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(NBC News)   The majesty of orbiting the Moon during the Apollo missions: seeing Earth float in Space, ruminating on our role in the Universe, having your turds float in Zero-G in the capsule and asking Mission Control what to do   (cosmiclog.nbcnews.com) divider line 17
    More: Fail, mission control, Apollo, moons, Gene Cernan, Alan Boyle, Earth, universe, Richard Garriott  
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9990 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Apr 2013 at 7:45 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Archived thread
2013-04-09 07:52:28 PM
3 votes:
Mary Roach had this covered a year or two ago. Start with that book, then read the rest of her books. She's hilarious.
2013-04-10 12:42:16 AM
2 votes:

Gyrfalcon: doosh: What if you have explosive diarrhea?

Not to worry; astronauts, like soldiers in the field, get special dehydrated rations guaranteed to cause constipation.


Well, except for Apollo 8.

Shortly after the voyage to the Moon began, Commander Frank Borman took a sleeping pill, which is believed to have made him sick. He repeatedly vomited and was subject to diarrhea, much of which ended up floating around the cabin.
2013-04-09 08:49:24 PM
2 votes:
collectivelab.typepad.com
2013-04-09 07:47:06 PM
2 votes:
A 500-page-plus transcript of the declassified mission log records tons of routine conversations among the mission's three astronauts: commander Tom Stafford, lunar module pilot Gene Cernan and command module pilot John Young. But six days into the eight-day mission, around page 414, an emergency pops up...


Ground control to Major Tom (10)
Ground control to Major Tom (9)
Clean your bunghole and may God's luck be with you....(7)
For here, am I shiatting in a tin can, far above the Earth.
Planet Earth is blue, and look!  My floating poo....

Though I'm past 100,000 miles
I'm pushing cloth and doing turtleheads
And Apollo 10 smells like shiat
Tell my Gene I can tell he had corn for dinner (he knoooo-ohh-ohh-ows!)

Ground control to Major Tom, there's something wrong
Your shiatter's full!
Can you hear me, Major Tom?
Can you hear me, Major Tom?
2013-04-10 01:25:00 AM
1 votes:

Clemkadidlefark: I would love to tell the tale of the clear Lexan test-toilet, a group of Air Force volunteer nurse, the fabled Vomit Comet and an 8mm film at a bachelor party for a NASA contractor/engineer ... but the Gag Order is still in place ....


There's no way you're old enough to remember 8mm film at bachelor's parties. I'm not even that old. If I had been at bachelor's parties back then, which I would not have been, but I heard stories.
2013-04-10 12:16:08 AM
1 votes:

doosh: What if you have explosive diarrhea?


Not to worry; astronauts, like soldiers in the field, get special dehydrated rations guaranteed to cause constipation.
2013-04-09 10:39:13 PM
1 votes:

BumpInTheNight: scottydoesntknow: xxmedium: BumpInTheNight: Kerbal Space Program thread?  Yup, Kerbal Space Program thread.

Just got a fueler into stable orbit last night, then tonight put another one up, this time featuring solar panels so the damned thing didn't run out of power this time (hah!).  Now trying to master the art of docking...yah this is not going so good.  Funny, but not going so good :P

GIS results indicate this is similar to my first few attempts at getting a fueler into orbit:
[img337.imageshack.us image 850x520]

I've been considering purchasing this game and I think you may have just talked me into it.

Me too. Is it like SimCity (not the new one!) but with rockets? It's been popping up in a lot of Fark threads recently.

In a nutshell:  You have cart-blanche to build and try any combination of rocketry and components to achieve whatever goal you have in mind within an earth-like solar system along with all the underpinning physics and mechanical constraints such tasks would impose without getting too gritty to be unbearing.

I've only had it for a few days but so far I've successfully launched a dozen or so craft into orbit over several hundred hilarious revisionary attempts.  That image I posted above is an example of someone who went 'as many rockets and fuel pods as I can stuff without the whole thing falling apart on the launch pad', but you can probably go further if you really push it :P  Its sandbox + rockets + lego-like-construction + spacial physics in an easy to approach package.

There is a free demo for anyone wanting to try it without committing but keep in mind it lags in terms of current engine revision and part selection.  Very expansive & welcomed (through extensive API options) modding community as well, this is going to be something great for sure.


10/10 would recommend! I've dumped about 100 hours into KSP so far, and I'm still going. Be prepared to lose yourself! The sandbox is fantastically accommodating. Load up, decide what you're going to do, build it, test it, attempt the mission. One day I might be mapping the Mun, the next I might be putting an unmanned rover on Duna (mars), or sending a set of probes out to study Jool (Jupiter) and it's moons.

Each and every goal you set provides a different engineering and physics challenges to overcome. From small probes and landers to interplanetary craft that take several launches just to assemble in orbit before you can even think about burning to set up a planetary rendezvous  Hell, I've even designed atmospheric craft that can fly out and pick up a crew that botched their deorbit burn and wound up on the wrong side of the planet. Lots of mods, the afformentioned mapping satellites, Habitat modules and rovers, lasers, line-of-sight comms dishes, multiple autopilot modules, just a ton of toys to play with... it's fantastic for anyone but near-orgasmic for the science geeks among us.

Seriously, the first time I made a successful manned Mun landing made me feel things no game ever has. Watching the surface approach from the lander window and taking those first EVA steps was simply amazing. Buy it. Buy it now.
2013-04-09 10:09:09 PM
1 votes:
Elemental Diet:  An elemental feed is a chemically defined diet whose protein source is amino acids or short-chain peptides, with short-chain carbohydrates and added fat, minerals, and vitamins.  The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) had initially designed elemental diets for astronauts.  This was with the intention of providing a nutritionally complete diet of which as much as possible would be absorbed.  However, although absorption was limited mainly to the upper small bowel, the diet did not prevent the production of stool, as hoped.

Nutrition in Pediatrics
W. Allan Walker, Christopher Duggan, John B. Watkins
Pg.: 640

/they did try, you know...
//execrable results
2013-04-09 09:16:04 PM
1 votes:

scottydoesntknow: xxmedium: BumpInTheNight: Kerbal Space Program thread?  Yup, Kerbal Space Program thread.

Just got a fueler into stable orbit last night, then tonight put another one up, this time featuring solar panels so the damned thing didn't run out of power this time (hah!).  Now trying to master the art of docking...yah this is not going so good.  Funny, but not going so good :P

GIS results indicate this is similar to my first few attempts at getting a fueler into orbit:
[img337.imageshack.us image 850x520]

I've been considering purchasing this game and I think you may have just talked me into it.

Me too. Is it like SimCity (not the new one!) but with rockets? It's been popping up in a lot of Fark threads recently.


In a nutshell:  You have cart-blanche to build and try any combination of rocketry and components to achieve whatever goal you have in mind within an earth-like solar system along with all the underpinning physics and mechanical constraints such tasks would impose without getting too gritty to be unbearing.

I've only had it for a few days but so far I've successfully launched a dozen or so craft into orbit over several hundred hilarious revisionary attempts.  That image I posted above is an example of someone who went 'as many rockets and fuel pods as I can stuff without the whole thing falling apart on the launch pad', but you can probably go further if you really push it :P  Its sandbox + rockets + lego-like-construction + spacial physics in an easy to approach package.

There is a free demo for anyone wanting to try it without committing but keep in mind it lags in terms of current engine revision and part selection.  Very expansive & welcomed (through extensive API options) modding community as well, this is going to be something great for sure.
2013-04-09 09:05:26 PM
1 votes:

buttery_shame_cave: my astronaut CSB : many moons ago i got to meet neil armstrong, and talk with him very briefly. i wanted something a bit more esoteric than talking about typical stuff i figured people asked, so i asked what the weirdest thing about 1/6th gravity was.

apparently it was peeing. taking a steamer worked just like on earth, but pee moved very... oddly, was his description.


ROFLMAO

You sir...are a very brave and imaginative fellow.

And I bet He thought it was a hilarious question.

*applause*
2013-04-09 09:01:32 PM
1 votes:

rnatalie: [collectivelab.typepad.com image 850x478]


Here's the actual text.
2013-04-09 08:35:16 PM
1 votes:
I spent a few nights last month reading the entire Apollo 13 transcripts and those guys made some poop jokes too. Also, they spent a hell of a lot of time having to adjust the antennas. I'd imagine nowadays it'd be so much easier with digital communication and computers.
2013-04-09 08:33:03 PM
1 votes:
The fact that the Apollo X Command Module was named Charlie Brown doesn't help the visuals get any better.
2013-04-09 08:13:13 PM
1 votes:

buttery_shame_cave: my astronaut CSB : many moons ago i got to meet neil armstrong, and talk with him very briefly. i wanted something a bit more esoteric than talking about typical stuff i figured people asked, so i asked what the weirdest thing about 1/6th gravity was.

apparently it was peeing. taking a steamer worked just like on earth, but pee moved very... oddly, was his description.


The left side of the stream cascades, while the other side flows...
2013-04-09 08:05:47 PM
1 votes:
my astronaut CSB : many moons ago i got to meet neil armstrong, and talk with him very briefly. i wanted something a bit more esoteric than talking about typical stuff i figured people asked, so i asked what the weirdest thing about 1/6th gravity was.

apparently it was peeing. taking a steamer worked just like on earth, but pee moved very... oddly, was his description.
2013-04-09 07:56:10 PM
1 votes:
This is exactly my point about all the spacenuts who talk about wanting to move the human race into space. Are you kidding? The people down here on Earth can barely prevent shiatting themselves, and you want to put these people in zero g with no atmosphere?

Good luck with that. Humanity isn't going anywhere.
2013-04-09 07:36:49 PM
1 votes:
images1.wikia.nocookie.net
 
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