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(NPR)   I said.... THiS IS WHAT HEARING LOSS SOUNDS LIKE   (npr.org) divider line 3
    More: Interesting, hearing loss, Real Sound, ear plugs  
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7191 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Apr 2013 at 9:45 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-07 11:06:43 PM
1 votes:

GBB: Of course, I get that it would be impossible to create a device that would give someone with partial hearing loss 100% restored hearing. But, there should be a way to determine what the individual needs from a hearing aid, and make that happen. For example, older people might just want to be able to hear speech, so you figure out what their hearing deficiencies are and make an aid that is able to take frequencies in the speech range and recreate them in the range the user can hear, filter out the rest.


Holy grail of hearing aid fitting.  It's simply not that easy.

For instance, how can you enhance speech when the background noise is also speech?

There's lots of cool stuff going on in hearing aids.  Personally, I've had great luck with frequency compression and frequency transposition.  Can't hear in a particular frequency range?  Shift the sounds to a frequency range that you can hear.  It takes some aural rehab (kinda like physical therapy for your ears/brain), but it helps a lot of people.  Also some neat hearing aid/tinnitus masker hybrids.  Using your iPhone as a remote microphone.

But hearing aids are not as simple as turning it up louder in ranges where you don't hear well.  It's not like eyeglasses and getting 20/20 vision again.  Fitting most hearing losses with hearing aids is like fitting eyeglasses on macular degeneration.
2013-04-07 05:04:03 PM
1 votes:
HOH here.  Low talkers are the bane of me.  Both of my bosses are terrible low-talkers, and even after repeated gentle reminders that "I really need you to speak up and enunciate a bit more when you're talking with me", after about two sentences it's back to muble wuddle wa ruddle, etc.
2013-04-07 09:54:09 AM
1 votes:
The "Loss of High Frequencies" one best describes what I hear. It's all muffled, and I'll get probably 60-70% of the sentence if they're looking directly at me, right in front of me, and no one else is speaking. I rely on lip reading to pick up the rest of the conversation.

If I'm in a noisy room I have to rely on lip reading for almost all of what's being said. And by noisy I mean two or three other people talking within 15 feet of me.

/Will not get a hearing aid. I kinda like my quiet world and I don't want to amplify noises like crying babies.
 
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