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(Tablet Magazine)   'Seinfeld' re-ups for a 5th round of syndication, bringing the syndication revenue to over $3 billion or $17 million per episode. Giddy up   (tabletmag.com) divider line 113
    More: Interesting, Seinfeld  
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3473 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 07 Apr 2013 at 1:12 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-07 12:21:17 PM  
mimg.ugo.com
 
2013-04-07 12:21:19 PM  
As huge fan of Seinfeld I can honestly say the majority of the series hasn't held up well. Although the first season is close to 25 years old
 
2013-04-07 12:31:49 PM  
I still think NBC should buy the rights to "The Strike" and air it as a special every December 23.
 
2013-04-07 12:38:07 PM  
Seinfeld is one of the few TV shows that I can watch anytime, anywhere. I've seen every episode countless times, but if there's nothing else on I'll watch it.  This is a rare syndication goldmine, because I know I'm not alone.  Guaranteed eyes-on is something that makes marketing execs wet between their legs, and Seinfeld is one of the few shows that can still do that.  It ain't going away anytime soon.
 
2013-04-07 01:19:29 PM  
It's remarkable how cutting edge the show remains compared to today's most popular sitcoms, such as The Big Bang Theory.
 
2013-04-07 01:20:20 PM  

Peter von Nostrand: As huge fan of Seinfeld I can honestly say the majority of the series hasn't held up well. Although the first season is close to 25 years old


Stop making me feel old!

/Shakes tiny fist.
 
2013-04-07 01:23:30 PM  
Well, there's always the Bloomingdale's Executive Training Program.
 
2013-04-07 01:23:48 PM  

Peter von Nostrand: As huge fan of Seinfeld I can honestly say the majority of the series hasn't held up well. Although the first season is close to 25 years old


I agree.

The problem is that the show relied heavily on the "shock" factor of seeing people be terrible and petty to each other. That shock has worn off, to say the least.
 
2013-04-07 01:23:49 PM  
I have the series on DVD, but still find myself watching it on TV when it's on.
 
2013-04-07 01:26:51 PM  
Now each of those 180 episodes

Most are rarely broadcast. Most nets only run the same couple dozen episodes over and over, especially TBS. You know the quotes, soup nazi, hand model, we're not gay, yada yada yada.

Which, is just as well for the first season, and the last two.
 
2013-04-07 01:29:05 PM  
I have the series on DVD

Yeah, it can be had for cheap now. Get the good seasons, rip your favorite eps and stream them to your TV whenever you want. Roku + Plex = WIN.
 
2013-04-07 01:33:37 PM  

Peter von Nostrand: As huge fan of Seinfeld I can honestly say the majority of the series hasn't held up well. Although the first season is close to 25 years old


This.

/don't like anything past the 4th season.
 
2013-04-07 01:38:20 PM  

Peter von Nostrand: As huge fan of Seinfeld I can honestly say the majority of the series hasn't held up well. Although the first season is close to 25 years old


With a Fark handle like that I'm not surprised you're a huge fan. I am as well, though I think most episodes are still entertaining as hell (with the occasional exception, of course)
 
2013-04-07 01:55:59 PM  
And none of the cast outside of Jerry has seen a nickel of it.
 
2013-04-07 02:06:46 PM  

Flappyhead: And none of the cast outside of Jerry has seen a nickel of it.


[Citation needed]
 
2013-04-07 02:08:09 PM  

Flappyhead: And none of the cast outside of Jerry has seen a nickel of it.


I did not know that. If true, that sucks.

Fred Gwynne never got anything from repeats of The Munsters either.
 
2013-04-07 02:09:57 PM  

Peter von Nostrand: As huge fan of Seinfeld I can honestly say the majority of the series hasn't held up well. Although the first season is close to 25 years old


I'd be curious how younger viewers who didn't grow up with the series view it. A huge chunk of the plots don't even work in a world where cell phones exist.  And while it was cutting edge at the time to have a show about a group of self-absorbed people being assholes to everyone else, we now get that in spades with shows like Always Sunny.

/love Seinfeld and can still spend an entire afternoon watching it if nothing's o.
 
2013-04-07 02:20:22 PM  

John Buck 41: Peter von Nostrand: As huge fan of Seinfeld I can honestly say the majority of the series hasn't held up well. Although the first season is close to 25 years old

With a Fark handle like that I'm not surprised you're a huge fan. I am as well, though I think most episodes are still entertaining as hell (with the occasional exception, of course)


I can still sit and watch them all day, too. But I know a lot of people that couldn't. They'd find the show slow and boring
 
2013-04-07 02:21:04 PM  
Seinfeld did have to cough up some dough for the others to do DVD commentary, iirc
 
2013-04-07 02:22:41 PM  
Proving once again, Hollywood elites have to rely on big government to do anything.

Not providing anything to do with jobs or revenue.
 
2013-04-07 02:24:54 PM  

PainInTheASP: Seinfeld is one of the few TV shows that I can watch anytime, anywhere.


Me too. And I don't watch any sitcoms now, probably haven't since Seinfeld. Unless 30 Rock counts as a sitcom.
 
2013-04-07 02:30:21 PM  

Mugato: Unless 30 Rock counts as a sitcom.


Hmm, hard to say.  Did that show feature any situations?
 
2013-04-07 02:30:39 PM  

thornhill: It's remarkable how cutting edge the show remains compared to today's most popular sitcoms, such as The Big Bang Theory.


To be fair, BBT claims to be nerdy, which by definition is the opposite of edgy.
 
2013-04-07 02:31:11 PM  

NeoCortex42: A huge chunk of the plots don't even work in a world where cell phones exist


That's the thing though, cell phones did exist. The show ran from 1990 to 1998. By 1994 cell phones were somewhat common. I had one and I was a broke ass college student. Yet most of the stories relied on the characters not being able to get a hold of each other. Loved the show, I'm just saying.

/hottest girl, Paula Marshall in the one where she outed them
//second hottest, Mulva
 
2013-04-07 02:32:24 PM  

T-Servo: To be fair, BBT claims to be nerdy, which by definition is the opposite of edgy.


Aren't they all hipster douchebags, isn't that edgy? Only saw like 20 minutes of it.
 
2013-04-07 02:43:03 PM  

NeoCortex42: A huge chunk of the plots don't even work in a world where cell phones exist.


I've heard this criticism pretty much every time Seinfeld is brought up, and I fail to see the point.  Cell phones would be handy in Game of Thrones too, but hey they don't exist.  I think that anyone who is a Curb Your Enthusiasm fan will tell you that Larry David is perfectly capable of creating comedy in a world with cell phones.  They just simply WERE NOT COMMON during most of Seinfeld's run.  I got my first cell phone, the generic Nokia brick that everyone had, in 2001.  It wasn't strange at all to see people on tv without cell phones in 1998.
 
2013-04-07 02:48:44 PM  

Mugato: T-Servo: To be fair, BBT claims to be nerdy, which by definition is the opposite of edgy.

Aren't they all hipster douchebags, isn't that edgy? Only saw like 20 minutes of it.


As someone who's an uptown loft apartment away from being an official hipster douchebag, BBT has no hipsters.
 
2013-04-07 02:48:57 PM  

Mugato: /hottest girl, Paula Marshall in the one where she outed them


Teri Hatcher ftw. They're real, and they're spectacular.
 
2013-04-07 02:49:19 PM  

John Buck 41: Flappyhead: And none of the cast outside of Jerry has seen a nickel of it.

I did not know that. If true, that sucks.

Fred Gwynne never got anything from repeats of The Munsters either.


That's generally not the case.  The way it works nowadays is that the production company (Castle Rock Entertainment in this case) usually gets 80% (and they usually pay some of that out to the creators depending on their original contracts) and the actors/writers/directors usually get 20%.

Prior to the 1970s, the idea of television shows having any life past their original run didn't really exist, so most residuals contracts were only for a handful of episodes (enough to fill out that season basically).  Once reruns became a thing, they negotiated for indefinite residuals.
 
2013-04-07 02:51:11 PM  

Mugato: That's the thing though, cell phones did exist. The show ran from 1990 to 1998. By 1994 cell phones were somewhat common. I had one and I was a broke ass college student. Yet most of the stories relied on the characters not being able to get a hold of each other. Loved the show, I'm just saying.


"On-the-street cell-phone call is the lowest phone call you can make." - George Costanza
 
2013-04-07 02:51:54 PM  

Hoban Washburne: NeoCortex42: A huge chunk of the plots don't even work in a world where cell phones exist.

I've heard this criticism pretty much every time Seinfeld is brought up, and I fail to see the point.  Cell phones would be handy in Game of Thrones too, but hey they don't exist.  I think that anyone who is a Curb Your Enthusiasm fan will tell you that Larry David is perfectly capable of creating comedy in a world with cell phones.  They just simply WERE NOT COMMON during most of Seinfeld's run.  I got my first cell phone, the generic Nokia brick that everyone had, in 2001.  It wasn't strange at all to see people on tv without cell phones in 1998.


I don't mean it as a criticism. I just think it would be interesting to see it from the perspective of younger viewers who never knew a time when the couldn't easily contact anybody they knew at any time.

Sure, plenty of other sitcoms didn't have cell phones, but Seinfeld stands out for so many of their plots relying on the characters not being able to readily contact each other. A show like Cheers (which I'm currently working on rewatching through Netflix) doesn't have this problem. Aside from a few instances, almost none of the plots hinge at all on communication problems.
 
2013-04-07 02:53:29 PM  
media.canada.com
The only reason to watch Seinfeld
 
2013-04-07 02:58:18 PM  

foo monkey: Flappyhead: And none of the cast outside of Jerry has seen a nickel of it.

[Citation needed]


"Apparently, other cast members from the show are not sharing in the billions.
Co-stars Jason Alexander, Michael Richards and Julia Louis-Dreyfus have a portion of the revenues from sales of "Seinfeld" DVDs -- something they held out for in contract negotiations for the series' final season. But not the show's syndication money." New York Post, June 7, 2010
<http://www.nypost.com/p/entertainment/tv/einfeld_rakes_in_bil_RFu9j OSt ArywzQ8I5rSvAJ>
 
2013-04-07 03:00:10 PM  

Spanky3woods: [media.canada.com image 375x375]
The only reason to watch Seinfeld


And Veep is back in only a week.
 
2013-04-07 03:10:19 PM  
Hoooooochie mama
 
2013-04-07 03:10:46 PM  

Spanky3woods: [media.canada.com image 375x375]
The only reason to watch Seinfeld


Truth
 
2013-04-07 03:11:46 PM  

NeoCortex42: I don't mean it as a criticism. I just think it would be interesting to see it from the perspective of younger viewers who never knew a time when the couldn't easily contact anybody they knew at any time.


Oh, okay, I misinterpreted you.  I've heard the cell phone criticism enough times that I just assumed that's what you were doing.  I'd agree that it's kind of interesting to think about.
 
2013-04-07 03:17:36 PM  

bugcrusher: "Apparently, other cast members from the show are not sharing in the billions.
Co-stars Jason Alexander, Michael Richards and Julia Louis-Dreyfus


Good thing she already has $billions from The Louis Dreyfus financial group, then.
 
2013-04-07 03:25:54 PM  

Flappyhead: And none of the cast outside of Jerry has seen a nickel of it.


That's the difference between Producer and Talent.

Don't hate the payer.
 
2013-04-07 03:31:53 PM  

Flappyhead: And none of the cast outside of Jerry has seen a nickel of it.


I've never understood why actors think they deserve a portion of the money a show makes outside of their original paycheck. Imagine if everything in life worked this way, construction workers would receive a portion of the monthly rent from an office building they worked on, airlines would send monthly checks to the Boeing engineers who designed their planes.

They get a paycheck for acting in the show, thinking they deserve to get a piece of the pie beyond that only demonstrates how utterly out of touch with the real world people in Hollywood actually are.
 
2013-04-07 03:40:39 PM  

NeoCortex42: Hoban Washburne: NeoCortex42: A huge chunk of the plots don't even work in a world where cell phones exist.

I've heard this criticism pretty much every time Seinfeld is brought up, and I fail to see the point.  Cell phones would be handy in Game of Thrones too, but hey they don't exist.  I think that anyone who is a Curb Your Enthusiasm fan will tell you that Larry David is perfectly capable of creating comedy in a world with cell phones.  They just simply WERE NOT COMMON during most of Seinfeld's run.  I got my first cell phone, the generic Nokia brick that everyone had, in 2001.  It wasn't strange at all to see people on tv without cell phones in 1998.

I don't mean it as a criticism. I just think it would be interesting to see it from the perspective of younger viewers who never knew a time when the couldn't easily contact anybody they knew at any time.

Sure, plenty of other sitcoms didn't have cell phones, but Seinfeld stands out for so many of their plots relying on the characters not being able to readily contact each other. A show like Cheers (which I'm currently working on rewatching through Netflix) doesn't have this problem. Aside from a few instances, almost none of the plots hinge at all on communication problems.


I remember watching a Dirty Harry movie with some of my younger relatives. There is one point in the movie were Dirty Harry is trying to warn his partner that the bad guys are after him, so he runs to the nearest pay phone and tries to call the guys apartment, but he isn't there so he can't warn him. Well his partner ends up getting killed.

The point is that one of my younger relatives, after that scene, commented that it was phony and said why didn't he call him on his cell. Then went on to say that he hates these older movies because they are phony because they never call anybody on their cell phones when they are in danger.  All of the people in the room that were older than 21 just quietly turned and looked at him.

How hard is it for younger people to realize certain things didn't exists and to keep a frame of reference when you are watching movies from different eras or that are set in different eras.
 
2013-04-07 03:41:54 PM  

Tax Boy: bugcrusher: "Apparently, other cast members from the show are not sharing in the billions.
Co-stars Jason Alexander, Michael Richards and Julia Louis-Dreyfus

Good thing she already has $billions from The Louis Dreyfus financial group, then.



Seriously. The woman comes from OLD money. Not "rich" money, but old world WEALTH.

/still hot as fark
 
2013-04-07 03:47:28 PM  

ongbok: How hard is it for younger people to realize certain things didn't exists and to keep a frame of reference when you are watching movies from different eras or that are set in different eras.


There was an episode of Beavis and Butthead (one of the few I watched) where Beavis asks Butthead, "Hey, what did people do before tv?" There was an uncomfortable silence, and then Butthead replied, "Shut up! There was always tv, there just used to be fewer channels."
 
2013-04-07 04:00:57 PM  

bugcrusher: foo monkey: Flappyhead: And none of the cast outside of Jerry has seen a nickel of it.

[Citation needed]

"Apparently, other cast members from the show are not sharing in the billions.
Co-stars Jason Alexander, Michael Richards and Julia Louis-Dreyfus have a portion of the revenues from sales of "Seinfeld" DVDs -- something they held out for in contract negotiations for the series' final season. But not the show's syndication money." New York Post, June 7, 2010
<http://www.nypost.com/p/entertainment/tv/einfeld_rakes_in_bil_RFu9j OSt ArywzQ8I5rSvAJ>


That's a damned shame.
 
2013-04-07 04:18:54 PM  
I used to love Seinfeld and watch it all the time. Now, not so much.

Still, I'd rather watch that than (insert name of reality series here).

The video mentioned the Simpsons ending. I think a voice artist is going to have to die for that to happen at this point.

The Simpsons is awful, has been for well over a decade. Fox has nothing to replace it with. That's why it's still around. They cancel everything with potential and let the old crap brew in its own juices until it ferments into a pile of rancid shiat.
 
2013-04-07 04:29:48 PM  

darch: Tax Boy: bugcrusher: "Apparently, other cast members from the show are not sharing in the billions.
Co-stars Jason Alexander, Michael Richards and Julia Louis-Dreyfus

Good thing she already has $billions from The Louis Dreyfus financial group, then.


Seriously. The woman comes from OLD money. Not "rich" money, but old world WEALTH.

/still hot as fark


Well her dad was a famous author.
 
2013-04-07 04:31:06 PM  

Spanky3woods: [media.canada.com image 375x375]
The only reason to watch Seinfeld


It's not like she needs the money.
 
2013-04-07 04:32:46 PM  

TeddyRooseveltsMustache: The video mentioned the Simpsons ending. I think a voice artist is going to have to die for that to happen at this point.


Marge Simpson already sounds like an 80-year-old woman in the last few seasons.
 
2013-04-07 04:33:44 PM  

bugcrusher: foo monkey: Flappyhead: And none of the cast outside of Jerry has seen a nickel of it.

[Citation needed]

"Apparently, other cast members from the show are not sharing in the billions.
Co-stars Jason Alexander, Michael Richards and Julia Louis-Dreyfus have a portion of the revenues from sales of "Seinfeld" DVDs -- something they held out for in contract negotiations for the series' final season. But not the show's syndication money." New York Post, June 7, 2010
<http://www.nypost.com/p/entertainment/tv/einfeld_rakes_in_bil_RFu9j OSt ArywzQ8I5rSvAJ>


I thought a minimum amount of residuals were set by the Actor's Union? Percentage-wise it isn't a lot but it adds up over time. This is the reason why TV shows used to make a big deal about hitting a 100 episodes. It meant the show could be syndicated and everybody could really start making money. Nowadays they will slap any show that lasted more than 3 episodes on to DVD so that magic number doesn't mean quite what it used to.
 
2013-04-07 04:45:58 PM  
I used to work for a TV station that ran Seinfeld in syndication.  That show was our most watched local program by far.  Nothing else was even close.
 
2013-04-07 04:52:23 PM  

barneyfifesbullet: Now each of those 180 episodes

Most are rarely broadcast. Most nets only run the same couple dozen episodes over and over, especially TBS. You know the quotes, soup nazi, hand model, we're not gay, yada yada yada.



Yep. I like to watch Seinfeld reruns because they're still better than a lot of new shows, even with its 20th century problems (no mobile phones, no internet, etc.). But after a while, you start to realize that they only show the same two or three dozen episodes.

Now, I've only ever watched Seinfeld in syndication. I can only just remember when new episodes were still coming out, and I was too young to care at the time. These days, I like the show a lot- in fact, I'd even say Seinfeld is one of the best TV shows ever made. But there are a bunch of episodes that I've never seen, and I never will see them unless I buy the DVDs or something. They're the episodes where nothing memorable happens, or they're from the early seasons before the characters are fully developed, or they just plain suck. Is it fair for me to call a show one of the best ever when you've never seen the bad episodes? I don't think so. But I don't want to invest the time to watch every single episode in order, either; I'm happy and comfortable with the curated selection that shows up every weeknight at 10.

I guess the lesson here is that no TV show is perfect, and anybody who claims one is has rose-coloured (or syndication coloured) glasses. Maybe in 10 years, 25 year-olds will be fondly reminiscing about the best episodes of How I Met Your Mother and Two and a Half Men, while ignoring the many, many episodes that were utter bollocks?
 
2013-04-07 04:53:06 PM  

TeddyRooseveltsMustache: The video mentioned the Simpsons ending. I think a voice artist is going to have to die for that to happen at this point.


They have enough voice data with the 500 episodes to recreate new episodes. There's already "voice modeling" available on the consumer level - the ability to talk into a microphone and have another person's voice/with a set of characteristics outputted.

I would think in the not-too-distance future it would be perfected to the point where you could create convincing, limitless dialogue without the need for the original voice actor. (It's probably already perfected somewhere.)
 
2013-04-07 04:56:10 PM  

ongbok: NeoCortex42: Hoban Washburne: NeoCortex42: A huge chunk of the plots don't even work in a world where cell phones exist.

I've heard this criticism pretty much every time Seinfeld is brought up, and I fail to see the point.  Cell phones would be handy in Game of Thrones too, but hey they don't exist.  I think that anyone who is a Curb Your Enthusiasm fan will tell you that Larry David is perfectly capable of creating comedy in a world with cell phones.  They just simply WERE NOT COMMON during most of Seinfeld's run.  I got my first cell phone, the generic Nokia brick that everyone had, in 2001.  It wasn't strange at all to see people on tv without cell phones in 1998.

I don't mean it as a criticism. I just think it would be interesting to see it from the perspective of younger viewers who never knew a time when the couldn't easily contact anybody they knew at any time.

Sure, plenty of other sitcoms didn't have cell phones, but Seinfeld stands out for so many of their plots relying on the characters not being able to readily contact each other. A show like Cheers (which I'm currently working on rewatching through Netflix) doesn't have this problem. Aside from a few instances, almost none of the plots hinge at all on communication problems.

I remember watching a Dirty Harry movie with some of my younger relatives. There is one point in the movie were Dirty Harry is trying to warn his partner that the bad guys are after him, so he runs to the nearest pay phone and tries to call the guys apartment, but he isn't there so he can't warn him. Well his partner ends up getting killed.

The point is that one of my younger relatives, after that scene, commented that it was phony and said why didn't he call him on his cell. Then went on to say that he hates these older movies because they are phony because they never call anybody on their cell phones when they are in danger.  All of the people in the room that were older than 21 just quietly turned and looked at him.

How hard is it for younger people to realize certain things didn't exists and to keep a frame of reference when you are watching movies from different eras or that are set in different eras.


Your relative sounds half retarded. People of all ages have been enjoying tv shows from past generations without asking stupid questions like that.

Asking why someone in a 70s movie didn't use a cellphone isn't a flaw of the 70s movie, it's a flaw of the moron asking the question.
 
2013-04-07 04:56:50 PM  

zvoidx: I would think in the not-too-distance future it would be perfected to the point where you could create convincing, limitless dialogue without the need for the original voice actor. (It's probably already perfected somewhere.)


So you're saying this stupid-ass show could go on forever?
 
2013-04-07 04:57:26 PM  
ongbok: How hard is it for younger people to realize certain things didn't exists and to keep a frame of reference when you are watching movies from different eras or that are set in different eras.

Exactly. When I was a kid back in the late 60s I used to watch westerns like Wagon Train, The Rifleman, etc. I never once thought they didn't make sense because they didn't drive cars or fly out west rather than take a wagon train.
 
2013-04-07 04:59:56 PM  

Pentaxian: bugcrusher: foo monkey: Flappyhead: And none of the cast outside of Jerry has seen a nickel of it.

[Citation needed]

"Apparently, other cast members from the show are not sharing in the billions.
Co-stars Jason Alexander, Michael Richards and Julia Louis-Dreyfus have a portion of the revenues from sales of "Seinfeld" DVDs -- something they held out for in contract negotiations for the series' final season. But not the show's syndication money." New York Post, June 7, 2010
<http://www.nypost.com/p/entertainment/tv/einfeld_rakes_in_bil_RFu9j OSt ArywzQ8I5rSvAJ>

I thought a minimum amount of residuals were set by the Actor's Union? Percentage-wise it isn't a lot but it adds up over time. This is the reason why TV shows used to make a big deal about hitting a 100 episodes. It meant the show could be syndicated and everybody could really start making money. Nowadays they will slap any show that lasted more than 3 episodes on to DVD so that magic number doesn't mean quite what it used to.


The ensemble gets paid for their work every time the show is broadcast. Jerry Seinfeld gets the fees the network pays for the rights to broadcast the show. Jerry makes a lot more money because he OWNS the show he created and rents it to the network. It pays to be the idea person and not the worker in show business just like every other business.

This will make him a real Billionaire which is VERY important to him.
 
2013-04-07 05:02:03 PM  

John Buck 41: zvoidx: I would think in the not-too-distance future it would be perfected to the point where you could create convincing, limitless dialogue without the need for the original voice actor. (It's probably already perfected somewhere.)

So you're saying this stupid-ass show could go on forever?


Yes.
 
2013-04-07 05:02:23 PM  

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: ongbok: NeoCortex42: Hoban Washburne: NeoCortex42: A huge chunk of the plots don't even work in a world where cell phones exist.

I've heard this criticism pretty much every time Seinfeld is brought up, and I fail to see the point.  Cell phones would be handy in Game of Thrones too, but hey they don't exist.  I think that anyone who is a Curb Your Enthusiasm fan will tell you that Larry David is perfectly capable of creating comedy in a world with cell phones.  They just simply WERE NOT COMMON during most of Seinfeld's run.  I got my first cell phone, the generic Nokia brick that everyone had, in 2001.  It wasn't strange at all to see people on tv without cell phones in 1998.

I don't mean it as a criticism. I just think it would be interesting to see it from the perspective of younger viewers who never knew a time when the couldn't easily contact anybody they knew at any time.

Sure, plenty of other sitcoms didn't have cell phones, but Seinfeld stands out for so many of their plots relying on the characters not being able to readily contact each other. A show like Cheers (which I'm currently working on rewatching through Netflix) doesn't have this problem. Aside from a few instances, almost none of the plots hinge at all on communication problems.

I remember watching a Dirty Harry movie with some of my younger relatives. There is one point in the movie were Dirty Harry is trying to warn his partner that the bad guys are after him, so he runs to the nearest pay phone and tries to call the guys apartment, but he isn't there so he can't warn him. Well his partner ends up getting killed.

The point is that one of my younger relatives, after that scene, commented that it was phony and said why didn't he call him on his cell. Then went on to say that he hates these older movies because they are phony because they never call anybody on their cell phones when they are in danger.  All of the people in the room that were older than 21 just just quietly turned and looked at him.

How hard is it for younger people to realize certain things didn't exists and to keep a frame of reference when you are watching movies from different eras or that are set in different eras.


Your relative sounds half retarded. People of all ages have been enjoying tv shows from past generations without asking stupid questions like that.

Asking why someone in a 70s movie didn't use a cellphone isn't a flaw of the 70s movie, it's a flaw of the moron asking the question.

That is the point that I was making. Some under 20's seem to think it is a flaw.
 
2013-04-07 05:07:11 PM  

ReapTheChaos: Flappyhead: And none of the cast outside of Jerry has seen a nickel of it.

I've never understood why actors think they deserve a portion of the money a show makes outside of their original paycheck. Imagine if everything in life worked this way, construction workers would receive a portion of the monthly rent from an office building they worked on, airlines would send monthly checks to the Boeing engineers who designed their planes.

They get a paycheck for acting in the show, thinking they deserve to get a piece of the pie beyond that only demonstrates how utterly out of touch with the real world people in Hollywood actually are.


Ultimately it comes down to what the artist negotiates in their contract.  The smarter ones take a cut on their front end salary to add on to future residuals down the road.  Granted, that's a gamble since you don't know how popular a show will be, but outside of new talent, I can't see how someone wouldn't know to make that determination apart from being a complete idiot.   Still, you'd have to be fairly high list talent or have a fantastic agent to make the residuals worth your while aside from blind luck.
 
2013-04-07 05:16:25 PM  
One of my favorite episodes is the one where George loses his glasses and thinks he's sees Jerry's girlfriend kissing Jeffrey, Jerry's cousin. I realized only within the past few weeks that the actress playing Jerry's girlfriend is Skylar from "Breaking Bad."
 
2013-04-07 05:31:38 PM  

Mugato: NeoCortex42: A huge chunk of the plots don't even work in a world where cell phones exist

That's the thing though, cell phones did exist. The show ran from 1990 to 1998. By 1994 cell phones were somewhat common. I had one and I was a broke ass college student. Yet most of the stories relied on the characters not being able to get a hold of each other. Loved the show, I'm just saying.

/hottest girl, Paula Marshall in the one where she outed them
//second hottest, Mulva


You people are over thinking this.

It's called suspension of disbelief. And especially in comedy, there is always a perfect storm every week that helps initiate the plot.

The only episode that completely relied on the premise of the characters being unable to get into contact with each other was The Movie. If that episode where being made today the whole issue of the cell phone could easily be addressed: someone's phone ran out of power, someone was in a place with no service such as a subway, the wrong person was texted, etc. And if you recall from that episode, a lot of the confusion was created because Jerry was in a comedy set so there was no way to reach him.
 
2013-04-07 05:48:16 PM  
www.searchenginepeople.com

Oh, NOW I get it.  It's actual Gold...
 
2013-04-07 05:52:00 PM  

weirdneighbour: darch: Tax Boy: bugcrusher: "Apparently, other cast members from the show are not sharing in the billions.
Co-stars Jason Alexander, Michael Richards and Julia Louis-Dreyfus

Good thing she already has $billions from The Louis Dreyfus financial group, then.


Seriously. The woman comes from OLD money. Not "rich" money, but old world WEALTH.

/still hot as fark

Well her dad was a famous author.


Funny guy, huh? I knew a funny guy in Korea. Got his brains blown out over the Pacific.
 
2013-04-07 05:54:46 PM  

ReapTheChaos: Flappyhead: And none of the cast outside of Jerry has seen a nickel of it.

I've never understood why actors think they deserve a portion of the money a show makes outside of their original paycheck. Imagine if everything in life worked this way, construction workers would receive a portion of the monthly rent from an office building they worked on, airlines would send monthly checks to the Boeing engineers who designed their planes.

They get a paycheck for acting in the show, thinking they deserve to get a piece of the pie beyond that only demonstrates how utterly out of touch with the real world people in Hollywood actually are.


It's different from a building or an airplane. The actor's face is on the screen. People often watch these shows to watch the actors play the roles. Are you saying Seinfeld could be recreated scene for scene and word for word with different actors and it wouldn't matter?

Interesting side point: HIll's Angels STILL get cheques from their time on The Benny Hill Show because of the reruns being played worldwide. But, then again, Benny Hill was that kind of guy. He was very private in real life and considered the cast and crew he worked with as family. He had no trouble helping somebody out by giving them 500 pounds, but he still took the bus or taxi to work because he didn't want to waste money on a car.
 
2013-04-07 06:20:21 PM  

thornhill: It's remarkable how cutting edge the show remains compared to today's most popular sitcoms, such as The Big Bang Theory.


Seeing as how the entire series was, "And what's up with airline food?" I am quite bewildered by your use if the phrase "cutting edge".
 
2013-04-07 06:37:49 PM  

thornhill: Mugato: NeoCortex42: A huge chunk of the plots don't even work in a world where cell phones exist

That's the thing though, cell phones did exist. The show ran from 1990 to 1998. By 1994 cell phones were somewhat common. I had one and I was a broke ass college student. Yet most of the stories relied on the characters not being able to get a hold of each other. Loved the show, I'm just saying.

/hottest girl, Paula Marshall in the one where she outed them
//second hottest, Mulva

You people are over thinking this.

It's called suspension of disbelief. And especially in comedy, there is always a perfect storm every week that helps initiate the plot.

The only episode that completely relied on the premise of the characters being unable to get into contact with each other was The Movie. If that episode where being made today the whole issue of the cell phone could easily be addressed: someone's phone ran out of power, someone was in a place with no service such as a subway, the wrong person was texted, etc. And if you recall from that episode, a lot of the confusion was created because Jerry was in a comedy set so there was no way to reach him.


The Bubble Boy episode would have been different if Jerry had been able to call George after he lost track of him on the road and got lost.
 
2013-04-07 06:53:04 PM  
Last year I was working with a young guy, early 20s, who bought the whole series used on DVD and loaded them on his tablet.  He would watch two episodes on his lunch hour, starting from season 1.

He freaking fell in love with the show by the end of season 2.  It got to the point when the first thing we would say when we saw him after lunch was "what episodes did you watch?", and a bunch of older guys like me would start shooting the shiat about Seinfeld like it was 1995.
 
2013-04-07 06:58:01 PM  

NeoCortex42: The only episode that completely relied on the premise of the characters being unable to get into contact with each other was The Movie. If that episode where being made today the whole issue of the cell phone could easily be addressed: someone's phone ran out of power, someone was in a place with no service such as a subway, the wrong person was texted, etc. And if you recall from that episode, a lot of the confusion was created because Jerry was in a comedy set so there was no way to reach him.

The Bubble Boy episode would have been different if Jerry had been able to call George after he lost track of him on the road and got lost.


I'm not going to sit and list them but I would bet almost 1/4 of the plot lines relied at least in part in their not being able to get in touch with each other.
 
2013-04-07 07:00:18 PM  

Brokenseas: Last year I was working with a young guy, early 20s, who bought the whole series used on DVD and loaded them on his tablet.  He would watch two episodes on his lunch hour, starting from season 1.

He freaking fell in love with the show by the end of season 2.  It got to the point when the first thing we would say when we saw him after lunch was "what episodes did you watch?", and a bunch of older guys like me would start shooting the shiat about Seinfeld like it was 1995.


I've had similar experiences.  I have a few 19-22 year olds working for me and a few of the guys are huge Seinfeld fans. It's kind of surprising. But I'm a huge fan to so it gives us something to talk about. I'm not that old but I don't have much in common with a 20 year old anymore.
 
2013-04-07 07:06:38 PM  

Mugato: I'm not going to sit and list them but I would bet almost 1/4 of the plot lines relied at least in part in their not being able to get in touch with each other.


Not really. A few famous episodes did. I just spot checked a few, and after checking the plots of ten episodes at random, I didn't bump into a one that involved not being able to get in touch. At a guess, I think probably ten episodes of the entire run involved plots that would have changed with cellphones.
 
2013-04-07 07:12:03 PM  

NeoCortex42: The Bubble Boy episode would have been different if Jerry had been able to call George after he lost track of him on the road and got lost.


He could have also googled "Moops"
 
2013-04-07 07:36:34 PM  
Cell phones have ruined tv and movies. Fark cell phones.
 
2013-04-07 07:40:41 PM  
I have a friend who was in ONE episode of News Radio and he still gets residual checks. I imagine the cast (besides Jerry) are doing just fine.

/even Newman
 
2013-04-07 07:45:58 PM  

Dr.Zom: I have a friend who was in ONE episode of News Radio and he still gets residual checks. I imagine the cast (besides Jerry) are doing just fine.

/even Newman


He also had a recurring role on Third Rock from the Sun, which was also pretty successful.  Unless he's a moron, I'm sure he's doing fine.
 
2013-04-07 08:04:27 PM  

Dr.Zom: I have a friend who was in ONE episode of News Radio and he still gets residual checks. I imagine the cast (besides Jerry) are doing just fine.

/even Newman


I wonder if he got any money from the recent Jurassic Park re-release.
 
2013-04-07 08:05:50 PM  

Hoban Washburne: Dr.Zom: I have a friend who was in ONE episode of News Radio and he still gets residual checks. I imagine the cast (besides Jerry) are doing just fine.

/even Newman

He also had a recurring role on Third Rock from the Sun, which was also pretty successful.  Unless he's a moron, I'm sure he's doing fine.


He was also in JFK and Jurassic Park.
 
2013-04-07 08:10:09 PM  

John Buck 41: He was also in JFK and Jurassic Park.


Damn, who wasn't in JFK?
 
2013-04-07 08:15:37 PM  

Mugato: Dr.Zom: I have a friend who was in ONE episode of News Radio and he still gets residual checks. I imagine the cast (besides Jerry) are doing just fine.

/even Newman

I wonder if he got any money from the recent Jurassic Park re-release.


I grew up with a guy who was one of the little kids in Blues Brothers. He gets $500 dollars every time it is shown anywhere. So I'm pretty sure he is getting something.
 
2013-04-07 08:17:21 PM  

ongbok: I grew up with a guy who was one of the little kids in Blues Brothers. He gets $500 dollars every time it is shown anywhere. So I'm pretty sure he is getting something.


Wow. And I don't even remember any little kids in the Blues Brothers.
 
2013-04-07 08:18:59 PM  

NeoCortex42: thornhill: Mugato: NeoCortex42: A huge chunk of the plots don't even work in a world where cell phones exist

That's the thing though, cell phones did exist. The show ran from 1990 to 1998. By 1994 cell phones were somewhat common. I had one and I was a broke ass college student. Yet most of the stories relied on the characters not being able to get a hold of each other. Loved the show, I'm just saying.

/hottest girl, Paula Marshall in the one where she outed them
//second hottest, Mulva

You people are over thinking this.

It's called suspension of disbelief. And especially in comedy, there is always a perfect storm every week that helps initiate the plot.

The only episode that completely relied on the premise of the characters being unable to get into contact with each other was The Movie. If that episode where being made today the whole issue of the cell phone could easily be addressed: someone's phone ran out of power, someone was in a place with no service such as a subway, the wrong person was texted, etc. And if you recall from that episode, a lot of the confusion was created because Jerry was in a comedy set so there was no way to reach him.

The Bubble Boy episode would have been different if Jerry had been able to call George after he lost track of him on the road and got lost.


Or there was simply poor cell service in upstate New York (which is the case), George's mailbox was full, someone's phone was out of juice, etc.

Comedy is always convoluted.
 
2013-04-07 08:31:51 PM  

Mugato: ongbok: I grew up with a guy who was one of the little kids in Blues Brothers. He gets $500 dollars every time it is shown anywhere. So I'm pretty sure he is getting something.

Wow. And I don't even remember any little kids in the Blues Brothers.


The orphans from the orphanage. He was the only one of them with a speaking role.
 
2013-04-07 08:33:07 PM  

ongbok: Mugato: ongbok: I grew up with a guy who was one of the little kids in Blues Brothers. He gets $500 dollars every time it is shown anywhere. So I'm pretty sure he is getting something.

Wow. And I don't even remember any little kids in the Blues Brothers.

The orphans from the orphanage. He was the only one of them with a speaking role.


I am mostly ignorant on this issue, but those residuals sound ridiculously high.
 
2013-04-07 08:37:10 PM  

Mugato: John Buck 41: He was also in JFK and Jurassic Park.

Damn, who wasn't in JFK?


Me. I never got a callback.
 
2013-04-07 08:37:27 PM  

John Buck 41: Hoban Washburne: Dr.Zom: I have a friend who was in ONE episode of News Radio and he still gets residual checks. I imagine the cast (besides Jerry) are doing just fine.

/even Newman

He also had a recurring role on Third Rock from the Sun, which was also pretty successful.  Unless he's a moron, I'm sure he's doing fine.

He was also in JFK and Jurassic Park.


Newman.....

/shakes tiny fist..
 
2013-04-07 09:09:08 PM  

ReapTheChaos: Flappyhead: And none of the cast outside of Jerry has seen a nickel of it.

I've never understood why actors think they deserve a portion of the money a show makes outside of their original paycheck. Imagine if everything in life worked this way, construction workers would receive a portion of the monthly rent from an office building they worked on, airlines would send monthly checks to the Boeing engineers who designed their planes.

They get a paycheck for acting in the show, thinking they deserve to get a piece of the pie beyond that only demonstrates how utterly out of touch with the real world people in Hollywood actually are.


By that logic, why does anybody from the studio on down deserve a paycheck for it at this point? Have Congress shorten copyright terms to 20 years, same as patents, and each year another season of Seinfeld would be entering public domain this year.
 
2013-04-07 09:21:45 PM  

Nem Wan: ReapTheChaos: Flappyhead: And none of the cast outside of Jerry has seen a nickel of it.

I've never understood why actors think they deserve a portion of the money a show makes outside of their original paycheck. Imagine if everything in life worked this way, construction workers would receive a portion of the monthly rent from an office building they worked on, airlines would send monthly checks to the Boeing engineers who designed their planes.

They get a paycheck for acting in the show, thinking they deserve to get a piece of the pie beyond that only demonstrates how utterly out of touch with the real world people in Hollywood actually are.

By that logic, why does anybody from the studio on down deserve a paycheck for it at this point? Have Congress shorten copyright terms to 20 years, same as patents, and each year another season of Seinfeld would be entering public domain this year.


Sorry but I can't agree with you on that. Using the office building example I gave above, that would be like saying after renting them out for X number of years you're required to let everyone have them for free. Let me know when you've lived in your house for 20 years because I'm looking for a cheap free new place.
 
2013-04-07 10:09:36 PM  

Precision Boobery: Mugato: Unless 30 Rock counts as a sitcom.

Hmm, hard to say.  Did that show feature any situations?



"EVERYTHING is a situation!"

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-04-07 10:46:58 PM  

foo monkey: Flappyhead: And none of the cast outside of Jerry has seen a nickel of it.

[Citation needed]


Luckily Elaine is master of her domain, being a billionaire heiress
 
2013-04-07 10:53:22 PM  

LDM90: Cell phones have ruined tv and movies. Fark cell phones.


The Wicker Man really suffered from this, among other things.
 
2013-04-07 11:15:11 PM  

ReapTheChaos: ongbok: How hard is it for younger people to realize certain things didn't exists and to keep a frame of reference when you are watching movies from different eras or that are set in different eras.

Exactly. When I was a kid back in the late 60s I used to watch westerns like Wagon Train, The Rifleman, etc. I never once thought they didn't make sense because they didn't drive cars or fly out west rather than take a wagon train.


For some reason that made me think of the bit from a black comedian where he talks about Brothers saying "I wouldn't have been a slave! The second I got off the boat, I'da smacked that cracker right in the face. Then I would drive off in my car."

Luckily, the cell phone has killed one form of comedy I loathed. I think it's "comedy of errors," but the sort of thing where a couple can't be together because one overheard something incriminating, and they spend the entirety of the plot not able to communicate until it's time for the ending. Granted, I guess damn you autocorrect mitigates that to some extent.

I don't know how modern horror movies cope. After a while, all the reasons to disarm a character of a cell phone start to make them look like an episode of Knight Boat. Maybe that's why zombie apocalypse movies are so popular now; it's the only plausible excuse for why a character can't call for help.
 
2013-04-07 11:27:17 PM  

Fano: I don't know how modern horror movies cope. After a while, all the reasons to disarm a character of a cell phone start to make them look like an episode of Knight Boat. Maybe that's why zombie apocalypse movies are so popular now; it's the only plausible excuse for why a character can't call for help.


Meh. Star Trek writers had to invent reasons why communicators/transporters/shuttlecraft couldn't come save the heroes decades before cellphones were invented!
 
2013-04-07 11:45:50 PM  

ReapTheChaos: Flappyhead: And none of the cast outside of Jerry has seen a nickel of it.

I've never understood why actors think they deserve a portion of the money a show makes outside of their original paycheck. Imagine if everything in life worked this way, construction workers would receive a portion of the monthly rent from an office building they worked on, airlines would send monthly checks to the Boeing engineers who designed their planes.

They get a paycheck for acting in the show, thinking they deserve to get a piece of the pie beyond that only demonstrates how utterly out of touch with the real world people in Hollywood actually are.


I like your flavor, neighbor.
 
2013-04-07 11:49:14 PM  

zvoidx: TeddyRooseveltsMustache: The video mentioned the Simpsons ending. I think a voice artist is going to have to die for that to happen at this point.

They have enough voice data with the 500 episodes to recreate new episodes. There's already "voice modeling" available on the consumer level - the ability to talk into a microphone and have another person's voice/with a set of characteristics outputted.

I would think in the not-too-distance future it would be perfected to the point where you could create convincing, limitless dialogue without the need for the original voice actor. (It's probably already perfected somewhere.)


4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-04-07 11:50:37 PM  
The Bubble Boy episode would have been different if Jerry had been able to call George after he lost track of him on the road and got lost.

Moops.

/I still double over laughing when Elaine hands Jerry and Bubble-boy's dad a napkin to dry their eyes and Jerry just wipes his mouth while he's eating.
 
2013-04-07 11:59:11 PM  
Really? No one has posted this yet?

Modern Seinfeld
 
2013-04-08 12:00:37 AM  

Nem Wan: Fano: I don't know how modern horror movies cope. After a while, all the reasons to disarm a character of a cell phone start to make them look like an episode of Knight Boat. Maybe that's why zombie apocalypse movies are so popular now; it's the only plausible excuse for why a character can't call for help.

Meh. Star Trek writers had to invent reasons why communicators/transporters/shuttlecraft couldn't come save the heroes decades before cellphones were invented!


They didn't have much answer for the fridge logic question of "why do they use spaceships at all when they have unlimited range on their teleporters."
 
2013-04-08 12:08:29 AM  

Fano: They didn't have much answer for the fridge logic question of "why do they use spaceships at all when they have unlimited range on their teleporters."


That bullshiat didn't happen until the new movie. Until then transporters had very limited range.
 
2013-04-08 12:19:03 AM  

realmolo: The problem is that the show relied heavily on the "shock" factor of seeing people be terrible and petty to each other. That shock has worn off, to say the least.


This post "always sunny in philadelphia" approved...  Seinfeld is the simpsons if 'always sunny' is south park or drawn together..
 
2013-04-08 12:26:01 AM  

Mugato: Fano: They didn't have much answer for the fridge logic question of "why do they use spaceships at all when they have unlimited range on their teleporters."

That bullshiat didn't happen until the new movie. Until then transporters had very limited range.


I was more a watcher of TOS and the movies, so I couldn't remember when they did that. Then again, this is a universe where people have access to a time machine and the chance to pick any hero they want, so they pick Kirk and kill him by waiting to time travel to 6 seconds before the villain's fiendish plan is executed so maybe I should remind myself it's just a show and relax.
 
2013-04-08 12:27:59 AM  

Somaticasual: realmolo: The problem is that the show relied heavily on the "shock" factor of seeing people be terrible and petty to each other. That shock has worn off, to say the least.

This post "always sunny in philadelphia" approved...  Seinfeld is the simpsons if 'always sunny' is south park or drawn together..


Outstanding point. The Simpsons WAS edgy humor... until South Park, Family Guy, and Drawn Together went in places the Simpsons simply could not follow.
 
2013-04-08 12:35:17 AM  

bugcrusher: foo monkey: Flappyhead: And none of the cast outside of Jerry has seen a nickel of it.

[Citation needed]

"Apparently, other cast members from the show are not sharing in the billions.
Co-stars Jason Alexander, Michael Richards and Julia Louis-Dreyfus have a portion of the revenues from sales of "Seinfeld" DVDs -- something they held out for in contract negotiations for the series' final season. But not the show's syndication money." New York Post, June 7, 2010
<http://www.nypost.com/p/entertainment/tv/einfeld_rakes_in_bil_RFu9j OSt ArywzQ8I5rSvAJ>


I wonder if they get residuals though? I remember Elisabeth Shue saying she's made more money off of Seinfeld residuals than she ever got acting in movies.
 
2013-04-08 02:16:29 AM  

W.C.fields forever: John Buck 41: Hoban Washburne: Dr.Zom: I have a friend who was in ONE episode of News Radio and he still gets residual checks. I imagine the cast (besides Jerry) are doing just fine.

/even Newman

He also had a recurring role on Third Rock from the Sun, which was also pretty successful.  Unless he's a moron, I'm sure he's doing fine.

He was also in JFK and Jurassic Park.

Newman.....

/shakes tiny fist..


I'm sure that Wayne Knight has some money piled away somewhere in Al's Toy Barn...
 
2013-04-08 04:16:35 AM  
Who would've ever guessed that they'd only get 3¢ every time an episode is re-aired? Farkin' crazy!
 
2013-04-08 09:32:15 AM  

Dr.Zom: I have a friend who was in ONE episode of News Radio and he still gets residual checks. I imagine the cast (besides Jerry) are doing just fine.

/even Newman


There was even a Seinfeld episode which dealt with that very subject, where Jerry kept getting cheques in the mail from Japan since some Japanese TV show used a clip of him and they had to keep paying him every time it was shown.
 
2013-04-08 01:13:33 PM  

t3knomanser: Mugato: I'm not going to sit and list them but I would bet almost 1/4 of the plot lines relied at least in part in their not being able to get in touch with each other.

Not really. A few famous episodes did. I just spot checked a few, and after checking the plots of ten episodes at random, I didn't bump into a one that involved not being able to get in touch. At a guess, I think probably ten episodes of the entire run involved plots that would have changed with cellphones.


Couldn't the same be said for shows like "I Love Lucy" as well? Ethel could have googled Vita-Veta-Vegamin on her phone and texted Lucy that it was full of booze.

Hell, a bunch of Shakespeare's plots could have been foiled by a cell phone. Romeo and Juliet?
 
2013-04-08 02:04:22 PM  

ladodger34: Couldn't the same be said for shows like "I Love Lucy" as well? Ethel could have googled Vita-Veta-Vegamin on her phone and texted Lucy that it was full of booze.

Hell, a bunch of Shakespeare's plots could have been foiled by a cell phone. Romeo and Juliet?


I think the point was that they actually had cell phones during Seinfeld's run but none of the characters had one, including the semi-rich comedian.
 
2013-04-08 02:24:25 PM  

Mugato: ladodger34: Couldn't the same be said for shows like "I Love Lucy" as well? Ethel could have googled Vita-Veta-Vegamin on her phone and texted Lucy that it was full of booze.

Hell, a bunch of Shakespeare's plots could have been foiled by a cell phone. Romeo and Juliet?

I think the point was that they actually had cell phones during Seinfeld's run but none of the characters had one, including the semi-rich comedian.


But he did have a car phone.
 
2013-04-08 03:18:00 PM  

Spadababababababa Spadina Bus: barneyfifesbullet: Now each of those 180 episodes

Most are rarely broadcast. Most nets only run the same couple dozen episodes over and over, especially TBS. You know the quotes, soup nazi, hand model, we're not gay, yada yada yada.


Yep. I like to watch Seinfeld reruns because they're still better than a lot of new shows, even with its 20th century problems (no mobile phones, no internet, etc.). But after a while, you start to realize that they only show the same two or three dozen episodes.

Now, I've only ever watched Seinfeld in syndication. I can only just remember when new episodes were still coming out, and I was too young to care at the time. These days, I like the show a lot- in fact, I'd even say Seinfeld is one of the best TV shows ever made. But there are a bunch of episodes that I've never seen, and I never will see them unless I buy the DVDs or something. They're the episodes where nothing memorable happens, or they're from the early seasons before the characters are fully developed, or they just plain suck. Is it fair for me to call a show one of the best ever when you've never seen the bad episodes? I don't think so. But I don't want to invest the time to watch every single episode in order, either; I'm happy and comfortable with the curated selection that shows up every weeknight at 10.

I guess the lesson here is that no TV show is perfect, and anybody who claims one is has rose-coloured (or syndication coloured) glasses. Maybe in 10 years, 25 year-olds will be fondly reminiscing about the best episodes of How I Met Your Mother and Two and a Half Men, while ignoring the many, many episodes that were utter bollocks?


The local Fox station here in Green Bay plays two Seinfeld episodes a night, and they play them all in order. Seen them all so many times, within 5 seconds of any episode starting, I can tell you what is going on with at least three of the characters in that episode.
 
2013-04-08 03:42:17 PM  

Mugato: ladodger34: Couldn't the same be said for shows like "I Love Lucy" as well? Ethel could have googled Vita-Veta-Vegamin on her phone and texted Lucy that it was full of booze.

Hell, a bunch of Shakespeare's plots could have been foiled by a cell phone. Romeo and Juliet?

I think the point was that they actually had cell phones during Seinfeld's run but none of the characters had one, including the semi-rich comedian.


Iirc, the last episode had an important plot point about Elaine getting a cell phone and saving a call on it for something really important.

The bubble boy episode stands out to me as an easily solvable problem now, but everyone who ever caravanned with friends to a destination you weren't sure of has happened to.
 
2013-04-08 04:10:57 PM  

Mugato: ladodger34: Couldn't the same be said for shows like "I Love Lucy" as well? Ethel could have googled Vita-Veta-Vegamin on her phone and texted Lucy that it was full of booze.

Hell, a bunch of Shakespeare's plots could have been foiled by a cell phone. Romeo and Juliet?

I think the point was that they actually had cell phones during Seinfeld's run but none of the characters had one, including the semi-rich comedian.


I was in college when Seinfeld was on. Nobody had cell phones back then. Sure, my mom had a "car phone", but it was expensive, and thus for emergencies only.
 
2013-04-08 10:53:54 PM  

Mugato: John Buck 41: He was also in JFK and Jurassic Park.

Damn, who wasn't in JFK?


maybe JFK ?
 
2013-04-08 11:26:32 PM  

Third_Uncle_Eno: Mugato: John Buck 41: He was also in JFK and Jurassic Park.

Damn, who wasn't in JFK?

maybe JFK ?


Well, he was. Sorta.
 
2013-04-09 08:19:32 AM  

John Buck 41: Third_Uncle_Eno: Mugato: John Buck 41: He was also in JFK and Jurassic Park.

Damn, who wasn't in JFK?

maybe JFK ?

Well, he was. Sorta.


Yeah, he was featured prominently.
 
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