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(Russia Today)   Norks assume the position   (rt.com) divider line 427
    More: News, Patriot missile, Yonhap, Kyodo News, ballistic missiles, North Koreans, missiles  
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18997 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Apr 2013 at 12:48 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-11 03:19:36 AM

that bosnian sniper: redsquid: When I was in 6th grade they showed The Day After on TV. If you're not familiar, this is intro enough- http://youtu.be/7VG2aJyIFrA
You can't imagine a more terrifying thing on TV for a kid. They actually had counselors come to the school the next day and spend time with each class discussing our feelings and fears.
I think that constant fear shaped our psyches for several generations and explains a lot of what makes us so crazy as a nation.

Ah, "The Day After" was the pussified American version. "Threads" was the hardcore one.


Thankfully I didn't see that until years later. I saw Testament on PBS back then and it was very emotionally traumatizing. Then I saw A Boy and His Dog and Road Warrior and everything changed.
 
2013-04-11 03:20:19 AM
Came here for pictures of norks, leaving disappointed.
(better be careful what I wish for)
 
2013-04-11 03:20:38 AM

Myria: Where does the Best Korea / Worst Korea meme come from?




Team America: World Police
 
2013-04-11 03:20:44 AM
And, not to double post but I figured I'd share this. Once upon a time in the late 'oughts, I got to meet Mikhail Gorbachev. He was local for a lecture series, and I knew the right people in the right places. It wasn't anything special, but still cool as hell. He's easily the most viciously intelligent man I've ever met in my life, even if listening to him talk is somewhere between watching Bob Ross and snail farking.

It's amazing to get the Soviet perspective of it, especially from the late '70s coming off the heels of detente and into the early '80s. In a very real way, electing Reagan was the  worst thing the United States could possibly have done in that time period and brought us closer to World War III than any other point in the Cold War, including the Cuban missile crisis.
 
2013-04-11 03:22:48 AM

redsquid: When I was in 6th grade they showed The Day After on TV. If you're not familiar, this is intro enough- http://youtu.be/7VG2aJyIFrA
You can't imagine a more terrifying thing on TV for a kid. They actually had counselors come to the school the next day and spend time with each class discussing our feelings and fears.
I think that constant fear shaped our psyches for several generations and explains a lot of what makes us so crazy as a nation.


They aired that here in Canada, in what must have been the early 90's, and it screwed up my sister. Looking back, it was completely over the top fearmongering. You'll frequently see me mentioning how nukes aren't nearly as powerful as hollywood makes them out to be, and that is a perfect example.

For anyone who didn't catch any of my rants, the nuke dropped in hiroshima only did heavy damage in a one mile radius, to wooden buildings. Even much larger ones would be far less effective on modern concrete and steel buildings. Even if the thousands of nukes out there were all used at once, it would be pretty anti-climactic. Would be far simpler to just use conventional explosives if you wanted to destroy stuff. The only unique threat they bring on the modern battlefield is as an EMP weapon, which is what you'll most likely see them used for if they're used at all when this conflict finally happens.
 
2013-04-11 03:22:51 AM
 
2013-04-11 03:24:05 AM
I'm with the crowd saying this is just another tantrum Un is throwing. Maybe he will launch one of his missiles. Maybe it will be shot down. I doubt him or his generals have the stones to actually go for it afterward. If they do, Seoul is farked for sure, there's just too much conventional arty zeroed in on it, no matter how good the Air Force and Navy are, they won't be able to get them all.

It won't be hours or days. Maybe two to four weeks before they get bludgeoned into some semblance of reason. Their nukes don't bother me-too large and primitive, the only conceivable way would be to stick it in a shipping container and they'd probably need a substantial ground team to set it off. They know that. Rattling a saber makes noise, drawing one doesn't. Can't remember where I heard that, but that's my feeling.
 
2013-04-11 03:24:50 AM

shower_in_my_socks: This is like Season 4 of Lost. NK needs some new writers. You can't keep dragging this shiat on and on without paying-off some of the setups.


I'm thinking it's more like Friends where Chandler tries to escape Janice by saying he has to move to Yemen. At some point it stopped becoming rhetoric and he actually had to go. NorK strikes me a little like that right now:

"We're going to shoot a missile"

World: "Do it, pussy"

"I guess we're going to have to shoot a missile"

We're totally calling their bluff, which is so different from the norm it makes me wonder if we know something is going down inside NorK, like an internal power struggle. Perhaps this is the last days of the Kim regime, one way or the other...
 
2013-04-11 03:26:27 AM

Charlie Freak: It's very much a shadow of the threat, but we all grew up with the idea that if one "red" nuclear-armed country gets into a shooting war, then we all do. I think that old line of thought and the fear that if the balloon goes up everybody will just start shooting is what is keeping me up tonight, even though it's extremely unlikely. It's interesting conversing with people who have no memory of the Cold War - you cannot believe the impact that had on our culture.


I believe that. Even the concept of communism probably has a very different meaning for me than it does for people of your generation. For me it was some antiquated thing I read about, like a loom or an ironclad, and was mainly the butt of jokes or scorn, not some menace that stood in direct opposition to Western power and threatened our very existence. Today, when I think of communism I think of starving North Koreans or Cubans driving 1950s Cadillacs.

redsquid: When I was in 6th grade they showed The Day After on TV. If you're not familiar, this is intro enough- http://youtu.be/7VG2aJyIFrA
You can't imagine a more terrifying thing on TV for a kid. They actually had counselors come to the school the next day and spend time with each class discussing our feelings and fears.
I think that constant fear shaped our psyches for several generations and explains a lot of what makes us so crazy as a nation.


Yeah, I could see that as being solid nightmare fuel. When I was a kid (maybe 8 or so) I remember watching Waterworld at a friends birthday party. It wasn't exactly disturbing, but I actually started hoarding food, toys and stuffed animals and putting them in the canoe we kept in our garage, just in case our neighbourhood ended up underwater. I remember the wtf moment when my dad discovered my stash when he was spring cleaning (apparently the concept of non-perishable food hadn't crossed my mind, so it was filled with expired yogurt and fruit roll-ups)
 
2013-04-11 03:28:28 AM

J. Frank Parnell: Even if the thousands of nukes out there were all used at once, it would be pretty anti-climactic.


Well, except for that whole nuclear winter thing.
 
2013-04-11 03:31:18 AM

redlegrick: I'm with the crowd saying this is just another tantrum Un is throwing. Maybe he will launch one of his missiles. Maybe it will be shot down. I doubt him or his generals have the stones to actually go for it afterward. If they do, Seoul is farked for sure, there's just too much conventional arty zeroed in on it, no matter how good the Air Force and Navy are, they won't be able to get them all.

It won't be hours or days. Maybe two to four weeks before they get bludgeoned into some semblance of reason. Their nukes don't bother me-too large and primitive, the only conceivable way would be to stick it in a shipping container and they'd probably need a substantial ground team to set it off. They know that. Rattling a saber makes noise, drawing one doesn't. Can't remember where I heard that, but that's my feeling.


People who talk about all the artillery that will turn Seoul into dust instantly lose credibility. There are plenty of write ups floating around about the actual capabilities of the NorK artillery and the geographic limitations thereof. Granted, the northern suburbs wouldn't be a place where I'd want to be, but the heart of Seoul would be relatively okay.
 
2013-04-11 03:31:49 AM

miss diminutive: Charlie Freak: It's very much a shadow of the threat, but we all grew up with the idea that if one "red" nuclear-armed country gets into a shooting war, then we all do. I think that old line of thought and the fear that if the balloon goes up everybody will just start shooting is what is keeping me up tonight, even though it's extremely unlikely. It's interesting conversing with people who have no memory of the Cold War - you cannot believe the impact that had on our culture.

I believe that. Even the concept of communism probably has a very different meaning for me than it does for people of your generation. For me it was some antiquated thing I read about, like a loom or an ironclad, and was mainly the butt of jokes or scorn, not some menace that stood in direct opposition to Western power and threatened our very existence. Today, when I think of communism I think of starving North Koreans or Cubans driving 1950s Cadillacs.

redsquid: When I was in 6th grade they showed The Day After on TV. If you're not familiar, this is intro enough- http://youtu.be/7VG2aJyIFrA
You can't imagine a more terrifying thing on TV for a kid. They actually had counselors come to the school the next day and spend time with each class discussing our feelings and fears.
I think that constant fear shaped our psyches for several generations and explains a lot of what makes us so crazy as a nation.

Yeah, I could see that as being solid nightmare fuel. When I was a kid (maybe 8 or so) I remember watching Waterworld at a friends birthday party. It wasn't exactly disturbing, but I actually started hoarding food, toys and stuffed animals and putting them in the canoe we kept in our garage, just in case our neighbourhood ended up underwater. I remember the wtf moment when my dad discovered my stash when he was spring cleaning (apparently the concept of non-perishable food hadn't crossed my mind, so it was filled with expired yogurt and fruit roll-ups)


Mommy's little prepper? No snark- that's adorable!
 
2013-04-11 03:32:43 AM

miss diminutive: J. Frank Parnell: Even if the thousands of nukes out there were all used at once, it would be pretty anti-climactic.

Well, except for that whole nuclear winter thing.


Don't worry. We have plenty of fruit roll-ups.
 
2013-04-11 03:36:20 AM

Charlie Freak: redlegrick: I'm with the crowd saying this is just another tantrum Un is throwing. Maybe he will launch one of his missiles. Maybe it will be shot down. I doubt him or his generals have the stones to actually go for it afterward. If they do, Seoul is farked for sure, there's just too much conventional arty zeroed in on it, no matter how good the Air Force and Navy are, they won't be able to get them all.

It won't be hours or days. Maybe two to four weeks before they get bludgeoned into some semblance of reason. Their nukes don't bother me-too large and primitive, the only conceivable way would be to stick it in a shipping container and they'd probably need a substantial ground team to set it off. They know that. Rattling a saber makes noise, drawing one doesn't. Can't remember where I heard that, but that's my feeling.

People who talk about all the artillery that will turn Seoul into dust instantly lose credibility. There are plenty of write ups floating around about the actual capabilities of the NorK artillery and the geographic limitations thereof. Granted, the northern suburbs wouldn't be a place where I'd want to be, but the heart of Seoul would be relatively okay.


My main fear for Seoul would be infiltrating saboteurs and sappers. I've heard about South Korean officials busting would-be spies by their out of date clothing and speech, and how it's kind of a joke over there, but it does seem more plausible than artillery.
 
2013-04-11 03:37:04 AM

redsquid: that bosnian sniper: redsquid: When I was in 6th grade they showed The Day After on TV. If you're not familiar, this is intro enough- http://youtu.be/7VG2aJyIFrA
You can't imagine a more terrifying thing on TV for a kid. They actually had counselors come to the school the next day and spend time with each class discussing our feelings and fears.
I think that constant fear shaped our psyches for several generations and explains a lot of what makes us so crazy as a nation.

Ah, "The Day After" was the pussified American version. "Threads" was the hardcore one.

Thankfully I didn't see that until years later. I saw Testament on PBS back then and it was very emotionally traumatizing. Then I saw A Boy and His Dog and Road Warrior and everything changed.


The one that got me was "Countdown to Looking Glass." My mom was watching it on HBO late one night and I thought it was really happening (it's acted out as a real breaking news report). It took a LOT of convincing to bring me down. I was around 9 or 10 at the time. Slept with my windows open for the next few years so I could hear the sirens if they went off. Also listened to nothing but AM news radio. shiat, that totally explains my addiction to FARK, not joking.
 
2013-04-11 03:39:08 AM

Danger Avoid Death: miss diminutive: J. Frank Parnell: Even if the thousands of nukes out there were all used at once, it would be pretty anti-climactic.

Well, except for that whole nuclear winter thing.

Don't worry. We have plenty of fruit roll-ups.


OMG Maybe the norks know about our crippling Twinkie Gap!
www.familyguyfiles.com
 
2013-04-11 03:40:13 AM

Charlie Freak: People who talk about all the artillery that will turn Seoul into dust instantly lose credibility. There are plenty of write ups floating around about the actual capabilities of the NorK artillery and the geographic limitations thereof. Granted, the northern suburbs wouldn't be a place where I'd want to be, but the heart of Seoul would be relatively okay.


And even that assumes that the norks target the civilian areas first instead of the military ones which doesn't make a whole lot of strategic sense. Seoul has plenty of armored bunkers already set up for the civilian population to run to if the cannons start banging. Most of the estimates say that within 3 hours people will either have fled out of range or will have holed up in bunkers.
 
2013-04-11 03:45:42 AM
You know, I guess I just don't have the good ol' American appreciation for a Cold War and ceaseless fear and paranoia.  North Korea is nothing that can do nothing.  If they even seriously tried there would be a quick execution of a fat man and a new Chinese speaking regime propped up in a matter of days.
 
2013-04-11 03:47:55 AM

Abacus9: Myria: Where does the Best Korea / Worst Korea meme come from?

Team America: World Police


Did Team America give us Best Korea?  I know they gave us "So Ronery", but I thought Best Korea was mocking the over the top colorful language used by official North Korean press statements.
 
2013-04-11 03:48:45 AM

miss diminutive: Well, except for that whole nuclear winter thing.


That's always been pretty questionable. Kind of like the fears about how the first nuke detonation might ignite the atmosphere of Earth. You might see a slight temperature change in some areas after, but again, i don't think it would live up to the hype. Just more of the fearmongering and exaggeration that's surrounded nukes from the start.

The only thing the entire planet should fear about all the nukes exploding would be all the radiation. The cancer deaths and birth defects that would come in the years after, but Fukushima already has a pretty good head start on that.
 
2013-04-11 03:49:59 AM

miss diminutive: Charlie Freak: Oh well, fark sleep I guess. Interestingly, I just had a twinge of the anxiety I had as a child growing up in the Cold War. Just a little, but seriously, that shiat sucked. As I listen to my kids breathe right now (they crawl into our room damn near every night), I am thankful they never had to go through that mindfark. No kid should. End this old-school pseudo-commie bullshiat blow-up-the-world propaganda so we can get back to the slow morphine drip our banks feed us.

This whole situation is something completely new to me, and I think it's given me a better understanding about when my parents talk about learning duck and cover drills in school and dealing with potential imminent annihilation on a constant basis.


Every city I've ever lived in had a Soviet missile pointed at it. I've lived in state capitals, near military bases, and in the deepest inland seaport in the US. This candyass shiat from Kim Jun Fat Ass doesn't begin to scare me.
 
2013-04-11 03:55:32 AM

nekom: crypticsatellite: nekom: Fingers crossed it explodes on the launch pad.

I still don't get the US stance of only shooting it down if it isn't going to hit water. Apparently, these missiles have been banned by agreement. Why let them collect data on a completed flight?

I don't agree with it either. In fact, and I seem to be in the majority opinion here on Fark, I would have blown them up as soon as they started fueling them.


You spawn camping scum.
 
2013-04-11 03:56:17 AM

miss diminutive: J. Frank Parnell: Even if the thousands of nukes out there were all used at once, it would be pretty anti-climactic.

Well, except for that whole nuclear winter thing.


Humankind is exceptionally good at surviving. Individually, perhaps not as good, but as a species, none compare.
 
2013-04-11 03:58:56 AM

Charlie Freak: redsquid: that bosnian sniper: redsquid: When I was in 6th grade they showed The Day After on TV. If you're not familiar, this is intro enough- http://youtu.be/7VG2aJyIFrA
You can't imagine a more terrifying thing on TV for a kid. They actually had counselors come to the school the next day and spend time with each class discussing our feelings and fears.
I think that constant fear shaped our psyches for several generations and explains a lot of what makes us so crazy as a nation.

Ah, "The Day After" was the pussified American version. "Threads" was the hardcore one.

Thankfully I didn't see that until years later. I saw Testament on PBS back then and it was very emotionally traumatizing. Then I saw A Boy and His Dog and Road Warrior and everything changed.

The one that got me was "Countdown to Looking Glass." My mom was watching it on HBO late one night and I thought it was really happening (it's acted out as a real breaking news report). It took a LOT of convincing to bring me down. I was around 9 or 10 at the time. Slept with my windows open for the next few years so I could hear the sirens if they went off. Also listened to nothing but AM news radio. shiat, that totally explains my addiction to FARK, not joking.


I remember one Christmas eve at my Dad's house when I was probably 12 or 13. I was laying in bed and I heard that far off siren sound, not like a cop car but like the intro to War Pigs. Then I heard a car down the block peel out. I freaked out. I just knew people were starting to evacuate. I ran into my Dad's room screaming. He had to turn on the TV and radio to convince me that everything was alright. It turns out it was the alarm from the mental hospital a mile away. (Somehow escaped mental patients were a relief)
I know a guy who believes that the whole history of nuclear weapons is just an elaborate series of rituals to create and harvest fear by the Illuminati. There was a time I may have agreed.
 
2013-04-11 03:59:32 AM

J. Frank Parnell: That's always been pretty questionable. Kind of like the fears about how the first nuke detonation might ignite the atmosphere of Earth. You might see a slight temperature change in some areas after, but again, i don't think it would live up to the hype. Just more of the fearmongering and exaggeration that's surrounded nukes from the start.


Are you basing this on anything more substantial than your gut reaction and supposition? Because this peer reviewed article using climate models used to analyze temperature changes due to volcanic eruptions seems to think that it'll be a little worse than that.

Like, as in a LOT worse than that.
 
2013-04-11 03:59:58 AM

Ed Grubermann: miss diminutive: Charlie Freak: Oh well, fark sleep I guess. Interestingly, I just had a twinge of the anxiety I had as a child growing up in the Cold War. Just a little, but seriously, that shiat sucked. As I listen to my kids breathe right now (they crawl into our room damn near every night), I am thankful they never had to go through that mindfark. No kid should. End this old-school pseudo-commie bullshiat blow-up-the-world propaganda so we can get back to the slow morphine drip our banks feed us.

This whole situation is something completely new to me, and I think it's given me a better understanding about when my parents talk about learning duck and cover drills in school and dealing with potential imminent annihilation on a constant basis.

Every city I've ever lived in had a Soviet missile pointed at it. I've lived in state capitals, near military bases, and in the deepest inland seaport in the US. This candyass shiat from Kim Jun Fat Ass doesn't begin to scare me.


The direct threat from N Korea worries me not, either. I've just learned to expect that when I'm ready for the geopolitical world to zig, it zags. It never goes as all the propaganda and hype predict. And being an information addict, thanks mostly to this type of situation, well, here I am. What capitals/military bases, may I ask?
 
2013-04-11 04:00:41 AM

J. Frank Parnell: That's always been pretty questionable. Kind of like the fears about how the first nuke detonation might ignite the atmosphere of Earth. You might see a slight temperature change in some areas after, but again, i don't think it would live up to the hype. Just more of the fearmongering and exaggeration that's surrounded nukes from the start.


Locally in the 5,000 degree range...

/sorry couldn't help it.

Ed Grubermann: Every city I've ever lived in had a Soviet missile pointed at it. I've lived in state capitals, near military bases, and in the deepest inland seaport in the US. This candyass shiat from Kim Jun Fat Ass doesn't begin to scare me.


Same here. Hell, at one point I was one of the guys aiming back at them. They don't worry me all that much like the USSR did back in the day and I live in one of the purported "Target" areas of Lil Kim if his longest range missiles even did work.
 
2013-04-11 04:01:48 AM

farkingismybusiness: King Something: How do you say "Glass Parking Lot" in Korean?

Grass Parkyng Rot.


Exactly what I expected, but still I laughed like a big idiot. kudos, funnyman.
 
2013-04-11 04:03:05 AM

LavenderWolf: miss diminutive: J. Frank Parnell: Even if the thousands of nukes out there were all used at once, it would be pretty anti-climactic.

Well, except for that whole nuclear winter thing.

Humankind is exceptionally good at surviving. Individually, perhaps not as good, but as a species, none compare.


That's quite literally the dumbest thing ever. We've been sentient for a few thousand years, and here you are, proclaiming us the ultimate survivor species.
 
2013-04-11 04:04:00 AM
My nuclear nightmare fodder was 'After the Bomb' by Gloria Miklowitz. I'm sure if I reread it now I'd find it laughable; but as an overly imaginative ten-year-old? Not fun.
 
2013-04-11 04:04:35 AM

redsquid: Charlie Freak: redsquid: that bosnian sniper: redsquid: When I was in 6th grade they showed The Day After on TV. If you're not familiar, this is intro enough- http://youtu.be/7VG2aJyIFrA
You can't imagine a more terrifying thing on TV for a kid. They actually had counselors come to the school the next day and spend time with each class discussing our feelings and fears.
I think that constant fear shaped our psyches for several generations and explains a lot of what makes us so crazy as a nation.

Ah, "The Day After" was the pussified American version. "Threads" was the hardcore one.

Thankfully I didn't see that until years later. I saw Testament on PBS back then and it was very emotionally traumatizing. Then I saw A Boy and His Dog and Road Warrior and everything changed.

The one that got me was "Countdown to Looking Glass." My mom was watching it on HBO late one night and I thought it was really happening (it's acted out as a real breaking news report). It took a LOT of convincing to bring me down. I was around 9 or 10 at the time. Slept with my windows open for the next few years so I could hear the sirens if they went off. Also listened to nothing but AM news radio. shiat, that totally explains my addiction to FARK, not joking.

I remember one Christmas eve at my Dad's house when I was probably 12 or 13. I was laying in bed and I heard that far off siren sound, not like a cop car but like the intro to War Pigs. Then I heard a car down the block peel out. I freaked out. I just knew people were starting to evacuate. I ran into my Dad's room screaming. He had to turn on the TV and radio to convince me that everything was alright. It turns out it was the alarm from the mental hospital a mile away. (Somehow escaped mental patients were a relief)
I know a guy who believes that the whole history of nuclear weapons is just an elaborate series of rituals to create and harvest fear by the Illuminati. There was a time I may have agreed.


Haha, wow, that would have done it for me as well. There would have been a pile of poop on the floor and little me firmly clinging to the ceiling above. They tested the sirens in my town once in a blue moon and I had never really heard them go off until one day in fifth grade while we were out at recess. Any respect my friends had for me up until that point had to have vanished.
 
2013-04-11 04:05:46 AM

LavenderWolf: miss diminutive: J. Frank Parnell: Even if the thousands of nukes out there were all used at once, it would be pretty anti-climactic.

Well, except for that whole nuclear winter thing.

Humankind is exceptionally good at surviving.


You only need maybe 10,000 - 20,000 people to ensure the survival of the species (I'm not an expert on that, or anything really but remember reading somewhere that our entire population is estimate to have come from about 10,000 breeding pairs). That still leaves a lot of people out in the cold.

LavenderWolf: Individually, perhaps not as good, but as a species, none compare.


I bet there are some bacteria that would probably disagree with that.
 
2013-04-11 04:06:36 AM

Shadow Blasko: Notabunny: armor helix: My only hope is that the the US does not end up getting involved in this nonsense.

NK will bomb Japan before dawn. NK has had an uncontrollable solanum infection crisis for the last few months. They've hidden as many healthy citizens as possible in underground tunnels, but the infected on the surface have grown exponentially and to such an extent that the military is being overwhelmed. Bombing Japan will trigger a military response from the US. NK's hope is that the US response will eliminate the walking infected so the healthy citizens can return to the surface.

Did you just combine WWZ and Day by day Armageddon?


Mmmaaaaaaybe...
 
2013-04-11 04:07:25 AM

Charlie Freak: Haha, wow, that would have done it for me as well. There would have been a pile of poop on the floor and little me firmly clinging to the ceiling above. They tested the sirens in my town once in a blue moon and I had never really heard them go off until one day in fifth grade while we were out at recess. Any respect my friends had for me up until that point had to have vanished.


Every Wednesday at noon when I was a kid, like clockwork. It got so that we all just ignored it and kept on playing (or knew that it was getting close to lunchtime and headed home to eat).
 
2013-04-11 04:11:00 AM

ThisIsNotSubtle: My nuclear nightmare fodder was 'After the Bomb' by Gloria Miklowitz. I'm sure if I reread it now I'd find it laughable; but as an overly imaginative ten-year-old? Not fun.


I'd think around10 would have to be one of the most impressionable ages for that kind of thought, especially in boys. 7-8 is too young to really grasp the gravity of the situation, and as a teen you're too busy dealing with hormones. I'd search the webs for studies done to that effect, but I'm too tired.
 
2013-04-11 04:17:48 AM

ShawnDoc: Abacus9: Myria: Where does the Best Korea / Worst Korea meme come from?

Team America: World Police

Did Team America give us Best Korea?  I know they gave us "So Ronery", but I thought Best Korea was mocking the over the top colorful language used by official North Korean press statements.


Sorry, it looks like I was wrong. I tried looking up the Best Korea meme, and also Team America, but I can't find one referencing the other anywhere. I think since North Korea threads tend to reference both, I naturally put two and two together and came up with three (and I never even saw the movie).
 
2013-04-11 04:18:27 AM

Charlie Freak: The direct threat from N Korea worries me not, either. I've just learned to expect that when I'm ready for the geopolitical world to zig, it zags. It never goes as all the propaganda and hype predict. And being an information addict, thanks mostly to this type of situation, well, here I am. What capitals/military bases, may I ask?


In California and Alaska.
 
2013-04-11 04:19:14 AM

neongoats: We've been sentient for a few thousand years, and here you are, proclaiming us the ultimate survivor species.


I'd like to know what your definition of sentient is, and your definition of 'few', because one of them or the other is wrong.
 
2013-04-11 04:22:16 AM

Charlie Freak: redsquid:

Haha, wow, that would have done it for me as well. There would have been a pile of poop on the floor and little me firmly clinging to the ceiling above. They tested the sirens in my town once in a blue moon and I had never really heard them go off until one day in fifth grade while we were out at recess. Any respect my friends had for me up until that point had to have vanished.

I moved to Oahu days before the September 11th attacks. About three weeks later I'm sitting in my apartment when I heard THE SOUND. I freaked out. I didn't have cable hooked up so I put on my mask and ran upstairs to ask the landlord's Filipino trophy wife if she knew what was going on. She took one look at the weird haole in the gas mask and started cracking up. She finally managed to stop laughing at me and tell me that it was just the monthly tsunami warning test.
 
2013-04-11 04:22:51 AM

awalkingecho: neongoats: We've been sentient for a few thousand years, and here you are, proclaiming us the ultimate survivor species.

I'd like to know what your definition of sentient is, and your definition of 'few', because one of them or the other is wrong.


A few thousand, 70,000 (as this species), what's the difference?
 
2013-04-11 04:24:17 AM
This is one of the few times I'll admit this, but Stratfor has the situation pegged.  NoKo is riding the line between too harmless to be worth destroying, too crazy and unpredictable to risk pissing off, and refusing to negotiate.  It's like a tiny dog that won't stop yipping - it knows it can't fight, so it has to act unhinged.
 
2013-04-11 04:25:44 AM

miss diminutive: J. Frank Parnell: That's always been pretty questionable. Kind of like the fears about how the first nuke detonation might ignite the atmosphere of Earth. You might see a slight temperature change in some areas after, but again, i don't think it would live up to the hype. Just more of the fearmongering and exaggeration that's surrounded nukes from the start.

Are you basing this on anything more substantial than your gut reaction and supposition? Because this peer reviewed article using climate models used to analyze temperature changes due to volcanic eruptions seems to think that it'll be a little worse than that.

Like, as in a LOT worse than that.

 
2013-04-11 04:27:00 AM

miss diminutive: J. Frank Parnell: That's always been pretty questionable. Kind of like the fears about how the first nuke detonation might ignite the atmosphere of Earth. You might see a slight temperature change in some areas after, but again, i don't think it would live up to the hype. Just more of the fearmongering and exaggeration that's surrounded nukes from the start.

Are you basing this on anything more substantial than your gut reaction and supposition? Because this peer reviewed article using climate models used to analyze temperature changes due to volcanic eruptions seems to think that it'll be a little worse than that.

Like, as in a LOT worse than that.


Woops. Meant to say your source is behind a paywall, have a copy you could inbox me?
 
2013-04-11 04:28:28 AM

gadian: You know, I guess I just don't have the good ol' American appreciation for a Cold War and ceaseless fear and paranoia.  North Korea is nothing that can do nothing.  If they even seriously tried there would be a quick execution of a fat man and a new Chinese speaking regime propped up in a matter of days.


totally like night of the comet
 
2013-04-11 04:29:53 AM

miss diminutive: LavenderWolf: miss diminutive: J. Frank Parnell: Even if the thousands of nukes out there were all used at once, it would be pretty anti-climactic.

Well, except for that whole nuclear winter thing.

Humankind is exceptionally good at surviving.

You only need maybe 10,000 - 20,000 people to ensure the survival of the species (I'm not an expert on that, or anything really but remember reading somewhere that our entire population is estimate to have come from about 10,000 breeding pairs). That still leaves a lot of people out in the cold.

LavenderWolf: Individually, perhaps not as good, but as a species, none compare.

I bet there are some bacteria that would probably disagree with that.


Survival of the species and survival of civilization and culture are two completely different things. Check out Earth Abides by George R. Stewart http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth_Abides With numbers like that, spread all across the globe and cut off from the technologies they depend on, education of the youth and preservation of knowledge become secondary at best. The film Glen and Randa presents this future pretty well http://youtu.be/Lh1WIFG4i0M
 
2013-04-11 04:32:05 AM

Abacus9: Sorry, it looks like I was wrong. I tried looking up the Best Korea meme, and also Team America, but I can't find one referencing the other anywhere. I think since North Korea threads tend to reference both, I naturally put two and two together and came up with three (and I never even saw the movie).


The Best Korea meme started about 7 years ago or so when Kim Mark II was making internal propaganda (photoshopped) that had him standing in beautiful fields of alpine flowers or whatever and so on while he was depicting South Korea as a capitalist wasteland. Best Korea, Worst Korea.
 
2013-04-11 04:35:15 AM

libranoelrose: gadian: You know, I guess I just don't have the good ol' American appreciation for a Cold War and ceaseless fear and paranoia.  North Korea is nothing that can do nothing.  If they even seriously tried there would be a quick execution of a fat man and a new Chinese speaking regime propped up in a matter of days.

totally like night of the comet


DMK? Who the hell is DMK?
 
2013-04-11 04:37:06 AM
tribuneofthepeople.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-04-11 04:39:07 AM

redsquid: Survival of the species and survival of civilization and culture are two completely different things. Check out Earth Abides by George R. Stewart


I think I saw something like that once:

Oooops. Okay, maybe nothing at all like that.
 
2013-04-11 04:41:06 AM

iq_in_binary: miss diminutive: J. Frank Parnell: That's always been pretty questionable. Kind of like the fears about how the first nuke detonation might ignite the atmosphere of Earth. You might see a slight temperature change in some areas after, but again, i don't think it would live up to the hype. Just more of the fearmongering and exaggeration that's surrounded nukes from the start.

Are you basing this on anything more substantial than your gut reaction and supposition? Because this peer reviewed article using climate models used to analyze temperature changes due to volcanic eruptions seems to think that it'll be a little worse than that.

Like, as in a LOT worse than that.

Woops. Meant to say your source is behind a paywall, have a copy you could inbox me?


Just sent it.
 
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