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(io9)   Nine of the most fascinating abandoned mansions worldwide. Subby would haunt that   (io9.com) divider line 63
    More: Cool, Prince of the Sa'id  
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21572 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Apr 2013 at 7:21 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-09 01:20:02 AM  
neato.
 
2013-04-09 01:39:40 AM  

Bathia_Mapes: iheartscotch: Walker: Why doesn't anyone try and save these masterpieces?

Um; have you never read a Steven King novel?

/ two words: Rose Red

He wrote the screenplay for Rose Red, not a novel.


You knew what I ment, dammit

/ I keed, I keed
 
2013-04-09 02:20:14 AM  

freetomato: p89tech: tours of Bannerman's Island

http://bannermancastle.org/island-tours.html

it's a little over an hour north of NYC, easy to get to by train.

also, to the issue of reno, I can't believe no one has mentioned asbestos, lead paint, radium paint...


Not to mention bringing them up to ADA code (in the US).  It's not nearly in the same ballpark as far as the enormity and grandeur of the structures in TFA, but my family lives in  the Gold County in California and historic structures are falling apart for a different reason.  Many Gold Rush-era buildings are still in use.  The guy who was the subject of a fark thread a while back, a Bay Area disabled attorney who makes his living solely by sending scouts out to find non-compliant businesses to sue, has managed to shut a half dozen or so mom and pop businesses down because the ramps up to their 160 year old buildings were not perfectly up to ADA code.  They could either go broke fighting for a time extension to come up with the thousands to get an old building modernized, or walk away paying out a settlement to an SOB who wouldn't recognize the business if he woke up on their floor. So either way, the business owner is screwed and the local economy is screwed.  There are too many empty storefronts where there used to be businesses that thrived on local business alone, not tourism.  If it's that expensive and tough to bring a simple, Gold Rush era wooden building to modern code, I can't imagine the nightmare a gigantic castle would be.  And that's a damn shame.  I'm all for disabled Americans having access to everything possible, but shouldn't those who own historic properties be given time to do it right, without bankcrupting themselves?

/My train tends to derail this time of night.


i know when we where in a "Historical Building" we where given a list of upgrades and chances we would have to do by the city. We called the local historical society about it (one of the biggest was that we had to replace the orginal spiral stair case because the bars where too far apart) a week later everything was waived by the city and all we had to do is build a external ramp and put up a sign saying the upstairs was off limits to non-employes
 
2013-04-09 02:45:10 AM  

thenumber5: i know when we where in a "Historical Building" we where given a list of upgrades and chances we would have to do by the city. We called the local historical society about it (one of the biggest was that we had to replace the orginal spiral stair case because the bars where too far apart) a week later everything was waived by the city and all we had to do is build a external ramp and put up a sign saying the upstairs was off limits to non-employes


This jerk makes a living out of seeking non-compliance. He is about him, not other disabled folks. This is one of those MF rich guys that the wealth is soaked up...no matter how hard you work, part of it is theirs.

//www.mtdemocrat.com/news/ada-attorney-forces-out-small-business - pollock/">http://www.mtdemocrat.com/news/ada-attorney-forces-out-smal l-business- pollock/

The historical significance is secondary.
 
2013-04-09 03:57:51 AM  

freetomato: thenumber5: i know when we where in a "Historical Building" we where given a list of upgrades and chances we would have to do by the city. We called the local historical society about it (one of the biggest was that we had to replace the orginal spiral stair case because the bars where too far apart) a week later everything was waived by the city and all we had to do is build a external ramp and put up a sign saying the upstairs was off limits to non-employes

This jerk makes a living out of seeking non-compliance. He is about him, not other disabled folks. This is one of those MF rich guys that the wealth is soaked up...no matter how hard you work, part of it is theirs.

//www.mtdemocrat.com/news/ada-attorney-forces-out-small-business - pollock/">http://www.mtdemocrat.com/news/ada-attorney-forces-out-smal l-business- pollock/

The historical significance is secondary.


That's for businesses and new buildings. If you've got a historical site, there is f*ck-all this jerk can do about it, as long as there is external access. And sometimes not even then if it would compromise the structural integrity or asthetic design of the historical structure.

I am a massive fan of ADA, but I'd like to take that asshole to Harper's Ferry, and push him down the historical stairs to the historical chapel. Totally non-compliant, and unable to be made so.
 
2013-04-09 04:56:50 AM  

Gyrfalcon: freetomato: thenumber5: i know when we where in a "Historical Building" we where given a list of upgrades and chances we would have to do by the city. We called the local historical society about it (one of the biggest was that we had to replace the orginal spiral stair case because the bars where too far apart) a week later everything was waived by the city and all we had to do is build a external ramp and put up a sign saying the upstairs was off limits to non-employes

This jerk makes a living out of seeking non-compliance. He is about him, not other disabled folks. This is one of those MF rich guys that the wealth is soaked up...no matter how hard you work, part of it is theirs.

//www.mtdemocrat.com/news/ada-attorney-forces-out-small-business - pollock/">http://www.mtdemocrat.com/news/ada-attorney-forces-out-smal l-business- pollock/

The historical significance is secondary.

That's for businesses and new buildings. If you've got a historical site, there is f*ck-all this jerk can do about it, as long as there is external access. And sometimes not even then if it would compromise the structural integrity or asthetic design of the historical structure.

I am a massive fan of ADA, but I'd like to take that asshole to Harper's Ferry, and push him down the historical stairs to the historical chapel. Totally non-compliant, and unable to be made so.


I approve of everything you just said, and generalize it to: everything in the future needs to be made to ADA standards, everything older that can be made reasonibly ADA compliant with minor modification needs to happen, but some old things gets a fark you, don't deny everyone else because your Rascal can't handle Moab.
 
2013-04-09 06:47:18 AM  
Château de Noisy? That place sounds annoying.
 
2013-04-09 08:01:16 AM  
God, I love urbex. Best explore was a derelict mental hospital, St Mary's, not far from where I live. It was a huge place the size of a small town. Even in bright daylight it was eerie and poignant, nothing on Earth would have persuaded me to be there after dark.
 
2013-04-09 08:24:19 AM  

IamPatSajak: The homes formerly owned by the DuPont family in the SE PA area are amazing. I am a photographer and rotate between a few of them every week. I love that some people had the forethought to donate their land or built a trust to keep it preserved for public use. I shoot around some crumbling mansions as well but Longwood Gardens and Ridley Creek State Park still look as beautiful as they did 100 years ago.


I am in the area and have been looking for some places to get my feet wet, so to speak. On some of the roads out of WC towards Delco I have seen some of the (what I believe are) DuPont building but they were always heavily fenced...

Any hints/tips for noob?...
 
2013-04-09 01:27:47 PM  

freetomato: p89tech: tours of Bannerman's Island

http://bannermancastle.org/island-tours.html

it's a little over an hour north of NYC, easy to get to by train.

also, to the issue of reno, I can't believe no one has mentioned asbestos, lead paint, radium paint...


Not to mention bringing them up to ADA code (in the US).  It's not nearly in the same ballpark as far as the enormity and grandeur of the structures in TFA, but my family lives in  the Gold County in California and historic structures are falling apart for a different reason.  Many Gold Rush-era buildings are still in use.  The guy who was the subject of a fark thread a while back, a Bay Area disabled attorney who makes his living solely by sending scouts out to find non-compliant businesses to sue, has managed to shut a half dozen or so mom and pop businesses down because the ramps up to their 160 year old buildings were not perfectly up to ADA code.  They could either go broke fighting for a time extension to come up with the thousands to get an old building modernized, or walk away paying out a settlement to an SOB who wouldn't recognize the business if he woke up on their floor. So either way, the business owner is screwed and the local economy is screwed.  There are too many empty storefronts where there used to be businesses that thrived on local business alone, not tourism.  If it's that expensive and tough to bring a simple, Gold Rush era wooden building to modern code, I can't imagine the nightmare a gigantic castle would be.  And that's a damn shame.  I'm all for disabled Americans having access to everything possible, but shouldn't those who own historic properties be given time to do it right, without bankcrupting themselves?

/My train tends to derail this time of night.


Our firm is currently working on an ADA renovation, conversion from a 55,000 sq.ft home (with an additional ~80,000 sq.ft. servant basement) to hotel and expansion of a period correct new wing of the Vanderbilt mansion of Elm Court in Lenox Mass.

Historic Photos, after the property was left abandoned for decades. More recently, heirs purchased the property and started restoring it, before they sold it to our client:
2.bp.blogspot.com

www.newyorksocialdiary.com


Today:
berkshires.org

media-cdn.tripadvisor.com

One project we're currently throwing around is the restoration and renovation of the old greenhouse facilities to host dining options for large gatherings. Instead of replacing the glass, we'd inlay glass solar panels to offer shading, while maintaining the original structure's look, and power much of the facility.
 
2013-04-09 03:00:50 PM  

MrSteve007: freetomato: p89tech: tours of Bannerman's Island

http://bannermancastle.org/island-tours.html

it's a little over an hour north of NYC, easy to get to by train.

also, to the issue of reno, I can't believe no one has mentioned asbestos, lead paint, radium paint...


Not to mention bringing them up to ADA code (in the US).  It's not nearly in the same ballpark as far as the enormity and grandeur of the structures in TFA, but my family lives in  the Gold County in California and historic structures are falling apart for a different reason.  Many Gold Rush-era buildings are still in use.  The guy who was the subject of a fark thread a while back, a Bay Area disabled attorney who makes his living solely by sending scouts out to find non-compliant businesses to sue, has managed to shut a half dozen or so mom and pop businesses down because the ramps up to their 160 year old buildings were not perfectly up to ADA code.  They could either go broke fighting for a time extension to come up with the thousands to get an old building modernized, or walk away paying out a settlement to an SOB who wouldn't recognize the business if he woke up on their floor. So either way, the business owner is screwed and the local economy is screwed.  There are too many empty storefronts where there used to be businesses that thrived on local business alone, not tourism.  If it's that expensive and tough to bring a simple, Gold Rush era wooden building to modern code, I can't imagine the nightmare a gigantic castle would be.  And that's a damn shame.  I'm all for disabled Americans having access to everything possible, but shouldn't those who own historic properties be given time to do it right, without bankcrupting themselves?

/My train tends to derail this time of night.

Our firm is currently working on an ADA renovation, conversion from a 55,000 sq.ft home (with an additional ~80,000 sq.ft. servant basement) to hotel and expansion of a period correct new wing of the Vanderbilt mansion of ...



That is going to be gorgeous.
 
2013-04-09 06:26:59 PM  

Walker: Why doesn't anyone try and save these masterpieces?


i.imgur.com
 
2013-04-09 07:50:01 PM  

Dead_Cat_In_A_Tophat: Any of you farkers wanna move in and squat get as a mother farkin FARK mansion !? they're abandoned supposedly, looks like its easy nuf to get in without furthering any damage. Isnt that how the law goes?


Only if we can make it a girls school again, perhaps a home for "wayward girls?"
 
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