If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Guardian)   WikiLeaks at it again. Releases secret data from 1973-1976. Apparently Alice Cooper is firing his band and Nixon is a Dick   (guardian.co.uk) divider line 81
    More: Followup, WikiLeaks, Henry Kissinger  
•       •       •

5610 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Apr 2013 at 1:58 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



81 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-04-08 12:24:51 PM
I remember when it was rumored that Ford was replacing his Secretary of State and one headline read," I wonder who's Kissinger now"...... All I got.....
 
2013-04-08 01:12:19 PM
Have you heard this new band? ABBA.
 
2013-04-08 01:19:07 PM

vernonFL: Have you heard this new band? ABBA.


They sound great on Quaaludes.
 
2013-04-08 02:00:07 PM
Kiss Army!
 
2013-04-08 02:00:16 PM
He added that his mother, who lives in Australia, had told him he was being kept at the embassy "with nothing to do but work on WikiLeaks material".

Translation: 'The longer I'm stuck in here, the more embarrassing infodumps I'm going to make, so ha ha neener neener'.
 
2013-04-08 02:00:56 PM

vernonFL: Have you heard this new band? ABBA.


Man, and here I was just getting into The Beatles.
 
2013-04-08 02:01:33 PM
Dude you got 'ludes??
I got the AWESOME Acapulco Gold for about $60 a pound.
Hardly any stems.
 
2013-04-08 02:06:08 PM
Hey, there's a new show from HR Puff & Stuff on!!!
 
2013-04-08 02:09:08 PM
"There's a reason we've never gone back to the moon..........

i.cdn.turner.com
 
2013-04-08 02:09:58 PM
Trolling headline is trolling.

This is not "secret" data.  This information was lawfully declassified and made available through the US National Archives.  Wikileaks is reposting stuff already in the open in this case.  Even TFA says this.

Interesting reading, but not "secrets".
 
2013-04-08 02:17:38 PM

Silverstaff: Trolling headline is trolling.

This is not "secret" data.  This information was lawfully declassified and made available through the US National Archives.  Wikileaks is reposting stuff already in the open in this case.  Even TFA says this.

Interesting reading, but not "secrets".


www.morethings.com
 
2013-04-08 02:18:27 PM

ChipNASA: "There's a reason we've never gone back to the moon..........

[i.cdn.turner.com image 545x363]


Well? WTF is it?
 
2013-04-08 02:22:09 PM

Silverstaff: Trolling headline is trolling.

This is not "secret" data.  This information was lawfully declassified and made available through the US National Archives.  Wikileaks is reposting stuff already in the open in this case.  Even TFA says this.

Interesting reading, but not "secrets".


If it means one less FOIA request to make and be branded an anti-government truth-seeking activist, I'm all for it.
 
2013-04-08 02:23:36 PM
This should happen automatically anyway.  Nothing should be allowed to be classified for more than 25 years, without a showing of direct and immediate harm to some who is still alive, such as a double agent or informant.   Democracy dies behind closed doors
 
2013-04-08 02:23:51 PM
Some damn fine albums came out in 1973:

www.besteveralbums.comwww.besteveralbums.comwww.besteveralbums.comwww.besteveralbums.com
static.rateyourmusic.comstatic.rateyourmusic.comwww.besteveralbums.comwww.besteveralbums.com

No wonder these guys are still virtually unknown:
(personal favorite lost gem from that year)

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-04-08 02:25:33 PM
I've never understood the support for Assange and Manning, specifically around the "leaked" consular cables.

It is the job of consular officers to provide U.S. intelligence with both subjective and objective reports on the regions in which they are stationed. How else is intelligence information to be gathered?

Why do people think they have the right to know the contents of these reports? The whole point of them is that they have to be secret in order for them to be candid.

What's next for Assange? Obtaining the voting records of everyone participating in a secret balot, because secrets are intrinsically bad?

I really don't get it.
 
2013-04-08 02:36:05 PM
Yeah, you want to impress me, Julian? Leak some documents about all those conspiracies the U.S. government has been hiding for decades. Where's my UFO proof, asshole? Where's my LBJ talking about how he whacked Kennedy? You got one leak from one farked-up kid, which didn't reveal anything illegal, and you think you're all that. Wanker.
 
2013-04-08 02:42:01 PM

lostcat: Why do people think they have the right to know the contents of these reports?


In some cases, the reports detailed possible cover ups of war crimes. CIA torture and stuff like that.
 
2013-04-08 02:42:02 PM

lostcat: I've never understood the support for Assange and Manning, specifically around the "leaked" consular cables.

It is the job of consular officers to provide U.S. intelligence with both subjective and objective reports on the regions in which they are stationed. How else is intelligence information to be gathered?

Why do people think they have the right to know the contents of these reports? The whole point of them is that they have to be secret in order for them to be candid.

What's next for Assange? Obtaining the voting records of everyone participating in a secret balot, because secrets are intrinsically bad?

I really don't get it.



That right there is the heart of the problem: I can;t be candid if anyone knows what I'm saying.   These folks work for me, and you, and we have no idea how competent they are, whether we are getting our money's worth from their labors if they can just slap a calssified stamp over every damn report.  It might be somewhat embarassing sometime for the country that is the subject of these reports but so. the fark. what?  It isn;t like they are unaware of the negative things going on in their own countires, and Diplomacy SHOULDN'T be about humoring other countries' deluded images of themselves.  Tibet never was part of China until the late 1950's and Taiwan has never been.  Saying these objective truths outloud should be considered a threat to US-SIno realtions somehow, and more than a cable saying that Kim Jong Il didn;t actually hit 18 holes in one on his first trip to the golf course
 
2013-04-08 02:48:27 PM
Interesting stuff?

Details from the Six Day War?
The health decline of Mao?
How the Army screwed the pooch in Saigon?
The tracking of Seinn Fein?
Black September?

It was just about as scary then as it is now.
 
2013-04-08 02:49:32 PM
My friend managed Cooper back in the day, after Vince took the name from the band, they all wanted out. The goal in the beginning was to make 1 million dollars each, they made that and more. At a friends wedding on Grossle Ille Mi, the band got into fist fights and from then on just finished up their contractual obligations. Vince became the band after that and they were never as good again. Sorry Steve you were good  but the original band was better.
 
2013-04-08 02:49:38 PM

Magorn: lostcat: I've never understood the support for Assange and Manning, specifically around the "leaked" consular cables.

Diplomacy SHOULDN'T be about humoring other countries' deluded images of themselves.


I'm pretty sure that Diplomacy has a lot to do with humoring other countries in whatever way is necessary to see that our own interests are met.
 
2013-04-08 02:49:45 PM
This just in:

robertmcoles.files.wordpress.com

Governments have secrets. And we're all better off not knowing about them. It makes everything run a little bit smoother.

Now stop worrying and enjoy your life.
 
2013-04-08 02:52:00 PM
I will be really impressed with Wikileaks when they start releasing secret Chinese documents.

/Mao liked frilly underwear.
 
2013-04-08 02:52:09 PM
Any secrets to what made SNL funny back then?
 
2013-04-08 02:52:27 PM

Magorn: This should happen automatically anyway.  Nothing should be allowed to be classified for more than 25 years, without a showing of direct and immediate harm to some who is still alive, such as a double agent or informant.   Democracy dies behind closed doors


Per the current executive order, there is not supposed to be anything classified longer than 25 years (and no more "indefinite" classifications).  One of the problems with some of the older stuff is trying to figure out who would actually be in charge of declassifying it, if the originating agency no longer exists.

http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Executive_Order_13526
 
2013-04-08 02:54:33 PM

Another Government Employee: Interesting stuff?

Details from the Six Day War?
The health decline of Mao?
How the Army screwed the pooch in Saigon?
The tracking of Seinn Fein?
Black September?

It was just about as scary then as it is now.


What's scary now? A half-assed, pseudo-nuclear-armed North Korea? Compared to thousands of Soviet tanks poised on the West German border and thousands of nuclear missiles on short-launch status aimed at U.S. cities? The farking '70s were DANGEROUS, man; today is like the Disney version of the world in 1975. War has been declining since the Soviet Union fell (not surprisingly, as they were funding many of the insurgencies around the world).

www.systemicpeace.org
 
2013-04-08 02:55:31 PM

Ishkur: This just in:

[robertmcoles.files.wordpress.com image 450x500]

Governments have secrets. And we're all better off not knowing about them. It makes everything run a little bit smoother.

Now stop worrying and enjoy your life.


And don't ask why when someone hijacks planes and flies them into buildings. The government will explain everything you need to know.
 
2013-04-08 02:55:33 PM

Onkel Buck: Any secrets to what made SNL funny back then?


They didn't know what the hell they were doing.
 
2013-04-08 02:58:48 PM

Onkel Buck: Any secrets to what made SNL funny back then?


That was before they ignored their own warning:
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-04-08 03:01:10 PM

Onkel Buck: Any secrets to what made SNL funny back then?


Cocaine
 
2013-04-08 03:09:04 PM

Onkel Buck: Any secrets to what made SNL funny back then?


 I was 20 when it premiered, and they were as hit and miss as the current cast. Loved it because it was different and occasionally right on the mark, sometimes it was painfully bad (skits with a good mremise but no ending were my pet-peeve) . SCTV was better.
 
2013-04-08 03:14:55 PM

lostcat: I've never understood the support for Assange and Manning, specifically around the "leaked" consular cables.

It is the job of consular officers to provide U.S. intelligence with both subjective and objective reports on the regions in which they are stationed. How else is intelligence information to be gathered?

Why do people think they have the right to know the contents of these reports? The whole point of them is that they have to be secret in order for them to be candid.

What's next for Assange? Obtaining the voting records of everyone participating in a secret balot, because secrets are intrinsically bad?

I really don't get it.


This.

Of course, when I say this stuff on Fark, Manning and Assange's white knights call me fascist or sheeple or something.

We've got a lot of Rebels without a Clue in this country.  Sometimes secrets exist for very good reasons, John Q. Public doesn't get to make the call of if it's a good reason or not anymore than he can decide if we go to war or what taxes he'll be paying this year, and diplomatic communications are secret for extremely good reason.
 
2013-04-08 03:20:13 PM

lostcat: I've never understood the support for Assange and Manning, specifically around the "leaked" consular cables.

It is the job of consular officers to provide U.S. intelligence with both subjective and objective reports on the regions in which they are stationed. How else is intelligence information to be gathered?

Why do people think they have the right to know the contents of these reports? The whole point of them is that they have to be secret in order for them to be candid.

What's next for Assange? Obtaining the voting records of everyone participating in a secret balot, because secrets are intrinsically bad?

I really don't get it.


Assange has little to do with it.  The role of wikileaks is to exist.  Not to seek.  It is a method of distribution, not a creator in and of itself. (Assange, obviously, feels he personally has a role to play, as well, but that's beside the point)  Personally, I don't particularly care about Assange, I am somewhat ambivalent about Manning (so far I've yet to see any real indication of any sort of gross moral failing that would require a whistle blower), but wikileaks itself I approve of existing.
 
2013-04-08 03:27:59 PM
73-76, that's great. most of the internet population wasn't born yet.
 
2013-04-08 03:30:22 PM
i suport the concept of wikileaks, but is too bad its "Face" is this Paranoid with delusions of grandeur and a martyr complex

Not sure who thinks hiding in a embassy when your wanted for questioning in a rape case some how proves your innocent
 
2013-04-08 03:33:00 PM

Silverstaff: Sometimes secrets exist for very good reasons


So you're okay with the NSC secretly running cocaine through Panama to pay for explosives to kill US Marines in Beirut, then?
Because, you know, "national security."

I mean it's not like you or I have to actually live in Chile or Cambodia, so who really cares, right?
 
2013-04-08 03:36:17 PM

macadamnut: Silverstaff: Sometimes secrets exist for very good reasons

So you're okay with the NSC secretly running cocaine through Panama to pay for explosives to kill US Marines in Beirut, then?
Because, you know, "national security."

I mean it's not like you or I have to actually live in Chile or Cambodia, so who really cares, right?


and some times they are used to hide horrible things

but not everything is a cover up
 
2013-04-08 03:59:09 PM

Magorn: That right there is the heart of the problem: I can;t be candid if anyone knows what I'm saying. These folks work for me, and you, and we have no idea how competent they are, whether we are getting our money's worth from their labors if they can just slap a calssified stamp over every damn report. It might be somewhat embarassing sometime for the country that is the subject of these reports but so. the fark. what? It isn;t like they are unaware of the negative things going on in their own countires, and Diplomacy SHOULDN'T be about humoring other countries' deluded images of themselves. Tibet never was part of China until the late 1950's and Taiwan has never been. Saying these objective truths outloud should be considered a threat to US-SIno realtions somehow, and more than a cable saying that Kim Jong Il didn;t actually hit 18 holes in one on his first trip to the golf course


And there's stuff that are useful for our files but no need to make public declarations.  Like what came out in the last cable release bullcrap.  It's all well and good for us to keep a file noting that Bolivia's transportation minister admitted to our ambassador that he uses prostitutes every weekend, but there's no reason for the US government to announce it.
 
2013-04-08 04:02:40 PM

thenumber5: macadamnut: Silverstaff: Sometimes secrets exist for very good reasons

So you're okay with the NSC secretly running cocaine through Panama to pay for explosives to kill US Marines in Beirut, then?
Because, you know, "national security."

I mean it's not like you or I have to actually live in Chile or Cambodia, so who really cares, right?

and some times they are used to hide horrible things

but not everything is a cover up


You're right. Maybe if we give government officials blanket immunity from criminal prosecution, they can do their dodgy kickbacks and war crimes right out in the open and only classify the real state secrets.
 
2013-04-08 04:12:04 PM

macadamnut: Silverstaff: Sometimes secrets exist for very good reasons

So you're okay with the NSC secretly running cocaine through Panama to pay for explosives to kill US Marines in Beirut, then?
Because, you know, "national security."

I mean it's not like you or I have to actually live in Chile or Cambodia, so who really cares, right?


There's a huge difference between the secret arragements that are being made with foreign powers that jeopordize people and principles, and the cables that consular intelligence officers submit to the State Department to understand the disposisition of various entities in that officer's location.

For example, I recently met the Consul to Japan stationed in Fukuoka just before he was moved to a new post. He would be responsible for reporting to the State Department about what the notable public figures in the area are up to, public opinion on Japanese and world events, etc. This is so that the State Department has data to work with about locations all over the world. He should be able to send those reports and expect that their contents will remain secret, to prevent embarassment when he reports that so-and-so is a womanizing drunk, and we should not be backing him, or what have you.
 
2013-04-08 04:18:56 PM
He said WikiLeaks had developed sophisticated technical systems to deal with complex and voluminous data.

Having "developed" some "sophisticated technical systems to deal with complex and voluminous data," I'm pretty sure this sounds bigger than it really is. Then again I might just be the ITG of the punchcard business - has anyone seen the code for this supposed system? Have they opened it up? Maybe I'll go looking for it later.
 
2013-04-08 04:19:53 PM

Satanic_Hamster: Magorn: That right there is the heart of the problem: I can;t be candid if anyone knows what I'm saying. These folks work for me, and you, and we have no idea how competent they are, whether we are getting our money's worth from their labors if they can just slap a calssified stamp over every damn report. It might be somewhat embarassing sometime for the country that is the subject of these reports but so. the fark. what? It isn;t like they are unaware of the negative things going on in their own countires, and Diplomacy SHOULDN'T be about humoring other countries' deluded images of themselves. Tibet never was part of China until the late 1950's and Taiwan has never been. Saying these objective truths outloud should be considered a threat to US-SIno realtions somehow, and more than a cable saying that Kim Jong Il didn;t actually hit 18 holes in one on his first trip to the golf course

And there's stuff that are useful for our files but no need to make public declarations.  Like what came out in the last cable release bullcrap.  It's all well and good for us to keep a file noting that Bolivia's transportation minister admitted to our ambassador that he uses prostitutes every weekend, but there's no reason for the US government to announce it.


but for every one of those there is a cable like the Khalilzad  cable from Baghdad in 2006 that completely exploded everything the Bush Adminstration was claiming about Iraq and the progress we were making there, and IMHO had a lot to do with shifing public opinion towards looking for an exit strategy and changing the outcome of the 2006 elections
 
2013-04-08 04:21:46 PM

Magorn: This should happen automatically anyway.  Nothing should be allowed to be classified for more than 25 years, without a showing of direct and immediate harm to some who is still alive, such as a double agent or informant.   Democracy dies behind closed doors


The possible reasons to keep something classified are numerous and legitimate. Methods of collection, revealing our capability, stuff they STILL do that makes them vulnerable. Stuff they still do that makes US vulnerable. And so on, and so on.

Plenty of valid reasons, and most of the incentives are aligned to keep you from producing classified material.
 
2013-04-08 04:24:39 PM

Another Government Employee: How the Army screwed the pooch in Saigon?


Well, considering the US Army wasn't in Vietnam '73-'76, I'd be surprised if they did something to screw the pooch.
 
2013-04-08 04:36:55 PM

vygramul: Magorn: This should happen automatically anyway.  Nothing should be allowed to be classified for more than 25 years, without a showing of direct and immediate harm to some who is still alive, such as a double agent or informant.   Democracy dies behind closed doors

The possible reasons to keep something classified are numerous and legitimate. Methods of collection, revealing our capability, stuff they STILL do that makes them vulnerable. Stuff they still do that makes US vulnerable. And so on, and so on.

Plenty of valid reasons, and most of the incentives are aligned to keep you from producing classified material.


OTOH the National Archives Annex in College Park MD has a classified document dated 1917.   And it isn;t merely classified because it slipped through the cracks,  the Archivist openly acknowledges it exists and the DOD is insiting that it remain classified, which is patently ridiculous.   there is no technological secret that could still be relevant 100 years later, and any adult actor in the document is undoubtedly dead.
 
2013-04-08 04:48:03 PM
Could be Senator Assange come September.
 
2013-04-08 04:48:45 PM

mbillips: Another Government Employee: Interesting stuff?

Details from the Six Day War?
The health decline of Mao?
How the Army screwed the pooch in Saigon?
The tracking of Seinn Fein?
Black September?

It was just about as scary then as it is now.

What's scary now? A half-assed, pseudo-nuclear-armed North Korea? Compared to thousands of Soviet tanks poised on the West German border and thousands of nuclear missiles on short-launch status aimed at U.S. cities? The farking '70s were DANGEROUS, man; today is like the Disney version of the world in 1975. War has been declining since the Soviet Union fell (not surprisingly, as they were funding many of the insurgencies around the world).

[www.systemicpeace.org image 800x600]




People should know when they are conquered.

Would you, Quintus? Would I?
 
2013-04-08 04:49:08 PM

Magorn: but for every one of those there is a cable like the Khalilzad cable from Baghdad in 2006 that completely exploded everything the Bush Adminstration was claiming about Iraq and the progress we were making there, and IMHO had a lot to do with shifing public opinion towards looking for an exit strategy and changing the outcome of the 2006 elections


And even more, look at what happened to foreign governments.  Wikileaks cable release was a big influence on the Tunisia arab spring movement.  A lot of government ministers/governors in Europe, Africa, and South America got brought down by those cables.

For the US, the cables were a political sideshow that was largely ignored by our population and the press, besides some grandstanding about trying Julian Assburger for treason.   But they were VERY followed overseas.

We in the US might not care much about our ambassador to Chile noting that the foreign minister of Chile and the Interior minister of Bolivia were co-owners to a transportation and concrete company and they were manipulating each others governments for their own financial benefit, but people down there were (note:  can't remember if those were the exact positions of those two guys, just naming one of the scandals that resulted from those cables that I heard on bbc).
 
2013-04-08 04:50:53 PM
" there is no technological secret that could still be relevant 100 years later, "

with some of Teslas research who knows
 
Displayed 50 of 81 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report