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(NPR)   Tired of this rampant proliferation of beer snobs? No worries, the arsenic that comes from all those fancy filtering processes they love so much will probably kill them soon   (npr.org) divider line 114
    More: Amusing, no worries, nuclear proliferation, natural products, The Salts  
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7864 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Apr 2013 at 3:35 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-09 01:43:44 PM
What if I'm snobby while drinking my unfiltered beer?
 
2013-04-09 01:50:26 PM
Yeah, just read any beer thread and it's non-stop discussion about filtering processes.  Good call, subby.
 
2013-04-09 01:57:05 PM
So now kidneys are fancy.
 
2013-04-09 02:05:00 PM
Yes, but in small doses over a long period of time does not one become immune to arsenic?  So, we should all be good right?
 
2013-04-09 02:08:13 PM
But their skin looks fantastic!
 
2013-04-09 02:14:28 PM
I don't filter my beer and use a vaccum system for my wine.
 
2013-04-09 02:28:25 PM
bythepint.com

Problem solved.
 
2013-04-09 02:35:58 PM
It turns out that any beer or wine that's clear has been filtered to strain out plant matter, yeast and anything else that would leave a drink looking unappealingly cloudy.

Beer snobs don't give a shiat about beer being cloudy.
 
2013-04-09 02:40:38 PM

Lando Lincoln: It turns out that any beer or wine that's clear has been filtered to strain out plant matter, yeast and anything else that would leave a drink looking unappealingly cloudy.

Beer snobs don't give a shiat about beer being cloudy.


TFA said that? BS. I can make an easy little wheaten ale that's crystal clear. You just need a wicked good cold break.
 
2013-04-09 02:48:21 PM

whither_apophis: Lando Lincoln: It turns out that any beer or wine that's clear has been filtered to strain out plant matter, yeast and anything else that would leave a drink looking unappealingly cloudy.

Beer snobs don't give a shiat about beer being cloudy.

TFA said that? BS. I can make an easy little wheaten ale that's crystal clear. You just need a wicked good cold break.


Yeah, I know. I've cleared up quite a few of my beers and I've never used DE before.
 
2013-04-09 03:34:06 PM
Beer snobs are against filtration. It removes stuff (and presumably affects taste) for the purpose of making the beer more appealing to the masses.
 
2013-04-09 03:36:32 PM

whither_apophis: Lando Lincoln: It turns out that any beer or wine that's clear has been filtered to strain out plant matter, yeast and anything else that would leave a drink looking unappealingly cloudy.

Beer snobs don't give a shiat about beer being cloudy.

TFA said that? BS. I can make an easy little wheaten ale that's crystal clear. You just need a wicked good cold break.


Indeed. I didn't even think wine uses filtration, because it ages enough to let the yeast settle out.
 
2013-04-09 03:40:23 PM
HOORAY BEER!
 
2013-04-09 03:41:24 PM
There's no arsenic involved in letting the fermenter sit for a few days before it gets siphoned into the keg.
 
2013-04-09 03:42:18 PM
Who drinks filtered beer these days?
 
2013-04-09 03:42:57 PM
Switch to fish guts, guys.
 
2013-04-09 03:44:58 PM
I KNEW that I disliked most commercial beer for a good reason.
 
2013-04-09 03:46:35 PM

Ennuipoet: Yes, but in small doses over a long period of time does not one become immune to arsenic?  So, we should all be good right?


There's an iocaine powder reference begging to be made here, but I'm too sleep-deprived today to figure out the cleverest way to create it...
 
2013-04-09 03:47:42 PM
Even a lot of comercial "unfiltered" beer has been filtered to some degree. A 30/70% blend will give you the look, feel, and taste without the risk of giant plug of sediment precipitating out in the bottle.

of course, we have abandond that process where i work know that we have a centrifuge.

So, only drink Hefe from Legend Brewing Company, it's the only way to be safe.
 
2013-04-09 03:48:18 PM
Whatever, those brain cells are going to get killed off one way or another.
 
2013-04-09 03:49:41 PM

tricycleracer: Switch to fish guts, guys.


thats used in casking and for taking the load off the filter...
 
2013-04-09 03:49:58 PM
Looks like it's already been said, but if you have to filter your beer to make it appealing, you suck at making beer.
 
2013-04-09 03:53:03 PM
Tell them what Isinglass is.
They'll kill themselves.

Done in.... oh ***K it.
 
2013-04-09 03:53:08 PM
FTA: "A few were found to have more than 25 parts per billion of arsenic. That's twice the 10 parts per billion for drinking water in the United States."

Um... I know 4 year olds that are aware that 10x2 does not equal 25.
 
2013-04-09 03:54:21 PM
You should be able to see through water, not beer.  (Beer is a food group after all. Is any other food clear?)
 
2013-04-09 03:55:18 PM
non-story is .... non-story:

FTA


"We already knew that," says Roger Boulton, a professor in enology at the University of California, Davis. "The levels shouldn't be alarming, because it's the kind of thing you see in dust or air."

One reason that chemists are now discovering arsenic in beer is that testing methods are much more precise than in decades past, Boulton says, detecting low levels of naturally occurring elements that have always been in food products."
 
2013-04-09 03:55:27 PM
So how it moving my beer from the fermenter the the keg making arsenic?
 
2013-04-09 03:56:14 PM

AmbassadorBooze: You should be able to see through water, not beer.  (Beer is a food group after all. Is any other food clear?)


Jello is food, right?
 
2013-04-09 03:57:19 PM
All macro beers are filtered.  Some craft beers are not.  Fail.

Also, one more awesome reason to homebrew.
 
2013-04-09 04:00:44 PM

LZeitgeist: Ennuipoet: Yes, but in small doses over a long period of time does not one become immune to arsenic?  So, we should all be good right?

There's an iocaine powder reference begging to be made here, but I'm too sleep-deprived today to figure out the cleverest way to create it...


truly, you don't have a dizzying intellect?
 
2013-04-09 04:01:18 PM

mrlewish: So how it moving my beer from the fermenter the the keg making arsenic?


It's alchemy.
Which is also a microbrew.
 
2013-04-09 04:04:54 PM
FTFA:It turns out that any beer or wine that's clear has been filtered to strain out plant matter, yeast and anything else that would leave a drink looking unappealingly cloudy

Bullshiat. I mad two lagers recently that were so damn clear you can read a newspaper through the glass. The problem is not wanting to wait for the end result, and instead using artificial means to get it.

First, make sure you have enough PPM calcium to promote good yeast flocculation. After fermentation is complete, rack to a secondary making sure not to disturb the yeast cake and lager it (cold storage) for 2-3 months. After that, very carefully siphon the beer out without disturbing any further sediment at the bottom. Crystal clear, all natural.
 
2013-04-09 04:06:01 PM

the_sidewinder: AmbassadorBooze: You should be able to see through water, not beer.  (Beer is a food group after all. Is any other food clear?)

Jello is food, right?


For the sake of argument, I would say that it is only partially a food or not a food at all.  (but in fairness, you got me)
 
2013-04-09 04:06:41 PM
More importantly, how does this affect my beer buzz?
 
2013-04-09 04:07:26 PM

Carn: All macro beers are filtered.  Some craft beers are not.  Fail.

Also, one more awesome reason to homebrew.


Last time I got to hang out at the local AB plant, they were using a centrifuge..
 
2013-04-09 04:09:23 PM

mrlewish: So how it moving my beer from the fermenter the the keg making arsenic?


The ingredients used (barley, hops, and adjuncts) absorbed it from the ground.  Then there's the natural part in your water.
 
2013-04-09 04:09:41 PM
I would be more worried about craft breweries cleaning procedures than a macro's arsenic levels
 
2013-04-09 04:10:06 PM
Yeah, don't repeat this with any American beers or anything to do with InBev.

Rice is high enough in arsenic that it's a small side dish only in my world. Turns out rice loves the arsenic, and will pull any out of the soil. I remember that in some part of asia they jumped in joy that they could tap this aquifer and have disease free water year round, but no one tested the mineral content and it turned out most of wells had enough arsenic to cause long term harm.

That's not to say we shouldn't have any arsenic. We evolved with arsenic in the environment, rarely at a high concentration but there might be hormesis effects. And at 25 ppb you'll experience trouble from the alcohol before the arsenic gets you.
 
2013-04-09 04:11:27 PM
Totally worth it.
 
2013-04-09 04:12:40 PM
Throw a little formaldehyde in there for good measure.

encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com
 
2013-04-09 04:13:02 PM

Cerebral Knievel: tricycleracer: Switch to fish guts, guys.

thats used in casking and for taking the load off the filter...


Wikipedia lumps isinglass and diatomaceous earth into the same fining category, so I just went with that.
 
2013-04-09 04:14:35 PM
I cannot understand folks who aren't beer snobs.  If the only beer out there was an Anheiser-Busch or a Miller product, I simply would not want to drink beer.
 
2013-04-09 04:14:36 PM
Well as long as it's organic arsenic, I hate that processed stuff.
 
2013-04-09 04:18:39 PM
I'd say I've gone reverse snob, but then someone would just call me a hipster.

Still:
i116.photobucket.com
 
2013-04-09 04:21:35 PM
Meh, beer is what the cretins drink. Beer is to booze what cigarettes are to aged hand rolled cigars.

/The Glenlivet & a Drew Estate Naturals please...
 
2013-04-09 04:23:04 PM
I filter all of my beer by pouring it through old lace.
 
2013-04-09 04:24:23 PM

impaler: whither_apophis: Lando Lincoln: It turns out that any beer or wine that's clear has been filtered to strain out plant matter, yeast and anything else that would leave a drink looking unappealingly cloudy.

Beer snobs don't give a shiat about beer being cloudy.

TFA said that? BS. I can make an easy little wheaten ale that's crystal clear. You just need a wicked good cold break.

Indeed. I didn't even think wine uses filtration, because it ages enough to let the yeast settle out.


The mass produced, toss it back this year plonk that most people drink as wine is very much filtered.  Anything you want to age and really enjoy however usually isn't filtered.  But then I'm willing to spend more than $20 a bottle an do my own cellar aging.  Currently working through 1999.  The 2000s are tasting very nice - look like they will be good drinking until 2020 at least, and maybe longer.
 
2013-04-09 04:25:44 PM
I was very disappointed to read that it doesn't seem likely that beer snobs will die from arsenic poisoning. Pity.
 
2013-04-09 04:26:03 PM

AmbassadorBooze: You should be able to see through water, not beer.  (Beer is a food group after all. Is any other food clear?)


jello
 
2013-04-09 04:28:18 PM

AmbassadorBooze: You should be able to see through water, not beer.  (Beer is a food group after all. Is any other food clear?)


Well, some people eat jellyfish I guess...
 
2013-04-09 04:34:00 PM

nocturnal001: I was very disappointed to read that it doesn't seem likely that beer snobs will die from arsenic poisoning. Pity.


I too wish death upon people that like things that I don't like.
 
2013-04-09 04:35:58 PM

tricycleracer: Cerebral Knievel: tricycleracer: Switch to fish guts, guys.

thats used in casking and for taking the load off the filter...

Wikipedia lumps isinglass and diatomaceous earth into the same fining category, so I just went with that.


All good, and it is technicly correct, which is the best kind of correct. :)

Isinglass, to put it in the simplist terms because i am mobile farking, creates a negitive ion bond and causes the yeast to stick together and fall out faster and denser. DE media grabs the stuff as it passes through the media.

IG is used traditionaly to drop out the beer in casking. and yes, popping a firkin or a pin, you do want that stuff to be clear.

a lot of breweries, craft, micro, macro etc use the IG to pre-drop a tank. speeding up the natural racking process, so as to take the load off the filter media when you want to "polish" the stuff.

extends the life of your media, and reduces waste. it can be used hot or cold, but usually cold.
 
2013-04-09 04:37:42 PM

Sultan Of Herf: Meh, beer is what the cretins drink. Beer is to booze what cigarettes are to aged hand rolled cigars.

/The Glenlivet & a Drew Estate Naturals please...


notsureifserious.jpeg

Glenlivet is pretty pedestrian.
 
2013-04-09 04:39:13 PM

busy chillin': nocturnal001: I was very disappointed to read that it doesn't seem likely that beer snobs will die from arsenic poisoning. Pity.

I too wish death upon people that like things that I don't like.


Umm, I'm pretty sure you have that backwards.
 
2013-04-09 04:40:18 PM
I mostly drink porters and stouts and such, so I dunno if they are cloudy or not. Am I gonna die?
 
2013-04-09 04:45:03 PM

nocturnal001: busy chillin': nocturnal001: I was very disappointed to read that it doesn't seem likely that beer snobs will die from arsenic poisoning. Pity.

I too wish death upon people that like things that I don't like.

Umm, I'm pretty sure you have that backwards.



You wish death upon people that don't like things you like?
 
2013-04-09 04:45:47 PM
Water standards aren't based on what's safe, they are usually way below what's safe. So having As levels 100 times the drinking water limit isn't necessarily dangerous. The oxidation state and chemical form are also significant.
 
2013-04-09 04:47:26 PM

busy chillin': nocturnal001: busy chillin': nocturnal001: I was very disappointed to read that it doesn't seem likely that beer snobs will die from arsenic poisoning. Pity.

I too wish death upon people that like things that I don't like.

Umm, I'm pretty sure you have that backwards.


You wish death upon people that don't like things you like?



Perhaps he wishes things upon people who are dead.
 
2013-04-09 04:49:13 PM

IntertubeUser: I cannot understand folks who aren't beer snobs.  If the only beer out there was an Anheiser-Busch or a Miller product, I simply would not want to drink beer.


No one cares.
 
2013-04-09 04:50:44 PM

Sultan Of Herf: Meh, beer is what the cretins drink. Beer is to booze what cigarettes are to aged hand rolled cigars.

/The Glenlivet & a Drew Estate Naturals please...


Seriously?
Drew Estate?

Are their naturals natural?
I am not a fan of flavored cigars.
Partagas, Fuente, 5 Vegas...
How did I do on the cigar snob try-outs?
5 Vegas is almost cheap and very good.
I buy more than I smoke these days...got to buy another humidor.
You ever hit alt.smokers.cigars?
See ya around the herfs.
 
2013-04-09 04:51:01 PM

busy chillin': nocturnal001: busy chillin': nocturnal001: I was very disappointed to read that it doesn't seem likely that beer snobs will die from arsenic poisoning. Pity.

I too wish death upon people that like things that I don't like.

Umm, I'm pretty sure you have that backwards.


You wish death upon people that don't like things you like?


It's not about what I like, but who I like.  Beer snobs are pretentious douches that judge other people on what they like or don't like. I don't like pretentious douches, and while I admit I don't wish death on them, maybe something like horrible ass pain.

Beer snob /= Enjoying good beer
 
2013-04-09 04:55:42 PM
Whatever happened to just "beer flavored beer"?

When the snobs started treating beer like wine.....the "ambience of this pilsner is like a fruity crevasse".... or some BS like that... that killed beer consumption
 
2013-04-09 04:57:12 PM
While many mass market beers use DE filtration, Miller Genuine Draft does not.

MGD is pushed through ceramic filters and not pasteurized.
 
2013-04-09 04:58:20 PM

Jument: I mostly drink porters and stouts and such, so I dunno if they are cloudy or not. Am I gonna die?


Yes.  We all are.  Someday.
 
2013-04-09 05:02:11 PM

SmellsLikePoo: non-story is .... non-story:

FTA


"We already knew that," says Roger Boulton, a professor in enology at the University of California, Davis. "The levels shouldn't be alarming, because it's the kind of thing you see in dust or air."

 This made me laugh. I can just see this guy banging his head on the desk after hanging up with the reporter, mutter "oh for fark's sake."
 
2013-04-09 05:04:59 PM
lh3.ggpht.com
 
2013-04-09 05:07:07 PM
All fine for people who drink rat piss beer.
I drink unfiltered.
I don't think there's much more to say and everyone who IS saying more is wasting everyone's time including theirs.
 
2013-04-09 05:10:58 PM

fickenchucker: While many mass market beers use DE filtration, Miller Genuine Draft does not.

MGD is pushed through ceramic filters and not pasteurized.


DE? Like diatomaceous earth? Like high end swimming pool filters? That stuff?
 
2013-04-09 05:12:31 PM

Phaeon: fickenchucker: While many mass market beers use DE filtration, Miller Genuine Draft does not.

MGD is pushed through ceramic filters and not pasteurized.

DE? Like diatomaceous earth? Like high end swimming pool filters? That stuff?


Yup, skeletons of tiny little critters.
 
2013-04-09 05:14:26 PM

Beerguy: [bythepint.com image 680x510]

Problem solved.


Came for weissbier porn, leaving satisfied

/but actually wanting one now, mmm
 
2013-04-09 05:19:27 PM

Cheesehead_Dave: [lh3.ggpht.com image 850x274]


Bell's.  The reason I moved to Kalamazoo.  Damn tasty brew.
 
2013-04-09 05:26:37 PM

nocturnal001: DE? Like diatomaceous earth? Like high end swimming pool filters? That stuff?

Yup, skeletons of tiny little critters.


They make dynamite out of that stuff!!!
 
2013-04-09 05:26:52 PM

FloridaFarkTag: Whatever happened to just "beer flavored beer"?

When the snobs started treating beer like wine.....the "ambience of this pilsner is like a fruity crevasse".... or some BS like that... that killed beer consumption


Your mass-produced macrobrews from inbev and others are still the most popular, most consumed beers in this country. They're not going anywhere just because other people like more interesting styles of alcoholic beverages.
 
2013-04-09 05:27:16 PM

asynchron: Beerguy: [bythepint.com image 680x510]

Problem solved.

Came for weissbier porn, leaving satisfied

/but actually wanting one now, mmm


I actually made myself thirsty for one while I was posting that.
 
2013-04-09 05:28:36 PM

fickenchucker: While many mass market beers use DE filtration, Miller Genuine Draft does not.

MGD is pushed through ceramic filters and not pasteurized.


I wonder if any heavy-metals can be detected, at similar levels, from ceramic filtration.
 
2013-04-09 05:29:08 PM

Phaeon: fickenchucker: While many mass market beers use DE filtration, Miller Genuine Draft does not.

MGD is pushed through ceramic filters and not pasteurized.

DE? Like diatomaceous earth? Like high end swimming pool filters? That stuff?


Yep.  It's amazingly similar to the stuff quoted in TFA.
 
2013-04-09 05:31:39 PM

FloridaFarkTag: Whatever happened to just "beer flavored beer"?

When the snobs started treating beer like wine.....the "ambience of this pilsner is like a fruity crevasse".... or some BS like that... that killed beer consumption


Beer flavored beer was killed by prohibition. The only companies that survived were massive, and their post prohibition product was less beer, more water, more profit.

Also, how does someone else enjoying a beer make you enjoy it less? That's like anti-empathy.
 
2013-04-09 05:35:28 PM
Beer snobs rarely drink filtered beer.
 
2013-04-09 05:35:40 PM

impaler: Also, how does someone else enjoying a beer make you enjoy it less? That's like anti-empathy.


It speaks to the exclusive hipster in all of us.
 
2013-04-09 05:39:30 PM

impaler: fickenchucker: While many mass market beers use DE filtration, Miller Genuine Draft does not.

MGD is pushed through ceramic filters and not pasteurized.

I wonder if any heavy-metals can be detected, at similar levels, from ceramic filtration.


None are added to the brew through ceramic filtration.

/My dad was an engineer at Miller in the '80s and worked on MGD.
 
2013-04-09 05:40:52 PM

Ennuipoet: Yes, but in small doses over a long period of time does not one become immune to arsenic?  So, we should all be good right?


That was a plot point in some mystery novel back in the day, wasn't it? Part of my brain is being tickled, but it suggests that cyanide was the poison in question. I may be wrong.

As for arsenic, it had its heyday as a critical component in green dyes in the Victorian era. As far as I'm aware, lots of people were killed by it without building up a tolerance.

Citations (so teh Beeb had a documentary on about this the other night so it's fresh in my mind):

http://www.historyextra.com/blog/hidden-killers-victorian-home
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scheele's_Green
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01rp5hh
 
2013-04-09 05:41:41 PM
I know of someone who's grandmother would have LOVED to have this information a long time ago.....

encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com
 
2013-04-09 05:43:17 PM
FTFA:  "University of California, Fresno "

What the f*ck?  They are quoting people from made up colleges now. For shame NPR, for shame.
 
2013-04-09 05:44:39 PM

Uchiha_Cycliste: FTFA:  "University of California, Fresno "

What the f*ck?  They are quoting people from made up colleges now. For shame NPR, for shame.


cal state, u cal, its all the same to us on the east coast.
 
2013-04-09 05:44:54 PM
I don't drink beer. Disgusting stuff. I make my own hard cider instead. I find it more refreshing than any beer, and it tastes WAY better too.
 
2013-04-09 05:45:04 PM

iron de havilland: As for arsenic, it had its heyday as a critical component in green dyes in the Victorian era. As far as I'm aware, lots of people were killed by it without building up a tolerance.


I believe arsenic builds up in your system. Kind of the opposite of "building a tolerance."
 
2013-04-09 05:45:18 PM

Uchiha_Cycliste: FTFA:  "Fresno "



got over on your girlie cuz you know you she never says no
 
2013-04-09 05:45:50 PM

wildcardjack: Rice is high enough in arsenic that it's a small side dish only in my world. Turns out rice loves the arsenic, and will pull any out of the soil.


And a lot of the big boys use rice as a large part of the grain bill for american style pale lagers.Why ? its cheaper than malt. Even Coors uses it now.
 
2013-04-09 05:45:53 PM
Nietzche Bier

My liver is bad, IT MUST BE PUNISHED!
 
2013-04-09 05:47:09 PM

fickenchucker: None are added to the brew through ceramic filtration.

/My dad was an engineer at Miller in the '80s and worked on MGD.


Wouldn't they have said the same for DE before these tests?

FTFA: One reason that chemists are now discovering arsenic in beer is that testing methods are much more precise than in decades past, Boulton says, detecting low levels of naturally occurring elements that have always been in food products.

Either way, the levels are too low to care.
 
2013-04-09 05:54:12 PM

ph0rk: Uchiha_Cycliste: FTFA:  "University of California, Fresno "

What the f*ck?  They are quoting people from made up colleges now. For shame NPR, for shame.

cal state, u cal, its all the same to us on the east coast.


It's like saying U. Mass Harvard. =P One's a respectable system and the other is a, um, default.
 
2013-04-09 05:55:54 PM

Sultan Of Herf: /The Glenlivet & a Drew Estate Naturals please...


If we are being common, sure. In the same range but for a better highland single malt (which is often less expensive), do Grangestone 12 year. For a better highland single malt which is able to maintain flavor against cigars, do Glenmorangie Original. However, get rid of the cigar and instead sip yourself some Oban 14 or Lagavulin 16 (or cask strength when available).
 
2013-04-09 05:58:14 PM

impaler: fickenchucker: None are added to the brew through ceramic filtration.

/My dad was an engineer at Miller in the '80s and worked on MGD.

Wouldn't they have said the same for DE before these tests?

FTFA: One reason that chemists are now discovering arsenic in beer is that testing methods are much more precise than in decades past, Boulton says, detecting low levels of naturally occurring elements that have always been in food products.

Either way, the levels are too low to care.


They found it in the DE testing, but it was so low it didn't matter, so ultimately it's a non-starter issue, like IMPALER implied.
 
2013-04-09 06:06:10 PM

impaler: Beer snobs are against filtration. It removes stuff (and presumably affects taste) for the purpose of making the beer more appealing to the masses.


I don't filter, but mainly because I'm lazy. Just let it settle and don't drink the last swig.
 
2013-04-09 06:13:53 PM
Unfortunately it won't save you from "homebrew guy" and his room temperature chunky, cloudy, and half flat "masterpiece" that makes you want to vomit before you even had any.
 
2013-04-09 06:14:12 PM
www.mentalfloss.com

Snob.
 
2013-04-09 06:22:27 PM
Know how i know subby doesnt know a goddam f'n thing about homebrewing "beer snobs?"
 
2013-04-09 06:24:05 PM

Sultan Of Herf: Meh, beer is what the cretins drink. Beer is to booze what cigarettes are to aged hand rolled cigars.

/The Glenlivet & a Drew Estate Naturals please...


Whatever you say, pleb.
 
2013-04-09 06:33:46 PM
Just passing through the bottom half of a Sam Smith's oatmeal stout, so I guess that I'm probably getting a kick...

/stuff is like bottled sex
 
2013-04-09 07:38:43 PM

Vangor: Sultan Of Herf: /The Glenlivet & a Drew Estate Naturals please...

If we are being common, sure. In the same range but for a better highland single malt (which is often less expensive), do Grangestone 12 year. For a better highland single malt which is able to maintain flavor against cigars, do Glenmorangie Original. However, get rid of the cigar and instead sip yourself some Oban 14 or Lagavulin 16 (or cask strength when available).


Is Grangestone 18 year good? I bought some for a friend going through a divorce, but only so I could make a barely legal joke.
 
2013-04-09 07:42:10 PM

impaler: iron de havilland: As for arsenic, it had its heyday as a critical component in green dyes in the Victorian era. As far as I'm aware, lots of people were killed by it without building up a tolerance.

I believe arsenic builds up in your system. Kind of the opposite of "building a tolerance."


Yeah, that was my point.
 
2013-04-09 07:50:02 PM

impaler: Indeed. I didn't even think wine uses filtration, because it ages enough to let the yeast settle out.


This.  If you have to filter a wine, its too young.
 
2013-04-09 08:07:04 PM

Phaeon: Is Grangestone 18 year good? I bought some for a friend going through a divorce, but only so I could make a barely legal joke.


Grangestone is simply a surprisingly good highland, single malt scotch for the cost, with the 18  slightly better. Grangestone, Balvenie, and Glenmorangie all suffer from rather drastic diminishing returns (though the Balvenie Caribbean Cask is impressive) despite having a quality offering as standard. Still, the Grangestone 18 and 21 are about equal in cost to offerings such as the standard Oban or Lagavulin, thus if someone enjoys the flavor of Grangestone primarily then those are excellent choices. Me, I prefer variety, which is why my shelf has the Grangestone 12, Balvenie Caribbean, Glenmorangie Original, Macallan Cask, etc., because were I in the mood for Grangestone 21 I would probably rather a Lagavulin, but more scotch drinkers have a type.
 
2013-04-09 08:22:01 PM
Irish moss has arsenic?
 
2013-04-09 08:26:43 PM
Fortunately, my favorite beer is a Weizenbock:

1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-04-09 08:35:35 PM

Tyrone Slothrop: Irish moss has arsenic?


I prefer whirlfloc. Irish moss does not seem to be as clarifying and requires extra effort. Allows me to avoid using a prechiller.
 
2013-04-09 08:55:52 PM

Sultan Of Herf: Meh, beer is what the cretins drink. Beer is to booze what cigarettes are to aged hand rolled cigars.

/The Glenlivet & a Drew Estate Naturals please...


I'm betting your aged hand rolled cigars say "Swisher Sweets" on them somewhere
 
2013-04-09 09:17:44 PM

jgilb: I filter all of my beer by pouring it through old lace.


Speaking of, my grandma want's her panties back, she never had a chance to wash them.
 
2013-04-09 10:39:20 PM

Vangor: Tyrone Slothrop: Irish moss has arsenic?

I prefer whirlfloc. Irish moss does not seem to be as clarifying and requires extra effort. Allows me to avoid using a prechiller.


I'm a rookie to homebrewing, but doesn't a nice cold break provide much of the clarifying needed? Maybe I've just been focusing on my lagers which I've been lagering for 2 plus months anyway, could be different for ales.

Flragnararch: impaler: Indeed. I didn't even think wine uses filtration, because it ages enough to let the yeast settle out.

This. If you have to filter a wine, its too young.


Not sure this is an issue. Even young wines are still a couple years old by drinking/bottling time.
 
2013-04-09 10:57:54 PM

nocturnal001: I'm a rookie to homebrewing, but doesn't a nice cold break provide much of the clarifying needed? Maybe I've just been focusing on my lagers which I've been lagering for 2 plus months anyway, could be different for ales.


For lagers, the lower amount of malt and duration of fermentation will often produce far clearer beers without need for a kettle fining. And getting a fast cold break, under 10 minutes, is the vast majority of what is needed to remove haziness, but this is not likely without a few techniques and some equipment such as prechillers, whirlpool arms, or iced bottles. With only the wort chiller in and nothing further, I take just north 16 minutes, and with a half tab of whirlfloc I have never been dissatisfied with clarity.

This has simply become customary for me, so use of fining isn't necessary except in one instance. When you wash and save a highly vigorous yeast (have had American Ale strains which devour through ~1.045 to ~1.001 in a few days), you want this as remaining proteins do not have enough time to settle into the trub.
 
2013-04-09 11:27:09 PM

Vangor: nocturnal001: I'm a rookie to homebrewing, but doesn't a nice cold break provide much of the clarifying needed? Maybe I've just been focusing on my lagers which I've been lagering for 2 plus months anyway, could be different for ales.

For lagers, the lower amount of malt and duration of fermentation will often produce far clearer beers without need for a kettle fining. And getting a fast cold break, under 10 minutes, is the vast majority of what is needed to remove haziness, but this is not likely without a few techniques and some equipment such as prechillers, whirlpool arms, or iced bottles. With only the wort chiller in and nothing further, I take just north 16 minutes, and with a half tab of whirlfloc I have never been dissatisfied with clarity.

This has simply become customary for me, so use of fining isn't necessary except in one instance. When you wash and save a highly vigorous yeast (have had American Ale strains which devour through ~1.045 to ~1.001 in a few days), you want this as remaining proteins do not have enough time to settle into the trub.


how much of a lock do you have on temp control? You want to keep that yeast locked at 70 and under during Krausen. Otherwise, a runaway ferment will jack the primary temp upwards of 90f making all types of trouble and funny flavors.

We use a strain of American Ale as out primary house yeast and draw out primary for a week or so even if the strain will do the job in 24 hours if you let it.. and we are talking a 30bbl batch.
 
2013-04-09 11:42:33 PM

Cerebral Knievel: Otherwise, a runaway ferment will jack the primary temp upwards of 90f making all types of trouble and funny flavors.


This was honestly with one particular batch of a Wyeast American Ale; new packs are nowhere near as vigorous. Fortunately, mead is more my thing, and mead yeasts do not operate well over 70 at all, so I have temperature control down when need be.
 
2013-04-10 01:05:40 AM
I use to have a fermentation fridge. Boy did I love the Kolsch yeast fermenting at about 60 degrees.

Anyway, one time I tried to get a caramel taste by pulling off about a half gallon of wort and boiling it hard down to about a half gallon, and adding it to the boil. It didn't do much for taste, that I could detect, but it was one of the clearest beers I've ever made. The suspect it might be something to do with the massive hot break in the half gallon, but it might have been luck. Feel free to try it sometime.
 
2013-04-10 08:56:32 AM

impaler: I use to have a fermentation fridge. Boy did I love the Kolsch yeast fermenting at about 60 degrees.

Anyway, one time I tried to get a caramel taste by pulling off about a half gallon of wort and boiling it hard down to about a half gallon, and adding it to the boil. It didn't do much for taste, that I could detect, but it was one of the clearest beers I've ever made. The suspect it might be something to do with the massive hot break in the half gallon, but it might have been luck. Feel free to try it sometime.


A combo fermenter / kegerator is next on my buy list.
 
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