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(Jezebel)   Struggling actors increasingly pay for typecasting classes in which instructors tell them exactly what cliché roles they should audition for. "If I look like a buttered popcorn-eating child molester, you know what? Cop shows need them every week"   (jezebel.com ) divider line
    More: Silly, roles, actors, Malcolm in the Middle, The Moog, casting directors, eating  
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2899 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 07 Apr 2013 at 4:48 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-07 09:22:47 PM  

Nuclear Optimism: Better to be typecast than not cast at all


That's Adam West's motto.  Michael Keaton didn't approve.  Considering the timing for both men, they were both right.
 
2013-04-07 09:45:08 PM  

ilikeracecars: skinink: Garret Dillahunt is an awesome actor who's hard to typecast. In "Deadwood" he played two different characters that were completely different from one another, and you wouldn't have realized right away if at all that the actor had been in the show as two different people.

[m.popstar.com image 384x320]
[images.buddytv.com image 385x286]

Actually had to stop watching the show at that point. It was too distracting.


I kept watching, but you're correct, it was damn distracting.
 
2013-04-07 09:49:57 PM  

No Such Agency: Mad_Radhu:

[images.wikia.com image 491x692]

O_o

Dat sporran.


What does he wear under it? Lipstick, probably.
 
2013-04-07 09:54:16 PM  

No Such Agency: bhcompy:
Is it the Brad Dourif School of Acting?  That dude made a career(and a few notable awards and nominations) off playing guys like that.

Watching Brad Dourif ham it up as the creepiest guy on set is a genuine pleasure.  Like a fine wine, but with stringy hair, bulging eyes and wiggins-inducing hand gestures.  The man is a farking artist.


Made a great Harkonnen assassin mentat in Lynch's Dune. Best casting of that movie.
 
2013-04-07 10:05:53 PM  

FunkOut: No Such Agency: bhcompy:
Is it the Brad Dourif School of Acting?  That dude made a career(and a few notable awards and nominations) off playing guys like that.

Watching Brad Dourif ham it up as the creepiest guy on set is a genuine pleasure.  Like a fine wine, but with stringy hair, bulging eyes and wiggins-inducing hand gestures.  The man is a farking artist.

Made a great Harkonnen assassin mentat in Lynch's Dune. Best casting of that movie.


I just checked his filmography on Wikipedia. I don't think I've ever seen one with so many titles in red (meaning there's no wiki page for them). The man has been in some truly obscure shiat.
 
2013-04-07 10:19:39 PM  
I wonder how I'd get typecast... 6'5" bald with a massive beard that's turning reddish with more sun.

I throw a pic for ya but I don't have any good current ones and I know better than to hand any fodder to Farkers.
 
2013-04-07 10:53:19 PM  

wildcardjack: I wonder how I'd get typecast... 6'5" bald with a massive beard that's turning reddish with more sun.

I throw a pic for ya but I don't have any good current ones and I know better than to hand any fodder to Farkers.


The doorman at the Frolic Room told me all the old timers have grown beards due to the Pirates movies and all the fantasy films. You'd be working steady as Thug #2  or random Viking, I imagine. Not so easy to find really big guys.
 
2013-04-07 11:18:22 PM  
One of my brother's college roommates is one of the background Warbler's on Glee. I'm pretty sure he got the gig because Glee needed to add some diversity to the Warblers because there's absolutely no way the guy is believably in high school. Well, either that or because his dad's some sort of music industry exec.
 
2013-04-07 11:18:58 PM  

dragonchild: Most serious actress I know is actually pretty good, but she can't get roles because she's Asian.  Studios don't want Asians until they do -- as in, "Asian woman".  She doesn't need to be told she's Asian.


No kidding!

I'm an Asian filmmaker and hang around other Asians in the film and television industry here in Hollywood. One horror story I remember from a get-together was from a guy who worked at an agency. His co-worker was trying to get one of his Asian clients to an audition for a TV show. The co-worker insisted that the guy was great, that he had awesome acting credentials and experience and would be perfect for a role on the show (keep in mind, he was an agent at a top agency, so he knew talent when he saw it) The casting agent at the TV show responded with this:

"Oh sorry, but we already HAVE an Asian."

There are tons of stories like that btw.

media.tumblr.com

/But in all seriousness, tell your friend to affiliate herself with East West Players. They are the premiere organization for Asian actors in Hollywood and have resources to help you get places in the industry.
 
2013-04-08 12:00:37 AM  
ambercat
This is kind of stupid since finding ANY ethnic looking people to use as extras is hard and they are always in demand. A lot of places stuff is shot in are pretty white places, and to make them look like other places, they need ethnic extras. This is especially obvious with stuff shot in Canada that they are pretending is America.

Apparently the same problem exists in Bollywood, just the other way around.

csb:
A friend of mine was staying in Mumbai for a few days and had no real plans as she was waiting for her bff to arrive so they could go backpacking through India. She was more or less immediately approached by someone going around the local hotels, looking for "western-looking" extras.

For shiats and giggles she agreed and got put into some ridiculous, colorful Bollywood dress to play the receptionist of an "American" hospital.
So somewhere out there there are a couple of episodes of a Bollywood soap that takes place in an US hospital and the very authentically dressed American receptionist greeting people and answering the telephone in English is actually a German living in France..
..and also a real hospital doctor with a PhD in medicine.
 
2013-04-08 12:09:35 AM  

The Voice of Doom: ambercat
This is kind of stupid since finding ANY ethnic looking people to use as extras is hard and they are always in demand. A lot of places stuff is shot in are pretty white places, and to make them look like other places, they need ethnic extras. This is especially obvious with stuff shot in Canada that they are pretending is America.

Apparently the same problem exists in Bollywood, just the other way around.

csb:
A friend of mine was staying in Mumbai for a few days and had no real plans as she was waiting for her bff to arrive so they could go backpacking through India. She was more or less immediately approached by someone going around the local hotels, looking for "western-looking" extras.

For shiats and giggles she agreed and got put into some ridiculous, colorful Bollywood dress to play the receptionist of an "American" hospital.
So somewhere out there there are a couple of episodes of a Bollywood soap that takes place in an US hospital and the very authentically dressed American receptionist greeting people and answering the telephone in English is actually a German living in France..
..and also a real hospital doctor with a PhD in medicine.


After reading the first part of that I thought: Surely this is a trap.
 
2013-04-08 12:20:17 AM  

dragonchild: ambercat: This is kind of stupid since finding ANY ethnic looking people to use as extras is hard and they are always in demand.

Really?  I'd guess it's more like there's a price point to get people to play a dumb stereotype.  Most "ethnic" bit roles are still insultingly regressive, so there are family implications to taking a big diarrhea shiat on your heritage.


Since his friend hasn't gotten any speaking roles or close to the camera, I doubt there's a lot of playing a dumb stereotype involved unless they're putting her in blackface or something -- right now she's basically being living scenery. Nothing wrong with that, it's what extras do, but if your role consists of walking along the sidewalk behind the people with speaking roles, dissing your heritage would difficult.
 
2013-04-08 12:37:23 AM  
The Dynamite Monkey: That 90 minutes was excruciating, with housewives and plumbers doing their monologues for me, then optimistically handing me their headshots and saying "I hope you liked it, I'd love you to represent me".  I felt like a con man and smiled back.  At the end of it the studio guy handed me $200 and said "We'd like you to come back twice a month for different classes."  They KNEW I was a useless nobody, who could do nothing for these people, but they used it to sell the classes :  "Guaranteed SAG agent readings".  Totally scummy.

So what would you have done if you'd seen someone with talent? Just leave? Or go back and tell your bosses, or tell the actor to let you know when s/he was in something, etc.? If you were absolutely not going to pay attention to anyone there regardless of talent or potential, then you're scummy and not doing your job. Every actor takes a first acting class. Most of the people in a first class probably are terrible, but wasn't in your job to spot the ones who had potential?

I know someone who'd in A&R for a record label. She sees a lot of shows and listens to a lot of demos, mostly bad. It's her job to stay alert and pull the needles out of the haystack.
 
2013-04-08 12:53:36 AM  
People say I look like John Malkovich. No, really, they do. (Of course, not THAT many people know John Malkovich, so it's not a constant thing.)
Anyway, perhaps I could get some sort of role where I just have to "be" him, not really do anything.
 
2013-04-08 01:56:32 AM  

Mobius strip of human stupidity: they're also always being told exactly why they were rejected - because they're too old, too fat, too ugly, too brunette, etc.

That's only because it's easier than the truth.

The truth is 99.999% of "actors" are not at all.


It's either that, or the next step of getting a shovel.

/carries $500 in personal burial money
 
2013-04-08 02:04:17 AM  
fusillade762
After reading the first part of that I thought: Surely this is a trap.


Yeah, given the whole "unaccompanied female 20-something in what's mostly a 3rd world country" setup, I probably should have asked her what convinced her that she wouldn't find herself raped and without kidneys the next day.
 
2013-04-08 04:00:51 AM  

ng2810: "Oh sorry, but we already HAVE an Asian."


That's the problem with shoehorning "diversity" in.  It's not real diversity, and it's more limiting than anything else.  Okay we got the black guy and the asian woman and the gay guy (and in America, some form of passes-as-Latino, in England you need an Indian, in NZ you need a Pacific Islander) - yay we've got diversity!

Real diversity is not looking for any particular colour unless you have a specific storyline in mind that requires a particular culture or religion.  For example, as much as I dislike her, Lucy Liu's role in Elementary is properly diverse.  Her ethnicity is of no importance to the role. Her character could be any colour, they happened to have cast an asian in the role.  They could have cast some blonde, and I bet there was a lot of pressure from places in the company to do so.
 
2013-04-08 06:26:55 AM  
The sad truth is real honest to god at talent wins every time. The "struggle from obscurity" doesn't exist much of the time for people with serious chops. Anthony Mackie was a movie star before he left Juilliard. Hollywood knew that. It just took the rest of the world a little while to catch up.
 
2013-04-08 06:47:21 AM  
The Dynamite Monkey:   keep your money in your pocket.  The people who matter don't want your money.

THIS!

Also, "typcasting" is the first thing we did at a small acting course for I took a few years ago.
It took maybe one hour, no need for 5 weeks, and it made everyone clear none of us were likely to be movie-stars.
 
2013-04-08 07:02:59 AM  

Mobius strip of human stupidity: The sad truth is real honest to god at talent wins every time. The "struggle from obscurity" doesn't exist much of the time for people with serious chops. Anthony Mackie was a movie star before he left Juilliard. Hollywood knew that. It just took the rest of the world a little while to catch up.


What?
in theater maybe (exept for midle aged womens).
In movies, you have to have the right look first. Talent comes second.
 
2013-04-08 07:28:56 AM  

On-Off: Mobius strip of human stupidity: The sad truth is real honest to god at talent wins every time. The "struggle from obscurity" doesn't exist much of the time for people with serious chops. Anthony Mackie was a movie star before he left Juilliard. Hollywood knew that. It just took the rest of the world a little while to catch up.

What?

in theater maybe (exept for midle aged womens).

In movies, you have to have the right look first. Talent comes second.


Nope. Mackie was an instant star because of his talents. Hollywood knew that while he was still doing Chekhov in drama school.  His look is completely generic and meaningless. His abilities are extraordinary.

The typical struggle for success in Hollywood is fully bypass-able with a real marketable gift. It's the actors with questionable talent that take a longer time to get a career going. (If at all)

 
2013-04-08 07:59:52 AM  

Phins: So what would you have done if you'd seen someone with talent? Just leave? Or go back and tell your bosses, or tell the actor to let you know when s/he was in something, etc.? If you were absolutely not going to pay attention to anyone there regardless of talent or potential, then you're scummy and not doing your job. Every actor takes a first acting class. Most of the people in a first class probably are terrible, but wasn't in your job to spot the ones who had potential?


My point was it was scummy for these acting studios to give people false believe that the shelling out of their hard earned money could result in their being discovered by an agent and cast in something, when in reality the only reason the agents were there was because they were being paid.  The students were not told that.

See how it is dishonest?

The agents were not there to find talent, and no agent worth a crap would go to a beginning acting class to discover new clients.
 
2013-04-08 10:18:09 AM  
http://www.actorsconnection.com/m/index.php

These folks charge actors to "audition" for a "casting director". It's right upstairs from my studio. They never seem to run low on paying customers.
 
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