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(University of Washington)   Scientist decides to create the sound of the Big Bang. A sound that would probably muted by the vacuum of space. John Cage approves   (faculty.washington.edu) divider line 28
    More: Unlikely, Planck, Big Bang theory, Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, cosmological constants, John Cage, cosmic microwave background, Doppler shift, Mathematica  
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831 clicks; posted to Geek » on 08 Apr 2013 at 11:12 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-08 10:32:14 AM
images4.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2013-04-08 10:34:40 AM
 
2013-04-08 10:38:27 AM
So they took a camera over to subby's mom's house?
 
2013-04-08 11:22:45 AM
According to the Listening Monks, it sounds like "One, two, one, two, three, four."
 
2013-04-08 11:24:21 AM
Agreed, that would probably muted. Yes, definitely would probably muted.
 
2013-04-08 11:35:29 AM
For John Cage, the sound would be SROOOOOM .
 
2013-04-08 11:36:01 AM
Sharp Music Theory and Astrophysics staff members approve, hoping their key mutual small talk will sound natural and allow them to score with each other at their flat.
 
2013-04-08 11:37:40 AM
Yes, the vacuum that would have existed when all matter and space was compressed into a very small but rapidly expanding area.  Or, not a vacuum.
 
2013-04-08 11:39:56 AM
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-04-08 11:56:16 AM
How can the sound of The Big Bang be muted by "the vacuum of space" when "space" was created by The Big Bang itself?
 
2013-04-08 12:18:38 PM

nmemkha: How can the sound of The Big Bang be muted by "the vacuum of space" when "space" was created by The Big Bang itself?


Nor that during the early expansion matter was dense enough to no be considered a vacume.... but I wonder if a soup made of subatomic particles transfer sound waves?
 
2013-04-08 12:27:12 PM

Saiga410: nmemkha: How can the sound of The Big Bang be muted by "the vacuum of space" when "space" was created by The Big Bang itself?

Nor that during the early expansion matter was dense enough to no be considered a vacume.... but I wonder if a soup made of subatomic particles transfer sound waves?


Its depends on if we are talking about sound internal or external to the nucleating universe. If internal, your question is certainly valid. I assumed the sound propagation discussed was external to event. In that case, the "nothingness" the universe expanded into could have been filled with raspberry jam for all we know.
 
2013-04-08 12:38:58 PM
Reading Fark threads is like watching "Wheel of Fortune" with the sound turned off.

B E H
 
2013-04-08 12:54:50 PM
"They say it all started out with a big bang. But, what I wonder is, was it a big bang or did it just seem big because there wasn't anything else to drown it out at the time?"

sharetv.org
 
2013-04-08 01:24:38 PM
People already know that this is the soud of the big bang.
 
2013-04-08 02:12:33 PM
sorry its their rules:
IF NO ONE IS THERE TO HEAR IT, IT DIDN'T MAKE A SOUND!
sorry for yelling.
 
2013-04-08 02:38:18 PM
Didn't the Beatles already do that?
 
2013-04-08 03:46:11 PM
ओ३म्
 
2013-04-08 03:51:19 PM
Bazinga!
 
2013-04-08 05:03:48 PM

Saiga410: nmemkha: How can the sound of The Big Bang be muted by "the vacuum of space" when "space" was created by The Big Bang itself?

Nor that during the early expansion matter was dense enough to no be considered a vacume.... but I wonder if a soup made of subatomic particles transfer sound waves?


The data used for this "project" was data of the cosmic microwave background, which was emitted about 360 kyr after the Big Bang.  By which time there was plenty of vacuum.
 
2013-04-08 05:37:00 PM
I think it sounds like FOOP.
 
2013-04-08 08:25:30 PM

LazarusLong42: Saiga410: nmemkha: How can the sound of The Big Bang be muted by "the vacuum of space" when "space" was created by The Big Bang itself?

Nor that during the early expansion matter was dense enough to no be considered a vacume.... but I wonder if a soup made of subatomic particles transfer sound waves?

The data used for this "project" was data of the cosmic microwave background, which was emitted about 360 kyr after the Big Bang.  By which time there was plenty of vacuum.


So its more of an sonic echo through the vacuum? That just raises more questions.

At least we know it didn't sound like a duck's quack.
 
2013-04-08 10:35:33 PM
Why shouldn't he make up a sound for a made-up event? Seems fitting.
 
2013-04-09 12:19:43 AM

nmemkha: Saiga410: nmemkha: How can the sound of The Big Bang be muted by "the vacuum of space" when "space" was created by The Big Bang itself?

Nor that during the early expansion matter was dense enough to no be considered a vacume.... but I wonder if a soup made of subatomic particles transfer sound waves?

Its depends on if we are talking about sound internal or external to the nucleating universe. If internal, your question is certainly valid. I assumed the sound propagation discussed was external to event. In that case, the "nothingness" the universe expanded intocould have been filled with raspberry jam for all we know.


"Expanded into" implies dimensionality - which is a function of something that exists. Nothingness is nothing, and therefore could not be "expanded into." The expansion of the universe created dimensionality.
 
2013-04-09 12:38:33 PM

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: nmemkha: Saiga410: nmemkha: How can the sound of The Big Bang be muted by "the vacuum of space" when "space" was created by The Big Bang itself?

Nor that during the early expansion matter was dense enough to no be considered a vacume.... but I wonder if a soup made of subatomic particles transfer sound waves?

Its depends on if we are talking about sound internal or external to the nucleating universe. If internal, your question is certainly valid. I assumed the sound propagation discussed was external to event. In that case, the "nothingness" the universe expanded intocould have been filled with raspberry jam for all we know.

"Expanded into" implies dimensionality - which is a function of something that exists. Nothingness is nothing, and therefore could not be "expanded into." The expansion of the universe created dimensionality.


Maybe. We don't know if the nucleating universe "pushed" something out of the way to be. We can't know because it would exist outside of the  structure of space-time. You are making an assumption that is impossible to prove.
 
2013-04-09 04:19:55 PM

nmemkha: Just Another OC Homeless Guy: nmemkha: Saiga410: nmemkha: How can the sound of The Big Bang be muted by "the vacuum of space" when "space" was created by The Big Bang itself?

Nor that during the early expansion matter was dense enough to no be considered a vacume.... but I wonder if a soup made of subatomic particles transfer sound waves?

Its depends on if we are talking about sound internal or external to the nucleating universe. If internal, your question is certainly valid. I assumed the sound propagation discussed was external to event. In that case, the "nothingness" the universe expanded intocould have been filled with raspberry jam for all we know.

"Expanded into" implies dimensionality - which is a function of something that exists. Nothingness is nothing, and therefore could not be "expanded into." The expansion of the universe created dimensionality.

Maybe. We don't know if the nucleating universe "pushed" something out of the way to be. We can't know because it would exist outside of the  structure of space-time. You are making an assumption that is impossible to prove.


The definition of "universe" is "everything that exists. So if there is "something" that exists that is pushed out of the way, it is by definition part of the universe. Postulating multiple universii in a "multiverse" simply expands the definition of "universe" to be that multiverse... with "bubble universii" (including our own) existing inside it.
 
2013-04-09 08:32:46 PM

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: nmemkha: Just Another OC Homeless Guy: nmemkha: Saiga410: nmemkha: How can the sound of The Big Bang be muted by "the vacuum of space" when "space" was created by The Big Bang itself?

Nor that during the early expansion matter was dense enough to no be considered a vacume.... but I wonder if a soup made of subatomic particles transfer sound waves?

Its depends on if we are talking about sound internal or external to the nucleating universe. If internal, your question is certainly valid. I assumed the sound propagation discussed was external to event. In that case, the "nothingness" the universe expanded intocould have been filled with raspberry jam for all we know.

"Expanded into" implies dimensionality - which is a function of something that exists. Nothingness is nothing, and therefore could not be "expanded into." The expansion of the universe created dimensionality.

Maybe. We don't know if the nucleating universe "pushed" something out of the way to be. We can't know because it would exist outside of the  structure of space-time. You are making an assumption that is impossible to prove.

The definition of "universe" is "everything that exists. So if there is "something" that exists that is pushed out of the way, it is by definition part of the universe. Postulating multiple universii in a "multiverse" simply expands the definition of "universe" to be that multiverse... with "bubble universii" (including our own) existing inside it.


You religious people are strange.
 
2013-04-09 08:48:34 PM

untaken_name: Just Another OC Homeless Guy: nmemkha: Just Another OC Homeless Guy: nmemkha: Saiga410: nmemkha: How can the sound of The Big Bang be muted by "the vacuum of space" when "space" was created by The Big Bang itself?

Nor that during the early expansion matter was dense enough to no be considered a vacume.... but I wonder if a soup made of subatomic particles transfer sound waves?

Its depends on if we are talking about sound internal or external to the nucleating universe. If internal, your question is certainly valid. I assumed the sound propagation discussed was external to event. In that case, the "nothingness" the universe expanded intocould have been filled with raspberry jam for all we know.

"Expanded into" implies dimensionality - which is a function of something that exists. Nothingness is nothing, and therefore could not be "expanded into." The expansion of the universe created dimensionality.

Maybe. We don't know if the nucleating universe "pushed" something out of the way to be. We can't know because it would exist outside of the  structure of space-time. You are making an assumption that is impossible to prove.

The definition of "universe" is "everything that exists. So if there is "something" that exists that is pushed out of the way, it is by definition part of the universe. Postulating multiple universii in a "multiverse" simply expands the definition of "universe" to be that multiverse... with "bubble universii" (including our own) existing inside it.

You religious people are strange.


What. Evar.
 
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