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(Sun Sentinel)   Experts believe a water shortage could be due to people watering their lawns, but they don't know for certain   (sun-sentinel.com) divider line 51
    More: Florida, water shortages, environmental issues, watering, Florida Department, Cooperative Extension Service, water body, Palm Beach County, instant-runoff voting  
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3705 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Apr 2013 at 11:37 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-07 10:49:47 AM
Subby. Did you link to the wrong article?

This article was about fertilization
 
2013-04-07 11:41:11 AM
I'm sure Rick Scott and his merry band of vulture capitalists will do something about this.
 
2013-04-07 11:45:23 AM
Dear news websites:

When I see 'touch' websites, I close the window.
 
2013-04-07 11:47:53 AM
Gotta say it;
We will run out of fresh water long before we run out of oil or Gore sycophants.
 
2013-04-07 11:49:10 AM

clancifer: I'm sure Rick Scott and his merry band of vulture capitalists will do something about this.


what do you want them to do?

The article was about the lack of responsibility of homeowners who didn't know how and when to fertilize their lawns.

In addition, TFA points out that there are laws that the majority of people aren't following.

but..but...but...but...Perry!
 
2013-04-07 11:54:05 AM
For $200,000 I would gladly to do a report for them, to show them how watering the lawn uses water from the aquifers.
 
2013-04-07 11:57:28 AM
Where I live, this problem has been mostly solved: in order to preserve our local waterways from their environmental consequences, and our children and pets from their dangerous effects, no herbicides or pesticides can be used on lawns. Period. End of discussion.  And you know something ? nobody cares ! It's only grass.

Nobody dies if the odd dandelion, or clover, or whatever sprouts up on a lawn.  Some of us pull them up, others don't bother. As I said, it's only grass, and there are more important things in life.  In fact, some of my neighbours have actually replaced all their lawn with clover. On purpose. It's easy to care for, it's the "right" colour, it resists invasion by other species, and it naturally remains short.
 
2013-04-07 11:58:51 AM

snocone: Gotta say it;
We will run out of fresh water long before we run out of oil or Gore sycophants.


All the fresh water you drink has been drank before. Fresh water is continuously recycled through the atmosphere.
 
2013-04-07 12:03:54 PM

snocone: Gotta say it;
We will run out of fresh water long before we run out of oil or Gore sycophants.


Isn't that asshole Pickens actually buying water? I think I read something along those lines.
 
2013-04-07 12:07:22 PM

tenpoundsofcheese: clancifer: I'm sure Rick Scott and his merry band of vulture capitalists will do something about this.

what do you want them to do?

The article was about the lack of responsibility of homeowners who didn't know how and when to fertilize their lawns.

In addition, TFA points out that there are laws that the majority of people aren't following.

but..but...but...but...Perry!


Comment said nothing about Perry, but don't let that stop you from spouting the usual retarded drivel.
 
2013-04-07 12:09:07 PM
Are you saying that landscaping practices that worked in a temperate island nation with plenty of rain don't work in other climate regimes? Get out!
 
2013-04-07 12:10:37 PM
Obviously this was caused by gay marriage.
 
2013-04-07 12:14:21 PM

Awesome T-Shirt: snocone: Gotta say it;
We will run out of fresh water long before we run out of oil or Gore sycophants.

All the fresh water you drink has been drank before. Fresh water is continuously recycled through the atmosphere.


Actually, since warmer air is capable of holding more moisture, that's less of that water occurring as groundwater.  Of course, that's probably also balanced by the influx of unlocked freshwater from polar caps and glaciers.

But both points are irrelevant.  It's not the net amount but the distribution of fresh water that is volatile.  You need water where the people are.  In fact, most cities were historically built with proximity to water for living and transportation in mind.  Coming up short in the water department is a pretty serious issue.
 
2013-04-07 12:23:47 PM

capt.hollister: Where I live, this problem has been mostly solved: in order to preserve our local waterways from their environmental consequences, and our children and pets from their dangerous effects, no herbicides or pesticides can be used on lawns. Period. End of discussion.  And you know something ? nobody cares ! It's only grass.

Nobody dies if the odd dandelion, or clover, or whatever sprouts up on a lawn.  Some of us pull them up, others don't bother. As I said, it's only grass, and there are more important things in life.  In fact, some of my neighbours have actually replaced all their lawn with clover. On purpose. It's easy to care for, it's the "right" colour, it resists invasion by other species, and it naturally remains short.


It's also WAY more drought resistant than grass. The only real downside is bees in the spring.
 
2013-04-07 12:25:24 PM

unyon: Of course, that's probably also balanced by the influx of unlocked freshwater from polar caps and glaciers.


Except polar ice caps and glaciers usually empty into the ocean, not into local reservoirs.
 
2013-04-07 12:26:15 PM

machodonkeywrestler: tenpoundsofcheese: clancifer: I'm sure Rick Scott and his merry band of vulture capitalists will do something about this.

what do you want them to do?

The article was about the lack of responsibility of homeowners who didn't know how and when to fertilize their lawns.

In addition, TFA points out that there are laws that the majority of people aren't following.

but..but...but...but...Perry!

Comment said nothing about Perry, but don't let that stop you from spouting the usual retarded drivel.


And the article had nothing to do with water shortages

But that won't stop you from spouting your typical drivel

/retarded? Are you 5 years old?
 
2013-04-07 12:26:48 PM
Why can't people just astroturf their gardens.
 
2013-04-07 12:28:47 PM
Sounds like Florida needs another Hurricane.
 
2013-04-07 12:34:30 PM

snocone: Gore sycophants


DRINK!
 
2013-04-07 12:37:59 PM

capt.hollister: Where I live, this problem has been mostly solved: in order to preserve our local waterways from their environmental consequences, and our children and pets from their dangerous effects, no herbicides or pesticides can be used on lawns. Period. End of discussion.  And you know something ? nobody cares ! It's only grass.

Nobody dies if the odd dandelion, or clover, or whatever sprouts up on a lawn.  Some of us pull them up, others don't bother. As I said, it's only grass, and there are more important things in life.  In fact, some of my neighbours have actually replaced all their lawn with clover. On purpose. It's easy to care for, it's the "right" colour, it resists invasion by other species, and it naturally remains short.


Of course some HOAs are going to need to be smacked down, and hard, for this to fly.
 
2013-04-07 12:39:39 PM

robodog: The only real downside is bees in the spring.


That could be an upside, actually.
 
2013-04-07 12:41:08 PM

robodog: capt.hollister: Where I live, this problem has been mostly solved: in order to preserve our local waterways from their environmental consequences, and our children and pets from their dangerous effects, no herbicides or pesticides can be used on lawns. Period. End of discussion.  And you know something ? nobody cares ! It's only grass.

Nobody dies if the odd dandelion, or clover, or whatever sprouts up on a lawn.  Some of us pull them up, others don't bother. As I said, it's only grass, and there are more important things in life.  In fact, some of my neighbours have actually replaced all their lawn with clover. On purpose. It's easy to care for, it's the "right" colour, it resists invasion by other species, and it naturally remains short.

It's also WAY more drought resistant than grass. The only real downside is bees in the spring.


Bees keep kids off your lawn.
 
2013-04-07 12:42:22 PM
Gotta raise them crops that nobody can eat...otherwise what will the Joneses think?
 
2013-04-07 12:42:59 PM

spawn73: Why can't people just astroturf their gardens.


One of the things I like about living the city is that I don't have to keep up a lawn. I hate lawns. Gorram parasitical time-sinks. It I lived in the burbs I'd probably annoy my neighbors by plowing up all the fescue and putting in berry brambles and tomato beds, among other things. Sure, a productive garden is plenty of work, too, but at least you're getting fed for your trouble.
 
2013-04-07 12:44:15 PM

Fuggin Bizzy: Gotta raise them crops that nobody can eat...otherwise what will the Joneses think?


Thorstein Veblen nods sagely.
 
2013-04-07 12:52:04 PM
When I lived in Colorado, they were trying to push xeriscape. Looked pretty cool.

Link

/I knew one family who had $600 a month water bills in the summer. They wanted that green lawn, and their flower gardens, and money be damned!
 
2013-04-07 01:05:44 PM

Awesome T-Shirt: snocone: Gotta say it;
We will run out of fresh water long before we run out of oil or Gore sycophants.

All the fresh water you drink has been drank before. Fresh water is continuously recycled through the atmosphere.


But most of it gets salinated and increasingly polluted before we can catch it, and it's currently incredibly energy intensive to clean it up.

And of course distribution is a huge deal too.  Mass migrations rarely go smoothly.
 
2013-04-07 01:11:24 PM
I am hoarding the worlds fresh water supply, and I will soon have it all!
Just as long as no one discovers I store it underground...
 
2013-04-07 01:40:38 PM

spawn73: Why can't people just astroturf their gardens.


Because astroturf doesn't filter and absorb rainwater runoff like grass does?

Basily Gourt: When I lived in Colorado, they were trying to push xeriscape. Looked pretty cool.

Link

/I knew one family who had $600 a month water bills in the summer. They wanted that green lawn, and their flower gardens, and money be damned!


Sound like they weren't smart enough to get a second meter for irrigation and were paying sewer charges for water not going down the drain.
 
2013-04-07 01:53:42 PM

capt.hollister: Where I live, this problem has been mostly solved: in order to preserve our local waterways from their environmental consequences, and our children and pets from their dangerous effects, no herbicides or pesticides can be used on lawns. Period. End of discussion.  And you know something ? nobody cares ! It's only grass.

Nobody dies if the odd dandelion, or clover, or whatever sprouts up on a lawn.  Some of us pull them up, others don't bother. As I said, it's only grass, and there are more important things in life.  In fact, some of my neighbours have actually replaced all their lawn with clover. On purpose. It's easy to care for, it's the "right" colour, it resists invasion by other species, and it naturally remains short.


I imagine many HOA's would disagree with you...but you may have discovered a nice legal way for lots of us in HOA's to tell them to F-off.

Not-a-Cool story Bro:  Neighbor has a rock covered lawn (note:North of Atlanta)..has had it for 20 years...HOA gets new "property manager" and neighbor gets told to get rid of it.  Had yet to see the resolution of the conflict, but the neighbor is an old retiree from when the division was built in the 70's and the rocks are still there.  I think he told them to STFU.

There are some streets where every house has a different species of grass and are all different colors.  I blame home depot/lowes for some of this as well.
 
2013-04-07 02:07:14 PM
Not to set off the more hair-triggered of conspiracy theorists; but I wonder what percentage of our precious water supply is currently sitting in bottles on the shelves of every grocery store, gas station, and coca-cola/pepsico distributor in the country...
 
2013-04-07 02:08:46 PM

spawn73: Why can't people just astroturf their gardens.


My late Mother-In-Law actually did that.  Lived in a what had been a relatively nice home in suburbia and covered the entire front yard with that bright green outdoor carpeting that somebody invented sometime around 1970.  The back yard was mostly natural and she mowed occasionally.  The most horrific part of her "landscaping" was the faux flower beds around the house.  She had a dark brown version of the same outdoor carpeting through which she had poked holes into which were "planted" a variety of those godawful plastic flowers.  Also had a few medium sized stones around to add some visual interest.  They were actual, real, honest-to-God stones, too.  Nothing fake about them!  When she finally went into a nursing home, the new owner had a couple dumpsters worth of rotting plastic to deal with.  Yes, as a matter of fact, there was a substantial allowance on the price of the house owing to the required work involved in restoring some small measure of sanity and aesthetics.  Had it been totally up to me, I would have given the house to whoever agreed to get rid of the landscaping nightmare.

Matter of fact, the inside of the house was just as kitschy.   I couldn't stand to go in there because she was a 3 pack a day smoker who never opened windows.  Also a bit of a hoarder.  My suggestion was to utilize a small thermo-nuclear device.  I was over-ruled by her real kids.

But she wasn't wasting any water, dammit!
 
2013-04-07 02:11:15 PM

green_plague: Not to set off the more hair-triggered of conspiracy theorists; but I wonder what percentage of our precious water supply is currently sitting in bottles on the shelves of every grocery store, gas station, and coca-cola/pepsico distributor in the country...


Not to mention how much of our precious oil reserves were used in making all those damned plastic bottles.  I know it's only a small percentage but there's one helluva lot of bottles.
 
2013-04-07 02:17:16 PM

Mr. Right: I couldn't stand to go in there because she was a 3 pack a day smoker who never opened windows.


Nothing like walls stained nicotine yellow, I tell you.
 
2013-04-07 02:34:59 PM
theorellior

Of course, that's probably also balanced by the influx of unlocked freshwater from polar caps and glaciers.

Except polar ice caps and glaciers usually empty into the ocean, not into local reservoirs.


    Ummm.....no. Many populations depend on glacial melt to supply their drinking water. The glaciers near where I live do not bypass local creeks and rivers to drain directly into the ocean. Just sayin'.
 
2013-04-07 02:40:14 PM
4.bp.blogspot.com
KILL YOUR LAWN! KILL IT!
 
2013-04-07 03:00:16 PM
Article is a lie.
We already have a state law and the state law supersedes all local city and county ordinances for minimum standards.
http://www.turf.rutgers.edu/newsandevents/summitmeeting/trenholm.pdf

In the industry we don't waste fertilizer by applying excess material that runs off.  We can't charge the customer for growth they don't get and the fertilizer is by FAR the most expensive of the chemicals we use per area.

We also don't use phosphate at all, which makes the bans on applying it in several counties hilarious because the bans cannot apply to homeowners who buy phosphate fertilizer and dump it on soil that is already well over any need.   Some soils around Polk are three to five pounds available phosphate per thousand feet over need.  If you dump three pounds of ammonia on a thousand square feet you'd kill most the grass and start a mushroom farm.   Phosphate simply isn't necessary on lawns down here.

There's a lot in that article that has already been resolved by the state.
Now we just need to restrict homeowner use of pesticides and fertilizer.   A little bit of google at the store would let the seller know how much fert the owner needed.
 
ows
2013-04-07 03:09:44 PM

clancifer: I'm sure Rick Scott and his merry band of vulture capitalists will do something about this.


he had his "mommy" go on tv and say "he's a good boy!!!!" when he ran for gov.

a kid in 7th grade running for class pres. would be embarrassed to do that.
 
2013-04-07 03:34:31 PM
Y'all understand the Earth has a finite number of H2O molecules, and irrespective of man or nature or God, that number does not change.  Ever.
/Okay, maybe a few dozen escape into space every year.
 
2013-04-07 04:11:29 PM

robodog: capt.hollister: Where I live, this problem has been mostly solved: in order to preserve our local waterways from their environmental consequences, and our children and pets from their dangerous effects, no herbicides or pesticides can be used on lawns. Period. End of discussion.  And you know something ? nobody cares ! It's only grass.

Nobody dies if the odd dandelion, or clover, or whatever sprouts up on a lawn.  Some of us pull them up, others don't bother. As I said, it's only grass, and there are more important things in life.  In fact, some of my neighbours have actually replaced all their lawn with clover. On purpose. It's easy to care for, it's the "right" colour, it resists invasion by other species, and it naturally remains short.

It's also WAY more drought resistant than grass. The only real downside is bees in the spring.



I inherited a beautiful st. augustine lawn about 7 years ago when i bought this house.  I had to pay a lot of money to keep it treated because of bugs, fungus, mold etc etc.  Then when we returned home from vacation one of our huge trees had fallen.  Fast forward to the summer and without the shade of that tree the grass just grows due to way too much direct sunlight.  Now my lawn looks like crap but I have an excuse for the lawn nazis in the area because they know it cant grow in that direct sunlight.

/Planting white dutch clover next week in the front yard...i despise wasting my weekends doing yardwork.
 
2013-04-07 05:00:22 PM
Gotta love FL people and their lawns. Nothing like being out in a rain storm, or just after, and seeing someones sprinkler system going full blast.
 
2013-04-07 05:43:39 PM

MaxSupernova: robodog: capt.hollister: Where I live, this problem has been mostly solved: in order to preserve our local waterways from their environmental consequences, and our children and pets from their dangerous effects, no herbicides or pesticides can be used on lawns. Period. End of discussion.  And you know something ? nobody cares ! It's only grass.

Nobody dies if the odd dandelion, or clover, or whatever sprouts up on a lawn.  Some of us pull them up, others don't bother. As I said, it's only grass, and there are more important things in life.  In fact, some of my neighbours have actually replaced all their lawn with clover. On purpose. It's easy to care for, it's the "right" colour, it resists invasion by other species, and it naturally remains short.

It's also WAY more drought resistant than grass. The only real downside is bees in the spring.


I inherited a beautiful st. augustine lawn about 7 years ago when i bought this house.  I had to pay a lot of money to keep it treated because of bugs, fungus, mold etc etc.  Then when we returned home from vacation one of our huge trees had fallen.  Fast forward to the summer and without the shade of that tree the grass just grows due to way too much direct sunlight.  Now my lawn looks like crap but I have an excuse for the lawn nazis in the area because they know it cant grow in that direct sunlight.

/Planting white dutch clover next week in the front yard...i despise wasting my weekends doing yardwork.


why would you bother to tell anyone that? even your dog could not care less.
 
2013-04-07 07:02:01 PM
sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net

Water shortage, what water shortage ... oh, that's right, you idiots are all living in areas affected by short term periods of drought.  Now excuse me while I enjoy my 5 Great Lakes.
 
2013-04-07 07:17:09 PM
I decided to revive the lawn before I put my house on the market.  Holy fark, what a lot of water that thing sucks up.  Looks beautiful but damn.  Just have to keep reminding myself that the hundreds I spent getting it looking good will come back many times over.

If I were staying, I'd go with some sort of dryscape or just let it go wild and keep the weeds mowed to create a fire break.  While I like the lawn, it's a lot of work.  Speaking of which, I should get busy with the mower.
 
2013-04-07 07:41:20 PM
In Arizona, it was fashionable to cover your yard with pea gravel and paint it green.

"The salesman said that if he used this gravel and painted it green it would look just like grass from an airplane. As a kid, it made a lot of sense, but later I wondered why anyone would want their yard to impress somebody in an airplane. "
 
2013-04-07 08:04:46 PM
After flying into a desert airport once, watched the lawn guys spraying the brown, dried former-grass green. And I thought the Alice in Wonderland croquet scene was fiction.
 
2013-04-07 10:04:25 PM

seadoo2006: [sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net image 850x637]

Water shortage, what water shortage ... oh, that's right, you idiots are all living in areas affected by short term periods of drought.  Now excuse me while I enjoy my 5 Great Lakes.


Idiot yourself then, moron.

images.publicradio.org


Maybe in the future they'll have pills to make you smarter. In the meantime: please try and do it yourself.
 
2013-04-07 11:26:43 PM

prjindigo: Article is a lie.
We already have a state law and the state law supersedes all local city and county ordinances for minimum standards.
http://www.turf.rutgers.edu/newsandevents/summitmeeting/trenholm.pdf

In the industry we don't waste fertilizer by applying excess material that runs off.  We can't charge the customer for growth they don't get and the fertilizer is by FAR the most expensive of the chemicals we use per area.

We also don't use phosphate at all, which makes the bans on applying it in several counties hilarious because the bans cannot apply to homeowners who buy phosphate fertilizer and dump it on soil that is already well over any need.   Some soils around Polk are three to five pounds available phosphate per thousand feet over need.  If you dump three pounds of ammonia on a thousand square feet you'd kill most the grass and start a mushroom farm.   Phosphate simply isn't necessary on lawns down here.

There's a lot in that article that has already been resolved by the state.
Now we just need to restrict homeowner use of pesticides and fertilizer.   A little bit of google at the store would let the seller know how much fert the owner needed.


Hmm the fertilizer I see on the shelf in the store doesn't have phosphate anymore (38-0-2, etc).
 
2013-04-08 12:12:16 AM
Whatever.
At least it wasn't that "climate change" hoax.
 
2013-04-08 02:30:51 AM

rkiller1: Y'all understand the Earth has a finite number of H2O molecules, and irrespective of man or nature or God, that number does not change.  Ever.
/Okay, maybe a few dozen escape into space every year.


Not necessarily true - chemical reactions can potentially bind H+ or OH- ions. But close enough - generally, those reactions are just as likely to eventually be reversed and result in liquid water again.

More significant to this discussion, though, is that the amount of potable water generated by the natural water cycle is, in specific locations, quickly becoming inadequate to support the increasing human (and domesticated plant and livestock) population in those locations. In this case, the amount of usable water generated per year, while still sufficient for the humans themselves, is approaching the point of being unable to support the amount of domesticated plants (specifically, lawns) that the humans would prefer to have.
 
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