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(Metro)   "Ding Dong The Witch Is Dead" enters download chart top 40 following the wicked witch's death   (metro.co.uk) divider line 262
    More: Followup, ding-dong  
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9792 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Apr 2013 at 10:44 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-10 02:28:11 AM  

wotthefark: why do most Britons rejoice so..... ?

For
The Miners
The Shipbuilders
The Steelworkers
The Old that Froze to Death
The Old that Couldn't Afford Food
For the Thousands Made Homeless

For
The North
The Disenfranchised Black Youth
The Lost Generation of Young
The Hillsborough families
The men dead in a conflict designed to win her an election
The men traumatised from the Falklands War
For Northern Ireland

For every LGBT kid who committed suicide due to Section 28 in schools
The teachers
The victims of gaybashing which were never investigated due to pressure from her government
For the gay men stitched up and banged up for being gay

For
The women of Greenham Common who were beaten and had their kids forcibly taken into care for no reason
For the men and women assaulted in the Battle of the Beanfield
For the men and women consigned to the scrapheap
For the services that used to belong to all of us and now are badly run in the hands of the rich
For the country that used to stand for social justice and created the National Health Service
The mentally ill thrown out on the streets
The children abused in care homes and ignored or worse abused by some in her government

THAT (and so much more) is WHY !


So it would have been better for the whole nation to go down together as one big happy Labor family?

During the 1970's, the British economy lost almost 62,000 worker years of production from strikes and work stoppages due to labor disputes. The British rate of lost production due to strikes and work stoppages was about 150% higher than in the United States during the 1970's. By the 1990's, after the Thatcher government reforms, lost production due to strikes were less than 5% of the levels in the 1970's. In fact, during the 1990's, lost production due to strikes and labor disputes were 22% lower in Britain than in the United States (relative to the size of the countries' labor forces) and remain lower to this day.

Sometimes you have to break a few eggs to make an omelet...
 
2013-04-10 03:46:27 AM  
i.imgur.com
 
2013-04-10 05:32:16 AM  

Norfolking Chance: The entire country was up shiat creek with rampant unemployment, nationalised industries that had dragged the country into bankruptcy and unions whose leadership were living the good life and wanted to be more powerful than the elected government.


You really lose any authority when you talk about Thatcher and unemployment given that the previous Labour government was committed to Full Employment, and indeed there were about 1.5m unemployed when Thatcher took charge (about 6%, up from about 4%), and over 3m for most of the time she was in power (about 10-12%) - and this wasn't by coincidence of things outside her control, one of her first acts was to get interest rates jacked up, which of course was designed to increase unemployment (with the commensurate expected effect of reducing wage push inflation - of course that was only part of the inflation of the 1970s, much of it was related to OPEC and the energy crisis, which obviously started sorting itself out in the early 1980s as the high prices during some of the 70s had caused a lot more investment and development of new oil fields/techniques and hence the glut and low price during the 80s).

http://www.tradingeconomics.com/united-kingdom/unemployment-rate

Also nation debt was stable in the UK throught the 70s at about 40% of GDP - in the second half of the 80s it was paid down to under 30% by the Thatcher government (mostly from NSO revenues), but this was spent by the Major government so it was back at around 40% of GDP by the time "New Labour" takes power (who then did their own cycle of paying it down in their first term or so, before easing the purse strings and on course to head back to about 40% or so again, that is until the global economy exploded.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:UK_GDP.png

The same with the coal industry. The main use for coal was in power stations, you know those smoke chugging power stations that belch out CO2, sulphur and radioactivity that needed to be replaced with much cleaner energy if we want to slow down climate change.
That would be a valid point if we had actually moved away from using coal in that era - we didn't, as late as 1991 coal was still nearly 70% of UK Energy production (pretty much the same area it had been since the 60s), it was just being shipped from Australia instead of dug out of the ground locally (after 1991 we switched over largely to Gas as a cheap/easy way of cutting CO2 after signing up to Kyoto)

http://www.economicshelp.org/blog/6498/energy/the-decline-of-the-uk- co al-industry/
(see the graph title Energy Sources UK about half way down)
 
2013-04-10 05:47:55 AM  

Gleeman: During the 1970's, the British economy lost almost 62,000 worker years of production from strikes and work stoppages due to labor disputes.


And during the 1980s, the British economy lost over 14 million worker years of production from increased unemployment compared to the 1970s.

Which is higher: 62,000 or 14,000,000?
 
2013-04-10 09:51:54 AM  

xria: Gleeman: During the 1970's, the British economy lost almost 62,000 worker years of production from strikes and work stoppages due to labor disputes.

And during the 1980s, the British economy lost over 14 million worker years of production from increased unemployment compared to the 1970s.

Which is higher: 62,000 or 14,000,000?


But would the economy have recovered at all without Thatcher's policies? What was the unemployment at the end of her administration, not at the beginning of the recover?
 
2013-04-10 10:37:08 AM  

Langdon_777: skullkrusher: Mrtraveler01: Cataholic: Fart_Machine: Cataholic: Hiro-ACiD: Nice win for Nelson Mandela. I imagine he cracked a tallboy and did a little dance.

Amazing that the left has completely whitewashed his reputation.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umkhonto_we_Sizwe

The ANC was the best of both worlds, communist and terrorist.

We get it.  You're still butthurt about the fall of Apartheid.

Careful, your false dichotomy is showing.

I miss Apartheid too.

Nelson Mandela was a founding member of Umkhonto we Sizwe. Umkhonto we Sizwe engaged in terroristic activities. Looks like it is possible for reality based entities to both oppose Apartheid and call ANC a terrorist organization. At least for the part of its history where Thatcher would be commenting on their activities.

You do realise that there comes a time when "terroistic activites" are called for?

Pretty sure the Germans considered the french resistance terrorists ...


no, I don't and you're a terrible person for saying so.
 
2013-04-10 11:11:15 AM  
Seriously - there is never a time?

Not some point in a string of events that should result in a peaceful rational person taking up arms?

(I often have this argument with a christian mate, who says he would not destroy his sisters murderer if he could in the moment of it happening ... I just bring up Ecclesiastes 3:1)

If you support a military, a justice system or even a police force then you have to accept there is a time and place for everything.

I am pretty sure violence by the abused majority in South Africa was waaay overdue and let us face it, it did lead too a better result.

(But of course this can be abused and peeps can act badly ... I am looking at you 'suicide bombers', specifically Irgun and Lehi.)
 
2013-04-10 12:27:12 PM  
Gleeman
During the 1970's, the British economy lost almost 62,000 worker years of production from strikes and work stoppages due to labor disputes. The British rate of lost production due to strikes and work stoppages was about 150% higher than in the United States during the 1970's. By the 1990's, after the Thatcher government reforms, lost production due to strikes were less than 5% of the levels in the 1970's. In fact, during the 1990's, lost production due to strikes and labor disputes were 22% lower in Britain than in the United States (relative to the size of the countries' labor forces) and remain lower to this day.

IOW she broke the back of the working class.

But would the economy have recovered at all without Thatcher's policies?

Did it? It recovered for the rich, maybe.
 
2013-04-10 01:11:09 PM  

Langdon_777: Seriously - there is never a time?

Not some point in a string of events that should result in a peaceful rational person taking up arms?

(I often have this argument with a christian mate, who says he would not destroy his sisters murderer if he could in the moment of it happening ... I just bring up Ecclesiastes 3:1)

If you support a military, a justice system or even a police force then you have to accept there is a time and place for everything.

I am pretty sure violence by the abused majority in South Africa was waaay overdue and let us face it, it did lead too a better result.

(But of course this can be abused and peeps can act badly ... I am looking at you 'suicide bombers', specifically Irgun and Lehi.)


attacking military installations is not terrorism. That is revolution if done from within. Attacking soft targets and killing civilians, as the ANC's military wing did, IS terrorism
 
2013-04-11 04:14:35 AM  

skullkrusher: Langdon_777: Seriously - there is never a time?

Not some point in a string of events that should result in a peaceful rational person taking up arms?

(I often have this argument with a christian mate, who says he would not destroy his sisters murderer if he could in the moment of it happening ... I just bring up Ecclesiastes 3:1)

If you support a military, a justice system or even a police force then you have to accept there is a time and place for everything.

I am pretty sure violence by the abused majority in South Africa was waaay overdue and let us face it, it did lead too a better result.

(But of course this can be abused and peeps can act badly ... I am looking at you 'suicide bombers', specifically Irgun and Lehi.)

attacking military installations is not terrorism. That is revolution if done from within. Attacking soft targets and killing civilians, as the ANC's military wing did, IS terrorism


Yeah it would be nice to thinks so.

Alas go back at look at the shock and awe bombings at the start of the last invasion of Iraq and try and tell me that no civilians were involved.

Why should carpet bombing get an exemption and yet a well placed bomb in a cafe shouldn't (the aim was to kill those two british soldiers having a coffee, sorry about the rest of the customers.)
 
2013-04-11 10:55:42 AM  
We're the entire cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki military or civilian targets justifying the deaths of hundreds of thousands of civilians?

Discuss.
 
2013-04-12 03:23:32 PM  

RanDomino: Gleeman
During the 1970's, the British economy lost almost 62,000 worker years of production from strikes and work stoppages due to labor disputes. The British rate of lost production due to strikes and work stoppages was about 150% higher than in the United States during the 1970's. By the 1990's, after the Thatcher government reforms, lost production due to strikes were less than 5% of the levels in the 1970's. In fact, during the 1990's, lost production due to strikes and labor disputes were 22% lower in Britain than in the United States (relative to the size of the countries' labor forces) and remain lower to this day.

IOW she broke the back of the working class.

But would the economy have recovered at all without Thatcher's policies?

Did it? It recovered for the rich, maybe.


70s: IMF bailout, 30%+ inflation, 80%+ taxation, 3-day week, rolling power cuts, rubbish on the streets, the dead piling up

80s: butthurt socialists who didn't get their way.
 
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