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(Wisconsin Gazette)   Holy cow. Third of Americans support Christianity as official religion   (wisconsingazette.com) divider line 251
    More: Interesting, Americans, Christianity, churches, North Carolina Republicans, school prayer  
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4903 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Apr 2013 at 12:28 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-08 01:04:41 PM

FloydA: [i105.photobucket.com image 640x325]



I'll let this guy sum it up:

http://youtu.be/8rh6qqsmxNs
 
2013-04-08 01:06:03 PM

Billy Bathsalt: "Think of how stupid the average person is, and realize half of them are stupider than that."  Carlin

The number of the beast shall be 6, 6, and 7, rounded to the nearest tenth.


/Shakes fist at Billy Bathsalt. . .
 
2013-04-08 01:06:32 PM
This is the precisely the same turd of the people that bangs on about the Constitution and then chooses to interpret it to mean the exact opposite of what it was clearly intended to mean and what it clearly says.

Well-regulated militia=Wild, Wild West free-for-all

No law respecting an Establishment of Religion=Obligatory Establishment of the Christian Religion aka Kristian Amerka-ka-ka.

Natural born American=the scion of one or more American citizens, whether born in the USA or abroad, who have lived at least x percent of their life in America before the age of 18=The candidate we like (McCain, born in Panama), but not the candidate we don't like (Obama, born in Hawaii)

And don't for God's sake remind them of the 10th Amendment, the 14th Amendment, etc. They're not quite ready for black people to have the vote. Well, black people and women. Black people, women, gays, liberals, moderates, socialists, social democrats, trade unionists, statists, poor people, non-Christians, atheists, etc. To make a long list short, the vote should belong to the same minority class of landed Whigs and Tories that enjoyed it prior to the Revolution and shortly thereafter.

Government of the People, by the Classes and for the Classes.

They spend their whole political careers trying to prove that the Constitution was a mistake. They very nearly succeed by simply existing.
 
2013-04-08 01:08:47 PM
Religion is the natural enemy of democracy.

Besides... if government could make/pass laws on religion that would make the head person in charge of dictating and directing religion Obama.

Are you ready to make Obama the American pope. I can't believe that that 1/3 thought this through all the way.
 
2013-04-08 01:09:06 PM

God's Hubris: Believe women are incapable of making decisions about their own bodies. Check.


This argument/point is far from the truth.

Those who are Pro-life arent against a woman making decisions about her own body.  Pro-lifers believe the unborn baby (fetus) is a living being - and that's who they wish to protect.  Most Pro-lifers would care less if a woman wanted to go out and:

Get tattoos
Get piercings/body modifications
Get cosmetic surgery
Get a hysterectomy
Or anything else for that matter...

...except dont hurt the baby inside of them.
 
2013-04-08 01:09:10 PM

SkinnyHead: voodoolady: SkinnyHead: wxboy: So one-third of Americans don't believe in the 1st amendment.  I bet most of those also vehemently defend the existence of the 2nd amendment.

It says that slightly more than a third of U.S. adults favor establishing Christianity as an official religion of their state.  The 1st Amendment only prohibits Congress from establishing a religion.  It was not intended to prevent state establishments.

What's that other one....the 14th maybe? What's that one do?

The Due Process Clause of the 14th says that no state may deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.  A state establishment of Christianity would not deprive any person of life, liberty or property without due process of law, would it?


You know what's explicitly in the Constitution? The judicial branch, and their responsibility of interpreting it in relation to court cases. The application of the Bill of Rights to the states, particularly the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment, has been nailed down as solidly as anything in American law.
 
2013-04-08 01:10:03 PM

Sticky Hands: It's all good and it's all in fun. Now get in the pit and try to love someone.


Is the bigotry, violence and misogyny that religion has caused on a global scale for the last couple thousand years "all good" and "all in fun"?  Religion is the most divisive and destructive force on the planet.
 
2013-04-08 01:10:43 PM

SMB2811: Galileo's Daughter: ....

North Carolina was going to try just that
http://www.wral.com/proposal-supports-state-religion-in-north-caroli na /12296876/

"SECTION 1. The North Carolina General Assembly asserts that the Constitution of the United States of America does not prohibit states or their subsidiaries from making laws respecting an establishment of religion.

SECTION 2. The North Carolina General Assembly does not recognize federal court rulings which prohibit and otherwise regulate the State of North Carolina, its public schools or any political subdivisions of the State from making laws respecting an establishment of religion."

It died though
http://www.wral.com/state-religion-proposal-dies-in-house/12305444/


This is one area in which the federal government, RIGHTLY, takes the position of supremacy.  Unfortunately, they overstep their bounds in a lot of areas that are NOT supposed to be controlled at the federal level.  The text below is the U.S. constitution Article 6, Clause 2 :

"This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in pursuance thereof; and all treaties made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the United States, shall be the supreme law of the land; and the judges in every state shall be bound thereby, anything in the constitution or laws of any state to the contrary notwithstanding. "

That is pretty much ironclad.  It even says that all individual state judiciaries are bound by the federal laws and decisions of the supreme court.
 
2013-04-08 01:11:14 PM

Kali-Yuga: Flappyhead: Why do a third of Americans hate the Constitution?  Why are they so disrespectful of the Founding Fathers?

Stupidity, a lack of education, and willful ignorance, I mean we are talking about religious people here.

The real question is, how can christianity be the official religion when Bill O'Reilly told me christianity isn't a religion, it's a philosophy?

http://atheism.about.com/b/2012/12/19/bill-oreilly-christianity-is-n ot -a-religion-its-a-philosophy.htm


LOL, yeah the whole Jesus as a secular philosopher bit damn near gave me a laughter induced hernia years ago.  You'd think an ex altar boy would know better.
 
2013-04-08 01:11:29 PM

SMB2811: North Carolina was going to try just that
http://www.wral.com/proposal-supports-state-religion-in-north-caroli na /12296876/

"SECTION 1. The North Carolina General Assembly asserts that the Constitution of the United States of America does not prohibit states or their subsidiaries from making laws respecting an establishment of religion.

SECTION 2. The North Carolina General Assembly does not recognize federal court rulings which prohibit and otherwise regulate the State of North Carolina, its public schools or any political subdivisions of the State from making laws respecting an establishment of religion."

It died though
http://www.wral.com/state-religion-proposal-dies-in-house/12305444/


I'm in Georgia, which is pretty much Jesusland already, but that is weapons-grade stupid there.  They planned on ignoring the 1st amendment because they just didn't like it?  Wow.
 
2013-04-08 01:12:02 PM
I wonder how the pole would change if the language expressed was that the church with the largest number of American adherents would be the Official Church of the US, see census based chart:

Catholic - 68.5 million
Southern Baptist - 16.1 million
Methodist - 7.8 million
Mormons - 6 million
Church of Christ - 5.5 million
National Baptist - 5 million
Lutheran - 4.5 million

So it looks like the US is going Papist!
 
2013-04-08 01:12:30 PM
So 33% of Americans enjoy the thought of wiping their ass with the Constitution of the United States, then?

Gee. I wonder if this was a Freedom of Speech or Second Amendment issue, how many posters would be frothing at the mouth to come after it.

Or, for that matter, how many would be frothing at the mouth if we were talking renewing prohibition!
 
2013-04-08 01:15:16 PM

ModernLuddite: When I moved to Canada, I had relatives warn me that Christ could not save me if I left God's country (the US).

I actually called my 90 year old grandma a "stupid farking coont" and don't get any Christmas cards. C'est la vie.

//Canada, though Godless, is nice.


The scene that played in my head was of you as Tourettes Guy talking to her on the phone about religion.
 
2013-04-08 01:16:38 PM

Kali-Yuga: Religion is the most divisive and destructive force on the planet.


Followed up by which BBQ is better, Soda vs Pop, and the great toilet paper hanging debate.

Just being silly, I do agree 100% with that statement
 
2013-04-08 01:17:38 PM
You know, the Puritans came to the New World specifically to get away from their religion-run country.
 
2013-04-08 01:17:43 PM

madgonad: I wonder how the pole would change if the language expressed was that the church with the largest number of American adherents would be the Official Church of the US, see census based chart:

Catholic - 68.5 million
Southern Baptist - 16.1 million
Methodist - 7.8 million
Mormons - 6 million
Church of Christ - 5.5 million
National Baptist - 5 million
Lutheran - 4.5 million

So it looks like the US is going Papist!


but we all know that there's a huge difference between average Catholic and "American Catholic" ... granted there are the papacy-toe-the-liners but, all of us know a lot of Catholics who consider the Pope to be more of a cute figurehead than a literal representative of their god on earth.  Are there more 'strict' Catholics in this country or more Catholics who think the churches stance on gender/sexuality, birth control, papal infallibility, etc.  is outdated at best and idiotic at worst?
 
2013-04-08 01:19:18 PM

areeves79: Kali-Yuga: Religion is the most divisive and destructive force on the planet.

Followed up by which BBQ is better, Soda vs Pop, and the great toilet paper hanging debate.

Just being silly, I do agree 100% with that statement


Don't forget pizza toppings. Even the Buddy Bears who always get along couldn't agree what toppings they wanted on their pizza.
 
2013-04-08 01:20:24 PM

madgonad: I wonder how the pole would change if the language expressed was that the church with the largest number of American adherents would be the Official Church of the US, see census based chart:

Catholic - 68.5 million
Southern Baptist - 16.1 million
Methodist - 7.8 million
Mormons - 6 million
Church of Christ - 5.5 million
National Baptist - 5 million
Lutheran - 4.5 million

So it looks like the US is going Papist!


If government can establish religion. They control religion.

As head of state. Obama is our pope.
 
2013-04-08 01:22:58 PM

SquiggsIN: madgonad: I wonder how the pole would change if the language expressed was that the church with the largest number of American adherents would be the Official Church of the US, see census based chart:

Catholic - 68.5 million
Southern Baptist - 16.1 million
Methodist - 7.8 million
Mormons - 6 million
Church of Christ - 5.5 million
National Baptist - 5 million
Lutheran - 4.5 million

So it looks like the US is going Papist!

but we all know that there's a huge difference between average Catholic and "American Catholic" ... granted there are the papacy-toe-the-liners but, all of us know a lot of Catholics who consider the Pope to be more of a cute figurehead than a literal representative of their god on earth.  Are there more 'strict' Catholics in this country or more Catholics who think the churches stance on gender/sexuality, birth control, papal infallibility, etc.  is outdated at best and idiotic at worst?


The is variation across the adherents of all religions. My point is that you can't make 'Christianity' the official state religion because there is too much variation. Even declaring Protestantism the state religion would span everything from liberal Presbyterians to conservative Baptists to whatever Mormons currently are. Other nations that have an official religion identify a specific church. Sweden's official state religion is Lutheranism. Money from the government actually goes to the church. If we are going to choose a state religion based upon the dominant church in the US it would have to be Catholicism. I'm sure that people that were all for it in this poll (I spelled it right this time) would be changing their mind once they knew this.
 
2013-04-08 01:23:38 PM
This country was never founded as a Christian nation.  Rather, it was founded on the judeo-christian philosophy.  Key elements of that were the supremacy of the rule of law, the equality of citizens before the law, and individual property rights for persons of any class.  Given that those were terribly radical ideas in that day, they weren't perfectly executed.  Slavery still existed.  Women had not achieved equality (although they were better treated under Judaism than many other societies of the day.  But the Jews understood that laws subject to the caprices of rulers would inevitably lead to tyranny.

The philosophical basis of Christianity is noble and worth pursuing.  But the founding fathers were acutely aware of the dangers of establishing any particular religion as the official religion.  Since the Reformation, Europe had been torn apart by religious schisms.  So they wisely chose to adopt the philosophy without being constrained by the religion.

It would be a mistake to change their vision.
 
2013-04-08 01:23:57 PM
Having a set of values in common means that society, not an increasingly militarized police force, enforces good behavior.

Civilization: try it!
 
2013-04-08 01:25:29 PM

mbillips: You know what's explicitly in the Constitution? The judicial branch, and their responsibility of interpreting it in relation to court cases. The application of the Bill of Rights to the states, particularly the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment, has been nailed down as solidly as anything in American law.


So in other words, the prohibition against a state establishment of religion is not specifically found in the constitution, it is something that has been invented by the judicial branch.  So the 1/3 of Americans who would support a state establishment are not going against the constitution itself, they are going against what they see as a misinterpretation of the constitution by the judicial branch.
 
2013-04-08 01:28:09 PM
The poll found 16 percent opposed, 31 percent strongly opposed and 19 percent "not sure."

There's that damn 47% again!  Why do these people hate Jesusmerica??
 
2013-04-08 01:28:16 PM

SkinnyHead: mbillips: You know what's explicitly in the Constitution? The judicial branch, and their responsibility of interpreting it in relation to court cases. The application of the Bill of Rights to the states, particularly the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment, has been nailed down as solidly as anything in American law.

So in other words, the prohibition against a state establishment of religion is not specifically found in the constitution, it is something that has been invented by the judicial branch.  So the 1/3 of Americans who would support a state establishment are not going against the constitution itself, they are going against what they see as a misinterpretation of the constitution by the judicial branch.


No. It is in the Constitution. It's in the 14th Amendment.

Additionally, you kind of go into some sort of self-defeating logic because the Constitution gives the judicial branch the power to interpret laws. That you or I disagree with their interpretation doesn't make it unconstitutional.
 
2013-04-08 01:29:50 PM

ISO15693: Hey - has anyone mocked the religious yet?


Why? It's like mocking the retarded...not very nice.
 
2013-04-08 01:31:00 PM

SkinnyHead: mbillips: You know what's explicitly in the Constitution? The judicial branch, and their responsibility of interpreting it in relation to court cases. The application of the Bill of Rights to the states, particularly the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment, has been nailed down as solidly as anything in American law.

So in other words, the prohibition against a state establishment of religion is not specifically found in the constitution, it is something that has been invented by the judicial branch.  So the 1/3 of Americans who would support a state establishment are not going against the constitution itself, they are going against what they see as a misinterpretation of the constitution by the judicial branch.


Damn, elchip, that was so derpy that it took me full circle and got rid of the headache I got from a different thread!  Thanks, man!
 
2013-04-08 01:31:18 PM

SkinnyHead: mbillips: You know what's explicitly in the Constitution? The judicial branch, and their responsibility of interpreting it in relation to court cases. The application of the Bill of Rights to the states, particularly the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment, has been nailed down as solidly as anything in American law.

So in other words, the prohibition against a state establishment of religion is not specifically found in the constitution, it is something that has been invented by the judicial branch.  So the 1/3 of Americans who would support a state establishment are not going against the constitution itself, they are going against what they see as a misinterpretation of the constitution by the judicial branch.


Many, many things you enjoy and take for granted are "not specifically in the constitution". Would you be so quick to give them up if it meant making Christianity the national religion by ignoring everything the judicial branch has set into law? Why do you want a national religion, anyway? You're not being oppressed, you're not being persecuted, you can worship perfectly fine without forcing it on the entire country.
 
2013-04-08 01:32:03 PM
Suck it, you atheist Europeans.  Brace yourselves for when the Muzzies own your land.
 
2013-04-08 01:32:19 PM

Mr. Right: This country was never founded as a Christian nation.  Rather, it was founded on the judeo-christian philosophy.  Key elements of that were the supremacy of the rule of law, the equality of citizens before the law, and individual property rights for persons of any class.



No it was founded on the Enlightenment philosophy of men like Locke, Montesquieu, Rosseau  and others. Only one of the founding fathers can be considered a christian, John Jay.  Jefferson and the rest were deists and no fans of christianity. In no sense whatsoever was this country founded as or based on any christian ideas.

"For we know that the common law is that system of law which was introduced by the Saxons on their settlement in England, and altered from time to time by proper legislative authority from that time to the date of Magna Charta, which terminates the period of the common law. . . This settlement took place about the middle of the fifth century. But Christianity was not introduced till the seventh century; the conversion of the first christian king of the Heptarchy having taken place about the year 598, and that of the last about 686. Here then, was a space of two hundred years, during which the common law was in existence, and Christianity no part of it."
-Thomas Jefferson , letter to Thomas Cooper, February 10, 1814-
 
2013-04-08 01:32:29 PM

SkinnyHead: mbillips: You know what's explicitly in the Constitution? The judicial branch, and their responsibility of interpreting it in relation to court cases. The application of the Bill of Rights to the states, particularly the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment, has been nailed down as solidly as anything in American law.

So in other words, the prohibition against a state establishment of religion is not specifically found in the constitution, it is something that has been invented by the judicial branch.  So the 1/3 of Americans who would support a state establishment are not going against the constitution itself, they are going against what they see as a misinterpretation of the constitution by the judicial branch.


They are also idiots that think this will put them in a position to dictate to others, as opposed to giving me the authority to dictate to them.
 
2013-04-08 01:34:01 PM

Mr. Right: This country was never founded as a Christian nation.  Rather, it was founded on the judeo-christian philosophy.  Key elements of that were the supremacy of the rule of law, the equality of citizens before the law, and individual property rights for persons of any class.  Given that those were terribly radical ideas in that day, they weren't perfectly executed.  Slavery still existed.  Women had not achieved equality (although they were better treated under Judaism than many other societies of the day.  But the Jews understood that laws subject to the caprices of rulers would inevitably lead to tyranny.

The philosophical basis of Christianity is noble and worth pursuing.  But the founding fathers were acutely aware of the dangers of establishing any particular religion as the official religion.  Since the Reformation, Europe had been torn apart by religious schisms.  So they wisely chose to adopt the philosophy without being constrained by the religion.

It would be a mistake to change their vision.


The US wasn't founded on Judeo-anything. The Founding Fathers were a mix of scholars, deists, and men of great faith. They all brought something to the party. Washington, Franklin and Jefferson were obvious Deists. Hell, Jefferson edited Jesus and miracles out of the Bible! There weren't any JEWS to be found. In fact, many of the Founders would be considered anti-Semitic based upon their positions and interactions with European financial structures that were heavily Jewish. The term Judeo-Christian came into use AFTER WW2 and the Holocaust.
 
2013-04-08 01:35:52 PM
Line forms to the left
education-portal.com
 
2013-04-08 01:39:57 PM
The poll, conducted April 3-4 and surveying 1,000 people

I'd like to know how many of those 1000 people identify themselves as Christian.
 
2013-04-08 01:43:04 PM

voodoolady: SkinnyHead: mbillips: You know what's explicitly in the Constitution? The judicial branch, and their responsibility of interpreting it in relation to court cases. The application of the Bill of Rights to the states, particularly the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment, has been nailed down as solidly as anything in American law.

So in other words, the prohibition against a state establishment of religion is not specifically found in the constitution, it is something that has been invented by the judicial branch.  So the 1/3 of Americans who would support a state establishment are not going against the constitution itself, they are going against what they see as a misinterpretation of the constitution by the judicial branch.

No. It is in the Constitution. It's in the 14th Amendment.

Additionally, you kind of go into some sort of self-defeating logic because the Constitution gives the judicial branch the power to interpret laws. That you or I disagree with their interpretation doesn't make it unconstitutional.


But people are free to point out where they think that Supreme Court was wrong.  There is nothing in the 14th that says that states cannot establish a religion.  The purpose of the Establishment Clause was to protect existing state establishments.  It is illogical to say that the 14th Amendment incorporates the Establishment Clause so as to prohibit state establishments when the purpose of the Establishment Clause was to protect state establishments.
 
2013-04-08 01:43:16 PM

madgonad: So it looks like the US is going Papist!


Just the hipsters.
/Papist Blue Ribbon
 
2013-04-08 01:44:03 PM
Just TRY forcing me into a church and praying to Republican Jeebus! I'll be muttering verses from the Necronomicon under my breath.
 
2013-04-08 01:45:16 PM





 
2013-04-08 01:45:32 PM

voodoolady: SkinnyHead: mbillips: You know what's explicitly in the Constitution? The judicial branch, and their responsibility of interpreting it in relation to court cases. The application of the Bill of Rights to the states, particularly the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment, has been nailed down as solidly as anything in American law.

So in other words, the prohibition against a state establishment of religion is not specifically found in the constitution, it is something that has been invented by the judicial branch.  So the 1/3 of Americans who would support a state establishment are not going against the constitution itself, they are going against what they see as a misinterpretation of the constitution by the judicial branch.

No. It is in the Constitution. It's in the 14th Amendment.

Additionally, you kind of go into some sort of self-defeating logic because the Constitution gives the judicial branch the power to interpret laws. That you or I disagree with their interpretation doesn't make it unconstitutional.


Constitutionality aside, it's a God-damn bad idea.

Can't you just picture the Baptists and Methodists going at it like the shiates and Sunnis?
 
2013-04-08 01:45:56 PM

cwheelie: Line forms to the left
[education-portal.com image 450x385]


Yes, yes it does:
 
2013-04-08 01:46:49 PM

MrBallou: shiates


Filter pwned: shiates.
 
2013-04-08 01:47:24 PM
So "christianity" is something that can be an official religion?

I would actually love to see this happen just to see these dumb shiats get pissed off when it winds up not being their brand of Christianity that becomes official. Oh, sorry Methodists and baptists your churches are now banned, only Lutheranism is allowed now.
 
2013-04-08 01:48:20 PM

MrBallou: MrBallou: shiates

Filter pwned: shiates.


Criminy. How do you say "people who follow the Shia Branch of Islam"?
 
2013-04-08 01:49:50 PM
I want all you Atheist, Muslim, Jew and whatever else.

I will die on the end of my brothers bayonet before I let this happen.
 
2013-04-08 01:52:11 PM

SkinnyHead: voodoolady: SkinnyHead: mbillips: You know what's explicitly in the Constitution? The judicial branch, and their responsibility of interpreting it in relation to court cases. The application of the Bill of Rights to the states, particularly the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment, has been nailed down as solidly as anything in American law.

So in other words, the prohibition against a state establishment of religion is not specifically found in the constitution, it is something that has been invented by the judicial branch.  So the 1/3 of Americans who would support a state establishment are not going against the constitution itself, they are going against what they see as a misinterpretation of the constitution by the judicial branch.

No. It is in the Constitution. It's in the 14th Amendment.

Additionally, you kind of go into some sort of self-defeating logic because the Constitution gives the judicial branch the power to interpret laws. That you or I disagree with their interpretation doesn't make it unconstitutional.

But people are free to point out where they think that Supreme Court was wrong.  There is nothing in the 14th that says that states cannot establish a religion.  The purpose of the Establishment Clause was to protect existing state establishments.  It is illogical to say that the 14th Amendment incorporates the Establishment Clause so as to prohibit state establishments when the purpose of the Establishment Clause was to protect state establishments.


Absolutely we can point out where we think the court is wrong. I think Kelo v. New London was decided incorrectly, for example. But there might be a difference between thinking one case being decided incorrectly and thinking that 100 years of precedent is unconstitutional. And establishing a state religion deprives a person of liberty.
 
2013-04-08 01:55:32 PM

TV's Vinnie: Just TRY forcing me into a church and praying to Republican Jeebus! I'll be muttering verses from the Necronomicon under my breath.


Why under your breath?
 
2013-04-08 01:55:45 PM
If this surprises you...you've never visited the right wing blogosphere.
 
2013-04-08 01:56:19 PM
On the bright side, "On a related question, 58 percent of those surveyed said the constitution probably prohibits establishing an official state religion."
 
2013-04-08 01:58:57 PM

nekom: Kali-Yuga: Flappyhead: Why do a third of Americans hate the Constitution?  Why are they so disrespectful of the Founding Fathers?

Stupidity, a lack of education, and willful ignorance, I mean we are talking about religious people here.

The real question is, how can christianity be the official religion when Bill O'Reilly told me christianity isn't a religion, it's a philosophy?

http://atheism.about.com/b/2012/12/19/bill-oreilly-christianity-is-n ot -a-religion-its-a-philosophy.htm

Actually to be fair, most religions do contain a lot of philosophy. Even someone who does not believe that Jesus was the son of god might say that they are a fan of his teachings. Love thy neighbor, let he who is without sin cast the first stone, etc. In some ways, I argue that Buddhism is a philosophy and not a religion. It has no creation myth, which seems to me to be the defining thing between a religion and a philosophy.


Religion is a learned behavior and a lifestyle choice.
/sometimes, it's just plain ol' mental illness.
 
2013-04-08 02:01:01 PM

SkinnyHead: voodoolady: SkinnyHead: mbillips: You know what's explicitly in the Constitution? The judicial branch, and their responsibility of interpreting it in relation to court cases. The application of the Bill of Rights to the states, particularly the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment, has been nailed down as solidly as anything in American law.

So in other words, the prohibition against a state establishment of religion is not specifically found in the constitution, it is something that has been invented by the judicial branch.  So the 1/3 of Americans who would support a state establishment are not going against the constitution itself, they are going against what they see as a misinterpretation of the constitution by the judicial branch.

No. It is in the Constitution. It's in the 14th Amendment.

Additionally, you kind of go into some sort of self-defeating logic because the Constitution gives the judicial branch the power to interpret laws. That you or I disagree with their interpretation doesn't make it unconstitutional.

But people are free to point out where they think that Supreme Court was wrong.  There is nothing in the 14th that says that states cannot establish a religion.  The purpose of the Establishment Clause was to protect existing state establishments.  It is illogical to say that the 14th Amendment incorporates the Establishment Clause so as to prohibit state establishments when the purpose of the Establishment Clause was to protect state establishments.


Even if it were not strictly constitutional, that doesn't mean it's not pants on head retarded.
 
2013-04-08 02:02:55 PM

FloydA: [i105.photobucket.com image 640x325]


Hahahaha...came to post the same thing!

/stupid people be stupid
///stupid people also tend to be poor
////poor, stupid people cause most of our problems
//rich, psycho's cause the rest
 
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