubes, goes in first. Then either clams or mussels, toss them in and cover pot until they open. Then I like to add a few shrimp, but they don't need much time at all.
 
2013-04-11 05:44:23 PM
Any excuse to break this out..
www.charlock.org
 
2013-04-11 05:44:43 PM
My absolute favorite way to cook my catch is  en papillote. I've done this with both smallmouth bass and catfish (I prefer the bass), and I find it the best way to enjoy the pure, delicious flavor of a fresh caught fish. As with any recipe utilizing this technique, feel free to substitute ingredients for any other  fragrant ingredient you have on hand.

Steppenwolf's Smallmouth Bass en Papillote
2 fillets bass (skin on)/1 whole bass
1 tbsp minced shallot
3 sprigs fresh dill
1 tbsp minced hot chili
1 tbsp olive oil
1 tbsp fresh squeezed lemon juice
Sherry
Kosher salt and cracked black pepper

1. Preheat oven to 400°F.
2. Cut a sheet of parchment paper long enough to fold over itself and contain the filets/fish. Place the fish in the center near one of the ends, leaving a margin of paper around the fish.
2. Drizzle the fish with olive oil, lemon juice, and splash with sherry. Season aggressively with salt and pepper.
3. If you are using fillets, arrange the shallot, dill, and chilis on top of the fillets. If using whole fish, stuff the ingredients inside of the cavity of the fish.
4. Fold the tail of parchment of the fish, and starting at one of the corners, fold the parchment into itself, working your way around the seams. You should do this until you have a relatively tight seal all around the fish.
5. Bake on a sheet pan for 15 minutes.
6. Remove from the oven and rest for 5 minutes. Cut open the papillote at the time of serving so you or your guest gets a blast of savory, steamy goodness. Dig in!
 
2013-04-11 05:45:52 PM

praxcelis: nirwana: CipollinaFan: Blue Crabs smothered in old bay and steamed with Natty Bo.
Served with Malt Vinegar because dipping crabs in butter is a travesty.

I like blue crabs dipped in butter on my grilled cheese sandwiches.

OK, I'll admit I'm a northwest boy.  Our crabs have to be cracked open so we can feast on the goo get at the meat inside.   You right-coasters really eat 'em whole?


Soft crabs, yes. Same species (blue crabs), just in their soft form. They shed their hard exoskeleton like a snake, and for a day or so they're soft and you can eat the whole thing. Most folks cut out the eyes and gills still, and some clean out the innards.
 
2013-04-11 05:46:02 PM

praxcelis: nirwana: CipollinaFan: Blue Crabs smothered in old bay and steamed with Natty Bo.
Served with Malt Vinegar because dipping crabs in butter is a travesty.

I like blue crabs dipped in butter on my grilled cheese sandwiches.

OK, I'll admit I'm a northwest boy.  Our crabs have to be cracked open so we can feast on the goo get at the meat inside.   You right-coasters really eat 'em whole?


I'm a Third Coaster these days, but grew up in Dungy crab country. I eat alaskan salmon twice a week, and love most seafood. I don't give a damn how anybody else eats their food. There is no right or wrong way, now please pass the HP sauce.
 
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