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(The Sun)   Teenager has survived on nothing but noodles since age 5 because parenting is too much work   (thesun.co.uk) divider line 146
    More: Stupid, noodles, Isle of Wight  
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13979 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Apr 2013 at 11:58 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-10 12:00:20 PM  
Another day, another attention whore in another completely fictitious Sun "article".
 
2013-04-10 12:00:33 PM  
That's using your noodle
 
2013-04-10 12:03:06 PM  
How would this kid not have scurvy?
 
2013-04-10 12:03:33 PM  
It will prepare him for college.
 
2013-04-10 12:04:59 PM  
A friend of my family's son, ate nothing but pizza. After he moved out and went to college he got very sick and was hospitalized because he couldn't eat correctly.

//cool story bro.
 
2013-04-10 12:05:22 PM  
subby sounds boiling mad. if this was their child that kid would be in hot water!
 
2013-04-10 12:07:16 PM  

coolcashiat77: A friend of my family's son, ate nothing but pizza. After he moved out and went to college he got very sick and was hospitalized because he couldn't eat correctly.

//cool story bro.


Nutritional deficiency?
 
2013-04-10 12:09:08 PM  

buckler: How would this kid not have scurvy?


Exactly, along with a number of other nutritional diseases.
 
2013-04-10 12:09:52 PM  
A child with "Selective Eating Disorder" is my worst nightmare. If my hypothetical children fussed about everything, I'd lose my mind. I already went through a year of my husband thinking he didn't like most foods, slowly broke him of that (his parents are terrible cooks, he never learned and his mom loves being a martyr about it) and if I had to start all over with a kid, I'd be done. Its hard enough to cook for my in laws on the 2-3 times a year that we get together at our place or when you have to pick a restaurant that fits 3 picky eaters (FIL, BIL and nephew).
 
2013-04-10 12:10:25 PM  
Good for her. She's saving money. It's bootstrappy.
 
2013-04-10 12:11:19 PM  
I was talking to a doctor the other day and out of nowhere she bragged that her 16 year old daughter has never eaten a vegetable.  And my uncle's girlfriend is proud of the fact that she's never eaten anything green; she'll tell you every chance she gets. These people are out there.  We don't have to pay attention to them.
 
2013-04-10 12:11:28 PM  
I remember a story from Britain some years ago about a 9 year old kid whose mum let him eat nothing but jam sandwiches. "I like jam because it's sweet," he said, "and nothing else tastes good," or some such nonsense.

I'd be in the "Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing" "EAT IT OR WEAR IT!" school of thinking on this subject, and there'd be no damned jam in the house if my kid tried to pull that crap. WTF is wrong with some parents?
 
2013-04-10 12:11:54 PM  

coolcash1777: A friend of my family's son, ate nothing but pizza. After he moved out and went to college he got very sick and was hospitalized because he couldn't eat correctly.

//cool story bro.


How did that happen most college kids live on pizza and beer without any problems

Pizza is not that bad for you assuming you don't eat an entire large in on sitting by yourself
 
2013-04-10 12:12:22 PM  
This is just evolution in action. Let the little biatch die of malnourishment.
 
2013-04-10 12:13:24 PM  

socoloco: It will prepare him for college.


This. She'll certainly have no trouble adjusting to dorm life.

/fondly remembers "dorm spaghetti:"  ramen noodles + ketchup from packets taken from local fast food places
 
2013-04-10 12:15:24 PM  

Splish: I was talking to a doctor the other day and out of nowhere she bragged that her 16 year old daughter has never eaten a vegetable.  And my uncle's girlfriend is proud of the fact that she's never eaten anything green; she'll tell you every chance she gets. These people are out there.  We don't have to pay attention to them.


They're train wrecks though, so hard to look away. My nephew won't touch vegetables. I'm truly horrified that someone that works in the health field (such as the doctor you know and also my MIL and SIL) are so willing to accept unbalanced diets. Then again, my nephew has had obvious speak issues since the age of two and he started getting therapy for it at 4.5 years old, because it wasn't convenient before. And the family doctor continually said he was OK. No one could say anything about it without getting shut down because the doctor said he was OK. Medical professionals can be idiots too.
 
2013-04-10 12:18:51 PM  

ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: Medical professionals can be idiots too.


This is clearly true, but they're not usually idiots with regard to medical issues.
 
2013-04-10 12:20:59 PM  
Followup story: Teenager has 15 foot tapeworm in digestive tract.
 
2013-04-10 12:21:27 PM  
F*ck picky eaters
 
2013-04-10 12:23:07 PM  
Subby forgot to mention that she is smoking hot.
 
2013-04-10 12:23:24 PM  
Deep fried noodles is far more nutritious than what the average Englishman Briton Limey eats.
 
2013-04-10 12:24:02 PM  
Ah, poor Johnny Bates. The mind of a child, forced to witness unbearable evil, and it retreats into itself...
 
2013-04-10 12:25:49 PM  

socoloco: It will prepare him for college.


And we're done here.
 
2013-04-10 12:27:53 PM  

Splish: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: Medical professionals can be idiots too.

This is clearly true, but they're not usually idiots with regard to medical issues.


IDK, my mother in law has pulled some seriously bone headed moves when it comes to health with my husband and my nephew. Like the time she was without insurance and she decided to take my husband (when he was 13) home after he broke his leg in a soccer game. She didn't think his leg was actually broken, so she said, "if its broken now it will be broken tomorrow!" He had a tib-fib fracture. Once his adrenaline wore off, he was in excruciating pain and she had to take him to the ER. They cased him to the hip for 6 weeks and to the knee for another 4-6 weeks. The to-the-hip cast was so heavy, he ended up having to be home schooled because it was too difficult to get to school, get around school and get home without being exhausted and unable to keep up with school work.

Then, one time, she asked her mother in law what she put in a cake made for my nephew's birthday, even though she learned it contained nuts which my nephew's mother already believed were allergens for my nephew, she still served it to him and then lied when my sister in law asked about it. Then, when his face got puffy, she blamed her 90 year old mother in law for making a cake with nuts, even though I was there when she asked about nuts in the cake. YAY ER visit for your first birthday!

Medical. Professional. 30 years experience. Thinks she's smarter than everyone.
 
2013-04-10 12:28:45 PM  
There's a branch of my family where we're fussy eaters. One relative who just turned 93 or 94 (eek I forget which) literally has never eaten a veggie in 90 years. Not kidding. She's also always been very thin and loves sweets. I'm not as bad, but I was pretty bad. Going out to eat was always sucky because I was the asshole who had to special order everything. I only liked bland foods, no condiments. No salad dressings. Nada. My best friend embarked on a quest to change this (with me wanting to obviously). Whenever I try a new food, I generally don't like it at first. Even if I DO like it...I can't eat a large amount, only a very small amount. I have to do that 3-4 times before I can eat even a decent portion of it. I feel like I'm going to throw up otherwise.

I could never eat hot or spicy foods either. Now I love them. I eat tacos (omg they're so good). I love grits. LOVE THEM. Oatmeal too.

But I can't even describe to you how difficult its been. And I really couldn't have done it without a lot of patience and cooking from my BFF. And I freaking love the fact that I can order right off the menu without making substitutions. :D

The only thing I've refused to try so far, were sardines. I just couldn't bring myself to do so. And the only thing I've discovered I do NOT like is pineapple. Do NOT like. But, I'm going to revisit it in other configurations. Raw chunks were super icky though.
 
2013-04-10 12:31:39 PM  
Funny how kids with Selective Eating Disorder (fancy term for abnormally picky eaters) have parents who cater to their shiat. I know one who only eats bologna sammiches on wonder bread, dry, and boxed mac and cheese. That's all she eats. And the parents allow it. Yes, she's as hideously sickly looking as you'd imagine.
 
2013-04-10 12:32:54 PM  
Okay Miss Raised-on-ramen,
i.imgur.com

I raise you one cheesedoodle girl:
i.imgur.com

...and a soapsuds lady:
i.imgur.com
 
2013-04-10 12:34:55 PM  

Johnny Bananapeel: Okay Miss Raised-on-ramen,
[i.imgur.com image 620x413]

I


The ramen must be affecting her eyesight. She trims her own bangs, and badly - she missed a whole bunch.
 
2013-04-10 12:35:11 PM  

namegoeshere: Funny how kids with Selective Eating Disorder (fancy term for abnormally picky eaters) have parents who cater to their shiat. I know one who only eats bologna sammiches on wonder bread, dry, and boxed mac and cheese. That's all she eats. And the parents allow it. Yes, she's as hideously sickly looking as you'd imagine.


And if it wasn't for the flour and noodles being fortified with B vitamins, she'd probably be dead. Cripes.

I knew a girl who would show up with nothing but buttered noodles for lunch sometimes. Her parents were too busy with their business to pay attention to whether there was food in the fridge for the kids.
 
2013-04-10 12:35:34 PM  
My daughter and I are both eating Ramen Noodles for lunch right now so I'm getting a kick out of this.

Seriously though, if this story is true it's nothing more than a severe parenting fail.  The problem starts when parents project their own tastes onto their children at a very young age by doing such things as wrinkling up their noses and saying, "eeeew are you sure you want to try that spinach?  You probably won't like it."  Serve up a side of veggies like it's something new and special and let the kids decide for themselves whether or not they like it.  Oh, and don't do something stupid like "hide" the vegetables in other foods and lie to the kids, i.e. calling mashed cauliflower mashed potatoes.  And start early with the new food discovery -- as soon as the kids are sitting at the table with you.

The result of this line of thinking?  My kids eat all sorts of vegetables like they're going out of style.  Why?  Because even though their friends may have told them that Brussels Sprouts are nasty, they've learned that everyone like different things.  They understand that they won't know if they like something without first trying it.  And they know that if they don't like it, mom and dad aren't going to force feed it to them but instead try another vegetable or serve up one that they do like.

Come on already parents.  Giving your children nutritious food is not the hard part of the gig.
 
2013-04-10 12:35:39 PM  
FTFA: "I've even eaten them dry and uncooked before!"


Well, that's nice that she's getting some variety.
 
2013-04-10 12:35:41 PM  
The 5ft 3in teen weighs just seven stone and has the health equivalent to that of an 80-year-old.

More information please?


"I always fancy noodles and could easily eat two packets at once.

I think we all can...  That's not even remotely unique.
 
2013-04-10 12:38:32 PM  

Maul555: "I always fancy noodles and could easily eat two packets at once.

I think we all can... That's not even remotely unique.


That's because they put crack in the little flavor packet. Addictive!
 
2013-04-10 12:43:02 PM  
Again?
 
2013-04-10 12:44:02 PM  
my favorite is the woman who claims she can only drink either pepsi or coke and no other liquids.
 
2013-04-10 12:44:04 PM  

ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: And the family doctor continually said he was OK. No one could say anything about it without getting shut down because the doctor said he was OK


This could be a case of selective hearing.  My mother was put on a low cholesterol diet which, in her head, she followed religiously and told the doctor that as well.  So the doctor put her on pills.  What she didn't tell him was that she was going through a stick of butter a day.  Her oatmeal was floating in butter.  Since the doctor thought she followed the diet as she said he concluded that her diet wasn't the contributing factor.  She translated this as that fast food was not causing her rise in cholesterol and therefore she could eat all the fast food she wanted.

Same thing with her diabetes.  She would eat "sugar free" deserts and tell the doctor how she was using fake sugar all the time while leaving out the fact that she was going through a 3-liter of soda a day.  Same thing as the cholesterol, she twisted it around to where her diet was not a contributing factor and concluded that she can eat/drink all of the sugar filled treats she wanted.

She's not doing it intentionally.  She has pathologically lied to herself and fully believes that none of her health problems are her fault.
 
2013-04-10 12:45:53 PM  

buckler: How would this kid not have scurvy?


We fortify bread products so that's how she's still alive.

My roommate is like this though not has severe, kid will NOT eat any veggies except for tomato sauce, potatoes, and corn. I pureed some veggies into a soup for him and he freaked out about the "veggies".

His favorite food is 2 boxes of Mac and Cheese, 2 packs of Ground Pork, and 2 packs of El Paso Fajita Spice. It's like a chemical explosion in my mouth, ick. He'll eat the whole thing for dinner.

He's horribly obese and is killing himself, I'm trying to get him to see a shrink.
 
2013-04-10 12:46:05 PM  
I have a noodle for her.
 
2013-04-10 12:47:42 PM  
If potatoes didn't contain Vitamin C, we'd be seeing a lot more scurvy I think.
 
2013-04-10 12:48:11 PM  

Lady Indica: There's a branch of my family where we're fussy eaters. One relative who just turned 93 or 94 (eek I forget which) literally has never eaten a veggie in 90 years. Not kidding. She's also always been very thin and loves sweets. I'm not as bad, but I was pretty bad. Going out to eat was always sucky because I was the asshole who had to special order everything. I only liked bland foods, no condiments. No salad dressings. Nada. My best friend embarked on a quest to change this (with me wanting to obviously). Whenever I try a new food, I generally don't like it at first. Even if I DO like it...I can't eat a large amount, only a very small amount. I have to do that 3-4 times before I can eat even a decent portion of it. I feel like I'm going to throw up otherwise.

I could never eat hot or spicy foods either. Now I love them. I eat tacos (omg they're so good). I love grits. LOVE THEM. Oatmeal too.

But I can't even describe to you how difficult its been. And I really couldn't have done it without a lot of patience and cooking from my BFF. And I freaking love the fact that I can order right off the menu without making substitutions. :D

The only thing I've refused to try so far, were sardines. I just couldn't bring myself to do so. And the only thing I've discovered I do NOT like is pineapple. Do NOT like. But, I'm going to revisit it in other configurations. Raw chunks were super icky though.


You should be very proud of yourself, changing something so deeply engrained is a huge accomplishment. No sarcasm. I went through this where I had to break the picky fussy eater habits of my husband (we were just living together at that time, but I literally could not cook for him.) My husband still hates mushrooms. Its OK, I don't like them either. When we met, he would eat chicken, some fish, broccoli, carrots, green beans, onion, lettuce, some fruit and starch - potatoes, pasta, rice and white bread. I am actually very proud that he worked through his food aversions. His favorite foods are brussel sprouts, cauliflower, pork, leafy greens, etc. He eats the weirdest breads now, ones that are not in my wheelhouse. He drinks Kombucha, eats quinoa, likes sushi, etc.

I like pineapple grilled with cinnamon. But don't force yourself... certain foods are never going to be your thing. Mushrooms aren't mine. And I am hesitant to eat a sardine (though if it in something as the "salt" then it might be OK, if I don't know about it.)
 
2013-04-10 12:48:34 PM  
Nothing pisses me off more than my grandmother calling me a picky eater.  I am the opposite of a picky eater, I am an adventuresome eater.  If I have never had it and have trouble pronouncing it, then I want it even more.  I will eat everything from sashimi, to indian food, to pickled quail eggs...  I just don't like farking nuts which she is always putting into her pies and salads n shiat and she thinks I must be the worst eater in the world because of it.  always trying to sneak nuts into my food on purpose...   I am not allergic to nuts, I will even eat nuts, I just dont care for them and they will straight up ruin a salad for me...

/end tangent
 
2013-04-10 12:51:02 PM  

Lady Indica: There's a branch of my family where we're fussy eaters....And the only thing I've discovered I do NOT like is pineapple. Do NOT like. But, I'm going to revisit it in other configurations. Raw chunks were super icky though.


I hate cold pineapple (and cold cheeses, as well). Try hot pineapple, such as on pizza or in rice or on top of chicken or pork chops or ham or....

Must be lunchtime, I'm making myself drool.

/Former extremely picky eater who is currently rearing a picky eater, so I understand.
/Fat, but my kids aren't. And the picky eater can choose from the entire supermarket, so he's not sickly.
 
2013-04-10 12:51:08 PM  

Splish: I was talking to a doctor the other day and out of nowhere she bragged that her 16 year old daughter has never eaten a vegetable.  And my uncle's girlfriend is proud of the fact that she's never eaten anything green; she'll tell you every chance she gets. These people are out there.  We don't have to pay attention to them.


I dated someone who never ate anything green because she had a phobia of that color. Her doctor was amazed at how healthy she was other than that. However, I had some older cousins who were overweight, but actually malnurished because they refused to eat any vegetables of any kind. My cousins will probably mature out of it, but my ex will probably have a more difficult time if she ever wants to beat the problem.
 
2013-04-10 12:53:42 PM  
I'll bet she smells weird.
 
2013-04-10 12:53:57 PM  
...with helpful picture of what teenager surviving on nothing but instant noodles will definitely look like.
 
2013-04-10 12:57:47 PM  

DittoToo: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: And the family doctor continually said he was OK. No one could say anything about it without getting shut down because the doctor said he was OK

This could be a case of selective hearing.  My mother was put on a low cholesterol diet which, in her head, she followed religiously and told the doctor that as well.  So the doctor put her on pills.  What she didn't tell him was that she was going through a stick of butter a day.  Her oatmeal was floating in butter.  Since the doctor thought she followed the diet as she said he concluded that her diet wasn't the contributing factor.  She translated this as that fast food was not causing her rise in cholesterol and therefore she could eat all the fast food she wanted.

Same thing with her diabetes.  She would eat "sugar free" deserts and tell the doctor how she was using fake sugar all the time while leaving out the fact that she was going through a 3-liter of soda a day.  Same thing as the cholesterol, she twisted it around to where her diet was not a contributing factor and concluded that she can eat/drink all of the sugar filled treats she wanted.

She's not doing it intentionally.  She has pathologically lied to herself and fully believes that none of her health problems are her fault.


I guess that could be going on, but when my FIL and my husband brought it up to my MIL, she told us we weren't trying hard enough to understand him. We pointed out other family members who were younger but were more easily understood than my nephew. Then they said he couldn't contain his excitement, so if you spent more time with him, you'd understand, because you'd see him at times that weren't exciting. *HUGE EYE ROLL* We spent every other weekend with him for several weeks in a row because of holidays and birthdays and family gatherings. He never seemed any more coherent. Literally, he sounds in coherent. The doctor supposedly talked to him and assessed his speech and he believed it was on par with his peers.

I think my MIL got a rude awakening when her neighbor moved in and has a child 6 months older and a child 6 months younger than my nephew and they speak much more understandably. So then it became, "He needs to go to school and daycare like my neighbor's kids!" Then someone pointed out that the neighbor's kids were adopted from a foreign country and they are sometimes prone to language delays, so maybe my nephew is SERIOUSLY delayed. She was so deflated. She said, "I don't want him to be picked on at school!" Umm... lady, he's going into the stage of needing speech therapy for many, many years. Being picked on is the least of your worries if he's not getting the right help to gain speech.
 
2013-04-10 01:02:21 PM  

Maul555: Nothing pisses me off more than my grandmother calling me a picky eater.  I am the opposite of a picky eater, I am an adventuresome eater.  If I have never had it and have trouble pronouncing it, then I want it even more.  I will eat everything from sashimi, to indian food, to pickled quail eggs...  I just don't like farking nuts which she is always putting into her pies and salads n shiat and she thinks I must be the worst eater in the world because of it.  always trying to sneak nuts into my food on purpose...   I am not allergic to nuts, I will even eat nuts, I just dont care for them and they will straight up ruin a salad for me...

/end tangent


My MIL tries to tell people that my husband has lots of food aversions and it drives him up the wall. He hasn't lived with her for 10 years, he eats lots and lots of food that she insists he won't. But you can't be a martyr if your cause doesn't exist. She's bat shiat crazy. She regularly makes up food issues that never existed for my husband too. Like he hates fish, onions or something else... I just look at her and laugh in her face. Like when one of the extended family is hosting and she is trying to fuss about foods being served not being appropriate for my husband. I shut that down. I tell them, "he'll eat anything and everything you serve. Please don't listen to these old stories."
 
2013-04-10 01:03:34 PM  
My friend's daughter is 8 and is a super picky eater.  She's rail thin, but otherwise pretty healthy.  Now she has a little brother (2 months old) and he's more than 1/3 her weight (15 pounds...she's 40 pounds).  That kid's and eater. They're hoping that he'll be a good influence on her in that department.

My grandpa never ate veggies...unless cheesy broccoli soup counts.  I swear that's the only vegetable he ever ate.  Unfortunately he also died of stomach cancer.  Since he passed away when I was only 6, in my mind not eating vegetables = you're getting stomach cancer.  It's a good incentive to eat veggies, even if it's a little deranged as a way of thinking.
 
2013-04-10 01:07:22 PM  

ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: Splish: I was talking to a doctor the other day and out of nowhere she bragged that her 16 year old daughter has never eaten a vegetable.  And my uncle's girlfriend is proud of the fact that she's never eaten anything green; she'll tell you every chance she gets. These people are out there.  We don't have to pay attention to them.

They're train wrecks though, so hard to look away. My nephew won't touch vegetables. I'm truly horrified that someone that works in the health field (such as the doctor you know and also my MIL and SIL) are so willing to accept unbalanced diets. Then again, my nephew has had obvious speak issues since the age of two and he started getting therapy for it at 4.5 years old, because it wasn't convenient before. And the family doctor continually said he was OK. No one could say anything about it without getting shut down because the doctor said he was OK. Medical professionals can be idiots too.


I've known at least two children (my nephew and a child of a friend) who couldn't speak more than babbling and "mama/dada" at the age of two and a half, but their pediatricians always said "they're fine, they're fine." I don't get it, how is that possible? Are the developmental milestones really that loose? (They're not; I've checked.)

You'd think these people would be reprimanded by their licensing boards or something.
 
2013-04-10 01:11:43 PM  
Lord Dimwit:
I've known at least two children (my nephew and a child of a friend) who couldn't speak more than babbling and "mama/dada" at the age of two and a half, but their pediatricians always said "they're fine, they're fine." I don't get it, how is that possible? Are the developmental milestones really that loose? (They're not; I've checked.)

You'd think these people would be reprimanded by their licensing boards or something.


That's bizarre. I heard my child muttering swear words in a correct context at that age. Apparently Lego is frustrating.
 
2013-04-10 01:15:31 PM  

Lord Dimwit: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: Splish: I was talking to a doctor the other day and out of nowhere she bragged that her 16 year old daughter has never eaten a vegetable.  And my uncle's girlfriend is proud of the fact that she's never eaten anything green; she'll tell you every chance she gets. These people are out there.  We don't have to pay attention to them.

They're train wrecks though, so hard to look away. My nephew won't touch vegetables. I'm truly horrified that someone that works in the health field (such as the doctor you know and also my MIL and SIL) are so willing to accept unbalanced diets. Then again, my nephew has had obvious speak issues since the age of two and he started getting therapy for it at 4.5 years old, because it wasn't convenient before. And the family doctor continually said he was OK. No one could say anything about it without getting shut down because the doctor said he was OK. Medical professionals can be idiots too.

I've known at least two children (my nephew and a child of a friend) who couldn't speak more than babbling and "mama/dada" at the age of two and a half, but their pediatricians always said "they're fine, they're fine." I don't get it, how is that possible? Are the developmental milestones really that loose? (They're not; I've checked.)

You'd think these people would be reprimanded by their licensing boards or something.


My mother in law is practically rabid when it comes to recommending this doctor to any and every body that will listen. I've saw him for 2.5 years. I won't be going back. He doesn't stay in his lane. He's a family practice doctor, but he wants to be your everything doctor. Thyroid issues? No need to see an endocrinologist, you see me! Pregnant? You can still see me! Its like specialists do not exist in his mind. Then there is the way he addresses things. I am being treated for hypothyroidism and I am losing weight. So I see a dietitian at my own expense (insurance doesn't cover it) and I lose over 15% of my body weight in less than 6 months. When I see him again, he tells me, "well, you know now that your thyroid is working, so its time to stop blaming that for your weight issues and to lose weight."

DAFUQ?

I haven't been working my behind off (literally!) for the last 6 months to lost 15% of my body weight? You think 25mcg of Synthroid would do that? You think that I just woke up on a Monday and said, lets go for a 27 mile backpacking trip with 20,000 feet of elevation gain without any preparation? Dang, I wish I'd just sat my fluffy behind on the couch and waited for that 15% of my body weight to melt away, it was HARD to train for a back packing trip through the mountains! And backpacking is farking expensive, I could have saved so much on the dietitian and backpacking equipment if I'd just sat on the couch and waited!
 
2013-04-10 01:16:06 PM  

ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: A child with "Selective Eating Disorder" is my worst nightmare. If my hypothetical children fussed about everything, I'd lose my mind.


My parents broke multiple nephews of selective eating problems.  The teen in the op is an extreme example, but if you catch them young and early, the *average* fix is to simply not break down and give them what they want all the time.  IE they'll eat what they're given when they're hungry enough.

There's some developmental reasons to be picky - back in the stone age new food is potentially unsafe, so if you can get what you've already been accustomed to, it's safer.  But then, you generally were forced to try new foods fairly frequently in order to get enough calories, so hunger alone would force you into trying sufficient new foods to stay healthy(mostly).
 
2013-04-10 01:17:56 PM  

FunkOut: Lord Dimwit:
I've known at least two children (my nephew and a child of a friend) who couldn't speak more than babbling and "mama/dada" at the age of two and a half, but their pediatricians always said "they're fine, they're fine." I don't get it, how is that possible? Are the developmental milestones really that loose? (They're not; I've checked.)

You'd think these people would be reprimanded by their licensing boards or something.

That's bizarre. I heard my child muttering swear words in a correct context at that age. Apparently Lego is frustrating.


My kid is 21 months old and already speaks better than his cousin did at 4. His cousin is 8 now and still has speech issues (can't pronounce "r" sounds correctly, for example) that his parents refuse to acknowledge or do anything about in any way. It frustrates me to no end. I've given up trying to say anything.
 
2013-04-10 01:18:58 PM  
So then, after breaking into the locked-from-within room and finding a severed head revolving on the turntable, someone followed the hosepipe up to the attic?
 
2013-04-10 01:19:15 PM  

FunkOut: Lord Dimwit:
I've known at least two children (my nephew and a child of a friend) who couldn't speak more than babbling and "mama/dada" at the age of two and a half, but their pediatricians always said "they're fine, they're fine." I don't get it, how is that possible? Are the developmental milestones really that loose? (They're not; I've checked.)

You'd think these people would be reprimanded by their licensing boards or something.

That's bizarre. I heard my child muttering swear words in a correct context at that age. Apparently Lego is frustrating.


My good friend's 2.5 year old was deeming things, "farking bullshiat" in conversation when she disagreed with you. But you can't even converse with my nephew and he's 5.5. You know those kids in the insurance commercials that have long involved conversations about why "less is not more" and are coherent? My nephew will talk for the same amount of time with the same amount of hand gestures but he's completely incoherent. Then, he turns to his mom and his mom "translates" for you. Except, it takes 10 seconds to translate 60 seconds of speaking, so I don't even think she understands him fully. Sometimes, he won't even talk to you, sometimes he just asks his mom to tell you something.
 
2013-04-10 01:22:46 PM  

Lord Dimwit: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: Splish: I was talking to a doctor the other day and out of nowhere she bragged that her 16 year old daughter has never eaten a vegetable.  And my uncle's girlfriend is proud of the fact that she's never eaten anything green; she'll tell you every chance she gets. These people are out there.  We don't have to pay attention to them.

They're train wrecks though, so hard to look away. My nephew won't touch vegetables. I'm truly horrified that someone that works in the health field (such as the doctor you know and also my MIL and SIL) are so willing to accept unbalanced diets. Then again, my nephew has had obvious speak issues since the age of two and he started getting therapy for it at 4.5 years old, because it wasn't convenient before. And the family doctor continually said he was OK. No one could say anything about it without getting shut down because the doctor said he was OK. Medical professionals can be idiots too.

I've known at least two children (my nephew and a child of a friend) who couldn't speak more than babbling and "mama/dada" at the age of two and a half, but their pediatricians always said "they're fine, they're fine." I don't get it, how is that possible? Are the developmental milestones really that loose? (They're not; I've checked.)

You'd think these people would be reprimanded by their licensing boards or something.


At 18 months old my daughter was speaking in 5-7 word sentences but couldn't legitimately jump and get air till 2.5 or 3. The next kid, a boy, was barely stringing two words together at two years old and had a very limited vocabulary but he could communicate a lot of what he wanted. He was also walking at 9 months and jumping and getting air around 14 months. We wondered a bit with him bit his big sister did all his talking for him so I think he just kept his mouth shut and kept moving. Around 2.5 or so he just broke out speaking in big sentences and putting together some pretty abstract, deep thoughts that I didn't hear out of my daughter till she was much older.
The youngest, who will be two in May, has been talking for a while and is now stringing together 4-7 word sentences from time to time. Granted, he slurs his speech a lot but I think it's because he's out of breathe from trying to keep up with big brother. He's almost got jumping figured out. When the other kids are launching themselves from the back of the couch to the floor he's trying to jump off the cushions and falling on his face and giggling about it. Or falling onto the other two kids after they've landed on the floor while laughing with a distinctive mad scientist laugh. Kid ain't right but he cracks me up.
 
2013-04-10 01:23:13 PM  
I don't get parents who do this. When I was a kid whoever cooked decided what everybody ate. It was my mom about 75% of the time. If I didn't like it I ate it anyway, because I either ate it hot then or cold later when I got hungry enough.

I watch my mother in law, who raises her other daughter's kid, make herself something, her husband something different, and the granddaughter a third thing. Ain't nobody got time for that.
 
2013-04-10 01:29:25 PM  

buckler: How would this kid not have scurvy?


He must drink some sort of alcohol with a lime in it. Mojito perhaps?
 
2013-04-10 01:30:41 PM  
How come these retards are always from England? Eat'n noodles, Sponges, Soaps, and fark knows what else. Round 'em up and ship 'em to an island somewhere where they can have thier own little disfunctional society. Just send in a container from the dollar store full of Ramen Noodles adn cleaning supplies once a month..... ohhhh shiat wait..... they are already on a disfunctional island..... England......
 
2013-04-10 01:31:27 PM  
I loathe picky people.  They brag about it like it makes them special... "oh I *can't* eat that, it will make me sick"  "if we're going to eat that, it has to be prepared this special way or else I can't eat it"  "if I eat garlic I'll swell up and can't walk for a week".  They think it makes them unique or precious in some way, but it just makes them look weak and pathetic.  One of my ex's would complain about garlic, said it made it hard for her to breathe is she ever ate any.  So I did experiments.  Would put garlic in food and tell her it had none in it.  She'd be fine.  Then tell her it had garlic in it when it didn't, and suddenly she couldn't breathe.  It was all in her head and she loved the attention.
 
2013-04-10 01:31:35 PM  

Pwnzor: Seriously though, if this story is true it's nothing more than a severe parenting fail. The problem starts when parents project their own tastes onto their children at a very young age by doing such things as wrinkling up their noses and saying, "eeeew are you sure you want to try that spinach? You probably won't like it." Serve up a side of veggies like it's something new and special and let the kids decide for themselves whether or not they like it. Oh, and don't do something stupid like "hide" the vegetables in other foods and lie to the kids, i.e. calling mashed cauliflower mashed potatoes. And start early with the new food discovery -- as soon as the kids are sitting at the table with you.


You sound like a good parent. I don't recall ever having a problem with vegetables and it's because my parents were like you. Also, picky eating was tolerated perfectly - you could be as picky as you wanted, but if you didn't eat what was served, your only other option was bread and milk. Parents with "selective eaters" have selective eaters because they produce them. Shiat, if I had a short-order cook for three meals a day I'd be pretty "picky" too.
 
2013-04-10 01:34:51 PM  

Koodz: I don't get parents who do this. When I was a kid whoever cooked decided what everybody ate. It was my mom about 75% of the time. If I didn't like it I ate it anyway, because I either ate it hot then or cold later when I got hungry enough.

I watch my mother in law, who raises her other daughter's kid, make herself something, her husband something different, and the granddaughter a third thing. Ain't nobody got time for that.


My poor wife does this. I'm vegetarian but will otherwise eat anything, she's not a vegetarian but a super picky (I mean reallypicky) eater, and our kid eats whatever we make for him (usually some from both of our plates and something extra on top of that).
 
2013-04-10 01:35:36 PM  

spunkymunky: Lord Dimwit: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: Splish: I was talking to a doctor the other day and out of nowhere she bragged that her 16 year old daughter has never eaten a vegetable.  And my uncle's girlfriend is proud of the fact that she's never eaten anything green; she'll tell you every chance she gets. These people are out there.  We don't have to pay attention to them.

They're train wrecks though, so hard to look away. My nephew won't touch vegetables. I'm truly horrified that someone that works in the health field (such as the doctor you know and also my MIL and SIL) are so willing to accept unbalanced diets. Then again, my nephew has had obvious speak issues since the age of two and he started getting therapy for it at 4.5 years old, because it wasn't convenient before. And the family doctor continually said he was OK. No one could say anything about it without getting shut down because the doctor said he was OK. Medical professionals can be idiots too.

I've known at least two children (my nephew and a child of a friend) who couldn't speak more than babbling and "mama/dada" at the age of two and a half, but their pediatricians always said "they're fine, they're fine." I don't get it, how is that possible? Are the developmental milestones really that loose? (They're not; I've checked.)

You'd think these people would be reprimanded by their licensing boards or something.

At 18 months old my daughter was speaking in 5-7 word sentences but couldn't legitimately jump and get air till 2.5 or 3. The next kid, a boy, was barely stringing two words together at two years old and had a very limited vocabulary but he could communicate a lot of what he wanted. He was also walking at 9 months and jumping and getting air around 14 months. We wondered a bit with him bit his big sister did all his talking for him so I think he just kept his mouth shut and kept moving. Around 2.5 or so he just broke out speaking in big sentences and putting together some pretty abstract, deep t ...


 They all sound like fun kids.

I think that your situation is slightly different than kids with legitimate speech issues with people denying the speech problems exist. You seem aware of the different advances/delays of your kids and what your kids aren't doing well. Awareness is necessary before you can take action, but my nephew's caregivers weren't even willing to admit something might not be perfect. My mother in law continually shut everyone down telling the adults that we were the problem, not the kid. And for 3 years, the kid has been mad at all of us for not understanding him. We're the problem according to Nana, so she will scold you in front of him. Not trying to make the kid feel bad for being difficult to understand, but she's not helping him either by telling us we're wrong.
 
2013-04-10 01:51:06 PM  

ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: spunkymunky: Lord Dimwit: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: Splish: I was talking to a doctor the other day and out of nowhere she bragged that her 16 year old daughter has never eaten a vegetable.  And my uncle's girlfriend is proud of the fact that she's never eaten anything green; she'll tell you every chance she gets. These people are out there.  We don't have to pay attention to them.

They're train wrecks though, so hard to look away. My nephew won't touch vegetables. I'm truly horrified that someone that works in the health field (such as the doctor you know and also my MIL and SIL) are so willing to accept unbalanced diets. Then again, my nephew has had obvious speak issues since the age of two and he started getting therapy for it at 4.5 years old, because it wasn't convenient before. And the family doctor continually said he was OK. No one could say anything about it without getting shut down because the doctor said he was OK. Medical professionals can be idiots too.

I've known at least two children (my nephew and a child of a friend) who couldn't speak more than babbling and "mama/dada" at the age of two and a half, but their pediatricians always said "they're fine, they're fine." I don't get it, how is that possible? Are the developmental milestones really that loose? (They're not; I've checked.)

You'd think these people would be reprimanded by their licensing boards or something.

At 18 months old my daughter was speaking in 5-7 word sentences but couldn't legitimately jump and get air till 2.5 or 3. The next kid, a boy, was barely stringing two words together at two years old and had a very limited vocabulary but he could communicate a lot of what he wanted. He was also walking at 9 months and jumping and getting air around 14 months. We wondered a bit with him bit his big sister did all his talking for him so I think he just kept his mouth shut and kept moving. Around 2.5 or so he just broke out speaking in big sentences and putting together some pretty abs ...


With my nephew, his parents would either translate for him, or simply anticipate what he wanted before he had to ask, so he never needed to say anything. They also refused to correct him. Any time I tried to bring up the problem, I was either told that "his pediatrician says he's fine" or it devolved into a "you don't have kids, you don't know what it's like" (which at the time was true) thing.

My son was saying his first word ("ball") at around 9 months and was speaking in reasonably complex sentences by 18-20 months. (My personal favorite so far was when he was about 19 months old and he said "Look, daddy, the moon in the door!" Turns out the house we were walking by had a moon-shaped window in their front door.) I have to say, I'm really grateful he's doing so well - he was born preterm and I was terrified it was going to lead to developmental delays.
 
2013-04-10 01:51:20 PM  
I see stories like this and am reassured that my kids will never eat like this.  My 4 year old will eat anything - including Sushi, Broccoli Pancakes, Chicken Vindaloo and pretty much anything but pomengranates, yogurt and chocolate milk.
 
2013-04-10 01:53:51 PM  

Lord Dimwit: Koodz: I don't get parents who do this. When I was a kid whoever cooked decided what everybody ate. It was my mom about 75% of the time. If I didn't like it I ate it anyway, because I either ate it hot then or cold later when I got hungry enough.

I watch my mother in law, who raises her other daughter's kid, make herself something, her husband something different, and the granddaughter a third thing. Ain't nobody got time for that.

My poor wife does this. I'm vegetarian but will otherwise eat anything, she's not a vegetarian but a super picky (I mean reallypicky) eater, and our kid eats whatever we make for him (usually some from both of our plates and something extra on top of that).


Do you just hate yourself?

I have the little girl sometimes and she'll say she's hungry and I will make whatever I was going to make and she'll biatch for a few minutes, discover I don't buckle, and eat the damn curry/fajitas/etc. I know how much willpower a seven year old has and dont believe for a second she can starve herself literally to death.

(I should note here that the poor kid is lactose/sucrose/maltose intolerant and it is hard enough to cook something she CAN eat. She is going to have to learn to broaden her palate within those restrictions or she's going to have a miserable and malnourished life. There is a method to my madness.)
 
2013-04-10 01:54:00 PM  
A cousin of mine would only eat peanut butter on a soft tortilla shell for many years of her young life. It used to infuriate me at family gatherings where there was so much delicious food that people took the time and care to prepare. I wish just once her parents would have made her choke down something else or at least experiment with other foods. it wasn't worth the fight for them I guess, which is why my cousin looked like Powder for many years.

I can't stand eating around picky eaters. If you don't like something just don't order it FFS.

Also I have noticed that for many picky eaters it has more to do with texture than flavor.
 
2013-04-10 01:56:06 PM  
Two things-

One, there's a fine line between a picky kid and a kid with a disorder. Having worked at a pediatric therapy office, I know the difference. I think it's 90% in the parenting approach, like it has been said this thread.

If your kid will only eat orange food because it's his favorite color? Give him sweet potatoes and squash and carrots and oranges. THAT CHILD DOESN'T HAVE TO LIVE ON MAC N CHEESE. *facepalm*

And two, I had an adult friend who didn't like vegetables. She's that lady who puts bacon, crispy chicken, cheese and ranch on a single leaf of lettuce and calls it a salad. She always used to complain about her weight. I went, you know, if you made a veggie ONLY salad for lunch every day, you'd probably lose a ton of weight. She was APPALLED at the suggestion. She also didn't feed her kids veggies because she "figured" they wouldn't like them either. BAD PARENT.

I've dated some picky eaters, turns out their moms were just shiatty cooks. I can make sautéed Brussels sprouts and stuffed zucchini that would make your taste buds sing. You don't have to straight boil veggies to cook them.

This girl will be dead in under five years. Calling it now.
 
2013-04-10 02:02:39 PM  

Lord Dimwit: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: spunkymunky: Lord Dimwit: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: Splish: I was talking to a doctor the other day and out of nowhere she bragged that her 16 year old daughter has never eaten a vegetable.  And my uncle's girlfriend is proud of the fact that she's never eaten anything green; she'll tell you every chance she gets. These people are out there.  We don't have to pay attention to them.


With my nephew, his parents would either translate for him, or simply anticipate what he wanted before he had to ask, so he never needed to say anything. They also refused to correct him. Any time I tried to bring up the problem, I was either told that "his pediatrician says he's fine" or it devolved into a "you don't have kids, you don't know what it's like" (which at the time was true) thing.

My son was saying his first word ("ball") at around 9 months and was speaking in reasonably complex sentences by 18-20 months. (My personal favorite so far was when he was about 19 months old and he said "Look, daddy, the moon in the door!" Turns out the house we were walking by had a moon-shaped window in their front door.) I have to say, I'm really grateful he's doing so well - he was born preterm and I was terrified it was going to lead to developmental delays.


I don't have kids yet, but I'm getting the same from my in laws. Now my nephew is getting as much speech therapy as insurance and the school district offer, but the hard thing is, from what my friends with speech delayed children say, its necessary to start therapy as soon as possible. My nephew didn't start until he was 4.5 and after a year, he's no more coherent. I asked my MIL about it and she said that sometimes you need to move backward to move forward. This is pretty scary to me because he can't move any more backward unless he regresses and since he's due to start kindergarten in September, how the hell is it OK to regress? As much money as my MIL has, I can't understand why she's not ponying up for private therapy. She's involved in every facet of their lives, so I don't know why extra therapy is off limits?

It honestly makes me angry, because my younger nephew is going to soon surpass the older one in terms of ability and then what will they do? When your younger child is more communicative than the older one? Is that when they'll admit there is something seriously out of whack with the situation?

My brother's ex had two kids who were 4+ years apart and it wasn't until the younger one was going to kindergarten that it was obvious that the older one had severe issues. Like, no joke, the 5 year old escorted the older sister to class. My brother's ex had to admit that the older one just might be on the spectrum... she had real issues functioning. But no school district can force you to have a child diagnosed and they won't get an IEP started for the fun of it when there is no parental support for starting services. CPS was involved after her and my brother split. Not sure who would have called. Certainly not my mom and my brother... *WHISTLES*

/Brother was living apart of the girlfriend for over 2 years while he was in the military.
//The girls are not his, but my brother did inform their dad (who was deployed to Korea) that there were issues.
///Their dad told the girlfriend that my brother contacted him and then they broke up for the 329th time.
 
2013-04-10 02:06:25 PM  
yeah, she would reek.
 
2013-04-10 02:09:04 PM  

kiwimoogle84: Two things-

One, there's a fine line between a picky kid and a kid with a disorder. Having worked at a pediatric therapy office, I know the difference. I think it's 90% in the parenting approach, like it has been said this thread.

If your kid will only eat orange food because it's his favorite color? Give him sweet potatoes and squash and carrots and oranges. THAT CHILD DOESN'T HAVE TO LIVE ON MAC N CHEESE. *facepalm*

And two, I had an adult friend who didn't like vegetables. She's that lady who puts bacon, crispy chicken, cheese and ranch on a single leaf of lettuce and calls it a salad. She always used to complain about her weight. I went, you know, if you made a veggie ONLY salad for lunch every day, you'd probably lose a ton of weight. She was APPALLED at the suggestion. She also didn't feed her kids veggies because she "figured" they wouldn't like them either. BAD PARENT.

I've dated some picky eaters, turns out their moms were just shiatty cooks. I can make sautéed Brussels sprouts and stuffed zucchini that would make your taste buds sing. You don't have to straight boil veggies to cook them.

This girl will be dead in under five years. Calling it now.


Moms who are bad cooks are a key problem with picky eaters. That was my husband's problem. I take a lot of credit for changing his picky ways, but he also wanted to be more adventurous AND he got very interested in nutrition (that happens when you run 80+ miles a week and need to meet extra demanding dietary requirements of such training), so he wanted to be a better eater too. My favorite dinner with my in laws was when his mother boiled veggies for 15 minutes and my husband said, "I'd rather drink the water. All the nutrients are there anyway." His mom was truly shocked that boiling veggies within an inch of their life and topping them with salad dressing was not a desirable option.

I agree, the girl has under 5 years to live unless someone intervenes. She does not look healthy.
 
2013-04-10 02:14:20 PM  

shifter_: How come these retards are always from England? Eat'n noodles, Sponges, Soaps, and fark knows what else. Round 'em up and ship 'em to an island somewhere where they can have thier own little disfunctional society. Just send in a container from the dollar store full of Ramen Noodles adn cleaning supplies once a month..... ohhhh shiat wait..... they are already on a disfunctional island..... England......


Could be the island gene pool phenomenon. Certain things become dominant. The English have people who eat weird stuff and have weird teeth. The Japanese have a lot of...weirdness. Newfoundland has some people who feel no pain and some people with random massive heart attacks at a young age. Iceland has too many attractive people.
 
2013-04-10 02:18:04 PM  

ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: kiwimoogle84: Two things-

One, there's a fine line between a picky kid and a kid with a disorder. Having worked at a pediatric therapy office, I know the difference. I think it's 90% in the parenting approach, like it has been said this thread.

If your kid will only eat orange food because it's his favorite color? Give him sweet potatoes and squash and carrots and oranges. THAT CHILD DOESN'T HAVE TO LIVE ON MAC N CHEESE. *facepalm*

And two, I had an adult friend who didn't like vegetables. She's that lady who puts bacon, crispy chicken, cheese and ranch on a single leaf of lettuce and calls it a salad. She always used to complain about her weight. I went, you know, if you made a veggie ONLY salad for lunch every day, you'd probably lose a ton of weight. She was APPALLED at the suggestion. She also didn't feed her kids veggies because she "figured" they wouldn't like them either. BAD PARENT.

I've dated some picky eaters, turns out their moms were just shiatty cooks. I can make sautéed Brussels sprouts and stuffed zucchini that would make your taste buds sing. You don't have to straight boil veggies to cook them.

This girl will be dead in under five years. Calling it now.

Moms who are bad cooks are a key problem with picky eaters. That was my husband's problem. I take a lot of credit for changing his picky ways, but he also wanted to be more adventurous AND he got very interested in nutrition (that happens when you run 80+ miles a week and need to meet extra demanding dietary requirements of such training), so he wanted to be a better eater too. My favorite dinner with my in laws was when his mother boiled veggies for 15 minutes and my husband said, "I'd rather drink the water. All the nutrients are there anyway." His mom was truly shocked that boiling veggies within an inch of their life and topping them with salad dressing was not a desirable option.

I agree, the girl has under 5 years to live unless someone intervenes. She does not look healthy.


Ugh. 15 minutes?? Unless they're in a crockpot, that's unacceptable. And disgusting. My mom just hated cooking so she did whatever was easiest- usually it was green beans or carrots and peas from a can. I always ate them anyway, but now that I buy my own groceries? Night and day. Plus, as Shepherd Book once said, "The seasoning is key. You can live on packaged food from here 'til judgement day if you've got enough rosemary." My kid is going to love everything on her plate. My inner fat child is always inventing new ways to cook stuff.

Good on you, and that running thing- wow. I consider myself a relatively healthy person but that gene some people have that make them like running? I don't have it.
 
2013-04-10 02:26:51 PM  

FunkOut: shifter_: How come these retards are always from England? Eat'n noodles, Sponges, Soaps, and fark knows what else. Round 'em up and ship 'em to an island somewhere where they can have thier own little disfunctional society. Just send in a container from the dollar store full of Ramen Noodles adn cleaning supplies once a month..... ohhhh shiat wait..... they are already on a disfunctional island..... England......

Could be the island gene pool phenomenon. Certain things become dominant. The English have people who eat weird stuff and have weird teeth. The Japanese have a lot of...weirdness. Newfoundland has some people who feel no pain and some people with random massive heart attacks at a young age. Iceland has too many attractive people.


The teenager FTA is from Isle of Wight too, so even smaller island gene pool.

kiwimoogle84: Good on you, and that running thing- wow. I consider myself a relatively healthy person but that gene some people have that make them like running? I don't have it.


I was raised by mother who cooked well and a father who was raised on a farm. I ate what I was fed and I complimented the cook. My husband was catered to, if you don't like dinner, mom or dad will make you a sandwich. *EYEROLL* That teaches them nothing.

My husband wanted to climb Mt. Rainier and was wearing a pack, hiking mountains as training, then one day, he thought, "I wonder how fast I could go without the pack?" Then the odyssey of ultrarunning started for him. It was so much fun for me to go to his races. His training was super hard on him and when he went back to school, it didn't work anymore, but I loved it. Now he plays soccer three times a week, which is much less of a time commitment. At his peak he was training up to 15 hours a week, not including the time it took to drive to places he ran or the special food requirements (I was going to 5 grocery stores a week to procure the necessary food items for his strict eat-everything-not-nailed-down diet. I cooked for a family of four and it was just the two of us. And then there is the clothing problems. He has 26" waist shorts, because they accommodate his thighs, but he needs to get 30" waist pants to fit his legs.

Still the best part: He weighed less than his mom when he was his fittest. I like to point that out to her if she gets particularly uppity about his dietary restrictions - his HEALTHY dietary restrictions - like not eating his weight in greasy potatoes.
 
2013-04-10 02:41:29 PM  

Splish: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: Medical professionals can be idiots too.

This is clearly true, but they're not usually idiots with regard to medical issues.


Sorry, but I have to disagree. My non-scientific experience has found the medical profession mimics the population in general.... some very smart, some absolute idiots, the rest in the middle, fairly average, unimpressive other than the fact they have memorized a lot of stuff. Your mileage may vary.
 
2013-04-10 02:45:00 PM  

Maul555: Nothing pisses me off more than my grandmother calling me a picky eater.  I am the opposite of a picky eater, I am an adventuresome eater.  If I have never had it and have trouble pronouncing it, then I want it even more.  I will eat everything from sashimi, to indian food, to pickled quail eggs...  I just don't like farking nuts which she is always putting into her pies and salads n shiat and she thinks I must be the worst eater in the world because of it.  always trying to sneak nuts into my food on purpose...   I am not allergic to nuts, I will even eat nuts, I just dont care for them and they will straight up ruin a salad for me...

/end tangent


I have a relative like that.  A couple of years ago when we all got together at someone's house for a week at Thanksgiving, she brought a huge bag of walnuts.  Now, I do like most nuts but not always in stuff, however I hate walnuts with a passion.  She was insisting that they were a "superfood" and wanted to put them in every-god-damned-thing that was cooked.  My wife (bless her heart) took her aside and said that she could only put them in things that she actually cooked or just leave the bag out for people to add to their food.
 
2013-04-10 02:45:20 PM  

Thespecialistkc: Splish: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: Medical professionals can be idiots too.

This is clearly true, but they're not usually idiots with regard to medical issues.

Sorry, but I have to disagree. My non-scientific experience has found the medical profession mimics the population in general.... some very smart, some absolute idiots, the rest in the middle, fairly average, unimpressive other than the fact they have memorized a lot of stuff. Your mileage may vary.


I think this is where the joke about, "what do you call the medical student who graduates last in his class?" comes in. Hell, my neurologist told me about a doctor he treats that went on the HCG diet. If that doesn't scream raving lunatic with serious misunderstandings of medical health, I don't know what does.
 
2013-04-10 02:45:59 PM  

ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: FunkOut: shifter_: How come these retards are always from England? Eat'n noodles, Sponges, Soaps, and fark knows what else. Round 'em up and ship 'em to an island somewhere where they can have thier own little disfunctional society. Just send in a container from the dollar store full of Ramen Noodles adn cleaning supplies once a month..... ohhhh shiat wait..... they are already on a disfunctional island..... England......

Could be the island gene pool phenomenon. Certain things become dominant. The English have people who eat weird stuff and have weird teeth. The Japanese have a lot of...weirdness. Newfoundland has some people who feel no pain and some people with random massive heart attacks at a young age. Iceland has too many attractive people.

The teenager FTA is from Isle of Wight too, so even smaller island gene pool.

kiwimoogle84: Good on you, and that running thing- wow. I consider myself a relatively healthy person but that gene some people have that make them like running? I don't have it.

I was raised by mother who cooked well and a father who was raised on a farm. I ate what I was fed and I complimented the cook. My husband was catered to, if you don't like dinner, mom or dad will make you a sandwich. *EYEROLL* That teaches them nothing.

My husband wanted to climb Mt. Rainier and was wearing a pack, hiking mountains as training, then one day, he thought, "I wonder how fast I could go without the pack?" Then the odyssey of ultrarunning started for him. It was so much fun for me to go to his races. His training was super hard on him and when he went back to school, it didn't work anymore, but I loved it. Now he plays soccer three times a week, which is much less of a time commitment. At his peak he was training up to 15 hours a week, not including the time it took to drive to places he ran or the special food requirements (I was going to 5 grocery stores a week to procure the necessary food items for his strict eat-everything-not-nailed-down diet. I cooked for a family of four and it was just the two of us. And then there is the clothing problems. He has 26" waist shorts, because they accommodate his thighs, but he needs to get 30" waist pants to fit his legs.

Still the best part: He weighed less than his mom when he was his fittest. I like to point that out to her if she gets particularly uppity about his dietary restrictions - his HEALTHY dietary restrictions - like not eating his weight in greasy potatoes.


Reminds me of Mr Kiwi's mom. The woman is ROTUND. We don't see her much since they don't get along, and fine by me. But he eats everything, and in fact, when his mother was pregnant with him, she lost 70 lbs, because if she ate garbage, she'd lose it. If she ate healthy, it stayed down. There's a private joke in there somewhere as to why my only major pregnancy craving this far has been apples. I go through fifteen a week sometimes.
 
2013-04-10 02:47:26 PM  
ImpatientlyUnsympathetic:I think this is where the joke about, "what do you call the medical student who graduates last in his class?" comes in.

I don't know, a chiropractor?  Do they even go do medical school?
 
2013-04-10 02:49:50 PM  
Do you get Honeycrisp apples in your part of the country? They're amazing, but my family outside of WA doesn't get them very often.

Congratulations on the Little Kiwi. Once Mr. Unsympathetic finishes nurturing his Wildlife Biology degree, we'll work on making some babies of our own. I figure about the time people stop wondering if we're going to have kids, then we'll have some.
 
2013-04-10 02:51:33 PM  

Beeblebrox: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic:I think this is where the joke about, "what do you call the medical student who graduates last in his class?" comes in.

I don't know, a chiropractor?  Do they even go do medical school?


LOL! There was a chiropractor at the indoor soccer place when my husband was playing last night and he kept offering people spinal exams. My husband said, "no thanks, I know its still there."

Chiropractors don't go to medical school...
 
2013-04-10 02:53:04 PM  

stonicus: One of my ex's would complain about garlic, said it made it hard for her to breathe is she ever ate any. So I did experiments.


You are frightening. I understand that you proved your point, but you are frightening.
 
2013-04-10 02:54:48 PM  

ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: Thespecialistkc: Splish: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: Medical professionals can be idiots too.

This is clearly true, but they're not usually idiots with regard to medical issues.

Sorry, but I have to disagree. My non-scientific experience has found the medical profession mimics the population in general.... some very smart, some absolute idiots, the rest in the middle, fairly average, unimpressive other than the fact they have memorized a lot of stuff. Your mileage may vary.

I think this is where the joke about, "what do you call the medical student who graduates last in his class?" comes in. Hell, my neurologist told me about a doctor he treats that went on the HCG diet. If that doesn't scream raving lunatic with serious misunderstandings of medical health, I don't know what does.


Sweet Jebus, I had never heard of the HCG diet. Now my brain is full of doctor eating placenta images thanks to you. Lunatic indeed.

/Point proven
//On a gluten free diet, it works for me
///Wheat is the da debil!
 
2013-04-10 02:55:52 PM  
"Selective Eating Disorder" = pyschobabble bollocks
 
2013-04-10 02:57:05 PM  

ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: Beeblebrox: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic:I think this is where the joke about, "what do you call the medical student who graduates last in his class?" comes in.

I don't know, a chiropractor?  Do they even go do medical school?

LOL! There was a chiropractor at the indoor soccer place when my husband was playing last night and he kept offering people spinal exams. My husband said, "no thanks, I know its still there."

Chiropractors don't go to medical school...


Hehe. Same with them, I know some really good, some dangerous idiots, and a lot inbetween.... but more on the lower end.

/Had one actually tell me he could cure cancer
//Had another tell me to go to the doctor if he couldn't help me in a week
///Likes the neck crunch
 
2013-04-10 02:57:20 PM  

FunkOut: Lord Dimwit:
I've known at least two children (my nephew and a child of a friend) who couldn't speak more than babbling and "mama/dada" at the age of two and a half, but their pediatricians always said "they're fine, they're fine." I don't get it, how is that possible? Are the developmental milestones really that loose? (They're not; I've checked.)

You'd think these people would be reprimanded by their licensing boards or something.

That's bizarre. I heard my child muttering swear words in a correct context at that age. Apparently Lego is frustrating.


at 11 months, my daughter babbles and will say "ma ma ma" when she wants my wife, b ut that is it on language. However, she also just pushed a box into position to use a magazine rack to climb onto the box then tried to use the box to climb up onto the sofa. I think she will take over the house by 4 and the world by 14. She eats just about everything we give her too, which is awesome
 
2013-04-10 03:00:09 PM  

Thespecialistkc: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: Thespecialistkc: Splish: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: Medical professionals can be idiots too.

This is clearly true, but they're not usually idiots with regard to medical issues.

Sorry, but I have to disagree. My non-scientific experience has found the medical profession mimics the population in general.... some very smart, some absolute idiots, the rest in the middle, fairly average, unimpressive other than the fact they have memorized a lot of stuff. Your mileage may vary.

I think this is where the joke about, "what do you call the medical student who graduates last in his class?" comes in. Hell, my neurologist told me about a doctor he treats that went on the HCG diet. If that doesn't scream raving lunatic with serious misunderstandings of medical health, I don't know what does.

Sweet Jebus, I had never heard of the HCG diet. Now my brain is full of doctor eating placenta images thanks to you. Lunatic indeed.

/Point proven
//On a gluten free diet, it works for me
///Wheat is the da debil!


Would it make you more disturbed if I told you my neurologist said this doctor is a male OB/GYN? Because that's the part I usually leave out because people get really outraged that a doctor that specializes in women's medicine and pregnancy would take that hormone just to lose weight while only eating 500-1200 calories a day...

My mom is currently on a wheat, dairy, egg, peanut, soy, corn and sugar free diet. She lost 10lbs in 3 weeks. She knows she's very allergic to some of those things because it was diagnosed during childhood, but she's adding them back in to track her symptoms, one at a time, to figure out what she can/cannot eat. She told me, "I'm eating things I never thought I would... like spinach." I am still not sure how she raised me to be a thoroughly unpicky eater and somehow she's never eaten spinach? I think it proves that if you try hard enough to not raise picky children, eventually they'll keep exploring, even beyond your own limits.
 
2013-04-10 03:04:00 PM  

Thespecialistkc: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: Beeblebrox: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic:I think this is where the joke about, "what do you call the medical student who graduates last in his class?" comes in.

I don't know, a chiropractor?  Do they even go do medical school?

LOL! There was a chiropractor at the indoor soccer place when my husband was playing last night and he kept offering people spinal exams. My husband said, "no thanks, I know its still there."

Chiropractors don't go to medical school...

Hehe. Same with them, I know some really good, some dangerous idiots, and a lot inbetween.... but more on the lower end.

/Had one actually tell me he could cure cancer
//Had another tell me to go to the doctor if he couldn't help me in a week
///Likes the neck crunch


We have ones around here that claim they can cure allergies. My allergies are pretty bad, because I'm allergic to all trees that grow in WA, so I've had several well meaning nuts offer me the cards to their cure-all chiropractors. My allergies are well controlled with medication, I don't need spinal adjustments or neck cracking to "cure" my issues, thanks.
 
2013-04-10 03:12:46 PM  

Thespecialistkc: I think this is where the joke about, "what do you call the medical student who graduates last in his class?" comes in. Hell, my neurologist told me about a doctor he treats that went on the HCG diet. If that doesn't scream raving lunatic with serious misunderstandings of medical health, I don't know what does.Sweet Jebus, I had never heard of the HCG diet. Now my brain is full of doctor eating placenta images thanks to you. Lunatic indeed./Point proven//On a gluten free diet, it works for me///Wheat is the da debil!


HCG Diet is totes legit u guise. See, take the magic drops and eat a lot of greasy food, that's phase 1. You won't lose any weight at this point because you're getting your body ready for the transition to weight loss.

Phase two- keep taking the magic drops. its incredibly important to take the drops. Don't forget about the drops, they are KEY. Now, eat no more than 5-700 calories a day for 60 days. Guess what will happen

You'll start losing weight.

HCG diet is one of those reasons I regret being an honest soul sometimes.
 
2013-04-10 03:16:37 PM  

roc6783: FunkOut: Lord Dimwit:
I've known at least two children (my nephew and a child of a friend) who couldn't speak more than babbling and "mama/dada" at the age of two and a half, but their pediatricians always said "they're fine, they're fine." I don't get it, how is that possible? Are the developmental milestones really that loose? (They're not; I've checked.)

You'd think these people would be reprimanded by their licensing boards or something.

That's bizarre. I heard my child muttering swear words in a correct context at that age. Apparently Lego is frustrating.

at 11 months, my daughter babbles and will say "ma ma ma" when she wants my wife, b ut that is it on language. However, she also just pushed a box into position to use a magazine rack to climb onto the box then tried to use the box to climb up onto the sofa. I think she will take over the house by 4 and the world by 14. She eats just about everything we give her too, which is awesome


That's my daughter too - just turned 1 and says "Mama" and "Ball".  She quite clearly communicates though - comes crawling when she's called, meows when asked what a kitty says, asks for things by bringing you her cup/cheerio bowl/whatever.  She also rolled/crawled/walked months before her big brother as well, though - it's almost like there's only enough mental resources for a few developments at a time.  Working on locomotion?  Verbal development stops.  Etc.

My son, on the other hand, is 3.5 and will hold complete discourses with you.  In clear, enunciated words and grammatically correct sentences.  My husband told him the other day "If you keep carrying your leap pad by the stylus string it's going to break and we aren't going to get you a new one."  The response - "I will go to Santa's workshop and get the instructions.  I will give the reindeers carrots and they will help me."

Can't get him toilet trained, though.
 
2013-04-10 03:17:58 PM  

ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: Thespecialistkc: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: Thespecialistkc: Splish: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: Medical professionals can be idiots too.

This is clearly true, but they're not usually idiots with regard to medical issues.

Sorry, but I have to disagree. My non-scientific experience has found the medical profession mimics the population in general.... some very smart, some absolute idiots, the rest in the middle, fairly average, unimpressive other than the fact they have memorized a lot of stuff. Your mileage may vary.

I think this is where the joke about, "what do you call the medical student who graduates last in his class?" comes in. Hell, my neurologist told me about a doctor he treats that went on the HCG diet. If that doesn't scream raving lunatic with serious misunderstandings of medical health, I don't know what does.

Sweet Jebus, I had never heard of the HCG diet. Now my brain is full of doctor eating placenta images thanks to you. Lunatic indeed.

/Point proven
//On a gluten free diet, it works for me
///Wheat is the da debil!

Would it make you more disturbed if I told you my neurologist said this doctor is a male OB/GYN? Because that's the part I usually leave out because people get really outraged that a doctor that specializes in women's medicine and pregnancy would take that hormone just to lose weight while only eating 500-1200 calories a day...

My mom is currently on a wheat, dairy, egg, peanut, soy, corn and sugar free diet. She lost 10lbs in 3 weeks. She knows she's very allergic to some of those things because it was diagnosed during childhood, but she's adding them back in to track her symptoms, one at a time, to figure out what she can/cannot eat. She told me, "I'm eating things I never thought I would... like spinach." I am still not sure how she raised me to be a thoroughly unpicky eater and somehow she's never eaten spinach? I think it proves that if you try hard enough to not raise picky children, eventually they'll keep exploring, even bey ...


I have no words to reply to that, beyond quack quack....
 
2013-04-10 03:20:22 PM  

shifter_: How come these retards are always from England? Eat'n noodles, Sponges, Soaps, and fark knows what else. Round 'em up and ship 'em to an island somewhere where they can have thier own little disfunctional society. Just send in a container from the dollar store full of Ramen Noodles adn cleaning supplies once a month..... ohhhh shiat wait..... they are already on a disfunctional island..... England......


Statement actually qualifies as ironic...

/check a map
 
2013-04-10 03:21:04 PM  

buckler: How would this kid not have scurvy?


Vitamins?
 
2013-04-10 03:22:09 PM  

willfullyobscure: Thespecialistkc: I think this is where the joke about, "what do you call the medical student who graduates last in his class?" comes in. Hell, my neurologist told me about a doctor he treats that went on the HCG diet. If that doesn't scream raving lunatic with serious misunderstandings of medical health, I don't know what does.Sweet Jebus, I had never heard of the HCG diet. Now my brain is full of doctor eating placenta images thanks to you. Lunatic indeed./Point proven//On a gluten free diet, it works for me///Wheat is the da debil!

HCG Diet is totes legit u guise. See, take the magic drops and eat a lot of greasy food, that's phase 1. You won't lose any weight at this point because you're getting your body ready for the transition to weight loss.

Phase two- keep taking the magic drops. its incredibly important to take the drops. Don't forget about the drops, they are KEY. Now, eat no more than 5-700 calories a day for 60 days. Guess what will happen

You'll start losing weight.

HCG diet is one of those reasons I regret being an honest soul sometimes.


LOL. Yeah don't forget the drops. Did I mention the drops? Oh and don't eat, except for the drops.
I dropped 25 lbs when I cut out gluten, from 200 to 175. It works and I've never felt better. Veggies and lean meant (and a few sweets I admit). I did put 10 of those 25 back on, but it was on purpose thanks to exercise and fat to muscle conversion.

/Loves spinach. Had a bunch for lunch
 
2013-04-10 03:25:24 PM  
This is a time when you show your mettle as a parent. Don't want to eat your veggies? Fine. But you're not getting anything else until they are eaten. Ever. Trust me, eventually the hunger will consume you and those veggies will look like ice cream. We will keep them in the refrigerator for when you are ready. I am the parent. I control the food supply. I win the argument. The end.
 
2013-04-10 03:42:57 PM  
Yea, agreed with some of the people here. In this girl's defense, the food in England is pretty terrible. When I was in London (granted I wasn't eating home-cooked food) I would have shouted GIGGITY at the sight of some Ramen.

/being a picky eater when you're a kid isn't that unusual - but when it makes you anti-social, you've got a bigger problem.
//weird way of sheltering their daughter, perhaps?
 
2013-04-10 03:52:07 PM  

SmartfoodPopcorn: Yea, agreed with some of the people here. In this girl's defense, the food in England is pretty terrible. When I was in London (granted I wasn't eating home-cooked food) I would have shouted GIGGITY at the sight of some Ramen.

/being a picky eater when you're a kid isn't that unusual - but when it makes you anti-social, you've got a bigger problem.
//weird way of sheltering their daughter, perhaps?


I think the eating out options for budget-conscious people might be the problem for Americans in England. My friend was there as an exchange student in college and she had no access to cooking facilities, so all she could do was eat out or microwave her food and she hated everything about the food. She ended up gaining 15lbs because she settled for American fast food instead of continuing to try English fare. She is still a pretty picky eater though. She was raised on a steady diet of processed American slop, so she had a pretty limited range of acceptable foods, textures and tastes. And apparently, Kraft Mac and Cheese is fairly pricy there and this was pre-microwave Easy Mac!
 
2013-04-10 03:55:03 PM  

ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: spunkymunky: Lord Dimwit: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: Splish: I was talking to a doctor the other day and out of nowhere she bragged that her 16 year old daughter has never eaten a vegetable.  And my uncle's girlfriend is proud of the fact that she's never eaten anything green; she'll tell you every chance she gets. These people are out there.  We don't have to pay attention to them.

They're train wrecks though, so hard to look away. My nephew won't touch vegetables. I'm truly horrified that someone that works in the health field (such as the doctor you know and also my MIL and SIL) are so willing to accept unbalanced diets. Then again, my nephew has had obvious speak issues since the age of two and he started getting therapy for it at 4.5 years old, because it wasn't convenient before. And the family doctor continually said he was OK. No one could say anything about it without getting shut down because the doctor said he was OK. Medical professionals can be idiots too.

I've known at least two children (my nephew and a child of a friend) who couldn't speak more than babbling and "mama/dada" at the age of two and a half, but their pediatricians always said "they're fine, they're fine." I don't get it, how is that possible? Are the developmental milestones really that loose? (They're not; I've checked.)

You'd think these people would be reprimanded by their licensing boards or something.

At 18 months old my daughter was speaking in 5-7 word sentences but couldn't legitimately jump and get air till 2.5 or 3. The next kid, a boy, was barely stringing two words together at two years old and had a very limited vocabulary but he could communicate a lot of what he wanted. He was also walking at 9 months and jumping and getting air around 14 months. We wondered a bit with him bit his big sister did all his talking for him so I think he just kept his mouth shut and kept moving. Around 2.5 or so he just broke out speaking in big sentences and putting together some pretty abs ...


I know the feeling well. One of my nephews is a bit delayed and at 6 is just now getting speech therapy. I feel bad for the kid because he's really bright, his mom is just a dumbass. Somehow she has a degree in early childhood education but until her kid started first grade completely missed it (she 'homeschooled' for Kindergarten).
A former coworker of my wife has a son who is 18 months and complains that he doesn't eat and only uses a couple words and is freaking out about it. But the Pediatrician hasn't said anything to them about clipping that little bit of skin that connects the tongue to the bottom of the mouth. On the kid's tongue it's so tight he cannot stick his tongue out to his lips without it looking as if he had his tongue split. And his tongue can't go more than 1\8th inch past his lips.
I really want to ask about it but I only see them every couple months so I just keep my mouth shut.

Also, my youngest runs around with a Nerf sword (yes, I gave all my kids Nerf swords for Christmas) and yells "SHEEERAAAAAA!" and then smacks whomever is nearest with the sword. It's farking awesome.
 
2013-04-10 04:03:29 PM  

Thespecialistkc: Splish: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: Medical professionals can be idiots too.

This is clearly true, but hey're not usually idiots with regard to medical issues.

Sorry, but I have to disagree. My non-scientific experience has found the medical profession mimics the population in general.... some very smart, some absolute idiots, the rest in the middle, fairly average, unimpressive other than the fact they have memorized a lot of stuff. Your mileage may vary.


I think we're probably talking about different groups when we say "medical professionals" then.  Or maybe you haven't dealt with some parts of the population in general.  There are definitely doctors out there who are quirky, egotistical, kooky, misguided, just plain weird, etc.  They may even say and do idiotic things from time to time.  But none of them are idiots at large.
 
2013-04-10 04:05:39 PM  

spunkymunky: Also, my youngest runs around with a Nerf sword (yes, I gave all my kids Nerf swords for Christmas) and yells "SHEEERAAAAAA!" and then smacks whomever is nearest with the sword. It's farking awesome.


Doing it right. I would not hide your status updates on Facebook if you posted about these thing. Is Shera popular again or are you doing it old-school and showing them the show on the interwebs/DVD?

/I was not allowed to watch cartoons as a child.
//Only vaguely remember Shera, Heman, etc.
 
2013-04-10 04:05:51 PM  

cardex: Pizza is not that bad for you assuming you don't eat an entire large in on sitting by yourself


At least pizza contains proteins and fats in addition to the carbohydrates, some calcium from the cheese, and whatever vitamins can be found in tomato sauce.  A sufficiently bizarre choice of toppings might even expand this list a bit.  Noodles, on the other hand, are just starch.
 
2013-04-10 04:07:36 PM  

pciszek: cardex: Pizza is not that bad for you assuming you don't eat an entire large in on sitting by yourself

At least pizza contains proteins and fats in addition to the carbohydrates, some calcium from the cheese, and whatever vitamins can be found in tomato sauce.  A sufficiently bizarre choice of toppings might even expand this list a bit.  Noodles, on the other hand, are just starch.


And that all important nutrient, MSG. Surely that makes up for the lack of protein, fat and vitamins and nutrients Ramen doesn't have?
 
2013-04-10 04:11:39 PM  
I see these kids that eat only chicken nuggets and mac 'n' cheese; their parents say "he won't eat anything else." Yes he will, you're just taking the easy route. Make them taste things. Just don't make them eat things they've tasted and don't like, that's just mean.

I was a very picky eater as a child (still am) but it was because I simply didn't like many things. I always tried them and ate a lot of things that kids today wouldn't touch (all kinds of seafood, lentils). What drove me crazy was that when we were eating with other people, I would just eat some of whatever it was I liked. Some adult would notice I wasn't eating a green veggie or something and then it would become an issue. They would all talk talk talk talk about it and repeatedly say "she's just doing it for attention." Meanwhile, I wanted to sink through the floor. I hated it when people talked about what I was eating and they're the ones who made a big deal out of it but I was doing it for attention?

My mom was a great cook and my Italian grandmother cooked on a heavenly level. We ate at good restaurants. But certain things taste bad to me. How often do you eat foods you don't like? I can't fathom how anyone can eat broccoli, it's repulsive. It bothers me when it's on someone else's plate because I can smell it. And it kills me when someone ruins perfectly good cheese soup by putting broccoli in it. People say "you can't taste it" I say your taste buds must be dead.

I recently read that repeated ear infections in children can damage a sensory nerve and that makes certain veggies (broccoli and cauliflower among them) taste really bad to them. I had a lot of ear infections as a child, I think I probably have that damaged nerve.

I'm trying very hard to eat more vegetables but as I said, no one wants to eat food they don't like.
 
2013-04-10 04:12:22 PM  

Splish: I think we're probably talking about different groups when we say "medical professionals" then.  Or maybe you haven't dealt with some parts of the population in general.  There are definitely doctors out there who are quirky, egotistical, kooky, misguided, just plain weird, etc.  They may even say and do idiotic things from time to time.  But none of them are idiots at large.


There is Representative Paul Broun, who somehow managed to become a doctor without learning any basic science.  Other Republicans have managed to find "doctors" who agree with their bizarre "biology of rape".
 
2013-04-10 04:15:28 PM  

spunkymunky: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: spunkymunky: Lord Dimwit: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: Splish: I was talking to a doctor the other day and out of nowhere she bragged that her 16 year old daughter has never eaten a vegetable.  And my uncle's girlfriend is proud of the fact that she's never eaten anything green; she'll tell you every chance she gets. These people are out there.  We don't have to pay attention to them.

They're train wrecks though, so hard to look away. My nephew won't touch vegetables. I'm truly horrified that someone that works in the health field (such as the doctor you know and also my MIL and SIL) are so willing to accept unbalanced diets. Then again, my nephew has had obvious speak issues since the age of two and he started getting therapy for it at 4.5 years old, because it wasn't convenient before. And the family doctor continually said he was OK. No one could say anything about it without getting shut down because the doctor said he was OK. Medical professionals can be idiots too.

I've known at least two children (my nephew and a child of a friend) who couldn't speak more than babbling and "mama/dada" at the age of two and a half, but their pediatricians always said "they're fine, they're fine." I don't get it, how is that possible? Are the developmental milestones really that loose? (They're not; I've checked.)

You'd think these people would be reprimanded by their licensing boards or something.

At 18 months old my daughter was speaking in 5-7 word sentences but couldn't legitimately jump and get air till 2.5 or 3. The next kid, a boy, was barely stringing two words together at two years old and had a very limited vocabulary but he could communicate a lot of what he wanted. He was also walking at 9 months and jumping and getting air around 14 months. We wondered a bit with him bit his big sister did all his talking for him so I think he just kept his mouth shut and kept moving. Around 2.5 or so he just broke out speaking in big sentences and puttin ...


Oh your co-worker's kid is tongue-tied, my cousin's kid had that and her pediatrician refused to clip the tongue for a long time, despite the fact that they can clip it at a few months old without a fuss AND no stitches.

I suggest your co-worker due some research and find a doctor to do the snip now. My cousin kid is 4 and speaks fine now. Winston Churchill had it as well.
 
xcv
2013-04-10 04:19:00 PM  
Parenting should require a license. I've seen photos of my ancestors that came from dirt-poor peasantvilles; the men were incredibly short and stout. I doubt it was all from childhood diseases alone, their diet consisted almost exclusively of the bread and potatoes that manifests today in old family recipes. Their American-born children were significantly taller.

These shiatty parents shouldn't be allowed to stunt their kids' physical and mental growth just so mom or dad can avoid a mealtime argument and keep watching their stories on the telly uninterrupted.
 
2013-04-10 04:23:13 PM  

ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: spunkymunky: Also, my youngest runs around with a Nerf sword (yes, I gave all my kids Nerf swords for Christmas) and yells "SHEEERAAAAAA!" and then smacks whomever is nearest with the sword. It's farking awesome.

Doing it right. I would not hide your status updates on Facebook if you posted about these thing. Is Shera popular again or are you doing it old-school and showing them the show on the interwebs/DVD?

/I was not allowed to watch cartoons as a child.
//Only vaguely remember Shera, Heman, etc.


I can't stand the bulk of newer cartoons (Phineas & Ferb is awesome, though) so we watch a lot of the "classics". The entire series of Shera, He-Man, GI-Joe, the 1960's and 80's Spiderman shows and quite a few other cartoons of my youth are streaming on Netflix so when I need a break from being a human jungle gym they get to watch an episode of one those shows. Yeah, Shera is dead in the eyes but I like my daughter to see a superhero type woman who shunned living in a palace with her family to go help people.
 
2013-04-10 04:24:49 PM  

ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: SmartfoodPopcorn: Yea, agreed with some of the people here. In this girl's defense, the food in England is pretty terrible. When I was in London (granted I wasn't eating home-cooked food) I would have shouted GIGGITY at the sight of some Ramen.

/being a picky eater when you're a kid isn't that unusual - but when it makes you anti-social, you've got a bigger problem.
//weird way of sheltering their daughter, perhaps?

I think the eating out options for budget-conscious people might be the problem for Americans in England. My friend was there as an exchange student in college and she had no access to cooking facilities, so all she could do was eat out or microwave her food and she hated everything about the food. She ended up gaining 15lbs because she settled for American fast food instead of continuing to try English fare. She is still a pretty picky eater though. She was raised on a steady diet of processed American slop, so she had a pretty limited range of acceptable foods, textures and tastes. And apparently, Kraft Mac and Cheese is fairly pricy there and this was pre-microwave Easy Mac!


Interesting. Well I did enjoy the fish n' chips!
 
2013-04-10 04:30:25 PM  

Lord Dimwit: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: Splish: I was talking to a doctor the other day and out of nowhere she bragged that her 16 year old daughter has never eaten a vegetable.  And my uncle's girlfriend is proud of the fact that she's never eaten anything green; she'll tell you every chance she gets. These people are out there.  We don't have to pay attention to them.

They're train wrecks though, so hard to look away. My nephew won't touch vegetables. I'm truly horrified that someone that works in the health field (such as the doctor you know and also my MIL and SIL) are so willing to accept unbalanced diets. Then again, my nephew has had obvious speak issues since the age of two and he started getting therapy for it at 4.5 years old, because it wasn't convenient before. And the family doctor continually said he was OK. No one could say anything about it without getting shut down because the doctor said he was OK. Medical professionals can be idiots too.

I've known at least two children (my nephew and a child of a friend) who couldn't speak more than babbling and "mama/dada" at the age of two and a half, but their pediatricians always said "they're fine, they're fine." I don't get it, how is that possible? Are the developmental milestones really that loose? (They're not; I've checked.)

You'd think these people would be reprimanded by their licensing boards or something.


Yes, that's actually not terrible. My first wasn't using complete sentences until after 3 and he's perfectly fine now. Some kids just start talking late. The main driver is "are they getting what they want without talking?" If all the kid has to do is point and cry and he gets what he wants, there's no incentive to talk.
 
2013-04-10 04:34:25 PM  

shortymac: Oh your co-worker's kid is tongue-tied, my cousin's kid had that and her pediatrician refused to clip the tongue for a long time, despite the fact that they can clip it at a few months old without a fuss AND no stitches.

I suggest your co-worker due some research and find a doctor to do the snip now. My cousin kid is 4 and speaks fine now. Winston Churchill had it as well.


Yep, really simple fix. A former gf's kid had it and they fixed it before he was six months old. Other than the autism the kid is fine. The problem with this particular lady is that she doesn't seem to notice it as being a problem. To make it better she's a nurse and her husband is an X-Ray tech. So they both spend 40+ hours a week in a hospital and all the MD's they work with know the kid. And none of them have said a damn thing to her about it. She's the overprotective, "OMG, my child is in another room of your house with your kids and I can't see them so I have to go see what they're up to" type of biatch.
 
2013-04-10 04:42:11 PM  

spunkymunky: ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: spunkymunky: Also, my youngest runs around with a Nerf sword (yes, I gave all my kids Nerf swords for Christmas) and yells "SHEEERAAAAAA!" and then smacks whomever is nearest with the sword. It's farking awesome.

Doing it right. I would not hide your status updates on Facebook if you posted about these thing. Is Shera popular again or are you doing it old-school and showing them the show on the interwebs/DVD?

/I was not allowed to watch cartoons as a child.
//Only vaguely remember Shera, Heman, etc.

I can't stand the bulk of newer cartoons (Phineas & Ferb is awesome, though) so we watch a lot of the "classics". The entire series of Shera, He-Man, GI-Joe, the 1960's and 80's Spiderman shows and quite a few other cartoons of my youth are streaming on Netflix so when I need a break from being a human jungle gym they get to watch an episode of one those shows. Yeah, Shera is dead in the eyes but I like my daughter to see a superhero type woman who shunned living in a palace with her family to go help people.


I really don't like cartoons. My dad's efforts to restrict children's TV worked as intended I think. I watched some Saturday morning cartoons, Smurfs, but otherwise, we watched Sharon Lois and Bram's Elephant show, Eureka's Castle, Carissa Explains It All, Pete and Pete, etc. If we were caught watching cartoons, Headline News was put on and we were sent to clean our rooms. And if our rooms were cleaned, we were sent outside to play. Oh, and we could watch People's Court and CNN. That's how I got in super trouble in 4th grade, because I tried to discuss current events that were not kid-approved (Gulf War and Waco Stand Off.) My teacher sent letters home and called a conference about kid-appropriate TV for children my age. My dad did not understand why discussing a false prophet who led believers away from Christ and how the government was doing illegal things by disrupting his right to practice his religion or a war over oil was some how inappropriate for a 10 year old...

At least I can laugh about it now, but being banned from discussing news from your 4th grade class sharing circle when all you know about is news is pretty harsh!
 
2013-04-10 04:47:22 PM  

socoloco: It will prepare him for college.


Know how I know you didn't read the article?
 
2013-04-10 04:51:42 PM  

pciszek: cardex: Pizza is not that bad for you assuming you don't eat an entire large in on sitting by yourself

At least pizza contains proteins and fats in addition to the carbohydrates, some calcium from the cheese, and whatever vitamins can be found in tomato sauce.  A sufficiently bizarre choice of toppings might even expand this list a bit.  Noodles, on the other hand, are just starch.


Bizarre toppings? Shoot, my hemade pizza is healthier than some salads out there. Wheat crust, pesto and a little Alfredo sauce, shreds of zucchini, bell peppers, onions, olives, grilled chicken strips, spinach, and lean mozzerella and feta cheese. And now I know what I'm making for dinner. *rummages through the fridge*

See, some of you talk about the vegetables and how some folks don't like them. Me? I will eat any veggie I can get my hands on, but I don't do fruit that isn't fresh. I can't handle slimy preserves or lumps of soggy fruit in yogurt. I also don't like peanut butter. Something in how it smells makes me feel sick. So I always preferred turkey sandwiches as a kid- no big deal.

/FYI, adding pesto to a turkey sandwich makes it so much better
 
2013-04-10 04:52:39 PM  

kiwimoogle84: pciszek: cardex: Pizza is not that bad for you assuming you don't eat an entire large in on sitting by yourself

At least pizza contains proteins and fats in addition to the carbohydrates, some calcium from the cheese, and whatever vitamins can be found in tomato sauce.  A sufficiently bizarre choice of toppings might even expand this list a bit.  Noodles, on the other hand, are just starch.

Bizarre toppings? Shoot, my hemade pizza is healthier than some salads out there. Wheat crust, pesto and a little Alfredo sauce, shreds of zucchini, bell peppers, onions, olives, grilled chicken strips, spinach, and lean mozzerella and feta cheese. And now I know what I'm making for dinner. *rummages through the fridge*

See, some of you talk about the vegetables and how some folks don't like them. Me? I will eat any veggie I can get my hands on, but I don't do fruit that isn't fresh. I can't handle slimy preserves or lumps of soggy fruit in yogurt. I also don't like peanut butter. Something in how it smells makes me feel sick. So I always preferred turkey sandwiches as a kid- no big deal.

/FYI, adding pesto to a turkey sandwich makes it so much better


Er, homemade pizza. Lost a couple letters there.
 
2013-04-10 04:55:22 PM  

Maul555: Nothing pisses me off more than my grandmother calling me a picky eater.  I am the opposite of a picky eater, I am an adventuresome eater.  If I have never had it and have trouble pronouncing it, then I want it even more.  I will eat everything from sashimi, to indian food, to pickled quail eggs...  I just don't like farking nuts which she is always putting into her pies and salads n shiat and she thinks I must be the worst eater in the world because of it.  always trying to sneak nuts into my food on purpose...   I am not allergic to nuts, I will even eat nuts, I just dont care for them and they will straight up ruin a salad for me...

/end tangent


No offense but your grandma sounds like a prick.
 
2013-04-10 04:56:53 PM  

spunkymunky: shortymac: Oh your co-worker's kid is tongue-tied, my cousin's kid had that and her pediatrician refused to clip the tongue for a long time, despite the fact that they can clip it at a few months old without a fuss AND no stitches.

I suggest your co-worker due some research and find a doctor to do the snip now. My cousin kid is 4 and speaks fine now. Winston Churchill had it as well.

Yep, really simple fix. A former gf's kid had it and they fixed it before he was six months old. Other than the autism the kid is fine. The problem with this particular lady is that she doesn't seem to notice it as being a problem. To make it better she's a nurse and her husband is an X-Ray tech. So they both spend 40+ hours a week in a hospital and all the MD's they work with know the kid. And none of them have said a damn thing to her about it. She's the overprotective, "OMG, my child is in another room of your house with your kids and I can't see them so I have to go see what they're up to" type of biatch.


I actually lived next door to a lady who is still tongue-tied at 70 years old.

Her mother was a teacher and when she started talking funny she thought she just had a lisp like her sister. Granted this was the middle of Northern Bumfark Nowhere Canada 70 years ago.

She was actually studied by speech specialists because conventional opinion was tongue-tied people would never learn to talk. To get snipped now she would have to re-learn how to talk both English and French, which she didn't want to do.

Before I knew this you could tell there was something "wrong" with the way she talked, very throaty and she would open her mouth wider than most people.
 
2013-04-10 04:58:59 PM  

kiwimoogle84: Two things-

One, there's a fine line between a picky kid and a kid with a disorder. Having worked at a pediatric therapy office, I know the difference. I think it's 90% in the parenting approach, like it has been said this thread.

If your kid will only eat orange food because it's his favorite color? Give him sweet potatoes and squash and carrots and oranges. THAT CHILD DOESN'T HAVE TO LIVE ON MAC N CHEESE. *facepalm*

And two, I had an adult friend who didn't like vegetables. She's that lady who puts bacon, crispy chicken, cheese and ranch on a single leaf of lettuce and calls it a salad. She always used to complain about her weight. I went, you know, if you made a veggie ONLY salad for lunch every day, you'd probably lose a ton of weight. She was APPALLED at the suggestion. She also didn't feed her kids veggies because she "figured" they wouldn't like them either. BAD PARENT.

I've dated some picky eaters, turns out their moms were just shiatty cooks. I can make sautéed Brussels sprouts and stuffed zucchini that would make your taste buds sing. You don't have to straight boil veggies to cook them.

This girl will be dead in under five years. Calling it now.


My dad avoided mint chip ice cream for years because he had some bad version of it when he was a kid. He loves it now. I know ice cream isn't healthy but the concept of trying something made bad probably does make people think the food is terrible. I like to try foods several times several different ways before I say I don't like it. I've done this with mushrooms and sushi. I just don't like them. This is a recent thing though because I was super picky as a kid. But I've discovered foods, especially Asian and pacific islander foods, to be very good when I thought I would not like it. I used to look at a food and think it looked weird so I said I didn't like it. Now I'm open to trying anything. Well except eyeballs. I finally ate squid tentacles about a month ago. It was good!
 
2013-04-10 05:01:58 PM  

kiwimoogle84: kiwimoogle84: pciszek: cardex: Pizza is not that bad for you assuming you don't eat an entire large in on sitting by yourself

At least pizza contains proteins and fats in addition to the carbohydrates, some calcium from the cheese, and whatever vitamins can be found in tomato sauce.  A sufficiently bizarre choice of toppings might even expand this list a bit.  Noodles, on the other hand, are just starch.

Bizarre toppings? Shoot, my hemade pizza is healthier than some salads out there. Wheat crust, pesto and a little Alfredo sauce, shreds of zucchini, bell peppers, onions, olives, grilled chicken strips, spinach, and lean mozzerella and feta cheese. And now I know what I'm making for dinner. *rummages through the fridge*

See, some of you talk about the vegetables and how some folks don't like them. Me? I will eat any veggie I can get my hands on, but I don't do fruit that isn't fresh. I can't handle slimy preserves or lumps of soggy fruit in yogurt. I also don't like peanut butter. Something in how it smells makes me feel sick. So I always preferred turkey sandwiches as a kid- no big deal.

/FYI, adding pesto to a turkey sandwich makes it so much better

Er, homemade pizza. Lost a couple letters there.


I thought it sounded like some dude was going to make it.
 
2013-04-10 05:18:56 PM  

Beeblebrox: kiwimoogle84: kiwimoogle84: pciszek: cardex: Pizza is not that bad for you assuming you don't eat an entire large in on sitting by yourself

At least pizza contains proteins and fats in addition to the carbohydrates, some calcium from the cheese, and whatever vitamins can be found in tomato sauce.  A sufficiently bizarre choice of toppings might even expand this list a bit.  Noodles, on the other hand, are just starch.

Bizarre toppings? Shoot, my hemade pizza is healthier than some salads out there. Wheat crust, pesto and a little Alfredo sauce, shreds of zucchini, bell peppers, onions, olives, grilled chicken strips, spinach, and lean mozzerella and feta cheese. And now I know what I'm making for dinner. *rummages through the fridge*

See, some of you talk about the vegetables and how some folks don't like them. Me? I will eat any veggie I can get my hands on, but I don't do fruit that isn't fresh. I can't handle slimy preserves or lumps of soggy fruit in yogurt. I also don't like peanut butter. Something in how it smells makes me feel sick. So I always preferred turkey sandwiches as a kid- no big deal.

/FYI, adding pesto to a turkey sandwich makes it so much better

Er, homemade pizza. Lost a couple letters there.

I thought it sounded like some dude was going to make it.


Special sauce?
 
2013-04-10 05:22:52 PM  
My Grandmother convinced my Dad that he wouldn't like a number of foods because she didn't like them and didn't want to buy or prepare them for anyone as a result...one of these foods being cheesecake.

My Mom broke my Dad of his "I don't like cheesecake" thing pretty early in their relationship.
 
2013-04-10 05:24:35 PM  
Variety is the spice of life. Eating the same thing for years is crazy.
 
2013-04-10 05:30:29 PM  
I was a fairly picky eater. My parents just did the old "eat it because that's all you're getting" routine. It didn't exactly make me a well-rounded eater but I managed not to get scurvy and die.

My wife is a horrifically picky eater, to the point that occasionally I want to stab myself in the brain when we start talking about where we should go for dinner.
 
2013-04-10 05:31:01 PM  

SueDisco: My Grandmother convinced my Dad that he wouldn't like a number of foods because she didn't like them and didn't want to buy or prepare them for anyone as a result...one of these foods being cheesecake.

My Mom broke my Dad of his "I don't like cheesecake" thing pretty early in their relationship.


My mother in law hates cheesecake, except the two pieces she ate at our wedding and every time you dine with her and order cheesecake, where she samples half of it. Or the times she eats the cheesecake I make. Yet, she will tell you how much she hates it.
 
2013-04-10 05:33:20 PM  

pciszek: Splish: I think we're probably talking about different groups when we say "medical professionals" then.  Or maybe you haven't dealt with some parts of the population in general.  There are definitely doctors out there who are quirky, egotistical, kooky, misguided, just plain weird, etc.  They may even say and do idiotic things from time to time.  But none of them are idiots at large.

There is Representative Paul Broun, who somehow managed to become a doctor without learning any basic science.  Other Republicans have managed to find "doctors" who agree with their bizarre "biology of rape".


I think you're mistaking lunacy for idiocy.  Broun may well be crazy, but he's not stupid.
 
2013-04-10 05:34:30 PM  

4seasons85!: kiwimoogle84: Two things-

One, there's a fine line between a picky kid and a kid with a disorder. Having worked at a pediatric therapy office, I know the difference. I think it's 90% in the parenting approach, like it has been said this thread.

If your kid will only eat orange food because it's his favorite color? Give him sweet potatoes and squash and carrots and oranges. THAT CHILD DOESN'T HAVE TO LIVE ON MAC N CHEESE. *facepalm*

And two, I had an adult friend who didn't like vegetables. She's that lady who puts bacon, crispy chicken, cheese and ranch on a single leaf of lettuce and calls it a salad. She always used to complain about her weight. I went, you know, if you made a veggie ONLY salad for lunch every day, you'd probably lose a ton of weight. She was APPALLED at the suggestion. She also didn't feed her kids veggies because she "figured" they wouldn't like them either. BAD PARENT.

I've dated some picky eaters, turns out their moms were just shiatty cooks. I can make sautéed Brussels sprouts and stuffed zucchini that would make your taste buds sing. You don't have to straight boil veggies to cook them.

This girl will be dead in under five years. Calling it now.

My dad avoided mint chip ice cream for years because he had some bad version of it when he was a kid. He loves it now. I know ice cream isn't healthy but the concept of trying something made bad probably does make people think the food is terrible. I like to try foods several times several different ways before I say I don't like it. I've done this with mushrooms and sushi. I just don't like them. This is a recent thing though because I was super picky as a kid. But I've discovered foods, especially Asian and pacific islander foods, to be very good when I thought I would not like it. I used to look at a food and think it looked weird so I said I didn't like it. Now I'm open to trying anything. Well except eyeballs. I finally ate squid tentacles about a month ago. It was good!


Though, if food makes you sick when you first try it, most people have a hard time breaking out of the "do not eat this" mode. It's most likely a (probably very successful) evolutionary thing. Even knowing this, I can't eat cheese curds or soft pretzels because they made me sick when I was younger.
 
2013-04-10 05:36:04 PM  
The people who think this is real make me feel sad, because there is no way it could be true for she would have died long ago from scurvy. Then there is the matter of protein along with a whole host of other items since the noodles are only starch and the flavor packets are pretty much all artificial.
 
2013-04-10 05:36:10 PM  

Jument: I was a fairly picky eater. My parents just did the old "eat it because that's all you're getting" routine. It didn't exactly make me a well-rounded eater but I managed not to get scurvy and die.

My wife is a horrifically picky eater, to the point that occasionally I want to stab myself in the brain when we start talking about where we should go for dinner.


That conversation, picky eating aside, will make you consider self-lobotomy. My husband once said to a friend, "the most annoying thing about my wife is talking about going out to dinner."

I'm pleased that of all the annoying things I do, that's the one that bothers him enough to talk about.
 
2013-04-10 05:41:44 PM  

Wikious: 4seasons85!: kiwimoogle84: Two things-

My dad avoided mint chip ice cream for years because he had some bad version of it when he was a kid. He loves it now. I know ice cream isn't healthy but the concept of trying something made bad probably does make people think the food is terrible. I like to try foods several times several different ways before I say I don't like it. I've done this with mushrooms and sushi. I just don't like them. This is a recent thing though because I was super picky as a kid. But I've discovered foods, especially Asian and pacific islander foods, to be very good when I thought I would not like it. I used to look at a food and think it looked weird so I said I didn't like it. Now I'm open to trying anything. Well except eyeballs. I finally ate squid tentacles about a month ago. It was good!


Though, if food makes you sick when you first try it, most people have a hard time breaking out of the "do not eat this" mode. It's most likely a (probably very successful) evolutionary thing. Even knowing this, I can't eat cheese curds or soft pretzels because they made me sick when I was younger.

My husband wouldn't eat mint-chocolate anything for a long long time. Its not a huge thing, as its not like its a nutrient rich dessert, but I found out the reason is that he suffered from really bad migraines between 7-11 years old and his parents were given a list of trigger foods for migraines and one of the ones that seemed to correspond to his migraines was mint-chocolate foods (ice cream, Thin Mints, Andes, etc.) and so they insisted he could not eat those things and after a while, the aversion was created.

Now, he'll eat some Andes mints or whatever, but if he gets a headache within a few days of eating them, he denounces the mint-chocolate foods as migraine inducing and its almost funny... actually, I laugh at him to his face, because his headaches are mostly caffeine related (if he consumes any, he'll have a headache for a few days after, so he doesn't consume it...)
 
2013-04-10 05:44:24 PM  

ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: SueDisco: My Grandmother convinced my Dad that he wouldn't like a number of foods because she didn't like them and didn't want to buy or prepare them for anyone as a result...one of these foods being cheesecake.

My Mom broke my Dad of his "I don't like cheesecake" thing pretty early in their relationship.

My mother in law hates cheesecake, except the two pieces she ate at our wedding and every time you dine with her and order cheesecake, where she samples half of it. Or the times she eats the cheesecake I make. Yet, she will tell you how much she hates it.


My mother is the pickiest eater I know, though if you ask her she claims she eats EVERYTHING as long as it's not spicy.

HA.

The woman thinks black onions, pepper, and garlic are all spicy. She doesn't eat beans because they make her bloated. Soda and carbonation "burns her throat." Half the veggies she won't eat because they don't agree with her. Meat has to be cooked perfectly or she'll pick at it. She only likes one kind of salad dressing. Refuses to eat anything crispy or deep fried. Hates rice of any kind because it reminds her of Mexican food.

Then again, this is the woman who I swear is a professional anorexic because she's terrified of being fat, so she lives on protein bars and tomatoes- her favorite food.

But she eats ANYTHING. *eyeroll*
 
2013-04-10 05:59:15 PM  

kiwimoogle84: But she eats ANYTHING. *eyeroll*


My Mom has a friend like that...she's a total whackadoodle. She asks questions like, "What kind of oil is this cooked with?" and "How much black pepper do you use to season this?" before ordering, even something simple like a grilled chicken sandwich.  She's not allergic to anything, just crazy.  I also think she's masking an eating disorder.

My Mom labeled me a picky eater as a kid because there were a handful of things I didn't like (beef stroganoff and meatloaf...still gross).  Now I think she's pickier than I am...I'll eat all kinds of ethnic stuff she's afraid of.  If she'd try it, she'd like it.  She's just skerrrred...also, she claims she saw a worm in sushi at a grocery store once so that's forever off the list.
 
2013-04-10 06:00:39 PM  
OMG, Kiwi, stop... You're describing my MIL. I had to put my head down on my desk to laugh this out. She likes all food!

Chinese Food: Its not like they make in Boston (where she's from) so its not good. Difficulty: Asian food =/= Chinese food. In WA, we have Thai, Vietnamese, Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Indonesian, Indian, etc.

Mexican: I didn't grow up eating that, so I can't eat it.

She gets really, really upset if she gains 5lbs, then she goes on Atkins for 3-6 weeks, restricts all carbs and loses the weight, then she binges on desserts and breads. That's why I like to mention that my husband weighed 121lbs at his lowest. She gets really upset about her grown son weighing less than her.
 
2013-04-10 06:15:15 PM  

Richard C Stanford: This is just evolution in action. Let the little biatch die of malnourishment.


Larry Niven  Evolution in Action™ (Oath of Fealty)
 
2013-04-10 06:18:51 PM  
I god damn hate the Sun. Who keeps submitting this lazy garbage?
 
2013-04-10 06:22:41 PM  

ImpatientlyUnsympathetic: OMG, Kiwi, stop... You're describing my MIL. I had to put my head down on my desk to laugh this out. She likes all food!

Chinese Food: Its not like they make in Boston (where she's from) so its not good. Difficulty: Asian food =/= Chinese food. In WA, we have Thai, Vietnamese, Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Indonesian, Indian, etc.

Mexican: I didn't grow up eating that, so I can't eat it.

She gets really, really upset if she gains 5lbs, then she goes on Atkins for 3-6 weeks, restricts all carbs and loses the weight, then she binges on desserts and breads. That's why I like to mention that my husband weighed 121lbs at his lowest. She gets really upset about her grown son weighing less than her.


121 at his LOWEST? Y'all must be short. I haven't weighed 121 since 8th grade. I don't think Mr Kiwi has weighed that since sixth grade (he was 5'9 by the time he hit 8th grade, is 6'3 now). My current mantra through this pregnancy is "I WILL NOT HIT 200 lbs." Though for my height, it's pretty likely that I might. (Oh and to answer your previous q, yes we have honeycrisps in CA though I'm partial to fuji's)

But yeah, sadly, people are strange. Denial is a bizarre thing. I've gone to a nice dinner with my parents and my mom will pick at an array of Chinese food dishes and say whatever they were cooked with, it's burning her throat. And she'll sit at the table and eat half a Luna bar while we politely ignore her and stuff our faces.

Going back on topic, if you sit a well rounded plate of food in front of a kid, and one parent tells the other parent how freaking delicious these grilled thyme zucchini quarters are, the kid will dig right in. They're absolutely subject to persuasion. Like injuries. Instead of babying the kid when he trips and cooing and coddling for a tiny bruise, just pick him up, dust him off, and tell him he's ok and send him off to play again. Guess which kid will be better adjusted?
 
2013-04-10 06:29:17 PM  
Mr. Unsympathetic might have cleared 5'7. I'm 5'2. My dad's side of the family all clear 6' (men and women) but my brother is crazy tall compared to my mom's side of the family. The tallest guy in my mom's side of the family (before my brother was full grown, at 6'4) was 5'6. My cousin's sons (from my dad's side) have cleared 6'6 and 6'7.

/When not training for ultramarathons, he walked around at 130-135.
//Now that he's not running every day, he's around 140. Super muscular.
 
2013-04-10 09:05:17 PM  

Richard C Stanford: This is just evolution in action. Let the little biatch die of malnourishment.


FTA: The 5ft 3in teen weighs just seven stone and has the health equivalent to that of an 80-year-old.

It may be sooner than we think, mercifully.
 
2013-04-10 09:35:54 PM  

Lord Dimwit: I've known at least two children (my nephew and a child of a friend) who couldn't speak more than babbling and "mama/dada" at the age of two and a half, but their pediatricians always said "they're fine, they're fine." I don't get it, how is that possible? Are the developmental milestones really that loose? (They're not; I've checked.)

You'd think these people would be reprimanded by their licensing boards or something.


When my eldest was 2 he was not speaking yet. Our pediatrician was concerned to the point he freaked us out pretty hard. He ordered hearing tests, half a dozen different types of evaluations (autism, etc) and at one point even an MRI (the boy has a big head and he thought that was "wrong"). All the results came back fine. So the doctor then concludes we should get speech therapy for the boy and hooks us up with contacts.

We do as told, get him into speech therapy four times a week. A few weeks in the speech therapist's conclusion - there is absolutely nothing wrong with the boy mentally or physically. It's not that he can't talk, it's that he doesn't talk unless he has something to say. The doctor had freaked us out so hard that something was terribly, terribly wrong with our son and come to find out there wasn't a damn thing wrong with him.

Fast forward ten years. Turns out the boy is just a bit of an introvert and a pensive kind of person. Get him with people he is comfortable around, talking about a subject he is interested in and he will not shut up. If he is not comfortable around you, flat out doesn't like you, or if the topic is not of interest he will sit there quietly feigning interest to appear polite.
 
2013-04-10 10:09:13 PM  

pciszek: Splish: I think we're probably talking about different groups when we say "medical professionals" then.  Or maybe you haven't dealt with some parts of the population in general.  There are definitely doctors out there who are quirky, egotistical, kooky, misguided, just plain weird, etc.  They may even say and do idiotic things from time to time.  But none of them are idiots at large.

There is Representative Paul Broun, who somehow managed to become a doctor without learning any basic science.  Other Republicans have managed to find "doctors" who agree with their bizarre "biology of rape".


I think you need professional help with your, "retard" problem...
 
2013-04-10 10:18:49 PM  
I guess we're lucky. We haven't found a food yet our kids won't eat; this goes for every vegetable you can imagine.
 
2013-04-11 07:24:06 AM  

kiwimoogle84: Going back on topic, if you sit a well rounded plate of food in front of a kid, and one parent tells the other parent how freaking delicious these grilled thyme zucchini quarters are, the kid will dig right in. They're absolutely subject to persuasion. Like injuries. Instead of babying the kid when he trips and cooing and coddling for a tiny bruise, just pick him up, dust him off, and tell him he's ok and send him off to play again. Guess which kid will be better adjusted?


That doesn't always work. My kids never believe me when I tell them something tastes good. Hell, I can't even get one of them to eat hot dogs. What kind of kid doesn't like hot dogs?
 
2013-04-11 09:17:17 AM  

Ranger Rover: stonicus: One of my ex's would complain about garlic, said it made it hard for her to breathe is she ever ate any. So I did experiments.

You are frightening. I understand that you proved your point, but you are frightening.


*blush*  Thank you... =)
 
2013-04-11 11:31:17 AM  

Your Average Witty Fark User: I guess we're lucky. We haven't found a food yet our kids won't eat; this goes for every vegetable you can imagine.


We made the mistake of introducing our kids to sushi too early. That gets expensive!

Got them down to one sushi night a week at one of the half-decent conveyor-belt places.
 
2013-04-11 11:44:54 AM  

xcv: Parenting should require a license. I've seen photos of my ancestors that came from dirt-poor peasantvilles; the men were incredibly short and stout. I doubt it was all from childhood diseases alone, their diet consisted almost exclusively of the bread and potatoes that manifests today in old family recipes. Their American-born children were significantly taller.

These shiatty parents shouldn't be allowed to stunt their kids' physical and mental growth just so mom or dad can avoid a mealtime argument and keep watching their stories on the telly uninterrupted.


Are you sure that all this rapid growth isn't simply the result of all the BGH and other crap that finds its way into the American foodstream?

My Chinese roommates and Thai cousins who grew up in the US are much taller than their parents too... and I'm pretty sure their ancestors had a wonderfully rich and diverse diet back in their homelands.
 
2013-04-11 02:42:50 PM  
My nephew may have a milder case of "selective eating disorder".

I am somewhat skeptical of this concept, but it is not impossible that there is such a disorder, as opposed to parents and other caregivers or guardians caving entirely on the issue of trying new foods before you decide you don't like them.

My nephew is somewhat fat and pasty with some sort of disorder or other, but seems healthy enough, so his short list of acceptable foods seems to be adequate.

This girl obviously must be cheating some how because pot noodles are simply not nutritious enough to keep you alive into your teens. She may be getting her vitamins through hidden eating (possibly even sleep-eating) or beverages. If you drank milk, juice, and other nutritional beverages with your noodles and ate meat, fish, dairy products or soup, you could live on pot noodles in the same way that cornflakes and a nutritious breakfast make a nutritious breakfast.

My nephew's peculiarities may be due to 1) brain damage from an accident when he was younger; 2) an incident when he was very sick (the doctor was an asshole and joked about him dying, this to very sick and impressionable seven year old or thereabouts) and 3) inheritance.

My sister and brother were picky eaters, my sister more so. I ate most of what was put in front of me although I hated cold lumpy potatoes. My uncle was the same way. The potatoes had to be hot enough to melt butter. I also disliked a number of foods intermittantly, although I could eat them. Tomatoes were something I sometimes hated and sometimes liked as a child. It depended on how they tasted and texture, I am sure. I have never liked drinking milk, although I drank chocolate milk as a child. I weened myself of the bottle at nine months, insisting on a sippy cup and then giving up milk for most of my life, except under duress or occasional brief flings.

I believe many of my nephew's psychological traits are the result of genetic or epigenetic inheritance, combined with a double dose from both Father and Mother. He might be high functioning Autistic or have Asperger's Syndrome. Both have been suggested and fit many of his traits.

Or he could just be a Generation Y a-hole.

I am open to factual evidence and argument.

But this "selective eating disorder" seems to be more common and not entirely independent of attitudes towards food mass-produced by the media and allowed, if not encouraged by home life.

Even my nephew can be coaxed to try something new once in a while, and his repertory of accepted foods has slightly increased since childhood.

I regard macrobiotic diets and other fads as BS and my theory is that it is healthiest and safest to eat a wide variety of food from a wide variety of sources. Even if some of the stuff is laden with lead or other heavy metals, for example, you won't get a lot if you vary your suppliers as much as possible.

My favourite meal is the smorgasbord or buffet, followed by the banquet, the family reunion dinner, and the browsing through everything in the fridge and cupboards. I likes my variety. I am the opposite of a picky eater. I am a liberal or catholic eater with a few exceptions to my catholic (omnivorous) tastes.

I thus remain open to both environment and heredity as factors in the multiplication of modern psychological disorders, or as we used to call them, vices and bad habits.
 
2013-04-11 02:52:28 PM  
Pot noodles always taste to me like something that has been left in plastic packaging for too long and consequently absorbed chemicals from the plastic bag.

I've thrown away unopened snack food for tasting like that after a few years on the top shelve. It can't be good for you to eat too much of this stuff, although technically it is not spoiled or stale, just contaminated with God knows what, Bisphenol A and such.

It's amazing how long something will last in foil bags though, even if they have been opened, if you seal them tightly. I have a number of bags of potato chips that are months old, maybe more than a year, but they taste just fine and are exactly like a fresh bag even though I gave up on them when I got bored with the flavour for a while.

Maybe the survivalists that stock-pile snack foods for the post-Apocalyptic world are on to something. You might never see another can of edible or palatable vegetables, but you can make a stock pile of junk food that will last you years.
 
2013-04-11 03:17:53 PM  

brantgoose: My nephew may have a milder case of "selective eating disorder".

I am somewhat skeptical of this concept, but it is not impossible that there is such a disorder, as opposed to parents and other caregivers or guardians caving entirely on the issue of trying new foods before you decide you don't like them.

My nephew is somewhat fat and pasty with some sort of disorder or other, but seems healthy enough, so his short list of acceptable foods seems to be adequate.

This girl obviously must be cheating some how because pot noodles are simply not nutritious enough to keep you alive into your teens. She may be getting her vitamins through hidden eating (possibly even sleep-eating) or beverages. If you drank milk, juice, and other nutritional beverages with your noodles and ate meat, fish, dairy products or soup, you could live on pot noodles in the same way that cornflakes and a nutritious breakfast make a nutritious breakfast.

My nephew's peculiarities may be due to 1) brain damage from an accident when he was younger; 2) an incident when he was very sick (the doctor was an asshole and joked about him dying, this to very sick and impressionable seven year old or thereabouts) and 3) inheritance.

My sister and brother were picky eaters, my sister more so. I ate most of what was put in front of me although I hated cold lumpy potatoes. My uncle was the same way. The potatoes had to be hot enough to melt butter. I also disliked a number of foods intermittantly, although I could eat them. Tomatoes were something I sometimes hated and sometimes liked as a child. It depended on how they tasted and texture, I am sure. I have never liked drinking milk, although I drank chocolate milk as a child. I weened myself of the bottle at nine months, insisting on a sippy cup and then giving up milk for most of my life, except under duress or occasional brief flings.

I believe many of my nephew's psychological traits are the result of genetic or epigenetic inheritance, combined with a do ...


As soon as you said "Aspie" and "Accidental Brain Damage", you nephew probably has something like this.

My brother is handicapped and all the kids in his classes fell into 2 categories when it came to food: "Eat all the things!" or "Eat very few foods". There was no in between.

Aspie and other brain damaged kids can have weird sensory issues that can effect taste and food. My family sorta lucked out because my brother is practically a vacuum cleaner. My brother instead has hearing sensory issues, crowded and loud places are hell on earth for him.

I would urge to get your nephew tested for sensory issues and Aspie, the accident and near death could have caused brain damaged. Even if your nephew is a "Gen Y Asshole" a diagnosis is the only way to get treatment and help him in social situations.

My currently fighting my Dad about this with my brother, I want my brother to get officially recognized as an Aspie and get treatment for it. My Dad is in denial.

It's very sad to see my brother struggle with social situations and being completely unable to find a job due to this (which may be the underlying reason why my Dad is in denial).

The younger the better for treatment.
 
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