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(Jezebel)   Struggling actors increasingly pay for typecasting classes in which instructors tell them exactly what cliché roles they should audition for. "If I look like a buttered popcorn-eating child molester, you know what? Cop shows need them every week"   (jezebel.com) divider line 9
    More: Silly, roles, actors, Malcolm in the Middle, The Moog, casting directors, eating  
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2894 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 07 Apr 2013 at 4:48 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-07 05:31:28 PM
4 votes:
Romero Report: Wannabe actors will pay for anything, and 95% of the whole system is a scam.

Many years ago (1988) I had my first job out of college at a small SAG franchised talent agency in NYC.  I hated it, and I can say without hesitation I was the worst and most ineffective talent agent in the history of the business.

A large acting studio (still in business) used to call me to ask me to come see their beginning acting class.  It was only because I was listed in The Ross Reports they wanted me, there was no other reason as I was a total nobody.  I refused, they persisted. I refused some more.  They said "we'll give you $200 bucks for 90 minutes".  I was making under $300 a week at the time.  So I went.

That 90 minutes was excruciating, with housewives and plumbers doing their monologues for me, then optimistically handing me their headshots and saying "I hope you liked it, I'd love you to represent me".  I felt like a con man and smiled back.  At the end of it the studio guy handed me $200 and said "We'd like you to come back twice a month for different classes."  They KNEW I was a useless nobody, who could do nothing for these people, but they used it to sell the classes :  "Guaranteed SAG agent readings".  Totally scummy.

I never went back, and quit soon after.  Actors still kinda make my skin crawl. But I have a lot of sympathy for them at the same time.  Maybe it's different now, but my advice to all wannabe actors:  keep your money in your pocket.  The people who matter don't want your money.
2013-04-07 04:54:47 PM
4 votes:
Better to be typecast than not cast at all
2013-04-07 06:19:12 PM
2 votes:
A friend of mine has been doing extra work for about 6 years or so.  She started out doing Star Wars & Star Trek fan films, got the acting bug, and has been schlepping from one set to another since.  She's done fairly regular work on Elementary lately and is in Staten Island all next week shooting a movie.  But she's never gotten a speaking part and is always waaaaay in the background.

She fired her last agent at her husband's urging, even though the agent was the one that hooked her up w/Elementary (where she's on-set at least 2-3x a week).  Her husband was upset because the agent told them the only reason my friend gets gigs at all is because the agent books her as "vaguely ethnic".  (She's Italian but w/the right makeup can look Latina or even Native American.)  He didn't want her typecast.

He's a stage-husband, living vicariously through her.  Fancies himself an actor because he's done community theater.  My argument (much like Nuclear Optimism 's) is better to be typecast than not at all.  After she's done w/the movie next week, she's got nothing on the horizon.  When she was with her former agent, she always had at least a month's worth of work booked.
2013-04-07 05:09:13 PM
2 votes:
Garret Dillahunt is an awesome actor who's hard to typecast. In "Deadwood" he played two different characters that were completely different from one another, and you wouldn't have realized right away if at all that the actor had been in the show as two different people.

m.popstar.com
images.buddytv.com
2013-04-07 06:29:06 PM
1 votes:

brigid_fitch: A friend of mine has been doing extra work for about 6 years or so.  She started out doing Star Wars & Star Trek fan films, got the acting bug, and has been schlepping from one set to another since.  She's done fairly regular work on Elementary lately and is in Staten Island all next week shooting a movie.  But she's never gotten a speaking part and is always waaaaay in the background.

She fired her last agent at her husband's urging, even though the agent was the one that hooked her up w/Elementary (where she's on-set at least 2-3x a week).  Her husband was upset because the agent told them the only reason my friend gets gigs at all is because the agent books her as "vaguely ethnic".  (She's Italian but w/the right makeup can look Latina or even Native American.)  He didn't want her typecast.

He's a stage-husband, living vicariously through her.  Fancies himself an actor because he's done community theater.  My argument (much like Nuclear Optimism 's) is better to be typecast than not at all.  After she's done w/the movie next week, she's got nothing on the horizon.  When she was with her former agent, she always had at least a month's worth of work booked.


In acting, it's a combination of who you know, who you blow, and talent. When I was on the fringes of the theater/TV community in LA, I knew a lot of working actors doing the extra gig, and a couple got pulled from doing background work to minor speaking parts on soaps or bits in movies, always by being around the stars, doing favors or "favors" for the directors or producers. But once they got those actual parts--then it was when talent mattered, and either an actor has it or doesn't. And mostly they don't.

If you can only get gigs because you're "vaguely ethnic" and it pays the bills and satisfies your need to act--go for it. Otherwise its Equity waiver and a lot of telling people you can't work Thursday because you have an audition.
2013-04-07 05:52:39 PM
1 votes:
Typecast you say, well if you need to end a show just let this guy know:

t3.gstatic.com
2013-04-07 05:43:42 PM
1 votes:

The Dynamite Monkey: Romero Report: Wannabe actors will pay for anything, and 95% of the whole system is a scam.


Which is pretty much how I think Scientology still does well despite being batshiat insane, since so many up-and-comers in Hollywood see it as a quick way to get in good with A-listers like Tom Cruise and Will Smith.
2013-04-07 05:19:08 PM
1 votes:
I have a good friend who is an actor in Hollywood, and he's done pretty well until recently.   He's had some speaking parts in a few blockbuster movies, recurring roles on some TV shows, and done a ton of commercials.   Last time we talked he said "The movie actors are all doing TV now, the TV actors are all doing commercials, and the commercial guys are all out of work."

He's doing theatre these days.
2013-04-07 05:06:51 PM
1 votes:
they're also always being told exactly why they were rejected - because they're too old, too fat, too ugly, too brunette, etc.

That's only because it's easier than the truth.

The truth is 99.999% of "actors" are not at all.
 
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